2011 Devinci Wilson Review

Oct 21, 2010 at 10:19
Oct 21, 2010
by Rob Venables  
 
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Devinci's new and much anticipated 2011 Wilson has been generating an incredible amount of buzz, and rightfully so, as the new bike is a complete redesign with the help of suspension guru Dave Weagle. That's all well and good, but some trail time is what we all really want to hear about. We were fortunate enough to be able to put in some hot laps at Whistler and then keep the new Wilson for six weeks of thrashing on our local B.C. mountains. Inside you can read the first test of the 2011 Wilson, check out all of the photos, and watch three videos!

Read on,

Dave Weagle explaining the new 2011 Wilson from Interbike

Views: 45,405    Faves: 104    Comments: 17


The new 2011 Devinci Wilson is a bit of a rarity these days, being one of the few high end bikes produced in Canada. The new bike has geometry to keep the racers happy and set personal best times on the track, and is designed to get the rider from point A to point B the quickest. With that in mind it features a sub 14
The new 2011 Devinci Wilson is a bit of a rarity these days, being one of the few high end bikes produced in Canada. The new bike has geometry to keep the racers happy and set personal best times on the track, and is designed to get the rider from point A to point B the quickest. With that in mind it features a sub 14" bottom bracket height and a relatively slack head angle that measures in at 64 degrees. The rear end is adjustable in length between 16.8" and 16.9", which is certainly shorter than the majority of race bikes out there.
How does Split Pivot work and what are its claims? The concentric axle pivot with the brake mounted on the chainstay allows for a relatively high main pivot to be used with great pedaling and square bump absorption in mind, but without adversely affecting the bike's braking performance. In simplest terms, suspension and braking forces are separated and both can be tuned independently of one another. The linkage that activates the shock pivots concentrically around the bottom bracket for nice packaging and to keep the weight as low as possible in the chassis. The 10.5
How does Split Pivot work and what are its claims? The concentric axle pivot with the brake mounted on the chainstay allows for a relatively high main pivot to be used with great pedaling and square bump absorption in mind, but without adversely affecting the bike's braking performance. In simplest terms, suspension and braking forces are separated and both can be tuned independently of one another. The linkage that activates the shock pivots concentrically around the bottom bracket for nice packaging and to keep the weight as low as possible in the chassis. The 10.5" x 3.5" custom tuned shock works with the Wilson's low leverage to deliver 216 mm of rear wheel travel.
This rendering will give you a better idea of what is actually happening down below. Not shown in this photo is the replaceable ISCG 05 chainguide adapter that installs on the splines around the bottom bracket shell. If the worst case scenario happens and you 50/50 that big step down, damaging your guide and tabs, it is simple and easy to replace just the tabs.
This rendering will give you a better idea of what is actually happening down below. Not shown in this photo is the replaceable ISCG 05 chainguide adapter that installs on the splines around the bottom bracket shell. If the worst case scenario happens and you 50/50 that big step down, damaging your guide and tabs, it is simple and easy to replace just the tabs.

Price
$6799
$4999
$3799
Travel
216mm
216mm
216mm
Rear Shock
Fox DHX RC4 (10.5x3.5)
Fox DHX RC2 (10.5x3.5)
Fox Van RC (10.5x3.5)
Fork
RockShox Boxxer World Cup 203mm
RockShox Boxxer R2C2 203mm
RockShox Boxxer RC 203mm
Headset
FSA Orbit 1.5ZS
FSA Orbit 1.5ZS
FSA Orbit 1.5ZS
Cassette
SRAM PGII 970 9spd 11-26T
SRAM PGII 970 9spd 11-26T
SRAM PGII 960 9spd 11-32T
Crankarms
Truvativ Holzfeller OCT 1.1
Truvativ Holzfeller 1.1
Truvativ Hussefelt 1.0
Chainguide
e.13 with 38T Truvativ chainring
e.13 with 38T Truvativ chainring
e.13 with 38T Truvativ chainring
Bottom Bracket
Truvativ Howitzer
Truvativ Howitzer
Truvativ Howitzer
Pedals
Wellgo MG1 Magnesium
Wellgo MG1 Magnesium
Wellgo MG1 Magnesium
Chain
Shimano HG53
Shimano HG53
Shimano HG53
Rear Derailleur
SRAM X.0
SRAM X-9
SRAM X.7
Front Derailleur
N/A
N/A
N/A
Shifter Pods
SRAM X.0
SRAM X-9
SRAM X.7
Handlebar
Truvativ Boobar DH 31.8mm
Truvativ Boobar DH 31.8mm
Truvativ Holzfeller 31.8mm
Stem
Truvativ Holzfeller Direct Mount 31.8mm
Truvativ Holzfeller Direct Mount 31.8mm
Truvativ Holzfeller Direct Mount 31.8mm
Grips
Devinci Performance
Devinci Performance
Devinci Performance
Brakes
Avid Code 203mm
Avid Elixir CR 203mm
Avid Elixir 5 203mm
Wheelset
N/A
N/A
N/A
Hubs
DT Swiss 340
DT Swiss 340
Formula Disc
Spokes
DT Swiss
DT Swiss
DT Swiss
Rim
Mavic EX721
Mavic EX325
Sun Ringle MTX31
Tires
Maxxis Minion DHF 3C
Maxxis Highroller 26x2.5
Maxxis Highroller 26x2.5
Seat
Selle Italia SL
Devinci Hyper
Devinci Hyper
Seatpost
Truvativ Holzfeller 31.6mm
Truvativ Hussefelt 31.6mm
Truvativ Hussefelt 31.6mm




Watch the video to see Adam Mantle and Robby V testing the 2011 Wilson

Views: 15,550    Faves: 70    Comments: 23


Devinci did a great job of spec'ing the bike with a sweet parts kit that leaves nothing to be desired and performed great during my first few days on the bike, but in order to get a proper feel for the new Wilson I wanted to swap on parts from my personal bike that I would be far more familiar with. I had spent an entire season riding and racing these parts, doing the swap would truly let me understand just what the chassis was doing under me. The goal was also to test the bike in a few different settings, not just my favorite trail that I can ride with my eyes closed on a 10-speed. This would let me see if the bike's engineers were simply using all the above techno mumbojumbo to make it sounds great, or if it actually is great. It is also fine and dandy to look at the given numbers on a chart, but how does the bike's geometry translate over to the real world; does it corner as expected or does it require more weight up front or to the back? How stiff and stable is it? Does it pedal as good as its high pivot would have you think? Keep reading to find out.
Devinci did a great job of spec'ing the bike with a sweet parts kit that leaves nothing to be desired and performed great during my first few days on the bike, but in order to get a proper feel for the new Wilson I wanted to swap on parts from my personal bike that I would be far more familiar with. I had spent an entire season riding and racing these parts, doing the swap would truly let me understand just what the chassis was doing under me. The goal was also to test the bike in a few different settings, not just my favorite trail that I can ride with my eyes closed on a 10-speed. This would let me see if the bike's engineers were simply using all the above techno mumbojumbo to make it sounds great, or if it actually is great. It is also fine and dandy to look at the given numbers on a chart, but how does the bike's geometry translate over to the real world; does it corner as expected or does it require more weight up front or to the back? How stiff and stable is it? Does it pedal as good as its high pivot would have you think? Keep reading to find out.
I spent my first few days on the new Wilson in the Whistler bike park getting used to how it rode.  Then it was time to get down to business! I wanted to see if the Split Pivot design works as advertised and separates braking forces from the suspension as well as they would have you believe. To do this I sought out some rough and beaten down tracks, which are not too hard to find when riding in the WBP at the end of the season. Like any sane rider, I would usually do my best to avoid braking through a portion of trail that is already littered with bumps from others who are not doing the same, but for testing purposes I thought that I'd try to rattle a few fillings loose. I immediately found that not only did the bike take the edge away from the chatter, something that other bikes can do as well, but it also behaved the same regardless of whether I had the binders on or not. A bike that handles and brakes consistently in the rough can be a huge boost of confidence, especially when it does it as good as the black Wilson manages to.
I spent my first few days on the new Wilson in the Whistler bike park getting used to how it rode. Then it was time to get down to business! I wanted to see if the Split Pivot design works as advertised and separates braking forces from the suspension as well as they would have you believe. To do this I sought out some rough and beaten down tracks, which are not too hard to find when riding in the WBP at the end of the season. Like any sane rider, I would usually do my best to avoid braking through a portion of trail that is already littered with bumps from others who are not doing the same, but for testing purposes I thought that I'd try to rattle a few fillings loose. I immediately found that not only did the bike take the edge away from the chatter, something that other bikes can do as well, but it also behaved the same regardless of whether I had the binders on or not. A bike that handles and brakes consistently in the rough can be a huge boost of confidence, especially when it does it as good as the black Wilson manages to.
So, excellent braking, but a bike needs to be a complete package in order to be a winner. Cornering and monster trucking are not two attributes that one usually finds together, but when you do, you usually have a winner on your hands. I spent quite a bit of time doing laps of Whistler's infamous B-Line trail, a fast and mostly un-bermed trail that can be ridden quickly on a bike that corners well. The new Wilson performed quite well on the trail's flat turns, no doubt in part to its low slung mass and just under 14
So, excellent braking, but a bike needs to be a complete package in order to be a winner. Cornering and monster trucking are not two attributes that one usually finds together, but when you do, you usually have a winner on your hands. I spent quite a bit of time doing laps of Whistler's infamous B-Line trail, a fast and mostly un-bermed trail that can be ridden quickly on a bike that corners well. The new Wilson performed quite well on the trail's flat turns, no doubt in part to its low slung mass and just under 14" bottom bracket height. I've spent a lot of time doing B-Line laps on many top flight DH bikes and the new Canadian made trail crusher sits in the top 5 of those without a doubt. When the line was crossed and the bike got loose, it was a controlled feeling that made you feel as if you could slide as long as your heart desired, even if that wasn't the case. I'm going to go ahead and put this down to the Wilson's relatively short rear end that also happened to be incredibly stiff. No matter how hard I smashed into corners, not a hint of flex was felt.
Now onto the fun stuff, the monster trucking! There are quite a few local places to test this out, but my personal favorite is a trail called Mr. E up on Cypress. This trail is mega fast and about as used and blown out as some of the local Eastside Vancouver residents. Because the Wilson corners so great I was half expecting it to not perform well on this terrain, like I said, a bike that does both cornering and 'trucking well is a rarity, but this wasn't the case. As much as I hate being wrong, the Wilson was a treat on Mr E, so much so that I actually put in my fastest timed run ever - quicker than on any of my personal bikes! After that confidence boost I took the bike to Whiskey Jack, the fastest trail I've ever ridden, so fast that riders have actually been Clocked and over 90 kph on it! Every time I've been down this trail I have literally been frightened for my life as it feels as if your bike is being torn into two. Much like my laps on Mr E, the Wilson did great here. Yes, I was still scared, but I certainly had more control than I've had before. The bike's high pivot seemed to handle the hard chundery hits very well and did a great job of smoothing the nasty out.
Now onto the fun stuff, the monster trucking! There are quite a few local places to test this out, but my personal favorite is a trail called Mr. E up on Cypress. This trail is mega fast and about as used and blown out as some of the local Eastside Vancouver residents. Because the Wilson corners so great I was half expecting it to not perform well on this terrain, like I said, a bike that does both cornering and 'trucking well is a rarity, but this wasn't the case. As much as I hate being wrong, the Wilson was a treat on Mr E, so much so that I actually put in my fastest timed run ever - quicker than on any of my personal bikes! After that confidence boost I took the bike to Whiskey Jack, the fastest trail I've ever ridden, so fast that riders have actually been Clocked and over 90 kph on it! Every time I've been down this trail I have literally been frightened for my life as it feels as if your bike is being torn into two. Much like my laps on Mr E, the Wilson did great here. Yes, I was still scared, but I certainly had more control than I've had before. The bike's high pivot seemed to handle the hard chundery hits very well and did a great job of smoothing the nasty out.
The new Wilson is a great bike, but even great bikes have drawbacks. The Wilson's is its low speed handling. It seemed to not track as well at low speeds as some other DH bikes, and the suspension didn't really come to life until the speeds picked up. It certainly feels as if it has been designed to go fast and faster, which is great by me as I only have one speed anyway. If you ride slower tracks, or are a slower rider, this may not be the best bike for you. The key is to be honest with yourself, if you are fast and aggressive, you'll like the new Wilson.
The new Wilson is a great bike, but even great bikes have drawbacks. The Wilson's is its low speed handling. It seemed to not track as well at low speeds as some other DH bikes, and the suspension didn't really come to life until the speeds picked up. It certainly feels as if it has been designed to go fast and faster, which is great by me as I only have one speed anyway. If you ride slower tracks, or are a slower rider, this may not be the best bike for you. The key is to be honest with yourself, if you are fast and aggressive, you'll like the new Wilson.


Pros
  • Bike corners exceptionally well, probably due to the bang on geometry and low slung mass
  • Incredibly stiff rear end
  • Very stable at high speed
  • Suspension stays active under braking
  • All of the bearings are oversized Enduro Max bearings
  • Hand built in Canada with a lifetime warranty and a decent price tag

Cons
  • Frame is a bit portly. Frame with steel spring weighed in at just a under 11 lbs
  • Low speed performance doesn't match its handling when ridden fast
  • The Wilson pedals well, but not as good as I had hoped
  • The Split Pivot makes straightening the derailleur hanger difficult if your tool doesn't have enough clearance

There are three complete Wilson's available, the high end SL model retails for $6799.95 CAD, the RC goes for $4999.95, and the XP will sell for $3799.95. A frame only option will also be available - Retail to be announced later.


Just in case you haven't seen it already, check out this video from Devinci!

Views: 41,371    Faves: 797    Comments: 87


The new Wilson isn't perfect, but what bike is? Aggressive riders will thrive on the bike while enjoying its great handling at race speed and consistent suspension. New or timid riders won't be able to get the most out of the bike, but if you spend your time between the tape or banging out hot laps in the bike park, then put the Wilson on your short list. You've seen the photos, read my opinion, now let's hear what you think about the 2011 Devinci Wilson. Think long and hard, then put your comments down below!

Visit the Devinici website for more information.

Looking for your own Wilson? Check out Dunbarcycles.com
Must Read This Week









106 Comments

  • + 14
 "Low speed performance doesn't match its handling when ridden fast"

....Dude, it's a dh bike
  • + 12
 Yeah but he specifically mentioned.... "Compared to other DH bikes"

Edit: "It seemed to not track as well at low speeds as some other DH bikes"
  • + 39
 jGell: Dude how many actualy ride fast?! I love those chit chats at the bottom of the lift of guys talking geometry unsprung mass and other crap, while I was just catching up on them on my AM bike, and I'm pretty far from being "fast"... but I see people being slower than what they can just because they ride DH bikes; they are not good enough to ride as fast as the bike is designed to. And in my world "fast" refers to being able to win a local mini-DH and come pretty high on national level. Super fast means being able to win a national comp, insane is WCup top 30.

So as author of this test says: be true to yourself
  • + 4
 So true! +1
  • + 2
 JGell - learn how to read .... then comment
  • + 3
 Had read that on the pros/cons list, seems I glazed over where he discussed that in the article. The paragraph regarding it was a lot more sensible.

Nothing meant by it.
  • + 1
 oops, gave a negative props by accident, meant to be a plus Razz
speaking of speed, i recorded the fastest time (59kph) in a provincial mini-DH comp and i ride an Intense 6.6, it's got nothing to do with the bike and everything to do with your gonads (was shaking from adrenline overload after that run though, no full face helmet)
  • + 0
 Does anyone know how to fit the chain devices to these things?
  • + 1
 WAKI... you beat them on your all mtn bike because you had less unsprung mass Wink
[Reply]
  • + 5
 Cuz it's a typical Weagle Production...all the hype without the annoying payout. One more over glorified single pivot. But if you charge enough, people will buy it.

really - have you actually ridden it yet?

because Dirt Magazine in England, UK have just ridden one of the first Wilson SP bikes available and chief tester Steve Jones (who is notorious for speaking his mind) was raving about it - certainly not an "over glorified single pivot" and he said the performance easily matches the hype...

here ya go: http://dirt.mpora.com/news/devinci.html
  • - 13
 The BIKE ITSELF doesn't annoy me as much as the hype DW tries to muster up over junk. Although it IS and extremely UGLY freaking bike. My opinion and I'm allowed to have it.
  • - 10
 And it is simply another single pivot bike. Why church it up?
  • + 3
 i wouldnt say its an over glorifed single pivot, i would say its a refined single pivot, but a single pivot nonetheless. its all for marketing, so they can claim their link is the best, it's a selling point if they said single pivot, people would think "just a single pivot nothing special" but when it becomes "split pivot" it becomes something different and unique
[Reply]
  • + 6
 Wow, glad to see this blog posted. I've been looking forward to hearing some "real-world" feedback regarding this bike, since I've been considering it for next season.
  • + 1
 now i saw pedaling inside video..
  • - 31
 Not very pretty bike imo... ;/ Old one looked better
  • + 16
 Nice to see they fixed the wet noodle of a rear end. lol
  • + 7
 A serious bike with a serious price tag.
  • + 10
 Zbrodniciel, actually I think this looks waay better than the old one. It's a question of taste though.
  • - 3
 Hopefully it looks better in real life because the photos aren't flattering, imo.
  • + 4
 such an awesome bike! i really like the split pivot design and the short rear end.
  • + 2
 Love the colour scheme!
[Reply]
  • + 6
 Just a thought here. If you're doing a test video on a bike, cut the music. I'd much rather hear whats going on with the bike than some snazzy soundtrack.
  • - 2
 Cuz it's a typical Weagle Production...all the hype without the annoying payout. One more over glorified single pivot. But if you charge enough, people will buy it.
  • + 1
 how many DW designs are around now? would the Sunday still hold its own today?
  • - 2
 Ever ridden a Sunday? Didn't hold it's own then... All the fan boys just thought they did because SH was on it. SH would kick ass on a hardtail...which is basically what a Sunday is once it gets rough.

Good way to find out how many Weagle designs are out there: Get on Ridemonkey.com, go to the DH forum and there's a "How to tune it" sticky thread for every single one of his designs.
  • + 1
 whoa cowboy! it was just a question. I don't know alot of DW bikes so i thought I'd ask. you're right SH would kill on a clapped out proflex with a softride stem if he had to.
  • + 0
 That wasn't meant to sound aggressive or anything, nor was it aimed at you, just griping in general! And I'd pay cash money to see him rock the Proflex!
  • + 1
 DW is being used by ibis, turner,and pivot. Both turner and pivot are producing DW DH bikes. All are producing some amazing machines. Check out some reviews before listening to the crap written above.
[Reply]
  • + 3
 awsome review. i like the whistler footage on the video review shows how you really did test it in somewhat unforgiving ways. i thought the trail on cypress was mystery dh not Mr. E though
[Reply]
  • + 2
 You've seen the photos, read my opinion, now let's hear what you think about the 2011 Devinci Wilson. Think long and hard, then put your comments down below!

subtle. are you suggesting that some comments are made on this site without a lot of self editing or reflection prior to being posted? lmao. this looks like a great bike at a competitive-ish price considering its being made completely(i believe?)in canada...i'd love to take it for a rip. the testing on b-line is an interesting choice and intelligent trail to test on imho. pretty good review gents.
  • + 1
 the frame is definately manufactured in canada as are all the race face and straitline components. but the rest is not, the fork however is made in the states.
  • + 1
 I can't even imagine why there is no Elka stage 5 on this bike. The Devinci and Elka shops are both Quebec made... There should be at least an Option to get a real shock !
  • + 1
 that's dave weagle's contract with fox for ya.
  • + 1
 although elka will make the big 10 1/2 inch shock for it as well the new fork cartridges for fox' and boxxers so you can run a mostly Canadian manufactured bike with a few small exceptions.
[Reply]
  • + 4
 You had me all excited for a Wilson with Dorado's on it. Kinda heart broken that its not coming on the regular bikes.
  • + 1
 No kidding! Hey anyone want a Boxxer WC so I can get me some Dorados????
  • + 4
 IMO I would not want to ride a Dorado. My friend had one and although the suspension feels good, he says the flex was ridiculous. It flexed to the point where he was terrified in high speed corners. Once his race season was over and his team contract was up he put his boxxer WC back on his bike. He's never been happier...
  • + 1
 I miss my 05' Dorado DH immensely. After riding Shivers and 05' 888rc, what little flex it had never phased me. Should get it at some point during the off season and we'll see how she goes.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 Man, I dunno how you guys afford this sh*t.

$7000!?!?! (Not that it's not deserving of such a price, but geez.)

I'm convinced I'll never be able to afford a bike that I can actually progress my skills with. FML.
  • + 6
 There's absolutely nothing wrong with the $3799 "XP" model. And there are a lot of other affordable DH bikes out there from Trek, Giant, Norco etc. that are excellent for skills progression. 99% of us on these forums don't need top-of-the-line equipment, but marketing gets the better of us most of the time.
  • + 1
 Look at it this way krishan.. You can buy that frame for probably $3000? Just a guess I have no idea.. But then you go with a boxxer wc which is 1600 dollars and the wheelset alone is another 1000 dollars.. the brakes 500 dollars and your already at 6100.. and on top of that the drive terrain.. so its competitive to alot of bikes these days.. the 2012 norco are going to be 5699 I believe for the shore at least.. but in that case the shore 1 is going to be 30 pounds out of the box.. so really look at what your saying.. I just built a 2009 wilson and it cost me ruffly 3000 dollars with alot of deals..
  • + 1
 I agree with smike. The XP model looks like a solid contender. And, with the XP, you always have the option a few upgrades down the road. The only thing I would upgrade immediately would be the brakes, but I'm a larger rider and need extra stopping power. For most guys, the stock brakes are probably adequate too.
  • + 2
 Yeah.. there is no doubt in my mind that the XP is a great bike as well.. everyone starts somewhere and can upgrade anything to a certain extant.. I personally love the new frame design it is pretty gnartastic
  • + 2
 The Spec on the XP is very rideable. The fork is great. After having a couple 888's, 66's, various RS's, the base model boxxer (race or RC or what ever they are calling it this year) is a freaking phenomenal fork for the price. I bought a 2010 Boxxer Race and upgraded it to the air spring and was going to eventually get the higher end rebound and compression, but I am very happy with it as it sits. Nothing wrong with the elixr 5's got a set on my bike and have put them on 2 others for friends, all of them love them. I would not hesitate to get one with that spec. Only thing I would change would be the cranks, but thats just me. Yeah, for $7k you can get a hell of a bike, but for just over $3k the base model is nothing that I would shake a stick at. Its not like it was 5-6 years ago when the base bikes from most makers had total junk for parts. Now they are actually really good performers for 80-90% of the riders out there.
  • + 1
 ^ True say that even the XP is a nice bike, bue Devinci sure didn't do a good job at making it look comparable to the other two... looks wise, it can't compare to the other two at all. I personally wouldn't wanna spend $4000 on a bike that makes you wish you had the higher-end models, even if it only lacks in the looks department.

I'm currently in the market for a Giant Reign X1. SICK bike, perfect for my riding style(s) (DH and XC) but at over $3000 (which makes it 1/2 the price of my car or motorcycle), I STILL can't afford it :\

I'll stick to my '04 Coiler for now, I guess.
[Reply]
  • + 4
 "No matter how hard I smashed into corners, not a hint of flex was felt."YAYYYY DEVINCI
[Reply]
  • + 4
 looks much better with the boxxers imo
[Reply]
  • + 3
 Good honest review and the sorta video that makes you want to ride. Thanks. Check the rear tire at 1.13-1.14.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 It may have been mentioned in the article but i just skimmed through and didn't see it. What frame size was ridden in your review? Also around how tall were the two test riders?
[Reply]
  • + 3
 I bet that dog is totally ripped
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Ive noticed alot of the new bikes coming out are going with inverted forks. Any insight as to why? noob question but just wondering.
  • + 2
 These bikes won't come with inverted forks. The photos show a Dorado because the writer/tester used his own parts on the bike to test the frame itself.

As for the advantages/disadvantages of inverted versus right-side-up forks, there have been many heated and lengthy debates on Pinkbike that come to no conclusion other than individual preference. Google and ye shall find. Find a comfy chair.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 too sick!! ive been looking forward to seeing a real world review and a new video of the 2011 wilson considering i just put a down payment on one. thanks alot!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I"ve been trying to decide between this, a Revolt, and a new Driver 8. I hear the Revolts are cracking though, has anyone else heard this?
[Reply]
  • + 2
 nice looking bikes,seriously thinking of getting 1 as my downhill bike!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Looks like a fun ride, there was a review on CCN as well with I think the bike as it is being sold.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 It's an improvement from their old bike but I still think I want a Revolt or a new Demo
[Reply]
  • + 2
 wilson's are now with a 10.5`` shock?
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Think anyone could survive a fail in the last gap of the video??? DAM!!! Oh and sweet frame^^.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 he only inverted a normal 4 point suspension ..put in this bike upside down
[Reply]
  • + 1
 This bike should be in a porn mag!!! With shit loads of girls all over it!! Superb bike
[Reply]
  • + 2
 nice movie )))
[Reply]
  • + 1
 wow the one drop at the end of the last video
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Wow! Function makes it beautiful.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Smile )
on 00:04 they used minion dhf tire, rear.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 PLEASE Devinci...make the frameset in black AND RED!
  • + 1
 Black and Titanium Black and Graphite White and Red Frame only options. Maybe able to pick up the red sticker kit though.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 imagine how sick a fully carbon wilson frame would be.
  • + 21
 Imagine how expensive a fully carbon Wilson frame would be...
  • + 3
 it would be expensive but just imagine how amazing it would be, dare i say that it may even be nicer than the santa cruz v10 carbon
  • + 1
 Even if they wanted to it would be a better idea to stay with aluminum for the first few production run years just in case changes and tweaks are needed after the first wave of consumers pound some miles on them.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 It was a medium tested. The riders where 5'10-6'0"
[Reply]
  • + 1
 looken good!!
[Reply]
  • + 5
 .....should be riding a wilson I agree!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 What fork
  • - 7
 Dorado without the decals! What's also funny, he also removed the Troy Lee Logo's off his riding kit. Guess shop team riders in Canada are on such big bucks they can't go advertising the brands that they don't ride for. Surly if your so good you gotta remove logos off your gear, especially when its the brand your dressed in head to toe in, they'd want to hook you up or someone else would? Bike looks good though doesn't it!
  • + 4
 Sorry, but what Troy Lee kit? I see a Troy Logo on the guys helmet.
  • + 5
 he could be sponsored by sombrio perhaps
  • + 5
 The Dunbar crew rides Sombrio gear and have it sublimated with their shop logos.
  • - 4
 no logo's, I said they have removed the logo's, hence you can't see the logo's! But there TLD trousers and shorts. Its probably sad that I know, but hey.
  • + 1
 im confused on the fork to it says boxxer in the specs for all 3 models but the small pic above them has and inverted fork and so do some other pics.
  • + 6
 "...in order to get a proper feel for the new Wilson I wanted to swap on parts from my personal bike that I would be far more familiar with. I had spent an entire season riding and racing these parts, doing the swap would truly let me understand just what the chassis was doing under me."
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  • + 1
 that looks ill!!!!!!!
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  • + 1
 that bike is sik
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  • + 1
 Manitou Dorado pro
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  • + 0
 It looks sick!!!!!!!!!!!!!
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  • - 1
 Hello !Can you tel me what is the forck of the bike ? thanks
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  • - 1
 whats the new fork???
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