Devinci's New 650B Troy - First Look

Aug 14, 2013
by Mike Levy  
 
You must login to Pinkbike.
Don't have an account? Sign up

Join Pinkbike  Login
Devinci Troy

Whistler, B.C., not only plays host to the annual Crankworx festivities, but it is also the location that some brands choose to debut new products, including Devinci. The Canadian brand gave us an exclusive early look at their new 650B-wheeled Troy, a 140mm travel machine that has been designed as a trail bike that can handle it all, with recent World Cup winner Stevie Smith proving that point by choosing to race his personal Troy in the upcoming Air DH race at Crankworx. With just 5mm less travel than the 26''- wheeled Dixon, the two bikes appear to be quite similar in their intentions, so what sets them apart? The answer lies in the geometry, with the 2014 Dixon sporting a slacker head angle and a 160mm travel fork spec'd as stock equipment through the entire line, while the Troy handles a touch quicker and sports either a 140mm or 150mm travel fork depending on the model. This puts the Dixon in a more aggressive category - think Enduro racing on a rough course - and situates the Troy as more of a trail bike for the everyday mountain biker who's rides are both long and technically challenging.

Devinci Troy Carbon Details

• Intended use: trail/all-mountain
• Rear wheel travel: 140mm/5.5''
• Wheel size: 650B
• Carbon fiber front triangle, seat stays
• Aluminum chain stays
• ISCG 05 chain guide tabs
• 12 x 142mm Maxle
• Internally routed cables
• Frame weight: 6.07lb (claimed, w/ shock,)
• Carbon frame only MSRP: $2399 USD
• Aluminum frame only MSRP: $1899 USD
• Troy SL (pictured) MSRP: $6499 USD


Devinci Troy


Frame Details

The aluminum and carbon fiber Troy frames may share similar lines to the more aggressive Dixon platform, but the Troy is a completely new design from the ground up. The similarities in their appearance shouldn't come as a surprise, though, as the Troy employs the same Split Pivot suspension layout that is used on the rest of Devinic's performance full-suspension lineup, although the pivot locations have been altered to better suit the bike's slightly shorter 140mm of travel. This is also the first carbon mountain bike frame from Devinci that makes use of internal cable routing, with the lines entering via ports located just behind the head tube and exiting the down tube near the BB92 bottom, and internal sleeves that make changing a cable a cinch. There is also built-in routing for an internally routed dropper post line, with the the top three carbon models coming complete from Devinci with a Reverb Stealth. A set of ISCG 05 chain guide tabs allows riders to mount a single or dual-ring guide if required.

Just like the carbon Dixon, Atlas, and Wilson, the Troy's front triangle is molded as a single monocoque piece, meaning that there is no tube bonding required during the manufacturing process. The Troy also employs a carbon fiber seat stay assembly and an aluminum rocker link, complete with angle adjusting chips that can be flipped to tweak the head angle by half of a degree (67.6 to 68.1) and the bottom bracket by six millimeters (333 to 339mm). The finished product weighs in at 6.07lb (claimed) with a FOX Float CTD shock.


Devinci Troy

Split Pivot Suspension

Having been in use for a few years now, the Split Pivot suspension design used on the Troy has proven to be both reliable and offer active suspension that can still be pedalled well. The key to the system is its concentric pivot that rotates directly in line with the rear axle, allowing the bike to remain relatively active under braking while also allowing the main pivot to be positioned with acceleration in mind instead of also having an effect on braking forces.


Pricing

Devinci will offer four complete bikes, with the Troy Carbon SL shown here going for $6499 USD. The $6599 USD Carbon RR sports a 150mm travel fork (the SL uses a 140mm FOX Float 34) and both a shorter stem and wide bar, while the lowest priced Troy Carbon, the RC, carries an MSRP of $4799 USD. All three of those carbon models are certainly not inexpensive machines, but the aluminum Troy XP goes for a very reasonable $2999 USD. Want to build up your own Troy? You can start with either the $2399 USD Troy Carbon frame or the $1899 USD aluminum Troy frame. Expect all of the Troy models to be available by this coming September.

www.devinci.com
Must Read This Week

156 Comments

  • + 51
 It looks good and its a 650b. The perfect all purpose bike.
  • + 17
 And I really like the weaved carbon look, its kind of old school compared to my Nomad C. Overall, good looking bike.
  • - 27
 I'd rather have that BMC.
  • + 9
 nice to see another trail bike on here
  • + 26
 I can't understand whether this is sarcasm or not...
  • + 2
 And at only $2999 one of the least expensive DW designs in this category. Shame its only 140mm rear though.
  • + 7
 ja... only 140mm. its not that more is better except that I'm not a pro and I can't ride so smooth, therefor I need some "headroom" for mistakes... aka more travel. 160-170... I make a lot of mistakes :-)
  • + 5
 I'm starting to feel 650B trail bike fatigue. Nothing against this Devinci, i just can't get excited about it anymore. Oh look.... there's another one
  • + 4
 How much do good looks come in to play when choosing a bike over anything else? I for one may choose the bike with lesser performance just because it looks better (to some degree). This bike looks good.
  • + 6
 I've never purchased a bike based on the way it looks, nor will I ever. I'm riding around with a freakin helmet that makes me look like a goof, doing something that most people think only kids do...riding a bike, wearing something akin to a diaper, with a bunch of dudes who look just as goofy as I do. Does riding a good looking bike matter at that point?
  • + 8
 We don't look good on our bikes? Whatever... look at this dude. He is clearly stylin. I wonder where he shops? www.blogcdn.com/www.urlesque.com/media/2008/11/bikerfox2.jpg
  • + 1
 I'm sure he'd look awesome if he was riding a good looking bike like an Enduro or this Devinci.
  • + 2
 If you believe 145mm is not enough, you've never riden a dixon. Try one and it will completely change your mind about smaller travel bikes. Unless your XC trails are more gnarly than the average dh course, it works just fine.
  • + 2
 Enduro racing? Have a look at the travel on Graves and Clementz's bikes.

Not saying that this won't be a great bike, I loved the Dixon, but I think Devinci should have gone for 10mm or so more as should Giant (Trance) to compete with the 150mm 29" and 160mm 26".
  • + 1
 another 650b... lets all jump on the safer and faster FEELING bandwagon... anyways nice bike and specs, though and I would like to see more of the inverted split pivot from the wilson for these bikes, it would make one low and mean trail machine !
  • + 1
 Thing is....forget that its 650b and look at the geo by itself. The Dixon rides amazing, is super stiff laterally, and if you go alloy its still made in NA. And its under 2k, and really not that heavy..6.5lbs or so. The new numbers on the Troy are perfect for me, the large now sits between the large and XL Dixon. Reach is roomy, chainstay didn't grow, bb height came down. On paper this thing should be fantastic, so give it a chance. Im not a 650b fan either, but the subtle changes in geo put this near the top of my list for next small bike.
[Reply]
  • + 15
 2014 trail bike review with a front derailleur? I thought they stopped making those!
  • + 2
 yeah! ...rip that thing off
  • + 10
 Some people ride trails where you have to climb in order to get down the mountain and like having some easy gears to climb. Buy the frame and build it yourself to your own specs
  • + 2
 Aha, I would like to see you on you 34 or whatever ring, after 1200 vertical meter of climbing, descend to the other side of mountain and then riding back 25 km to parkplace. Now with this sweet shadow plus shimano deralleurs 3 rings are more convenient than anytime before.
  • + 0
 I do know what you mean, 25km ride back would be awful without adequate chainring or cassette cogs.
Correct me if i'm wrong, spinning at 34/42 (srams XX1 cassette) seems like it would be pretty darn hard gearing, being so much higher than a 1:1 ratio. But again, correct me. because i haven't ever spun anything even close to 34/42
  • + 1
 34/42 is lower than 1:1. Just sayin.
[Reply]
  • + 11
 All the carbon in the world doesnt stop an old innertube being the best chainstay protector though!! ;-)
[Reply]
  • + 8
 Raceface narrow wide with a shimano zee clutch.

30t with 11/36 in the back.

Done deal.
  • - 3
 Yeah only if you're XC Marathon FIT and live someplace without any significant climbs.
  • + 2
 we have got lots of 2000m above mountains in the alps where I usually go and ride my all mountain bike with 1x9 drivetrain. 32 in the front and 11-34 in the back. enough for everywhere
  • - 1
 And would you describe yourself as a fit XC marathon class rider or an unfit weekend only trail bike rider ? What you choose to run on your personal bike is just that...personal. Manufacturers on the other hand are concerned with the vast majority of their customers, not individual mutants.
  • + 2
 Go mutants!
  • + 1
 I'm a weekend warrior only nothing more
  • + 1
 I still like front derailleurs for dumping gears in a hurry.
  • + 1
 RVD604.... You made me drool a little... And if someone can't ride a 1x10 pretty much anywhere then they should hit the gym and do some squats... Or maybe ride your bike uphill more?
  • + 2
 it me a while to get there! hard work and a passion for riding! and some days calling in sick to the office.
  • + 1
 believing you have to be super fit to ride a 30 ring with 11/36 gearing is just silly, i'm a slightly over weight 40yr old and can comfortably ride a 32 ring up just about anything actually thinking of getting a 34 when my 32 wears out.
  • + 1
 agreed its a pretty good setup and not too hard.
  • + 1
 @parkcityplush: when I started xc I could squat 265lbs and deadlift 315lbs @ 145lbs bw and I was extremely fond of my granny. Strength transfers well into dh but to my experience, it doesn't do much for xc. You get tired way too fast.
  • + 1
 ^^^^That comment makes no sense.. Look at the pics from the crank works XC.. Although you need endurance as well, strength translates directly to XC..and BTW squatting 265# is not impressive.. I could bench press 225# when I weighed 119# in 10th grade
  • + 2
 there is a difference between a bodybuilders leg muscles and the legs of someone like andre greipel ,greipels legs are massive but he has endurance to go with it, your average gym monkey wouldn't be able to push hard for more than a few seconds before blowing up and complaining about lactic acid etc.
  • + 2
 ^^^ my point exactly... You have to have both strength and endurance...
  • + 1
 Why the hell are you comparing bench press and squat numbers, especially in a bike discussion?Go to ANY gym and you'll easily find a bunch of out of shape douches who can press a bazillion. 265 is not impressive but it's largely over what 98%+ of people riding xc can squat. My point is that I spent a lot of time squatting and I would get passed on climbs by 100# girls who never set foot in a gym. Squatting is not the solution. also, any trainer will tell you that balancing strength and endurance in a training is a nightmare. I spent a lot of time in gyms and read a truckload of articles on the topic and I believe after you reached a certain base "gym fitness" level, you'll get a lot more gains by actually biking, especially in sports where technique/experience is largely involved.
  • + 1
 ^^LOL you got passed by 100# girls.... Should keep that one to yourself
  • + 1
 And your point is? Emily batty is 105# and she passes you, me and everyone else here all day every day.
  • + 2
 there is a 12 yr old girl that rides road with our club sometimes that would smoke 90% of the riders on this site, power to weight and aerobic fitness is the key. the size of the leg muscles is irrelevant, a low gear being spun at a high cadence produces just as much wattage as a big gear being pushed slowly.
[Reply]
  • + 6
 Nice bike! Hopefully the production bikes have a custom chain stay protector (similar to what Trek and Specialize use), instead of what looks like a zip tied tube.
  • + 22
 Being Canadian it's taped like a hockey stick.
  • - 2
 But its a bike, not a hockey stick. And not cheap, like hockey tape.
  • + 4
 ooo... hockey tape isn't a bad idea actually lol
  • + 2
 I use hockey tape as a chain stay protector! It's cheap and it comes in sick colors
[Reply]
  • + 5
 Why?!?!? Do they have a massive gap from 145mm bikes then straight to 210mm? Where are the 160-170mm bikes? Most enduro bikes start at 160mm dont they?
  • - 1
 Maybe Devinci develops smaller-travel bikes that can handle more like their big travel brethren. The USA is also predominantly flat, with exception to a full small areas, and if we look at the population distribution, more people (ie larger market) live on the more-flat east coast than the big mountain west coast.

That being said, I'm with you. I wanted a 170mm 650b with Split Pivot.
  • + 3
 I don't believe any offense was meant and none was taken, but please take a trip to the east coast and you will find our little Appalachian mountains are just as large as the west coast ones when seated on your bike. Back on topic, I was really hoping for a 650b version of the Dixon, or maybe something more burly. I'm looking for something lighter to replace my Range Killer B and love Devinci's stuff but looks like this won't be the bike.
  • + 0
 You have to think about bikes differently when you change wheel sizes. You need 20mm less travel, and 1-2deg less HTA for an equivalent ride with 650b compared to 26" wheels. In 26" terms this is a 160mm travel bike. You get the benefit of the feel of more suspension with less cost in pedaling compared to a traditional build.
  • + 1
 ErikRC10, I live in the Appalachians (Pennsylvania), and aside from areas of New England and North Carolina, the majority of riders do not have access to big mountains like they do out west.

While I'm directing my comment to you, do you think the Range climbs/pedals well enough to justify spending the extra money for a carbon frame? If we extrapolate the projected cost of the Sight Killer-B3 Carbon starting at $3600 against the Sight alloy at $2554, the current Range B3 being $2670 may make the Range Carbon around $3700. $3700 is a good chuck of change for a FSR design bike that as good as it is may not climb as well as a DW or Maestro. Would the light weight compensate for the slightly less efficient suspension design?
  • - 8
 Im gonna disagree @erikrc10, devinci is a BC company. i think your trying too hard to use logic, i don't thing they GAF about east coast vs west coast america
  • + 11
 @fiercepierce Devinci is from Quebec... East Coast Canadia...
  • + 2
 redhit - I was thinking the same thing. The Troy is very close to the Dixon I own now. (except my Dixon is Alum)
Right now the only reasons for me to update would be carbon and 650B wheels.
Not enough difference at this time.
My Aluminum Dixon is only 29.5 lbs right now.(not bad)
The 145mm travel I have now is very capable but I don't think I would want less.
If anything I wouldn't mind 10mm more at the back.

If Devinci now takes the Dixon and bumps the travel up to 155mm in the rear and adds 650B wheels.
Sold!
My Aluminum 26" Dixon would be in the PB buy and sell tomorrow.
  • + 1
 I guess you got me there. I do live in mountains of North Carolina, home of Pisgah Forest... Where we have some pretty gnarly stuff compared to a lot of places.

I actually have a Range 3 but the only thing left stock are the wheels and fork. Drivetrain is Zee and brakes are XT rear shock is a DB Air. As is it comes in at 33 1/2 lbs. I could knock quite a bit of weight off the bike with a different wheelset, fork, drivetrain etc but it's still quite portly. A friend's Sight setup up identical except for i9 wheels weighs in at 29 lbs.
I have other dislikes about the frame as well. The two main pivots continuously loosen themselves, I have to tighten them every other ride. Cable routing is not the best and the bike bobs like crazy when standing. So I'm thinking about going to something not quite so burly but I don't want to drop down to 140mm.
I do plan on getting a set of i9s for it once I have my Canfield Nimble 9 built up and hopefully that will help.

So I'm not sure if I answered your question or not... My next frame will most likely be carbon, yes, though probably not a Norco.
  • + 1
 Another thing to point out, there are plenty of 160mm-170mm 650b bikes out there as well. So its not at 145mm because of the wheel size, I think.
  • + 1
 Back in 2011 when I was about to buy my dixon and I wasn't sure 145mm would be enough, it was my main sticking point to be honest. It was a blind guess as I never really rode anything below 200mm before and I couldn't demo anything. I'm glad I went for the dixon as all the trails around here are pedally and I would have hated to pedal a 160mm around.

This year I took my dixon to highland mtb park to see how much it could handle (145mm isnt too inspiring when you own a 200mm) and it took the 30 feet jumps, the technical slick rocks, the rock gardens, the chunder, the 12 feet drops, the hucks to flat and so on like a boss. I'm not a pro but I like to believe I'm somewhat above average when it comes to faster/technical riding (don't we all...) and I couldn't believe how well it rode and how it handled everything. My friends were as surprised as I was and they nicknamed it "the little bike that could".

Yeah, I bottom it out here and there but I never felt the bike was limiting me in any way. Sometimes I wish I was better to really push it to the brink of it's capabilities. I love that little bike so much. For my riding style and for the trails I ride, I find it's the perfect compromise. A "xc" bike that handles like a DH sled when pointed down. Maybe if I lived in the alps or something I would change my mind but around here I wouldn't ride anything bigger.
  • + 1
 I think the Wilson looks fantastic, but the other bikes in the range don't look that cool to me. They look very well made, and I love the name Troy, but I wouldn't buy one because of the looks. I would like to see Devinci make a mini Wilson, long and slack with 160-180mm travel. My suggestions for names are Brad, Kurt, Trent and Stevo. To me, the Wilson is the single most stylish bike available today, and I know I am not the only person thinks that is as important as function.
  • + 1
 I dont think they would go back to an FSR 4bar, that design is over for them. All they really need to do is add .25-.50 inches on the shock stroke of the Dixon, and adjust the seat stay/rocker link to accommodate the travel. Dave Weagle needs to get Devinci on that new design. Dixon is a great looking bike, I like the look of the smaller seat tube/top tube support of the RX model. Maybe slightly lower stand over height overall. The Transition Bottlerocket and the Specialized P Slope has a great top tube look. That would be a sweet Dixon freeride range of bikes. If it can handle short shuttle runs, enduro and still climb, it would be a great bike.
[Reply]
  • + 5
 thanks Devinci for making resonably priced carbon frame. My next bike should be carbon Dixon, but now it's gonna be this beauty. Any frame for free? Smile
  • - 2
 Urcite nejakej bude zadarmo, neboj
  • + 1
 oh well, make it twice, please. Smile
[Reply]
  • + 4
 Looks good to me! I got a used carbon Rocky Altitude last year, and I can really say carbon is the way of the future. I'm definitely never going back (at least for trail/xc riding)
  • + 2
 ehhh... why does that happen to me? No drugs work on me as everyone else say they do. I get depressed when smoking weed, then I just bough a Carbon Blur Trc and I really can't understand what the fuzz is all about. It is lighter to strength but that comes at a huge price, making any reasonable person wonder, if it's worth it - period.
  • + 4
 I'm hoping that Carbon is the way after purchasing a Mojo HD. I have snapped two aluminium frames now. So far, so good!
  • + 4
 Mojo HD is the way, actually.
  • + 4
 LOL at the children neg-propping wakis comment. He speaks sense, if your not already faster, Carbon ain't gonna turn you into Clementz. All good,and you pay yo money and take your choice but value for $ Carbon is not.
That said, nice lookin bike although I'll keep mine thanks.
  • + 1
 Waki, I have been convinced that in five years Aluminium will be on the way out as a bicycle frame material. In ten years, Carbon will be the norm and the prices will come down to what the market will sustain, which I believe to be about what ally bikes cost now. Do they work better? Shit, I don't know, but they do look better, and that's more than half the battle.

Mini Wilson, do it Devinci. And... go.
  • + 1
 Carbon is already the norm for Ibis and are priced lower then some alloy frames kits.
  • + 1
 We talked about it many times and I keep my mind unchanged that carbon will never be cheaper than alu. At the very moment alu frames are extremely overpriced, and yes when carbon will get cheaper, so will alu frames. For instance Giants asking prices for their alu frames damn right ridiculous. After watching DortTV interview with the guy from Yeti, I have absolutely no doubts that carbon will never get cheaper than alu. But well Im no avcountant of a major companies so I just speculate, because no one has ever give ne excell sheet with production prices.
  • + 1
 Well I know that the Ibis frame is cheaper than the alloy Norco Range and Sight kill b frame kits. I was really looking forward to the Sight being my introduction to 650b wheels, but $2700 price tag for a alloy AM frame is ridiculous. Add that almost every manufacture gives the low end spec the sh!tt!est paint job imaginable your forced to marry the ugly sister.
  • + 1
 In 1991, pretty much all bikes were steel. When the first production aluminium bikes came out, we were told they would eventually be cheaper to buy than Chromoly because the cost of the raw material and processing is cheaper. They were only more expensive at fist because they were new, light, fat and people wanted a piece of the hype. Now the big players don't make steel frames because the accountants won't let them. The same will happen with carbon. I'm not saying the prices will go below ally, I'm saying that ally will disappear and carbon will take its place at the price the customers are willing to pay, which at the moment is the price of ally bikes. Does that make sense? If it doesn't happen, I will be the first to admit I was wrong.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 As someone who is tall (6' 5"/196 cm), I could still ride a 140 or 150mm 29er so this bike wouldn't be for me. This would be a great bike for a person who is a normal height. Looks pretty stellar too!
  • + 3
 Even before reading the article I was coming to comment that finally they're making a proper XL size frame! I'm 194cm and could imagine myself riding with the XL size, but of course I'm now stuck with 26" 62cm ETT and haven't tried XL sized long travel 29er.
  • + 30
 Jeez, 6.5"!
Don't they give you guys free bikes in the circus anyway?
  • + 14
 Free bike with too small geometry is still a too small bike Wink and besides, they give us only unicycles Frown
  • + 6
 Frown

The nice hat must make up for something though at least.
  • + 6
 The hat is small also and it makes me sad Frown
  • + 3
 You will need to cry yourself to sleep on your enormous pillow.
  • + 2
 Still a bit small for a 6'5" dude unless you have long legs. Manufacturer's recommended sizing is usually pretty optimistic but Devinci seemed to nail it with this.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 Its about time devinci got into the 650b game, I work at a bike shop that carries devinci and almost twice a week we would get customers in that were wondering if they had a 650b model yet. Now I can finally tell them yes!
[Reply]
  • + 3
 Yep this may be my next trail bike looks sweet and backed up with Devinci lifetime frame warranty
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Nice looking bike! I'm glad to see Devinci is releasing a 650b rig but please stop with the odd ball names. Devinci must have the same marketing crew as Santa Cruz. Hey fellas I'm going out for a Solo ride with Troy! LOL.
[Reply]
  • + 3
 worst bike name ever.....ever
demo is the 2nd worst. when will they make the full version???
  • + 2
 Troy fell... devincis need a history lesson.
  • + 2
 But Troy had a babe for a leader...
  • + 1
 I agree that the name Troy sucks. Especially when they had a theme going with their FS bikes, Wilson, Dixon; the 'son' sound at the end.

could have been the Larson, Gibson, Hudson, Dawson etc. But no, we got Troy.

Damn it Devinci, why didn't you let us decide like so many other bike companies do? then i'd have a Larson.
  • + 1
 or Nixon--- Devinci Nixon that sounds good or Devinci Ripson
  • + 1
 -on, at the end = 650b, like Bronson,
  • + 2
 @Mate1998, i like Nixon too but manitou probably wouldn't let them have it
  • + 1
 I like to think my "demo" is the short name for demolition haha.

Wilson and dixon are similar sounding but the other bikes in the MTB range are the Atlas and the Dexter so the "on" theme was never really a theme...
[Reply]
  • + 2
 Umm, that thing looks pretty much perfect...

Are the geo numbers with a 140mm fork?
[Reply]
  • + 3
 Damn. Choosing a new bike just got even tougher....
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Looking good! Finally some internal cable routing and stealth dropper routing too.....just wish they would have done it last year on my carbon Dixon.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 So, its 6 pounds without the shock? The Trek Session carbon is 7 pounds with a steel coil. Does this mean the frames weight about the same?
  • + 1
 From the article:

"• Frame weight: 6.07lb (claimed, w/ shock,)"
"The finished product weighs in at 6.07lb (claimed) with a FOX Float CTD shock."
  • + 1
 Ah, with shock. Misread it. Still, what is it, a pound difference between a coil and air vivid? Still, there would be more of a weight difference comparing a piggyback dh air to an all-mountain one. The Session is 7.2 pounds, so the davinci frame weighs pretty close to what the Session 9.9 does
  • + 1
 True but this is a 650b so the frame is probably a bit bigger than the usual 26". Dont forget that the dixon is a very burly XC/am bike for it's travel so the troy was probably built with that same line of thinking. I find the 140-160mm range in general is becoming closer and closer in capabilities to DH sleds so the weight will take a hit for sure. Don't let the travel fool you, I find they're much more like mini dh sleds than heavier xc bikes.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 Too many good bikes coming out, too quickly! Really, that's not a bad problem if you are looking for a new bike.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 @Sladevallydh - keep posting. I am sure PB and the rest of the bike industry will eventual come around to your way of thinking. Wink
[Reply]
  • + 2
 Seems heavy for 140 carbon frame...?
I'd be hardpressed to buy a new complete bike w/o a new pike on it tho.
  • + 0
 It is heavy and made out of low grade carbon hence the large weave patches. My Remedy would rip Troy a new one at only 28lbs with a dropper post and 650b wheels
[Reply]
  • + 3
 Aaaaaaand there go all my savings.
[Reply]
  • + 0
 I never liked the Dixon but the Troy looks superb. I want to get a trail bike but so many of the 2014 bikes look so amazing it's going to be so hard to choose.
  • - 2
 stumpy s-works 2014 best am rig
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I got a Wilson and I really like the prdocuts Devinci offers. But I'm into DH but this thing looks pretty cool.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 If they specced it like Steve's Air DH rig, I'd be all over it. That thing looks ill.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 Love the look, love the price, wish it had 160mm travel rear.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 Looks like a Trek...Remedy.
  • + 1
 aye aye.. the old ones without the floating shock aswell..
[Reply]
  • + 3
 looks like a Norco...
[Reply]
  • + 1
 lovely worth having as short trips of 160-165 would be perfect
[Reply]
  • + 1
 is the geo chart with a 150mm fork or 140mm?
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I think it looks better than the Dixon!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 are those carbon 650b havens i spy?
[Reply]
  • + 1
 badass looking rig, would definitely shred
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I love my Wilson and can't wait to build one of these up
[Reply]
  • + 1
 in the quest for carbon-porn they didn't overlook the spacers. gorgeous.
  • + 1
 However they did overlook the chainstays...
[Reply]
  • - 1
 gorgeous looking bike but I have to admit I am a snob now that I ride VPP and have a hard time even considering anything else.
  • + 0
 DW Link - MMmmmmmm
  • + 2
 its not a DW link
  • + 0
 How observant of you!
  • + 1
 Keep with it on that VPP....Full Floater is where it's at.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 i think i may just buy a used similar frame...
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Looks like a beauty, but I'll stick with my Altitude 770.
[Reply]
  • + 0
 Looks very nice, liking the split pivot incorporation on it Wink
[Reply]
  • + 1
 A.K.A smith's air DH rig
[Reply]
  • + 0
 My name is Troy! My nomad is now up for sale Smile
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Air DH. I think yes
  • + 1
 I think I saw on Stevie's Instagram that he will be racing this tomorrow. Could've misinterpreted it though.
[Reply]
  • + 0
 if the top tube lengths are virtual, then they are too long. imho.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 They all look the same!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 drop dead gorgeous!
[Reply]
  • + 0
 650 marketing for me blablabla......26 forever$$$$$$$$$$$$$
[Reply]
Below threshold threads are hidden

Post a Comment



Copyright © 2000 - 2014. Pinkbike.com. All rights reserved.
dv15 0.080704
Mobile Version of Website