2011 Nukeproof

Sep 23, 2010 at 12:55
Sep 23, 2010
by Alasdair MacLennan  
 
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At Eurobike we spent a lot of time trekking around the huge trade halls to see the latest and greatest of new kit and technology on show. We’ve already shown you the 2011 Nukeproof Scalp frame in video, but here is a little more of what the following year holds for the brand which has come a long ways in a very short time.

Read on,

Snap!  The new 4x race hardtail frame from Nukeproof has been put through its paces at World Cups all year in the hands of Lukas Mechura.  And if you buy the large size, then you will be running exactly the same frame that Lukas rode to the European 4x series overall title in 2010.
Snap! The new 4x race hardtail frame from Nukeproof has been put through its paces at World Cups all year in the hands of Lukas Mechura. And if you buy the large size, then you will be running exactly the same frame that Lukas rode to the European 4x series overall title in 2010.

A short back end that still manages to keep a decent amount of tyre clearance with some sleek looking chainstay yokes.  Lots of bracing and tight angles keeps the strength and stiffness up, regardless of the size you opt for.  The headtube enables the full spectrum of headsets and forks to be used, allowing for a flush setup to keep the front end ultra low should that be your wish.
A short back end that still manages to keep a decent amount of tyre clearance with some sleek looking chainstay yokes. Lots of bracing and tight angles keeps the strength and stiffness up, regardless of the size you opt for. The headtube enables the full spectrum of headsets and forks to be used, allowing for a flush setup to keep the front end ultra low should that be your wish.

The full build seen here features a significant number of Nukeproof parts which tie together well and should help the bike come in at a killer price as well.  It weighs in at 26lb (including pedals) and felt well balanced both in hand and when we took it for a quick spin in the car park at the back of the show.  Currently no firm price was available for the full bike, the frame only should come in somewhere between 300-350Pounds which is a bargain in anyone's book.
The full build seen here features a significant number of Nukeproof parts which tie together well and should help the bike come in at a killer price as well. It weighs in at 26lb (including pedals) and felt well balanced both in hand and when we took it for a quick spin in the car park at the back of the show. Currently no firm price was available for the full bike, the frame only should come in somewhere between 300-350Pounds which is a bargain in anyone's book.

Mega.  This is a bike which has been in various stages of prototyping for over a year (we first saw a basic frame at the 2009 Megavalanche).  And now it's getting closer to the final version, the aim being to have frames ready for sale in February 2011.  At 150mm travel it is what most would consider an 'all mountain' bike, aimed to be matched with 150-160mm forks up front.  Despite being about a pound overweight it still comes in at 31lb for the full build seen here.
Mega. This is a bike which has been in various stages of prototyping for over a year (we first saw a basic frame at the 2009 Megavalanche). And now it's getting closer to the final version, the aim being to have frames ready for sale in February 2011. At 150mm travel it is what most would consider an 'all mountain' bike, aimed to be matched with 150-160mm forks up front. Despite being about a pound overweight it still comes in at 31lb for the full build seen here.

Bolt on dropouts allow the bike to accept a multitude of different axles: Maxle in both 135mm and 142mm spacing, standard vertical QR and also horizontal should you wish to set it up as a singlespeed.  Meanwhile, up front, there is a 66 degree head angle with a 75 degree seat angle in the middle to help keep weight over the front wheel when climbing, sometimes the achilles heel of longer travel bikes.  Available very soon, the colours will be the awesome raw featured here, Nukeproof yellow or black.
Bolt on dropouts allow the bike to accept a multitude of different axles: Maxle in both 135mm and 142mm spacing, standard vertical QR and also horizontal should you wish to set it up as a singlespeed. Meanwhile, up front, there is a 66 degree head angle with a 75 degree seat angle in the middle to help keep weight over the front wheel when climbing, sometimes the achilles heel of longer travel bikes. Available very soon, the colours will be the awesome raw featured here, Nukeproof yellow or black.

A 13.2
A 13.2" BB (+5mm from baseline) and offset chainstays are a prime feature of this bike, enabling it to keep clearance on the rocky trails, but still keep stability when the ground starts pointing down. The offset chainstays provide clearance for both front mechs and ISCG05 chainstays so you have the choice of how you set the bike up. You can also just see from this photo that the main pivot is tucked behind the chainring.

CNC machined dropouts take a 135mm Maxle and also take the seatstay pivot (which makes this a single pivot with a linkage driven shock). Lots of work on the machining means that this bike has a great look of something vastly more expensive.  Another feature to note is the addition of cable guides for a dropper post which should save on the zip ties as well as looking infinitely neater and more integrated.
CNC machined dropouts take a 135mm Maxle and also take the seatstay pivot (which makes this a single pivot with a linkage driven shock). Lots of work on the machining means that this bike has a great look of something vastly more expensive. Another feature to note is the addition of cable guides for a dropper post which should save on the zip ties as well as looking infinitely neater and more integrated.

Erosion Link.  This is the linkage system which drives the shock in a motion aimed to reduce mid stroke dive in an effort to improve pedalling.  Combined with the pivot positioning this should ensure that the bike drives forward with the best of them - and we're looking forward to testing this out as soon as the bikes are available.
Erosion Link. This is the linkage system which drives the shock in a motion aimed to reduce mid stroke dive in an effort to improve pedalling. Combined with the pivot positioning this should ensure that the bike drives forward with the best of them - and we're looking forward to testing this out as soon as the bikes are available.

A view from the other side of the drive area showing the offset chainstays and more of the detailed machine work that has gone into this bike to create hollow and pocketed sections.  This means that even in prototype stage the frame weighs 6.7lb plus shock.  The aim is to get this under the 6lb mark for production by February.  Torx hardware throughout may be unpopular with a few riders, but to those who spend their lives working on bikes this is a very welcome addition - even the best make mistakes when tired and rushing before a race run.
A view from the other side of the drive area showing the offset chainstays and more of the detailed machine work that has gone into this bike to create hollow and pocketed sections. This means that even in prototype stage the frame weighs 6.7lb plus shock. The aim is to get this under the 6lb mark for production by February. Torx hardware throughout may be unpopular with a few riders, but to those who spend their lives working on bikes this is a very welcome addition - even the best make mistakes when tired and rushing before a race run.

Pedals were something we heard a lot about from Nukeproof at Eurobike.  Several platform designs and a multitude of options when it comes to body and axle materials are now available.  The body options are both standard aluminum and the lighter magnesium on the Proton and Neutrons shown here with their more squared body shape.  Both feature the options of a standard chromoly steel axle or titanium for the ultimate in lightweight pedals when combined with the magnesium bodies.  And while it may be a small thing, an 8mm allen key can be used to remove the pedals or a standard 15mm pedal spanner - as with many things in life, you don't realize how handy the choice is until you don't have it!
Pedals were something we heard a lot about from Nukeproof at Eurobike. Several platform designs and a multitude of options when it comes to body and axle materials are now available. The body options are both standard aluminum and the lighter magnesium on the Proton and Neutrons shown here with their more squared body shape. Both feature the options of a standard chromoly steel axle or titanium for the ultimate in lightweight pedals when combined with the magnesium bodies. And while it may be a small thing, an 8mm allen key can be used to remove the pedals or a standard 15mm pedal spanner - as with many things in life, you don't realize how handy the choice is until you don't have it!

Neutrons in the foreground, Protons in the background.
Neutrons in the foreground, Protons in the background.

Seen on the Scalp downhill bike was this prototype direct mount stem that uses the now standard Boxxer pattern.  At 45mm long it's on the money as far as length goes and looked good in the various colors.  No weights yet, but be sure that we'll get all the info to you, the readers, as soon as it's available.
Seen on the Scalp downhill bike was this prototype direct mount stem that uses the now standard Boxxer pattern. At 45mm long it's on the money as far as length goes and looked good in the various colors. No weights yet, but be sure that we'll get all the info to you, the readers, as soon as it's available.

It's a subtle change and one which is perhaps not picked up on by many, but the name in previous years has been 'Nuke Proof', but revised graphics bring about a consolidation to 'Nukeproof'.  Moving from utilitarian graphics, these look much slicker and bring with them an increased number of finishing options: Lacquered raw, Yellow & Black.  The raw shown here is very brushed, the final is likely to be more along the lines of the pedals seen below which feature a more tarnished effect.
It's a subtle change and one which is perhaps not picked up on by many, but the name in previous years has been 'Nuke Proof', but revised graphics bring about a consolidation to 'Nukeproof'. Moving from utilitarian graphics, these look much slicker and bring with them an increased number of finishing options: Lacquered raw, Yellow & Black. The raw shown here is very brushed, the final is likely to be more along the lines of the pedals seen below which feature a more tarnished effect.

We tested these Warhead cockpit controls last year in the 760mm wide, 20mm rise option.  For 2011 there are now the options of 800mm and zero rise.  All come in the new Nukeproof color options.
We tested these Warhead cockpit controls last year in the 760mm wide, 20mm rise option. For 2011 there are now the options of 800mm and zero rise. All come in the new Nukeproof color options.
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51 Comments

  • + 6
 As a home, shop and race mechanic with close to twenty years of wrenching up my sleeve, I hate torx bolts. We have four or five T25 tools in the shop (of different brands) and they are all broken except for one long end, and it is damaged. The tool is weak. If the only advantage is to be able to do it up tighter, then that is no advantage as the tools is not strong enough to do that. And in the shop, I don't want to have to keep swapping tools. Plus, out on the trail I want one multi-tool that will do every bolt on my bike: if half my bolts are torx then that can't happen or the tool is ridiculously big.

If the 'problem' with allen bolts is that they strip, then use a non-burred tool and less force. I have never stripped an allen bolt getting it to manufacturers torque settings - never. And after a while you get a feel for how much force is needed.

Someone please explain to me the advantages of torx bolts that have no downsides. I will listen.
[Reply]
  • + 5
 The snap looks awesome, nice and chunky, I'm sure it will live up to its manufacturer name not its model name Wink
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I'm a little confused about the picture describing the different drop-outs available and the headtube angle (5th picture down). The picture is of the Snap dropouts yet is sounds like the description is of the Mega. Two pictures down is a shot of the Mega's dropouts, but Im not entirely sure whether those dropouts are swapable or not. Anyone know any better?

p.s. Props to the guys at Nukeproof; your killing it with the looks and hype surrounding the brand right now, looking forward to getting some more info and first tests on the new line-up!
  • + 2
 On the snap you can have vertical dropouts, for running gears, or horizontal ones for single speed so you can adjust chain tension, so yes they're swapable. Like DMR's swap-outs. But not on the mega, you wouldn't run horizontal dropouts on it with SS as it doesn't have a pivot round the BB. And it looks as through they're describing the Mega with the seat/head angle.
  • + 1
 Cheers dude. I thought as much...Do you know if the Mage has a 1.5" headtube. I can't really tell from the pics.
  • + 1
 **I meant Mega**
[Reply]
  • + 1
 forum warriors unite & bag the shit out of NUKEPROOF, you douchenozzles! I know where my next DH frame is coming from these guy's have got there shit together & at cheap prices about f*cking time a mtb company stopped ripping off the general public thank you NUKEPROOF.
[Reply]
  • + 4
 that hardtail looks sick!
[Reply]
  • + 0
 I'm sure nukeproof are owned, part owned by CRC?!

yes, that is correct

Nukeproof is an "in house" brand of Hotlines, which is Chain Reaction Cycles' distribution arm

lots of independant bike shops won't stock Hotlines brands, because they don't want to give Chain Reaction even more share of the market...
  • + 1
 More fool them this frame will be my next buy - my only experience so far with hotlines and nuke proof is 100% good. The Mega is a great spec sensible technology proper price. Lets hope they don't get too excited and follow the the trend to all be the same and or over priced. And THANK GOD someone has made a frame to beat the crap out of Orange 5's Yeti etc and still be better than the mass produced treks of this world.
  • + 2
 the Nukeproof products are great - I ride their flat pedals and have no complaints

but you need to understand that many local bike shops (LBS) have seen their high-end sales massively eroded, and their profits on any high-end kit dramatically reduced (by having to price match) the large on-line retailers like CRC and Wiggle

you can sympathise with these shop owners (who are often passionate bike riders themselves) if they don't wish to stock brands distributed by Hotlines (CRC) as this just provides further income to CRC, who these shop owners (rightly or wrongly) see as "the enemy" (a serious competitor who is reducing their livelihood)

it would be like an independant food shop stocking Tesco's products when Tesco and the like have decimated the high street independant food, clothing, music, dvd, electrical stores and have also moved into insurance, banking, mobile phones, etc.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Amen to pedals that use both 15mm spanner and 8mm Allen key. I hate 8mm only pedals because if they are done up super tight and then ridden they are next to impossible to get off.
  • + 1
 8mm only I can deal with, it's the ones that take a 6mm and are soft that are the worst if they've not been removed for a few months.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Al - in the blurb about the Mega you said "Despite being about a pound overweight it still comes in at 31lb for the full build seen here.". Can you expand on that please?
  • + 3
 i think they mean by the time the bike comes out, after all the refining they still want to do, it will be a pound less
[Reply]
  • + 1
 this company is on point. Both sets of pedals look nice, Mg Ti should be real light too.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 when is the nukeproof mega coming out ? anyone know or is it yet to be confirmed?
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  • + 2
 They have some sick pedals on their line up!
[Reply]
  • + 2
 super swish hardtail thats been made there!
[Reply]
  • + 2
 that mega looks pretty damn sweet.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 any update on their dh rig?
[Reply]
  • + 1
 mega for me, perfect do it all bike! longing to get a ride, all i need is frasme only!
[Reply]
  • + 2
 that direct mount stem looks clean
[Reply]
  • + 3
 i want that 4x bike
[Reply]
  • + 1
 does nukeproof have a web site
[Reply]
  • + 1
 i want that hardtail,and ofcourse very nice fs nukeproof
[Reply]
  • + 1
 weight of the dj frame?
[Reply]
  • + 5
 Price looks good I'm interested...
  • + 22
 i think nuke proof is my new favorite bike company
  • + 3
 Great to see nukeproof becoming a bigger company! Love the prices as well!
  • + 2
 i want the mega Drool
  • + 4
 think i might be interested at giving a hardtail play bike ago, and with the maxel option on the snap it should be really stiff.

(not forgetting the great price Wink )
  • + 7
 Before you shell out X amount for the pedals, go check out Superstar Components. They make the pedals for companies such as Nuke Proof, Deity etc and sell the exact pedal in a lot more colour options for a lot less cash.
  • + 6
 Yeah all the pedals come from HT Components straight out of asia. Nukeproof have good stuff just I dont think the pedals are really worth paying for when Superstar have more options for them. Saying that if you do buy the pedals you will NOT be disappointed with them. They kick ass.
  • + 4
 bunky cowieuk is right, superstar do the same nukeproof, rebadge another company product. but superstar sell their for less, and they are a great pedal (im running nano thrupins)


the full list of company's and models that are actually the same pedal
Superstar Components Nano Tech
Superstar Components Nano Thru Pin
Nukeproof Neutron
Da Bomb Bullet Hole Pedals
Deity Components Decoy Pedals
Fire Eye PJ Pedals
Premium BMX Thin Pedals
Kona Wah Wah
Mcneil BMX Slipless
El Gallo Garra
  • + 1
 i totally agree don't shell out over for the pedals i have a set of Nano tech Flats which are the 100% out the same factory the same as Nuke Proof Neutron pedals pictured above, the only difference like people have said is the badge and the colour (which comes in something like 14 colours) titanium upgrades for the pedals are also cheaper than what nuke proof would ask too.
  • + 1
 I'm sure nukeproof are owned, part owned by CRC?!
  • + 4
 nukeproof looks to have suddenly come out with a pretty legit full line of bikes. Looking super sharp and if their parts are any indication they should hold up very solidly. Proppage
[Reply]
  • + 1
 omg i want the hardtail... but the freerider looks nice too Smile
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Snap! not a very good name for a bike or frame =)
  • + 3
 In referal to "Snapping out of the gate" at 4X races.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 800mm bars sound good for it though yeee
[Reply]
  • + 1
 i want the snap as a dj bike pretty bad
[Reply]
  • + 1
 loving it. so much nice stuff!!!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 pretty cool bikes.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 i want the hardtail
[Reply]
  • - 3
 why some companies think that: because they work with Taiwan they can start building bikes??? please stop this trend! or start designing something new and revolutionary! NUKEPROOF FAIL for me!
  • + 1
 Nukeproof are far from that mate, Brant Richards of 'Shedfire/On-one' fame designed the bikes and he knows what he is doing. I suggest you look at his blogs and then talk about 'revolutionary'.
  • + 0
 hi mate, if you think so...let's see, wait for the ride tests here in greece... form the photos they looks nothing special...just an other bike. you know what I mean.. cheers
[Reply]
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