2013 Shimano Saint - First Impressions

Jun 21, 2012
by Brad Walton  
 
You must login to Pinkbike.
Don't have an account? Sign up

Join Pinkbike  Login

Mountain biking's most reverent component group has received a makeover for 2013. Shimano first presented the new grouppo at Sea Otter earlier this year, and we recently attended a media camp hosted by the component giant in Whistler, B.C.. Wondering just exactly what a media camp is? In short, we got to ride the hell out of the new Saint kit for three days in the arduous testing grounds of the Whistler Bike Park, all while Shimano drowned us in technical details, fine food, and riding with Shimano-sponsored pros. The presentation was impressive, but the new component group is even more so.

  The Saint Media Camp. Top: breakfast of champions. Middle: The media all salivating to shred the park on the new Saint kit. Bottom (l to r ): Darren Butler of Endless Biking, Darcy Turenne and Katrina Strand, Sterling Lorence.

Media camps are a bit like going to school, but you're actually enjoying it. Greg "The Hammer" Hammond, marketing manager of Shimano Canada, served as our charismatic counselor for all things Shimano. Greg is the crucial link between many of the top pro riders that drive the bike industry, and the engineers that create the components that allow us to benefit from those who push the limits of their equipment. Shimano's lead mechanic, Ben Pye, was also on hand to explain many of the technical features of the new Saint group and to keep our bikes performing in tip top shape throughout our time at the camp. Joe Lawwill, also of Shimano, introduced a panel of pro riders including Geoff Gulevich, Darcy Turenne, Mike Hopkins, Matt Hunter, Thomas Vanderham, and Andrew Shandro. We drilled the pros with questions about the new Saint group, and in summary we learned: the brakes are phenomenal, the shifting is super crisp, the new pedal is awesome, and the cranks are bombproof. Of course, they are paid to ride these goodies, but their enthusiasm was enough to raise our blood pressure for some serious saddle time in the Whistler Bike Park.

Shimano Saint Panels of Riders
  Greg "The Hammer" Hammond leads the charge at the Saint Media Camp (photo Sterling Lorence ). The Hammer is the bridge between what pro riders want and what the engineers can create. A panel of pro Saint riders answers a Q&A session about the new Saint.

Saint originated in 2003 to create a durable component group that could withstand freeride and downhill use. Shimano's third generation of Saint – the M820 group – was developed under the “Pure Gravity” design philosophy with a clear focus on the rigors of DH racing. With huge success in it's initial iteration ruling the durability segment, the latest rendition shaves weight everywhere possible. This is everything we love about Saint, refined. Saint is now an exclusively 1 x 10 specific drivetrain optimized for sound management, and the new Saint brake is designed entirely around heat management. After a brief product overview, it is immediately apparent that Shimano is an engineering company, not a marketing company. Sure the new logos look great, the ads with the pro riders and big budget video ads are appealing, but as Mike Hopkins said at the media camp, the real value in Saint is "consistency", because Saint is engineered specifically for pursuits in gravity.

Shimano Saint lever
  The new Saint lever employs the same Servo-wave action as the rest of the Shimano lineup, with a tactile feel for all-weather performance. (photo Sterling Lorence )

Hands down, the most exciting aspect of the Saint camp for us is the new brake. We've long been fans of previous Saint brakes, and after a season on the new XT trail brake, we were foaming at the mouth to get the snappy, short Servo-wave lever pivot feel mated to the four-piston caliper of the new Saints. The new Saint lever is about as ergonomic of a one-finger lever as one could imagine, with ideal finger placement on a textured lever. Tool-free lever adjustment provides quick tuning for custom reach.

bigquotesI've been riding Saint brakes on my enduro bike, too, because the modulation is addicting. - Matt Hunter
As mentioned, everything about the new Saint brake is optimized for heat management. It gets the ICE technologies treatment, with the obvious standout the aluminum finned brake pad for cooling. Also, ceramic pistons inside the caliper prevent heat transfer from the pads to the brake fluid. A new, longer hose banjo extending from the caliper is designed to assist in cooling brake fluid. Shimano has also created a new super stiff, three layer brake hose for a more consistent feel at the lever. The Shimano system uses mineral oil because, unlike DOT fluid, mineral oil does not absorb moisture, which is known in DOT brakes for causing a mushy lever feel. The system is a one-way bleed for easy and clean servicing.

Shimano Saint quad-piston caliper
  Same quad-piston caliper as before, but now optimized for heat dissipation. Note the cooling fins and longer banjo bolt. (photo Sterling Lorence )

Those familiar with Shimano's ICE Technologies three layer clad rotor (steel/aluminum/steel sandwich construction for cooling ) will be even more impressed with the new Saint ICE ultimate clad rotor, which takes the innovative three layer clad rotor to the next level by adding radiator fins. The SM-RT99 rotor is the most effective heat management rotor ever produced by Shimano, claiming an additional 50°C decrease in operating temperatures over the previous Ice Technology rotor, 20% less brake fade, 20% increase in stopping power, and 20% longer pad life. A production version of the rotor was not available during our test, though, but we look forward to seeing how those figures fare in the real world. The ultimate clad rotor comes in 203mm for DH use only, and only in centerlock mounting.

Saint s new ICE Tech ultimate clad rotor
  Saint's new ICE Tech ultimate clad rotor with cooling fins on the left, and the standard ICE Tech clad rotor on the right. (photo Sterling Lorence )

Saint goes 10 speed Dyna-sys, but that's not the only revision seen in the new shifter. The new SL-M820 shifter has longer, textured levers running on dual sealed bearings that contribute to a smoother shift with less effort. The main lever is 6% longer than the previous Saint shifter, and the release lever is 10% longer, both contributing to a more linear feel. Just like all Shimano Dyna-sys shifters, downshift is two-way release, so it can be shifted with the thumb or forefinger. When using the thumb, the downshift is multi-release, so like the thumb upshift, a rider can shift through multiple gears at once. For the new Saint, the downshift can be shifted two clicks with one push of the thumb.

Shimano Saint brake levers
  Saint is more ergonomic than ever. Tactile textured levers provide a sure-fired shift. (photo Sterling Lorence )

Shimano's renovation of the drivetrain is based on sound management, with the premise that a quiet drivetrain means better rider focus on the trail ahead. The new short cage Saint Shadow Plus RD-M820 is a 10 speed design with Shimano's clutch mechanism. The adjustable clutch works similarly to a coaster brake hub where a small tension band prevents the derailleur cage from pivoting forward, thus eliminating chain slap. Other features include a urethane elastomer bump stop to reduce noise, low-profile Shadow Plus chain stabilizer, super-wide links for resistance to twisting and improved durability, and an integrated skid plate to protect the derailleur from impact. An included mode converter (DH mode or freeride mode ) allows for a switch between close and wide ratio cassettes: 11-27 or 11-34 cassettes are now possible with the same derailleur. Extra long limit screws on the derailleur allow for limiting to 5 speed on a 10 speed cassette, should a rider be so inclined.

Shimano Saint rear derailleur
  The new Saint rear derailleur is a work of functional art. Note the on/off gold clutch switch. (photo Sterling Lorence )

Saint's front and rear hubs utilize angular contact bearings - you won't find and sealed bearings in these hubs. The front hub offers a new, lighter construction in it's 20mm form. The rear hub offers a micro-ratchet with super-quick 10° engagement for added speed and durability, with 8/9/10-speed compatibility. Labyrinth and lip seals increase sealing. The also use the Center Lock disk mount for easy rotor interchangeability and a lighter hub shell, and a one-piece axle keeps things internally lightweight and strong. Available sizes include 135/10mm, 135/12mm, 150/12mm, and 142/12mm with 32 or 36 hole drilling.

Shimano Saint front and rear hubs
  Saint front and rear hubs (photo Sterling Lorence )

Saint Hollowtech II cranks are forged from ''Duraluminum'' to form a light weight, extremely strong crank set. The single-ring-only crank is available with multiple 10 speed chainring options. The new Saint cranks is claimed to be 250% stronger than XTR Trail cranks, and 100grams lighter than previous Saint cranks. They still utilize a heavy duty steel axle and steel pedal inserts, though. A revised spider with bolt caps create a clean appearance. The crank is available in 73 or 83mm axle/BB width, 165mm, 170mm, and 175mm lengths, with 34, 36, or 38 tooth ring options. A DH press-fit BB is also available.

Shimano Saint cranks
  Lighter than ever but still strong like a bull? Vanderham was raving about the reliability of his Saint cranks at the media camp. (photo Sterling Lorence )

New for the Saint group is a signature flat pedal. There isn't much to say about this pedal, but with a low-profile design, market proven axle durability, and two-tone finish, it certainly has that Saint look and feel about it. Shimano came up with an original take on pedal pins by including washers under the pins that, when removed, make for a taller pin height. The PD-MX80 pedal is 3mm wider than the older DX pedal, with a profile that is 8.5mm thinner. Several of the pro riders were hyping up the new pedal.

  Shimano's new Saint gravity-oriented pedal. ( photo Sterling Lorence)

Still in the concept stage for Saint is the chainguide that debuted at Sea Otter this spring. Although the guide was absent for testing, there was much talk about the unique design and the benefits of a non-roller system. The modular chain device looks to provide efficiency through less resistance of the chain, as well as silent operation to keep the rider focused on the trail ahead. A built-in damper and silencer on the lower guide is spring loaded for chain tension and has the ability to move out of the way on impact. Protection duty is provided by a minimalist alloy bash guard that attaches to the crank itself and can be relocated to either downward side of the crank depending on which foot a rider has forward. Weight is claimed to be an impressive 147 grams with bash guard.

New chain guide
  (photo Ian Hylands )

With all the tech jargon out of the way, it's test time in the Whistler Bike Park. The amount of lift-access vertical coupled with such rocky, gnarly terrain means that there really is no better proving grounds for bike components than the Whistler Bike Park. Brian Finestone, the WBP manager came by to tell us about the 13th year of the bike park. Last year reached the 1 millionth visitor mark, which is leaps and bounds ahead of any other bike park. Whistler is heavily invested in the bike park and Finestone talked a lot about his role in water management at the park. Clearing snow takes weeks of work because there really isn't a lot of places to put it, but with all of us chomping at the bit to put our passes to work this summer, Finestone's crew has been working hard to get our bikes on the lift. This year Whistler invested in a roto-tilt attachment for their main machine, which allows the operator to maneuver the bucket in any direction without having to move the machine itself. Finestone says on the first day of operating the new piece of equipment, the operator was able to do 2 hours worth of work in 22 minutes.

Our test bike is a 200mm travel Specialized Status outfitted with a full Saint kit (minus the rear wheel as Shimano did not have a 135/10mm hub on hand ) and a mix of parts from Shimano's Pro components group. Schwalbe outfitted the test bikes with Muddy Mary 2.5 tires. Oakley set us up with Crowbar MX goggles. GoPro set us up with a POV cam. Fox Racing Shox was on hand to dial in our Fox 36 Van RC2 180mm single-crown for the test, and out the door we went.

  Our Saint test bike, a Specialized Status outfitted with a Fox 36 Van RC2 180mm fork.

First Impressions
Right off the lift the ergonomics of the cockpit were impressive. Saint's shifter tucks in perfectly under the brake lever, with moulded triggers that wrap around the thumb knuckle when not in use. The short lever blades of the brake levers are certainly designed for one-finger use, and don't interfere with our other fingers or thumbs some some traditional lever blades do.

Thomas Vanderham at 2012 Shimano Saint launch in Whistler British Columbia
  The new Saint lever/shifter integration is ergonomically flawless. (photo Sterling Lorence )

Braking Performance
The new Saint levers have a silky smooth and snappy feel that we've come to expect from Shimano. Last generation's Saint brake had a similar feel initially, but where the new Saint prevails is in the power modulation. As snappy as the lever feels, we were surprised that the new Saint isn't as 'touchy' as it's predecessor - it is more powerful than ever, but also easier to control. And quieter. Our last test day in Whistler greeted us with rain that lasted all day. From no brake to feathering resulted in a minute squeal that went away in two seconds or less. From no brake to full power resulted in a small squeak. This is probably the biggest improvement over the old brake that would squeal all day in the wet. We were so focused on staying upright in the greasy roots that the brakes were one of the last things on our mind. The adjustment dial on the lever is quick and easy to dial in reach. The free stroke adjustment requires a screwdriver and most riders won't find it necessary to use, but we played around with Free Stroke and found that while it's main function is to move the lever blade farther from the point of pad contact, it also introduces a degree of detent to the lever feel. Turning the Free Stroke screw out on the lever increases the snappy feel of the brake.

  New Saint pads with radiator fins (top). Surprisingly, the previous version of Saint pads can also be used and are undoubtedly cheaper.

We had one full-frontal foliage encounter at decent speed on a steep, wet rock that left us nearly assured that the left lever was busted. After recollecting our thoughts and thanking the powers that be, close examination of the brake revealed it to be unscathed. We pried a bunch of bark and debris out of our lever pivots and the brake continued to work flawlessly as if nothing had even happened, despite the lever stopping our body mass abruptly into a large tree.

Matt Hunter at 2012 Shimano Saint launch in Whistler British Columbia
  Matt Hunter enjoys a wet day of Whistler riding thanks to Saint performance. (photo Sterling Lorence )

Shifting Performance
Saint's new shifter feels very impressive. There really is no way to describe it until you experience it yourself. The textured shift levers make for an assured shift interface that won't leave you slipping, no matter the weather. We fell in love with the multi-shift downshift that allows the rider to quickly skip a gear on the downshift.

As for our Saint rear derailleur, day one of the camp left us with a loud and clangy derailleur from where the clutch knuckle hit the horst-link pivot of our frame. No matter how much B-tension was applied to the rear mech, we couldn't get rid of the sound. Other riders in the park actually asked what was wrong with our test bike because it was so loud. Later that evening it was discussed amongst other riders that the same issue was occurring on other bikes, not just the FSR-link ones. Shimano quickly addressed the issue on our bike by installing the mode converter (included with derailleur ) which effectively adds greater range to the B-tension adjustment by setting the derailleur farther back off the hanger. Newer bikes with the direct-mount hangers will not have to use a mode converter, and bikes with higher chain stays and non-chain stay pivots likely will not need it either. With our derailleur now set up properly to our steed, the bike was just as quiet as all the pros declared it would be.

  (l to r ) Mode converter mount. The mode converter. Mode converter mounted on the Saint derailleur.
  (l to r ) Derailleur mounted right out of the box presents instant interference with the suspension linkage. B-tension dialed all the way in eliminates contact in the repair stand, but led to crunchy shifting and a loud bang while riding. With the mode converter installed, we eliminated the interference issue altogether and enjoyed flawless shifting.

The derailleur clutch works very well in the field. Gone are the days of the floppy, slappy chain. The drivetrain is so quiet (after installing the mode convertor ) that we're already finding other noises on our bike that drive us crazy. For one, it's dead quiet. For two, missed shifts are far less likely with optimal chain tension all of the time. Some of the redesign in the Saint shifter is due to the added resistance of the clutch derailleur. Whatever the case, it's all been well thought out and works great for keeping the drivetrain in line. This doesn't eliminate the need for a chain guide as that is specifically dealing with the front end of the drivetrain, but as seen in Shimano's concept guide, clutch derailleurs do not require the tension of a traditional roller-type guide thanks to the clutch derailleur.

  Shimano's Saint clutch derailleur all but eliminates chain slap and drivetrain noises entirely.

Brad Walton at 2012 Shimano Saint launch in Whistler British Columbia
  Catching some air-time on the new Saint group. Solid, precise, quiet. (photo Sterling Lorence )

Everything Else
The new Saint pedals have a great profile, adequate width, excellent traction, and looks that could enter a gun show. While the pedal market is largely over-saturated, Shimano did their homework in creating a pedal that isn't over-tractioned. These provide ample grip but still have enough release for sticky rubber shoes.

The cranks are as stiff as ever, but there really isn't anything new that can be felt on the bike. 100 grams of weight is appreciated, but largely unnoticed. With the surplus of companies entering the carbon crank market, we asked Shimano what they thought of carbon cranks. The response was that they do forged aluminum very well. The Shimano fishing division has vast experience with carbon fiber rods so it's not like they don't know carbon, they have simply found that for a bicycle crank, the work they can do with forged aluminum creates a product far superior to the performance of carbon. Rest assured they've thought this out.

Brad Walton at 2012 Shimano Saint launch in Whistler British Columbia
  The new Saint group's refinement allows for pure focus when negotiating rock lines in the wet. (photo Sterling Lorence )

Our test bike utilizes a 135x10mm rear axle, and Shimano did not have any Saint hubs in this configuration so we weren't able to give the rear hub a full test. Shimano hubs use a fully adjustable loose-ball angular contact bearing. We have been surprised for years that Shimano continually releases new product with cup-and-cone style bearings when the convenience of cartridge bearings is surely a win for the average rider. On the contrary, we learned that cartridge bearings work better in a linear environment like suspension pivots, where forces come from primarily a single rotational point. Due to the gyroscopic effect of a spinning wheel, angular contact bearings are better able to balance destructive loads from any direction. We'll probably continue to see loose-ball hubs in the Shimano lineup for many years to come. And for the record, Shimano is not making Saint rims... yet. There was no mention of plans for a Saint rim, but we're hopeful. The rims labeled as Saint are actually DT-Swiss brand.

  Rueben and Darren of Endless Biking offered an advanced cornering clinic that opened new doors to our riding. Darren Butler and Kelli Sherbinin, owners of Endless Biking. Darren shredding the bike park. (Sterling Lorence right two photos )

Endless Biking was on hand all weekend to show Saint riders around the Whistler Bike Park, as well as offer up instruction to media attendees. With twenty years of riding experience, we were a bit reluctant to sign up for any form of coaching, but decided to go ahead and give it a shot. It was apparent within five minutes of talking to Darren that perhaps even old dogs can learn new tricks. We jumped in on the advanced cornering clinic and within a few minutes we learned the difference between turning and cornering. Do you know where many of the pro riders hang out in the Whistler bike park? B-line. We've wondered why for years, but after the tips from Endless Biking we quickly realized how fun flat corners can be. The awareness of body motions and their effect on cornering is something we are working to reprogram our riding style towards. You're never too good to learn to be better.

There was brief mention of Shimano's new Zee component group targeted at the younger, less-financially stable market. Zee appears to be a capable mix of Saint durability with SLX-level price, and retail pricing is roughly half that of the Saint offering. The stuff looks solid, so if Saint is beyond your price range, you'll only have to wait a few more months before Zee hits the market.

Overall we were thoroughly impressed by the new Saint offering and we took our test bike home for long-term testing. Be on the lookout for new Saint to be available in the next couple months. We'd like to thank Shimano for the good time in Whistler.

For more info, visit ridesaint.com
Must Read This Week
Video: Biketherapy
49380 views

180 Comments

  • + 92
 I'm drooling. Saint set up on that black and red status was dialled as shit.
  • - 38
 But why in the world did they have a Deore XT rear wheel on that thing??????????
  • + 17
 It says right above the picture..
  • + 2
 they didnt have a saint hub on hand with the proper spacing
  • + 3
 Have always run sram gear and raceface cranks but this new saint group looks impressive, has anyone tried the clutch mech yet to see if its actually worth the money? Does the added chain tension really improve shifting on rough ground?
  • + 4
 Wow, can't wait to get it. So much nicer than anything SRAM makes. They are clearly beating them in the areas of shifting, brakes, and cranks.
  • + 11
 durability of the Saint group is second to none. I have only excellent things to say about Saint and Shimano in general.
  • + 5
 @mnorris, they are talking about the ability to jump multiple gears while downshifting (down the stack to a higher gear), which your shifters are not capable of. All shifters can jump about 5 gears when shifting to a lower gear.
  • - 2
 I will only ride Time pedals, SPD is a no go for me...
  • + 1
 Personally i dont like the look of the levers. Last years m810's look better
  • + 8
 It wouwould be sick if the pedals had gold pins in them. Imo. They still look pretty fresh thou.
  • - 1
 ive put my m810 saints on xtr trail levers and they are the best brakes ever!!! basically the new saint without the ceramic pistons or ice tech fins but to be honest i dont think id bother with saint if i was building a new dh bike now, its not that saint arn't awsome, belive me they are but the xtr trails have not all that much less power and now that they have ice tech to stop them overheating unless youre a really big guy (im not) you probably don't need the extra power so you might as well save some weight, sorry shimano but you may have shot yourself in the foot from my opinion. Frown
  • + 3
 Always loved Saint parts, never so much the price lol but with the amount of effort into those things the price is understandable for the most part

Those parts though are honestly such a thing of beauty, good work Shimano
  • + 1
 They're showing off the wheels again, but no mention of a wheelset.. What gives shimano? I bought my brakes at the shittiest time, not even 6 months later, new saint stuff lol Cry
  • + 4
 more gold less silver. The gold is what makes them stand out, pretty much every other component out there is black and silver.
  • + 9
 I would enjoy seeing a saint chain, with black links and gold pins. That would be ill!
[Reply]
  • + 39
 They need to make a saint SPD Platform pedal!
  • + 2
 They should start with a platform as they have then move to an SPD
  • + 3
 they should make a clip in dh pedal, but spd is one thing that actually does need a redesign. I have a finger that will never straighten again, thank you very much spd pedals... NOT! I generally vote against unnecessary new "standards" but spd almost drove me to riding flats until I found how well crank brothers clips work.
  • + 12
 ya except crank bros clips fall apart
  • + 6
 as far as anything crank bros goes....... epic while they work.......
  • + 1
 reduce the DX-SPD weight,, redesign the clip tension adjuster,, make it tougher,, .. and name it Saint-SPD! . . . i'll be happy to buy it
  • + 2
 They just need to make it lighter with a more platform orientated cage. If the cage has pins and the SPD is more recessed, then it would be on par or even better than the mallet, especially with Shimano reliablity.
  • + 0
 True, crank brothers pedals wear out faster, but shimano pedals just don't work by comparison, so it's like we're comparing apples to oranges. I'll choose the pedals that work, even if they don't last forever. Shimano needs to redesign the spd cleat so that the pedal has a WAY bigger target area for getting clipped in. It's almost impossible to find the spot on shimano's pedal when the trail is rowdy and rough. Once they do that, the unclipping reliability would be addressed. A pedal should never never never never fail to release the foot. Crank brothers achieves this.
  • + 1
 If you want flats you don't really need SPD's you could just go for the Saint ones there decent and priced well but I think a Saint clipless pedal would be awesome, something similar to Shimano's DX pedal but more DH oriented because I personally don't like Crank Brothers clipless at all.
[Reply]
  • + 27
 Saint looks so awesome! And i guess works too! Buying it.
  • + 9
 @ridenz: this was a commercial for shimano, guessing that it is good is far more acurate then beliving these marketing phrases right away....
  • + 5
 did ridenz just delete his post? hehe
  • + 4
 I didn't I actually have no idea where it went haha.. You can't delete comments can you?
  • + 2
 at least i wouldnt know how
  • + 2
 The Pinkbike ninja admins probably deleted it without us knowing! Wink
[Reply]
  • + 23
 Looks incredible! Keep it up Shimano. I have some shopping to do soon. That derailleur is calling my name...
[Reply]
  • + 15
 Ok so when can i get my hands on this stuff?
  • - 2
 one of my friend is already use it . . . the saint flat pedal
[Reply]
  • + 10
 Just ordered some Saint parts. Seem to be worth it haha.
[Reply]
  • + 5
 All looks nice enough but im still not sold on saint hubs. Center lock and loose balls? Incompatible much? Ok so loose balls supposedly take side loads better but who the hell puts huge loads through the side of there wheels? Not me, atleast not on purpose. Smile
  • + 9
 Agreed Pigeonlips Somebody should tell Shimano that angular contact cartridge bearings are readily available. They are designed to take side loads.
Center lock shimano? Really? Proprietary parts only alienate your possible demographic, and make it impossible to get repairs when away on that dream holiday. Want to sell more? Make your product better than the competition, not incompatible.
  • + 9
 Big rock gardens, hard corners, and especially hip jump landings give you lots of side load force, so it does make some sense to use ball bearings. I'm glad they are sticking with aluminum cranks rather than just making some carbon cranks that might be a little lighter but not hold up as well in the long run. I respect Shimano's integrity, along with their superior engineering and manufacturing abilities.
  • + 3
 Agreed on the Aluminum Cranks. I don't think a carbon crank would be much lighter or stiffer. XTR cranks are lighter and stiffer, than SRAM XX cranks. Aluminum just has a more solid feel. Not to mention this is one part on your bike that is going to take some really hard impacts.
  • + 2
 I like that Shimano still uses loose ball. Hub's like these if serviced will last forever. And always run butter smooth. Cartridge bearing work well too.......but I think, especially for a DH hub, that not having buy new bearings everytime they start to get notchy is a nice feature. As far as proprietary centerlock rotors....... Shimano sells standard rotors too........if you prefer to run a different wheelset. But IMO, one could do worse than run a full Saint group.
  • + 6
 PigeonLips

I think you will find that you will put allot of force through the side of your wheels. It is the connection point for the rear of the frame at the end of a lever arm. The stiffness of the rear triangle is often as good as the axle/hub load capacity and every time you hit corners, rock gardens, roots you will be loading your wheel from an angle regardless of if you try to or not.

foghorn1

In general the ACC bearings won't take as much load as loose balls would as they still rely on the transfer of the load through the cartridge rather than direct through the hub face. The cost is lower also as you are not paying for a cartridge system.

DARKSTAR63

I think the issue is that Shimano are not releasing the new Ice Tech rotor in anything but centerlock. You could still use the XTR ones but this is still limiting your market options. Yes you could do worse but why remove options.
  • + 3
 True. Coming out with a standard version of the ice-tech would be welcome.
  • + 1
 I've been using the same xt wheels since they came out in 2008. I have changed the bearings once because i thought it should be done, but nothing was wrong with them. Rims are still strait as an arrow, and never needed trueing. I have the saint brakes and on my first ride took a angry header from all the slick angry rocks from the heavy rain in Whistler, the levers are still in mint even from the hit, I didn't fair so well. As far as center lock rotors, i found that the rivets do get a bit loose but I only notice them when I'm chillin' holding my brakes and rocking front to back. The new brakes are also super quite.
  • + 0
 Saint hubs are brutal. In the past month, I've had a broken rear axle, blown free-hub body, needed new cups and cones, and a new front axle. The rest of my saint stuff has been pretty good, but the hubs? Not so much.
  • + 1
 Oh, and the cones constantly come loose so I've resorted to carrying cone wrenches with me at all times.
  • + 1
 Sounds like your a hack. Coming from a hack, that is saying something. Our shop bike had Saint hubs, we never opened them once for 3 years, and they are still beautiful inside. No play, just were running a bit dry.

You put immense angular loads on a hub. What do you think breaks axles? Vertical Shear?

Cup and Cone is the best, and you can rebuild them anywhere you have a hand full of bearings.

I have never seen or even heard of a hub just coming loose.
  • + 4
 been running sealed-bearing hubs (Hope, etc.) for years with 0% issues

ran 2 pairs of wheels built with Shimano XT hubs and had nothing but trouble with cones constantly working loose (despite pro mechanic setup) and dubious freehub durability

Shimano make fantastic transmission and brake components, but their hubs are not something I would ever pay for again Wink
  • + 1
 Interesting.

Their freehub's can be lame. But I have only ever seen great performance out of XT, even Deore hubs/bearings. I have seen some pretty ratched cones, that had loosened off, but over many seasons and never adjusted. I had one guy who's had gotten loose, like not loose loose. Just not snug. Little drop of linseed oil on the threads and all was well. He was skeptical as hell to put them on his Epic. He was doing a 7 day mountain stage race. He had the Roval wheels that everyone had on their Epic's. 3rd day of straight rain, everyone needed new bearings. I sold so many spare wheels to people, because their bearings had seized and we had sold out of bearings, we had brought as many as specialized and NTN could sell us.

My customer rolled in, said his hubs sounded kind of loud, popped them open, threw new bearings in, he back on his way in 15 minutes all square. I had a Nalgene bottle full of loose bearings.
  • + 1
 bonfire, that's a tad presumptious don't you think? I'm not easy on my bikes but I'm no hack. I've run cheaper DT Swiss and Shimano hubs for 5+ years at a time with no problems. Many people in my riding community have had issue with the durabily of the Shimano freehub body. And as for the problem with the axle, the threaded end of the Saint axle is extremely short - like 2 or 3 threads - and that is where it broke.
  • + 1
 Kings all the way. interchangeable axles, 5 year warranty, amazing sealed bearings. The one time I had Shimano hubs, they were loud, the centerlock got loose every ride, the machined aluminum contact points of the center lock became slightly rounded, and my friend's freehub body and front hub seized up, so for the last three months before I sold them, I lived in constant fear of being flipped over the bars. This was on my Ti Hardtail.
[Reply]
  • + 7
 The whole line never seems to make me lose interest. How about a contest? Big Grin
[Reply]
  • + 6
 I think this will convert a couple of SRAM riders. It has me with the new xtr. Very good work shimano, pat yourself on the cog.
[Reply]
  • + 3
 "Proprietary parts only alienate your possible demographic, and make it impossible to get repairs when away on that dream holiday. Want to sell more? Make your product better than the competition, not incompatible."

Hit the nail on the head. The gear looks sick, big step forward for shimano. but still this issue.
[Reply]
  • + 6
 I lost interest after 'Shimano is an engineering company, not a marketing company'
[Reply]
  • + 6
 Shimando did a great job with this, the old Saint stuff was awsome but this stuff looks amazing
[Reply]
  • + 3
 Oh yeah... "Duraluminum" LOL... I wonder if shimano is actually using the actual alloy that the trademarked term went with, or if they thought they were being clever
applying a century old trademarked name for a particular alloy to some new (to them anyways) alloy ?
  • + 2
 So it's 2024? Meh. At least thats stiffer than 6061
  • + 1
 It might be placebo, but my XTR cranks that Shimano claims to be made from Duraluminium as well, seem stiffer than SLX I used before
  • + 12
 I think it is the 3% unobtainium that gives duraluminum its strength.
  • - 2
 Iamamodel Unobtainium is not a good material for cranks, as in the process of moulding, the non-exi-static conduction is used and that makes it prone to hype-active acid present in FOCS-shok class bullshit. If the cooperate so closely with FOX, I wonder when they will come up with an idea to make all those gold parts as Kashima coating...
  • + 1
 Well they have formerly admitted to using 6000 series and 7000 series alloys for their crankarm forgings, but 6061 is unlikely to have been one of them. What works well for welding frame tubes or extruding handlebars from doesn't automatically lend itself to forging pieces from. Why limit yourself to such a weak alloy when there are better alternatives in the same alloy series ? 6066 and 6069 are both over 50% stronger than 6061 for example.

As to "stiffer"... that's a function of the design not the alloy. All aluminium alloys not considered as some other material group (such as metal matrix composites and al-li alloys) are roughly equally stiff. The difference between any of them is usually less than 1%.
  • + 0
 Would be great to have an article once on alloys. As far as my research went before deciding upon material for my own frame (as if there was much choice) the main thing that goes through google-engineering is that alloy does not matter as much as the way it is formed. Both the shape/form and how was it achieved. Then you can have alloys of really cool properties themselves, but it's all good to you when it is hard to process or even worse: hard to weld.

So you can have a company bragging about using 7020 tubing but when not butted or hydroformed, it is inferior to a butted cheapo 6061 T6. Differences in prices of aluminium alloys themselves are also very small (comparing to HQ steel) so oh wow 7000 series, it costs 2$ more per crankset than 6000 - less margin for you, woooow!
  • + 5
 Shimano should apply Kashima coating to their crankarms, to prevent rubbing off with 5.10 shoes
  • + 3
 in the picture of "hammer" with his foot on the chair - looks like he is illustrating the average size and steely weight of the b**ls of Saint users, while in the pic of the pros underneath they got their hands in their laps like "WTF he aint going anywhere near mine"...
[Reply]
  • + 6
 Shut up and take my money!
[Reply]
  • + 2
 The first thing i read in the article for some reason was this.
"The rear hub offers a micro-ratchet with super-quick 10° engagement"
Shimano you so silly, that's only 36 engagements,
take a note out of Profiles book and try 204!
  • + 1
 It gets to a point with POE above which it makes no difference. I would imagine Shimano know more about it than you, and have deemed 36 to be enough
  • + 2
 Having so many engagement points in a small space means very small teeth and pawls, I imagine the torque from super-strong riders and abuse this hub will take on the track meant that having less engagement but the greater more reliability and longevity of larger teeth/pawls was a worth-while trade off Smile
  • + 3
 Big call amateur-soilder..
Have you ridden a hub like profiles where its nearly instant engagement?
and Banseyhcxc Profile have supposedly eliminated that problem, and if you don't trust it then go to Hadley, or Chris King with a little less engagement but they never slip. Seeing as i own a CK hub i think "i'd know"
  • + 2
 I'm not saying it doesn't matter, but you get to a point where it's just redudant
  • - 1
 None of those hubs with the quick engagement are anywhere close to Shimano in terms of reliability. I've seem so many issues with those hubs that it isn't worth it, especially if you ride in the wet. I'll take an XT rear hub over a CK any day of the week, regardless of price.
  • + 2
 people ride king hubs for over a decade. sounds pretty reliable. my king hub is coming up on 7 years without so much as a rebuild. it's ok to say that shimano hubs are reliable without making stuff up about other hubs.
  • + 2
 To me, super quick engagement is not all that important for DH. I run an i9 hub with 120 points of engagement, and to be honest, I don't feel like my old Hope with 24 was lacking. I WOULD, however, appreciate the quick engagement on technical trail rides, and if I raced 4x (which I don't).
  • + 2
 ^ What he said.

I have the I9 too - they were good when ratcheting on a stop-balance-start-try-not-to-hit-the-cranks technical sections in California, but on my smooth trails here in Canberra, I don't notice the difference on my on Shimano, SRAM or DT hubs.
  • + 3
 My first comment was towards the fact shimano claim 36 POV is super quick. it's not. stop trying to use weak attempts of advertising to fool unsuspecting customers. that's all i was putting across..
[Reply]
  • + 2
 the saint of the previous generation has left the bike is very quiet, I imagine the pleasure of playing with this new rear derailleur. o / /

o saint da geração anterior já deixa a bike muito silenciosa, imagino o prazer de rodar com esse novo desviador traseiro. o//
[Reply]
  • + 6
 This derailleur will work on an 11-36 sass être right?
  • + 5
 Great question. Shimano confirms 11-34, and says 11-36 'will probably' work. I tried this on our test Status but the chain was a bit too short to ride. It does shift perfectly in the bike stand with 11-36. Will try soon with a longer chain. I cannot foresee any problems with Saint 1x10 using 11-36, and that is ideally the setup I would use.
  • + 1
 Let me know how it goes! I will probably go 1x10 soon.
  • + 0
 Don't know about that specific rear mech, but in general 11-36 is two steps too far for a short cage. At least on longe travel bikes 6"+ there is too little tension on 11 and on the edge of too much on 36. I already broke the chain twice when nearly bottomed out my Nomad having chain at 36t cog. It does work but mid cage shifts and tensions better. Ground clearance is important, sure, but the biggest damage to the derailleur is done by side hits to the paralleogram (or whatever they call it)
  • + 1
 Well, when I got it right, the thing about the new clutch derailleur is, that you don't have to have as much chain tension by cutting it short as with those old derailleurs... so that chain-length problem seems kind of eliminated, does it not?
The chain can be longer and still not slap on the 11t cog because of the clutch and at the same time there is enough chainlength to properly run a 36t cog.
  • - 3
 There is no room for the cage on 11-36 setup to go more backwards than max tension on 11t. It gets so retracted on 36t that one link more would make it touch the cassette. The fact that there is no room for adjustment, that one link out or one link more makes the whole thing not working, is a small clue that short cage does not work well on such big range cassette. Clutch would not help I think, there would be just too much chain that has nowhere to go.
  • + 1
 are they making a saint mid-cage? i didnt think they were. sucks they didnt think to make the cage what a few mm longer so that it could wrap a 11-36... that ONE link you're talking about WAKI. 11-36 IS the reason to ride a 10s 1x over 1x9 IMO.
  • + 2
 Just talked to Shimano, they confirmed that with it set up for wider cassettes it will work with an 11x36 cassette no problem.
  • + 2
 Using the mode converter, it works just fine with 11-36. This effectively pulls the derailleur 'more backwards' as WAKI says.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 This is getting just silly. You don't need to cool the pad? just use carbon mixed composites, works in motorsport to beyond 1000c and we aint going to reach those temps in MTB You need to cool the fluid, especially if you use mineral oils, and that means cooling the caliper not the pad? at the low speeds we move in MTB, the aero flow we have, a duct which is the obvious solution is not going to do much and look hilarious, the current situation is fine the caliper is in the air dissapaiting heat, and there is no way to cool it any better.

How many deraileurs get bent and broken? why a clutch there? use a chain device and the problem is solved.Geez' are we just making ''fashion'' parts now?

This is just preying on people who don't know better. Its gone crazy this last few seasons, appears most just want something that looks 'cooler' than the last one? Hilarious.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 been running sealed-bearing hubs (Hope, etc.) for years with 0% issues..
not for years no issues with my Hopes but have had loads issues with balls!!
and no one dies sort it out afetrsales support like Hopes..
Have to agree that brakes and drive chain the Shimano stuff is the best..
but for us lesser wage slave/mortals..when are we going to see some of the much trailed Zee stuff?
[Reply]
  • + 3
 I like seeing high end compoents on the Specialized Status Smile I Wish Specialized sold the Status frame separately and cheaply! Oh yeah... Saint, good Smile
  • + 1
 You can buy the status frame in some markets.
  • + 1
 @thrasher2

unfortunately not in the UK Frown
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I do love all the Saint stuff I've got on my bike but I've noticed that the pins are a little short (even with out the spacers) and I fin my feet slip alot while they are very durbale I think a long pin should be an option. Also a thought on the chain guide; it looks like the bashguard is attached to the crank but only on the one side, this is fine and dandy if you always ride right foot or left foot forward but I fin to get the best cornering and such I'm always switching which foot I have forward so it's entirely possible to f*ck up your chainring and chain while riding and even while your pedaling if you knock a rock or something
[Reply]
  • + 1
 All my life ive stayed away from shimano and only used the top of the range sram stuff, anyways since i tried the zee kit ive decided to upgrade my whole bike with it cos it feels that much better then my old sram X0 kit im surprised to say!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Proprietary Shimano stuff and starts to look like their fishing gear.

The finned brakepad is unsound engineering - will be clappery. Imagine the huge blisterwrap at the store...
Finned discs look weird - Why you would want a heatsink on discs is absolutely strange. It is aircooled - damit.
Oil is not the right fluid for brakes - someone tell Shitmano - it is DOT.
Centerlocks wear out. That is why the car industry abandoned it and why they were/are illegal in some states. Unsound engineering. Discs on centerlock - bad idea.
The brakefeel is very hard - I have seen peoples fingers fall off.

Derailleur is incompatible with itself and 100% of the bikes out there - it will hit the stay. Mistake.
Derailleur clutch will wear. It is still noisy when new and will be rackety when worn. For serious DH you will need a chain device. No improvement. Someone tell Shimano - adding complexity to fix an old problem is not sound engineering. 5 speed Shimano 600 was almost perfect. Maybe they should start back there again or do a hubbox.

Where they did not f*ck up is with the rims - they look alright.

This stuff is markeenered beyond goofyness and because it is you wont find Shimano on my bikes at all except my 1976 Roadracer with 10 speed S600.
  • + 1
 @wakaba

you raise some interesting points

I would agree on the use of Mineral Oil in hydraulic disc brakes - the only advantage over DOT is that its not hydroscopic (absorbs water), apart from that its a poor choice (in terms of heat management), otherwise automotive (car and moto) would use mineral oil

and 'DOT fluid does not absorb water as readily as some make out, especially when introduced from a new DOT fluid bottle in a brake system, if you leave the lid off the bottle for a day before using the bottle for a bleed, it will cause a problem!

Shimano and Magura have also exaggerated the "environmental benefits" of mineral oil, its still a horrible substance that poisons the eco-system, admittedly not as severely as the more caustic DOT fluids but its not as harmless as they make out!!

Shimano have had to go to great lengths with their newer mineral oil brake systems using expensive finned brake pads, ceramic pistons, special banjos and Ice-tech rotors to achieve similar heat performance to old Hayes or Avid DOT brakes

As many riders who took older Shimano disc systems to the Alps or Whistler could tell you, their brakes would "cook" on .long descents, rendering the brake near useless, as the boiling point of mineral oil is dramatically lower than high-performance DOT 5.1 fluid...I remember waiting in Whistler for buddies using Shimano disc brakes for their brakes to cool down, whilst I had no problems with my crappy old Hayes HFX-9 discs?

one of my buddies had such problems with his Saint brakes (he was a nervous rider somewhat prone to brake dragging) he bought Formula 230mm rotors and special adapters when he got home, after suffering horrible brake fade in Whistler

on his previous trip where he was even more nervous he was on 203mm Avid Juicy 7s with no heat issues!

I have a lot of love for Shimano's cranksets, bottom bracket, derailleurs, shifters and caliper brakes, but not their disc brakes, nor their wheel hubs!
  • + 1
 Heh it's a bit funny, both what Shimano did and what you guys talk about. I have previous 4pot Saints and honestly I could not ever wish for more stopping power or better modulation. I bought them straight away after trying them on rental bike abd riding on steep technical proper DH track. I am not an accomplished racer so it's hard to say for me, even Peaty complained on arm pump in Val Di Sole, but I find thise fins to be the ultimate brake burners dream.
  • + 1
 The rim's aren't even Saint they are DT Swiss with Saint decals but I must agree they do looks nice.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 nice picture of "hammer" with his foot on the chair - looks like he is illustrating the average size and steely weight of the b**ls of Saint users, while in the pic of the pros underneath they got their hands in their laps like "WTF he aint going anywhere near mine"...
[Reply]
  • + 1
 uh,,, the Jekyll would look killer with all that , might have to start with the derailure first and then go from there. My brother rides his Intense with shimano parts too and swears by them. Time for a change, no offense to the Sram products. Def going to have to get a medium cage derailur.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I know you only tested the saint line but Do you guys have any thought on the zee derailer and wether it might have the same clearance issues? I thought i remember reading that the zee didn't have the mode converter, which ended up being you solution here with the saint.
[Reply]
  • + 3
 There are a lot of MTB'ers hoping the world doesn't really end this year.....who would want the world to end with a sweet groupo like this for 2013?!?
[Reply]
  • + 1
 My first impression is that shimanos design dept. is on crack. The saint brakes and shift look great but those new cranks look like alivio turd cranks. Pour some olive oil on those 2013 cranks and stick them in the freezer. Everyone with the old saint cranks, stay with them. Old one look way better.
[Reply]
  • + 4
 If only saint was cheaper, then i'd have it all on my bike
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Bought the cranks and derailleur and I can just say that they are as perfect as they look. Absolutely amazing to ride and the clutch system for keeping your chain more tort is brilliant.
[Reply]
  • + 0
 Saint look's great, but i wonder why they chose a Specialized Status to test the components. You'd think they would test the higher end components on the higher end bike. Not like the status is a bad bike, but something like a demo (or better-not a specialized! lol ;D) seems like it would be a better test bike for Saint.
  • + 2
 As you said the Status is not a bad bike at all. In fact it is very good but I don't know why they haven't got test bikes with the correct rear axle sizings to use the rear hub on the test. Seems rather odd considering.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 I wonder if the new 4-piston brake caliper was actually designed in-house or did they go and license something from grimeca again.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 All looks nice to me, still not keen on the fins on Shimano brake shoes though. That rear mech looks the "Dogs b******s", not a Downhiller myself but would consider buying the mech. Cant beat those short cage mechs..
  • + 1
 i dont like how the pads look either. nor the pedals. i do however know that tons of time and effort were put into this new line and i cant wait to see people shred on it!
  • + 14
 I didn't realize that the way my pads look matters. Bravo Shimano, they look awsome!
  • + 8
 Nothing to do with looks dude, its the fact that here in the UK we have lots and lots of rain. It gets very sloppy as a result and anything like those fins will just have mud stuck to them. Especially our local rides, its like modelling clay..This does not apply to all, dusty and dry regions will be ok IMO..
  • + 2
 Touche Sir, but you can get them without the fins. I never had that problem, dry and dusty here!!!
  • + 2
 i think the pad fins look wierd n do agree with david on the uk modelling clay point, but cooling fins make sense in my head so if it makes for beter braking bang em on there. myself i like the chainguide, if its the same price as a taco type i will b getting the saint guide
  • + 0
 Who cares if you get mud stuck on the fins? Not like it's going to affect the way it works. Plus, I'd rather get mud stuck on the outside of the fins rather than inside the caliper, no? I would think it would almost act like an added level of protection.
  • + 2
 smike Em yeah it would. The mud would create an insulation layer around the fins meaning that heat would not be lost through the fin but build up there instead. The air needs to flow around the fins to cool them.
  • + 1
 I think both of our theories are speculation, at best, without any real evidence to back either. How much heat is actually dissipated (or trapped by the mud) by the fins is questionable in the first place. While I don't doubt that they do help dissipate SOME of the heat, I think that most is still conducted through the caliper.
  • + 2
 smike. I understand in this application what you mean but there is plenty of data that shows how well fins work. Also simple physics would state that mud would trap the heat. Mud is very thermally effective. Again there is plenty of info out there if you wish to read. I won't go into details here. I am sure someone who works closer with this tech will be able to answer. I just know the basics but even that should be enough to show both benefits and issues as described above.
  • + 1
 culyriff your point is spot on regarding mud insulation, if we ride fast enough then the mud wont stick to us at all. lol
  • + 1
 yea curlyriff, you know what your saying i spent alot of time reading on thermal dynamics and heat transfer while getting my M.E. degree. the point of the fins is to increase the surface area in which a cooler medium (in this case air. sometimes liquids) passes over the heat sink to strip the heat load of the material or part. like why intercoolers in cars come in larger sizes to help keep water temps lower during races. there is still alot more factors involved but this is the basics of how it works. BUTTT!!!

to be honest the fins on the pad isnt in airstream. its kinda tucked in the calaper. so air that crosses over the calaper wont get into all the fins.. well as efficently as it could be. and from the look of it, those fins are also casted. it would be nice with a much smaller "rod" type or a billet heat sink that is long enough to reach past the outside of the calaper into direct air stream. OR creat a little plastic scoop to re direct air into the fins. just my 2 cents.

cheers everyone!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 does anybody know if the zee brake lever is gonna b the same shape as the saint ?..ta very much...i cant quite afford the saint. but lovin the saint lever feel..its a bit like avids levers
  • + 0
 The Zee uses the same basic lever design, with a very similar 4 pot caliper. It loses the finned pads (that shoud fit anyway, if you wanted to upgrade) and the lever doesn't have free stroke adjust, or tool-free reach adjust. The Saint brake is basically an XT lever with an old Saint caliper, the Zee is a Deore lever with Saint caliper.
  • + 1
 cheers dude
[Reply]
  • + 0
 thats what i was thinking .... just ... hmmmmm ..... and wtf is with not using a full DH bike for DH "gravity" orientated components ...le sigh
  • + 4
 What exactly is a 'full DH' bike? 200mm isn't enough?
  • + 0
 *facepalm* looks like a poor attempt to troll from here who the hell props that lol this site is full of tuckfards....
  • + 1
 actually i'd typed something by mistake and couldn't delete the comment, best i could do was edit it into 3 dots... definitely not an attempt to troll and wasn't thinking anything with it...
  • + 1
 uh ... i was responding to the guy who posted after i agree with your three dots if you didnt read my first comment ..erm wtf is with people lol wasnt hatn on ya dude but whateva
  • + 1
 oh ok, haha, it's all good...
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Now I gotta build new wheels on top of all this new saint stuff!! Im hoping they are about the same price as the old saint stuff
[Reply]
  • + 1
 "'Pure Gravity' design philosophy with a clear focus on the rigors of DH racing" - Then why the 10sp derailleur/shifter Shimano?
  • + 1
 In all fairness they did mention the extra long limit screws to allow you to create a 5 speed block should you wish.
  • + 1
 You're still talking about spacing out half your cassette though - Alu freehub bodies get chewed to bits as it is.
  • + 1
 Yeah the alu freehub body would still be an issue but that would take a whole new hub standard anyway's to change from the standard 8/9/10spd system. That doesn't change the derailleur/shifter combo. What you need is a DH specific hub with a shorter more central free hub body that is steel rather than alu and a 5-6 spd cassette which is 11-16 or similar.
[Reply]
  • - 1
 Although looking quite good, some of the items in the Saint group look a lil... hmmm, ugly compared to the Zee counterparts. Refering to the rear derraileur and the crankset - the Zee one are both better looking and lighter, so its a little bugger for me why should i choose the more expensive Saint ones over the cheaper Zees. Smile
The brakes are by no doubt out of this world, so there's no question about it in this direction! Big Grin
[Reply]
  • - 1
 my guess why they fitted a xt rear wheel is the axle had snapped on the saint and so would the xt in time.
correct me if i am wrong, but 2011, 2012 xt hubs ahd huge problems with axles snapping. ( fair enough des to lack of maintence) but you dont see hopes or halos snapping in the same way.
  • + 1
 They stated that they don't do 135mm saint hubs so one would not fit. That is why. Nothing to do with snapping of an axle. I also assume you mean something else other than the axle snapping like the hub flanges/body anything. The axle is part of the frame not the hub? Unless you run single speed/bmx hubs as they often have the axle direct with the hub also.
  • + 1
 the open bearing system works loose as it wears, and chews the axle till it snaps. i would say 90% of the xt wheels fitted to 2011/2012 bikes have had this problem
[Reply]
  • + 2
 i need some new cranks..hmm..
[Reply]
  • + 1
 And about new clip pedals. Any news? I think it's time to redesign a new DX pedals.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 was there a price for these items i din't even notice
  • - 1
 My dad owns a bike shop, and he just talked to a shimano rep, so I know what everything is going for at cost on QBP... I'm hopefully buying all the new saint stuff soon at cost. But even then I can tell you it's not cheap!!
  • + 1
 Uk suggested retail prices look around the same as the 2011 Saint kit.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I'm just gonna pretend I know half the stuf they are talking about and nod my head. Wink
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Getting the shifter mech and brakes at the end of the month, proper excited!!!!
[Reply]
  • + 2
 Those rotors look so sweet! Want one now!!!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Sram XO is as good as saint
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Why the off-switch on the derailleur clutch? Why turn it off?
[Reply]
  • + 1
 New Saint rotor only coming in centerlock flavor=lame
[Reply]
  • + 1
 The forks on that bike look bent
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Will the new rear derailleur work with last gen saint shifter?
[Reply]
  • + 1
 wow ,i need it in my life.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 that will take too long, I want it now!!!
  • + 0
 Hate to be the bearer of bad news but Santa isn't real!
[Reply]
  • + 2
 Oh baby, you sahhh fine.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 ZEE has already "hit the market" and available now
  • + 1
 Saint has as well.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I hope the hubset will be more performing than the last version.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 if only they werent so expensive
[Reply]
  • + 1
 so saint for 2013 it is!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 ohhh daaaammmmmm
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Great review Brad!
[Reply]
  • + 0
 EVERYBODY LIKES MY PEEPEE!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
[Reply]
  • + 0
 Brad getting some nice air in those photos!
[Reply]
  • + 0
 Where can people get the rims, or are they not available?
  • + 1
 "And for the record, Shimano is not making Saint rims... yet. There was no mention of plans for a Saint rim, but we're hopeful. The rims labeled as Saint are actually DT-Swiss brand."
[Reply]
  • - 3
 guess whos getting new 2013 Saint Components ..... ME! Big Grin
  • + 3
 Want a cracker? Sorry, I am just jealous. I want it all.
[Reply]
Below threshold threads are hidden

Post a Comment



Copyright © 2000 - 2014. Pinkbike.com. All rights reserved.
dv14 0.073107
Mobile Version of Website