Bos Suspension: A History of Victory

Jun 5, 2012
by Matt Wragg  
 
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bigquotesYou run your life on opportunities. Maybe at that moment I was the right man at the right time, in the right place. - Olivier Bossard

The story of Bos Suspension is an unlikely one. It’s also a difficult one to track down, as owner Olivier Bossard doesn’t like talking about the past. Trying pushing him and he protests, “I am not so old! My future is so much more important than my past.” Yet when your achievements include developing the suspension for around 20 top-level MTB titles (mostly in the downhill, but there is an XC World Champs in there too), four Paris-Dakar winners, an enduro World Championship, a World Rally Championship win, Junior World Rally Championship wins and a Formula 3 win, it gets hard to ignore that kind of past.

Olivier Bossard
  Olivier Bossard.

His story doesn’t begin with a college, a university or a school. It starts in 1986 with a young boy, a Honda motocross bike and a natural urge to improve things. Olivier completely disassembled the damper on that motorbike to try and work out what was going on inside. At first things didn’t go too well and he had ended up with what he described as “a big bullshit! But if you want to learn, you have to make some mistakes.” He learnt quickly too, soon making his own damper, doing almost everything himself, even machining the parts.

At the start of the 90s he bought his first mountain bike and fell in love, “I discovered it was good fun, coming from motorbikes it was more or less the same sensations.” Yet his joy at riding soon gave way to that need to improve things as he realised he enjoyed that even more. As he explains, “when I saw at the beginning of the 1990s the Manitou and Rockshox forks, coming from motorcycles, I said ‘ok, it’s nice, it’s an improvement compared to a rigid fork, but we are quite far from what we want to achieve with this suspension’. I decided I would like to make a fork, to make an improvement compared to the other brands. I thought that I could, so I tried. I started again with a big mistake! I spent so much money trying to make the lowers, the stanchions, I had done everything myself and it was a disaster because I had spent almost all of my money. But never mind... Even if I only ate potatoes, I got my fork!”

With that fork he headed down to the south of France in 1993 to show to show it to the boss of Sunn Bicycles, Max Commencal. Max agreed to test the fork. At the time Sunn had just signed a new rider, a young guy who was just moving over from motorbike trials to come and race downhill. His name was Francois Gachet. “He tried the fork and compared it to the forks on the market and said ‘ok. We have big problems with your fork. It is difficult to do a full run with it, but there is something there that looks better than the others. So I would like to improve it, I would like to try it. If we can work together on it, I trust your fork’.”

With François’ blessing Max employed Olivier to develop his bikes. He is reluctant to describe what he did at Sunn as job, rather it was a “target”: to win World Championships. This created a new challenge. To make and improve one fork was one thing, but a single fork was not going to be enough. Max asked him what they needed to win, coming from motocross his answer was simple, “we need a frame, we need a shock, and we need a fork – a complete bike.” They didn’t just need one either; the whole team would need bikes. The Sunn race programme was born there.

Francois Gachet of France wins the Senior Men s World Championship race in Vail Colorado in 1994 and Gachet on the gondola at Mont Saint Anne in 1997.
  Francois Gachet winning World Championships in Vail, Colorado in 1994, and then on the gondola at Mont Saint Anne in 1997.

He started in October 1993 and the first race for the new bikes was at the 1994 Cap D’Ail World Cup in Southern France. On the team were François Gachet, Anne Caroline Chausson and Alex Balaud. It wasn’t a smooth birth... Throughout training the bike was plagued with problems, again in the first heats and final practice. By the time finals came around there had been so many problems that nobody had managed a full run on the bikes, yet for the final run something miraculous happened – the bikes started to work. François Gachet and Anne Caroline Chausson both took the wins. That year the two of them went on to win everything: World Cups, World Champs, European Champs and French Champs. On board those bikes they won everything they entered that year. From there began the greatest period of domination in downhill history and Olivier developed championship-winning bike after championship-winning bike for Sunn. Piloted by great names like Fabien Barel, Mickal Pascal, Francois Gachet, Anne-Caroline Chausson, Cedric Gracia and, of course, Nico Vouilloz. Between 1994 and 2003 those bikes won around 20 top-level titles.

One of the most incredible things about Sunn during that period was the level of technology they used. Olivier went to lengths that haven’t been seen in mountain biking before or since to win, as he says, “to stay in front of the other competitors the most important thing is the work, you have to find new solutions, to think and try to do better. So I had asked to Max to help me buy data-logging kit, do some benchmarking and bring people in for a study office. He trusted me so much that he gave me almost everything I asked for! A dream.” On the race track that translated to having such a thorough understanding of what was happening they could tell precisely when it was faster to pedal and when to go for a full aero-tuck.

He’s typically modest when he recalls the 1997 World Championships at Château-d'Oex, describing it as simply a “nice day.” Sunn bikes took four of the top five positions in the men’s competition. The only person who could spoil their perfect sweep was his boyhood hero, John Tomac, who took second after Gracia lost the front wheel near the end. “When were young and on mountain bikes I remember when we saw John Tomac, it was like he was a star, a god. A few years later, when I saw that I could make bikes that could beat John Tomac it was unbelievable.” In fact, talking to him about that period he reveals that “my only regret is that I never met John Tomac.”

In 1999 Olivier created Bos Suspension to follow another one of his dreams, rallying. At first he was doing it alongside the Sunn bikes, but by 2003 he decided to leave mountain biking altogether to concentrate on the rally suspension. “We had a target, to win a WRC event. We did. With Danny Sordo in the Citroen.” From there he goes on to list a mind-bending list of successes: enduro motorbikes, track racing, 250cc track racing, more rallying, Formula 3. A desire to win drove him on, he’s a quiet, reserved man, you don’t expect him to tell you that “it’s like a fuel – competition and victory is like a fuel for me. I always try to do my best and stay until I win. There is something I remember hearing once from a Volkswagen driver on the Paris-Dakar: ‘ok we can win against the Mitsubishi [with Bos suspension] on some stages, but how can we follow them on the camel grass? Their suspension is so far in front of our suspension.’ That was a pleasure.”

Bos-equipped Mitsubishi on the Paris-Dakar.
  One of the Bos-sprung Mitsubishi 4x4s in the Paris-Dakar.

So what bought Olivier and Bos Suspension back into mountain biking? “A joke.” Bos’ marketing man, JC kept prodding, saying they should make a cartridge for other brands of fork. Olivier wasn’t convinced though, “I said no, there is no option to do them. We were in mountain biking so many years ago, everybody will have forgotten us. I was sure of that, nobody would remember the story. I don’t like to look at the past, because everything has to be done and the next step is the future – there is no place for me in the past. I said we have gone in another direction with the cars, I want to win there. He asked if we could make some just for his pleasure. So I made 25 cartridges, for 888s, Boxxers and Fox 40s. We only did 25 for all those forks. I put them on the stock at Bos and forgot about them, my target was to work on the car dampers again. Ten days later JC came to me and said everything is sold. I asked where? New Zealand, Canada, Mexico, Japan, Austria... How is this possible, I just put them on the website and they were sold in ten days? How was that possible?”

Bos-eqiupped Citroen DS3 and Mitch Delfs on a Bos-equipped Morewood.
  A Bos equipped Citroen DS3 rally car and Mitch Delf on a Bos-equipped Morewood Makula, circa 2010.

JC pushed him to make another batch and again they sold out quickly. Seeing there was still interest in Bos, he decided to make a complete fork. Working with another company who made the lowers and some other parts, they were disappointed with the results; it didn’t meet Olivier’s high standards. Failure wasn’t an option, so Bos dived back into mountain biking. It took another two years for them deliver their downhill fork, the Idyll.

Now they have turned their interest back to mountain bikes, it shouldn’t be surprising to anyone that Bos are taking a different approach to how they manufacture their products. “Each fork is fully-assembled by one guy – it’s not a production line. We don’t take the stanchion and put in the first lower we find, it’s all unique. There is a serial number on the fork and we know who assembled it. Everything is done in Toulouse, in France, and for me it makes the fork like a jewel. It’s not like a damper you use on your car where you forget and just drive it. For me it’s very important for it to be as nice on the inside as it is on the outside. I would like it if someone opened the fork or shock and said, ‘ok, that’s a nice piece.’ I appreciate it so much that I sometimes I go to the factory during the weekend and have a look at the pieces on the tables, the tools, the colour. It’s a pleasure for me.”

Nico Vouilloz testing the Bos Deville 160mm fork.
  Nico Vouilloz testing the Bos Deville fork.

Olivier sees his experience of working in a range of sports as a big advantage for the company, and it’s reflected in their production. As he explains, “if one line is a Deville [their 160mm trail fork], the next line is for a Citroen DS3 for car racing, rally. All the lines are beside each other, close together –it’s not MTB on one side and cars on the other side.” This follows through into the testing too; their mountain bike gear is tested to the same level as their parts for WRC rally cars or Paris-Dakar jeeps. Originally it went the other way though, “Nico Vouilloz’s bike from 1999-2003 had a special system on the damper, which was developed for mountain bikes and is used today by the top-level teams in the WRC. It is one of my patents and it is one of the main improvements on their dampers in the last fifteen years. For me mountain biking is very prestigious, when I work with work with top-level rally teams I am very happy to say that I come from mountain bikes - everything I know comes from them.”

The Bos factory in Toulouse France.
  The Bos factory in Toulouse.

So what does the future hold for Bos? Now they are working at what Olivier calls a “correct” level, he wants developing the range further. More than that, he wants to look at how they produce things, reducing their environmental impact is very big concern for him, as he says, with surprising bluntness and passion, “you cannot shit on the ground.” Pick a little further and it’s almost inevitable that he wants to be back at the races. “The next challenge will be to find a team which will trust in our knowledge and we will do everything possible to win that championship. And you can trust me, I will do everything. We are looking for good riders, a good team and the right moment. I don’t know if it will happen, but it’s the target.” If they find those things, with his experience, you wouldn’t want to bet against seeing a Bos-equipped bike on a World Champs podium once again...

www.bosmtb.com

142 Comments

  • + 121
 When I think about Bos I think about riding my bike, like a boss.
  • - 16
 you mean like whenever you like at whatever place you desire with every budget you can possibly spend???

Beer
[Reply]
  • + 52
 nice piece of history. i learned a lot. i hope pinkbikes features more of this kind of articles.
  • + 20
 I'd like to see one on fox, marzocchi, and/or rockshox Big Grin It's very interesting to see how things started in MTB Smile
  • + 5
 Great stuff! I remember when MBA did a feature on that single crown Sunn after Gatchet won the original World Cup on it. To prepare for that season Francois did tons of road riding, look at those calves! He did get beat that year once by 16 year old Nicolas Vouillloz, who won on his rocky home track.
[Reply]
  • + 25
 When my Lyrik dies, DeVille will surely replace it - the performance of open oil bath at the weight of semi-bath with factory dialed-in compression and rebound + probably the best looks on the market - yeees... I am not going to Kashima coat my arse to bare the load of marketing that Fox is willing to stuff in it
  • + 14
 + it is produced in Europe, It's hard to count wins when buying BOS
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  • + 25
 I smell some fanboy battle here....
  • + 8
 yep, rockshox fanboy myself, but BOS are equally appealing......
  • - 22
 vivids are way better than stoys FACT
  • + 3
 i pulled a vivid off my bike cos it didnt even compare to a cheaper fox shock....... FACT
  • + 4
 my vivid feels great.. when the piston shaft isn't unscrewing itself from the eyelet...
  • + 5
 that comment was my brother -.- sorry
  • + 2
 But it was words from your mouth that your vivid is better than my stoy Razz
  • + 1
 no i said i prefere the feel of my vivid to your stoy
  • + 2
 Since you're all fanbois here... Mr Hill runs a shitty Vivid. It might have a special tune, but it's just mechanicals. It's not full of magic jelly. Persoanlly, Fox can go f*ck itself, atleast in the MTB world. I run their coilovers on my truck, but their MTB customer service friggin BLOWS. Rockshox badly needs to up the quality of their QC, but their CS is top notch.
That being said, My 3 fav shocks ever were a Marz ROCO WC, a Vivid 5.1, and a Vivid Air. I currently have an RC4 on my Legend that I'll gladly trade for any one of the three listed above! Smile
  • + 3
 ok then... valdi sole. anybody else notice that fox suspension systems had all of the podium positions.............. NEWSFLASH!!!! rockshox no longer dominate world cup dh HA!!!!
  • + 8
 Fox is just a company that charges too much for there products so they can pay to have all the good riders on there teams to make there company look better. In my opinion with fox suspension you pay a lot more for the name.
  • + 0
 yeah, and the fact that all their internals are machined in the USA, out of actually alloy.
  • + 4
 to be fair im not going to deny it you can buy a 36 van 180 rc2 and the rrp is 880.... and somehow it costs an 700 more to make the 40............

i think fox are charging 1450 for the 40 because they can :/
  • + 2
 It's the same story with the RC4 being the same price as a stoy, and it's not as good a shock. Also the CCDB being better than both of them (if it's set up right) and being cheaper than both :L
  • + 1
 just imagine that GT would have stuck with SRAM and Rockshox, there would have been both Gee an Mark up there, same thing about Greg...I can tell you this was not because fox is working that much better (Greg still at the same level) it is all about the money.
[Reply]
  • + 16
 I love my BOS Deville! The best do-it-all fork ever!
bikebert.pinkbike.com/album/BOS-Deville
  • + 6
 Wow, after looking at bikeberts album, it looks like they have a very high level of attention to detail. The Deville looks amazing.
  • + 4
 Cool part about them is that they have a very good preset on damping - unlike other companies they sort of don't allow you to screw up your suspension by under or overdamping it. They give you the adjustment range that is useful and that actualy works and that you can't really screw up. I think it is the total opposite of mentality that goes into Cane Creek DB - where probably half of customers have never managed to set it up right.
  • + 2
 I have often wondered why some comany give such wide ranges of adjustments , as if anyone is going to ride with no high speed rebound damping or with it so damped it barely returns.
15 clicks of adjustability = 6 clicks max of usefull range
  • + 4
 depends entirely on your weight... if they only had those 6 clicks of usefulness they may not suit a significantly lighter or heavier rider.... its better to have them and not need them than to need them and not have them
  • + 1
 I see what youre saying bigburd but I agree with alazamanza. A 150 pound rider vs 250 pound rider will have different settings to get the same results
  • + 1
 Good point never considered that
  • + 1
 if you weigh under 100lbs or over 250 you should get a custom shim stack anyways, even for RS and Fox. It doesn't cost that much at Push Tftuned or Mojo
  • + 1
 what about bos..... should i have to pay shipping an extra 2 times so i dont void my warrenty.... dont think so
  • + 2
 also if you're so amazing that you can feel the difference as to a basic rebound adjust fork fork and a RC1000000TL mag ti 4.0 coated blaa blaaa fork you will be able to feel the difference the adjusters make and use them propperly... its really not rocket science Bottom line if you dont know how to use the adjusters.... DONT PAY MORE TO HAVE THEM!!!!
[Reply]
  • + 6
 I'd trade my 40s in for a set of bos just from the things I've heard about them alone. But there's no service centre where I live that do them so it would be harder for me. They make some serious looking forks though. so nice.
  • + 1
 only problems with bos are that
1> servicing can be a pain but it isnt that difficult to do yourself
2> their dh forks are on the heavy side when you consider how expensive they are

beyond that i cant really say a bad thing about them
  • + 0
 Meh, Avalanche forks are better in every way suspension wise. =] And they don't need a multi mazillion dollar backing behind them to do so.
  • + 1
 You say that, but the Idylle fork is actually slightly lighter (about 30 grams or something) lighter than a boxxer r2c2 and the Idylle rare air might be one of the lightest DH forks you can buy now (when it's out and we know a weight for sure)
  • + 0
 ok.....
the bos "rare" weighs 2930
the 888rc3 evo ti weighs2990

500 quid for 60 grams that's a bigger rip off than shimano's old yumeya upgrades for xtr!!!!!!
  • + 1
 Fair one, but you got to consider the work that goes into these units as well, and the Bos does perform better than a 888 (even though it'd only really be faster racers that will gain advantages from that)
  • + 0
 yeah... more top teams run marzocchi though...... i can name crc intense and ms mondraker that run 888s the only wc racer i know of thats running bos atm is sabrina jonier and i dont know what team she's on now that maxxis rocky mountain split
  • + 5
 alazamanza, that doesn't mean anything. That just means BOS is not shelling out mega cash sponsoring teams to run their products. Everyone in MTB these days think that if something isn't on a top end WC team, or WC racing brand, it isn't good. Also, I don't know why everything thinks something shouldn't be expensive if it's heavier.
  • + 2
 Remi Therirorecrujbje (don't know how to spell it) is also on the Labyrinth team running bos. Jullien Camelini is running Bos on his V-10c, and he's running it out of choice, not because he's sponsored by them !!
  • + 2
 His last name is Thirion and it's pronounced tee ree on.

For the septics just watch runs of riders on BOS suspension (Remi Thirion, Julien Camelini), the front always remain firmly on the ground, not bouncing like 40's
  • + 1
 The only 40s I rode where 2010s, and they felt that they just have a certain speed threshold below which they felt like shit. As soon as you start pushing all you found was well composed fork. RS improved a lot with introduction of MiControl DH as previously it was either divey or harsh - now you get them smooth and stable. Haven't tried latest MZ Rc3 Ti but as I remember 888RC2x and 66rc2x from 2006 and 2007 - they were amazing forks. A bit divey under braking and in corners but super smooth and planted to the ground, They had something that I never found on Fox or RS - they were truly damping hits - you felt that a part of energy is being absorbed by the fork, not that fork just goes into travel allowing the wheel to go above the obstacle
[Reply]
  • + 5
 I have a full Bos equipped Makulu. Bos suspension performs very well and I like the fact that there are minimal settings. Unfortunately last time I needed a spring change R51 in the UK wanted £80+£15 delivery for a standard steel spring and I had to wait a month for it. This is ridiculous, they also don't have service manuals, you can't buy seals etc and the "special" oil is £35 for 500ml + £15 delivery no doubt. Standard 7.5wt seems to works just as well. Idylles do only need an oil change once a year and serviced every two. R51 did service my rear shock and were very quick so I didn't lose any riding time.

Great experience with the actual products its just the support and availability which means next time I'll probably go with another brand.
  • + 1
 From what I've read on the biggest french speaking thread about bos suspension, their oil is really a high end one, it's a kinda pricey motorsport oil. It's the same deal with the seals. Sad but true but it seems that it's hard to get both good product and good customer service with a french brand.

But man be honest, you may consider going with another brand but you won't, you can't go back, a bos product works way better and you know it Wink . Only the CC Double Barel can match a Stoy, but for the forks peanuts! Even without Hiroshima, Fukushima or Kashima treatment on stanchions, bos forks are upfront when it comes to low frictions.

What bos needs is a bunch of Americans pushing the brand on another level commercially speaking.
  • + 1
 Euskafreez - do you remember how Americans from Tenneco pushed Marzocchi They started in 2004 with placing pics of sluts on lowers and beginning the move to Taiwan reaching the quality bottom in 2008...
  • + 1
 You misunderstood me, what I mean is that BOS needs some kind of American employee improving their public relation. It's just a personal observation, their products are fantastic but the CS and the communication are not matching the quality of their suspension.
  • + 1
 Mah Public Relations was "invented" by Edward Bernays who was a nephew to Siegmund Freud - so get some German guy Big Grin One of his observations was: you can sell anything: it all depends how smart is the seller and how stupid is the buyer.

It seems to me that BOS is not after high-fly far fetched marketing bullcrap - Fox does that, running a full frontal attack on riders minds. BOS seems to adress peoples rationality, not play on desires with gooooooold! Keep PR away please, there's nothing wrong with being a small company, it is awesome to do what you believe in - in typical PR you stuff people with bullsht, you can say what you believe only if you believe that your product is the best thing in the world, and that it is 100 times better than closest competitior - and only a douche says that Wink
  • + 1
 I see your point but what I've in mind was just a slightly improvement of their PR, something that match the size of the company. When I'm saying that they should improve in PR and CS I'm speaking of experience.

Anyway don't be too manichean with PR, it helps but what matters is the quality of the product. I see this situation to often in the french industry, when we have great products the communication sucks big time Frown .
  • + 1
 no no no! All what people need to know is: it's better because it's French! Big Grin Just kiddin - I see your point Smile

BTW Do you know why Nico left them and went to Fox?
  • + 1
 I can honestly say my next DH build will probably have 888 Evo Ti's on the front and a CCDB or Stoy on the back. If something breaks and I'm waiting a month for a part in the middle of summer that would push me towards another brand, same thing if I need to replace a seal I can do it myself for £20 with other brands but with Bos I have to send it away pay all the postage and distributors repair costs etc.
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns

Nico don't left BOS, due to Nico's commitment with both team and R&D at Lapierre he was forced to end his collaboration with BOS. The main reason was the connection between Fox and Lapierre. As a part of Lapierre R&D he knows about what guys are Fox are working on. I guess the goal is to avoid any potential conflict of interest.
  • + 1
 I'm having a genuinely terrible experience in the UK with after sales service. BOS do not give a hoot about their customers. Surf sales uk distributer don't know what they are doing, and they have told me BOS rarely get back to them and are extremely slow getting parts. What's the point spending effort on new developing new products if your current customers are not going to give repeat business. I certainly will not buy another BOS product unless they personally call me to apologise for the terrible experience I have been having. I also tell anyone I can how bad BOS after sales support is. No doubt, they are amazing products, but what use is that when you can't even get parts for them.
[Reply]
  • + 6
 Bos is a legend, because their philosophy only aims better and better performance, not making the more money they can. Proud it's french :-p
  • + 6
 Yea, I salute you guys for BOS and most of all for Mavic! So awesome that those are still made in France! Respect Wink
  • + 1
 you may have mavic and bos but weve got hope and orange bikes..... not that anyone outside the uk particularly cares about orange bikes... hahaha
  • + 1
 kanioni - I think I will limit myself with appreciating Iittala and knives Smile
[Reply]
  • + 2
 the 888 ti chassis is actually ridiculasly light... i know that bos is commited to their own range but if they made a closed cartridge damper for that they could be on a serious winner... i rekon theres at least 200g in excess oil in those things that could mean a sub 2.8 kg coil dh fork????
[Reply]
  • + 4
 On Bos suspension since 2009, at first on my DH bikes, then on the Enduro bike (have a look at my album)

Simply another world.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 Very interesting read. I knew of BOS originally from Dakar and WRC. The fact a top Dakar team felt they couldn't compete properly as the BOS equipped rival was superior says it all. The amount of money thrown at Motorsport dwarfs biking which just shows that BOS ultimately had the superior product when funding wasnt an issue. If the goal is for a dominant team in the future with the funding in place its not unrealistic at all, if they can support it. Its always going to be hard to get established against the big companies with the top riders but I hope they do. Its only going to make everyone push harder to improve after all, competition is a good thing for product development.
@gnarbar. Plenty of european users on here who I am sure have found this of interest. I personally dont mind if you dont have BOS available in the US I ride in europe. Oh and there are plenty of big alpine descents in Europe just not in your typical bike park environment. Off the top of my head Pila has a lift accessed run of over 12km, is that enough of a test? It sure hammered my RC4 and Boxxers last summer!
[Reply]
  • + 2
 Would love to give it a try if they had a support center in the States, I've heard horror stories about shipping forks to France for a simple servicing as doing it on your own will void the warranty.
  • + 1
 What kind of stories because the postal services here in France are not perfect but this is not Italy, your parcel won't be stolen (personal experience). From what I've heard a simple servicing may not void the warranty if you use the right kind of oil.
  • + 2
 On the MTBR IBIS forums a number of people from the states have purchased devilles only to find there is no documentation to perform the maintenance & being told by BOS that performing it on their own would void the warranty. Shipping a fork overseas is a huge pain in the a$$, I have not heard of stolen parcels. I have looked for support documentation on the site & have not found any as I would love a Deville but being without a fork for a lengthy amount of time in the middle of the season would suck.

Plus lack of availability of parts in the US
  • + 1
 Sadly, I am fully agree with you. Hope to see BOS opening a service center in the US one day, at least bos products only need to be serviced once in a year or two ... if you don't have problem in between (no worries mate, just kidding Big Grin ).
  • + 1
 The great thing about Bos products is they rarely need to be serviced, but then again, if something does go wrong, I see your problem
[Reply]
  • + 1
 This gets the thumbs up from me. Great article. Never knew most of that and that there is also so much to know. One thing i like about his attitude over the big companies is that it sounds personal for him, the production sounds personal. It just seems much more involved. Rather than production line like others, not that thats a bad thing. I like the fact that he is also blatant and to the point. No beating around the bush, says what he means.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Its fantastic to see another performance driven company with heritage step back into the mountain bike industry. this means more competition between brands, which means faster advancements and eventually lower prices. With Fox's new 40 coming out, Marzocchi turning it around (The SHIVER!), and Xfusion making a run for it. the suspension market is heating up big time!
[Reply]
  • + 3
 Would gladly try bos but not available in us . Time to step up to north american market if the performance is there , the customers will be there too.
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  • + 6
 I love BOS......
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  • + 1
 never ever buy Bos their after sales, customer service is shocking, even the service centers and distributors are dropping them like flies no parts no manuals not even a reply to emails off customers or their service centers, if they can't even look after their distributors or service centers how are you as a customer going to get help? I have made the mistake of putting 2 full sets on my bikes before researching them 2x stoy rear shocks N'dees on my XC and Idylle pro triple clamps on my DH bike. do you think i can get any help nope not one single bit. the service centers are trying but don't have the parts or the info due to Bos restrictions on everyone. even the UK distributor dropped them because of their poor service.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 Since riding my refilled for a couple months I,ve had to send the rear fox shock off for a custom tune......it was being massively outclassed.
  • + 5
 Deville not refilled. damn phone.
  • + 1
 which fox shock?????
  • + 1
 Float rp23.
[Reply]
  • + 3
 I ride bos front and rear and it's amazing I don't know what your on about jack mackenzie clearly you haven't got a clue
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Killer article, PB. It's funny to hear his humility - his damper hop-up kits gone in 10 days? For me, that's not surprising. For him, wow, what must have been a great thrill once it set in. BOS!
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  • + 3
 I love my Boss it's Payday!!!!
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  • + 1
 I loved my Bos Devilles - all the way from my car to my shed, 10 metres, in which time they broke and have already gone back. Took 2 months to get hold of them too.
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 If I had more money... I would get a RaRe Air!!!
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  • + 1
 I just got the first devil black fork (they only make white)in the world i like the looks and it os awsome smooth 160 trc tapered
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  • + 1
 Does anyone actually know where you can buy their suspensions products online and order them to the U.S.? Anyone have comments on the Void DH Air shock? Looks very tempting.
  • + 1
 If I'm not mistaken, you should try to contact the French Maverick service center alpatech@free.fr, the guy speaks english and he has sold few bos products to the US. But if you can deal with french then buy directly your fork or your shock directly on their website.
  • + 1
 Thanks a bunch. Damn they are pricey, but I'm sure well worth it. I wish I could shell out the 816 euros for a Void DH Air shock.
  • + 1
 Well it's pricey but when it comes to forks it's not, at least in Europe, for the 40's price you could afford an Idylle.
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  • + 0
 Bos really needs to work on their grammar on their mtb website. Negative prop me, but I'm just telling it like it is. Go see the description on the Idylle SC fork if you don't believe me.
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  • + 1
 Cool. i knew they raced dakar. Should show Fox. there history is very long lol. Thats Fox with the tail.
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  • + 1
 I looked at their site. The suspension looks cool enough I might forgive them for putting it on Mitsubishi and Citroen ={D
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  • + 3
 I wish I could try BOS.
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  • + 1
 It would all be great if I didn't hear some shit opinions about bos customer support.
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  • + 1
 Got to properly hammer my Devilles this weekend, they're excellent. They just handle everything.
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 Wish i can get a fork here in the cdn
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 Waiting on my deville!! Smile
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  • + 1
 i wanted a bos fork in may but couldn't get one, but i will try again next month for the nukeproof mega i will be getting
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  • - 1
 Attn BOS: Hook me up with a Deville fork and the new VOID air shock for my carbon Nomad please! PM me for shipping info to Southern California! You front me these parts and I will blow you up on the West Coast, I promise! Wink
  • - 1
 Come on Olivier, I know you are reading! Get this stuff to Merica!!!
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  • + 1
 Seems like a very down to earth brand. Sick write up!
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  • + 1
 yeeee like a boss. i wana see this suspension
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 BOS is coming to the USA by the end of the year.
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 anyone looking to buy a bos fork? check my page....
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  • + 1
 Oliver knows where it´s at....his shocks are amazing!!
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