Easton Haven Carbon wheels Reviewed

Jun 9, 2011 at 0:07
Jun 9, 2011
by Mike Levy  
 
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What is it: The Easton Haven Carbons are a no holds barred attempt to create the ultimate all-mountain wheelset. They are built using a 375 gram, tubeless carbon fiber rim, 24 Sapim spokes per wheel and eye catching hubs that spin on ceramic, sealed bearings. Total weight for both front and rear wheels adds up to an impressive 1450 grams - lighter than many pure cross-country racing wheelsets. With an eye popping suggested retail price of $2300 USD, Easton knows that these premium wheels will not be for everyone, but those who do decide to spend the money will have piece of mind knowing that they come with a 2 year, no questions asked warranty. You'll be looked after if the worst does happen, no matter if that's a jump gone horribly wrong or backing over your wheels with your car.


Easton's 1450 gram Haven Carbon wheelset has been designed to be put through the ringer on all-mountain and trail bikes by aggressive riders.<br><br><span style='font-size:17px'>Easton Haven Carbon details:</span><br><br>- Intended use: All-mountain/trail<br>- Uses 375 gram, fully sealed, UST, carbon rims<br>- 24 Sapim straight pull, double butted spokes, 3x front/rear (<i>all the same length</i>)<br>- Axle options to fit QR, 15mm and 20mm forks, QR and either 135 or 142mm thru-axles in the rear<br>- 21mm internal rim width, 26mm external width<br>- 36 point gear ring/3 pawl hub for 12 degrees of freehub engagement<br>- 1450 gram wheelset weight<br>- No questions asked 2 year warranty that covers everything, including rider error<br>- Haven Carbon 29'er wheelset available as well<br>- MSRP $2300 USD
Easton's 1450 gram Haven Carbon wheelset has been designed to be put through the ringer on all-mountain and trail bikes by aggressive riders.

Easton Haven Carbon details:

- Intended use: All-mountain/trail
- Uses 375 gram, fully sealed, UST, carbon rims
- 24 Sapim straight pull, double butted spokes, 3x front/rear (all the same length)
- Axle options to fit QR, 15mm and 20mm forks, QR and either 135 or 142mm thru-axles in the rear
- 21mm internal rim width, 26mm external width
- 36 point gear ring/3 pawl hub for 12 degrees of freehub engagement
- 1450 gram wheelset weight
- No questions asked 2 year warranty that covers everything, including rider error
- Haven Carbon 29'er wheelset available as well
- MSRP $2300 USD


The details: While the exquisitely machined hubs are certainly striking, the main talking point with these wheels is undoubtedly the 375 gram carbon fiber rims. In order to create a carbon rim capable of meeting their ambitious impact strength tests Easton brought Sayeed Syed on board, an engineer with extensive experience working with composites for military applications. The outcome is a high modulus polyethelyne (HMPE) composite material, held together by an exclusive resin, that Easton says is far better suited to the abuse rims go through than a more standard carbon layup. The rims also have a matte gray finish to them, forgoing the use of a purely cosmetic carbon weave finish that would only add weight. Just like the aluminum Haven's, the carbon version has a fully sealed rim bed that doesn't require a rim strip when used with standard tubes or tubeless setups. Easton accomplishes this by using inserts at the rim that the nipples thread to. The aluminum nipples have threads on the outside that thread into the insert at the rim, and on the inside that the spokes thread into. The threads on the outside of the nipple are left hand thread, while the spoke threads are right hand thread, allowing the carbon Havens to be trued using standard tools and techniques. The rim is also UST compatible for quick and secure bead seating, even at low pressures, and they come complete with UST valve stems to make setup easy.

At the center of the 24 straight pull Sapim spokes you'll find a set of impressive looking hubs, complete with ceramic, sealed bearings as stock from Easton. The drive side hub uses a three pawl aluminum freehub body that, while not quite having the near instant engagement of some of the competition, seems to freewheel smoother - a selling point for many riders. The front hub can be had in two flavors: one that fits both 9mm QR and 15mm thru-axles, and another designed specifically for 20mm axles, while the rear can be converted to fit standard 135 mm QR, as well as 135 mm and 142 mm thru-axles. You should have no worries when upgrading your frame or fork down the road because the Carbon Havens will bolt right up. The hubs fit standard 6 bolt discs - there is no Center Lock option.


The fully sealed, UST rim is manufactured using an exclusive carbon and resin mix that Easton says has incredible impact strength.
The fully sealed, UST rim is manufactured using an exclusive carbon and resin mix that Easton says has incredible impact strength.


Performance: What would you expect from a $2300 USD wheelset? Nothing but the best as far as performance and reliability are concerned, naturally. And the Haven Carbons come close to that in both categories. The wheels are staggeringly light out of the box and in your hands, almost unbelievably so (the front wheel alone weighs less than many all-mountain tires), but it's on the trail that that lack of rotating heft really comes into play. Having spent plenty of time on many all-mountain wheelsets in the 1600 gram range I wasn't expecting to be blown away by the roughly half pound weight difference between those and my new carbon rimed wonder wheels, but the contrast between them was immediately noticeable. The result of the wheel's light weight is a bike that not only accelerates fast, but one that is also a lot more lively on the trail. This was especially evident at slow speeds where you can't use the bike's momentum to help you, whether it was getting through a tricky, technical section of trail or just playing on some rollers, the Haven Carbons actually made the bike easier to ride.

Sure, the Haven Carbons are staggering light given their all-mountain intentions, but building up a lightweight wheelset isn't actually that hard - the trick is to add stiffness and reliability into the equation as well. The 24 spoke per wheel Haven Carbons are not just stiff, but actually manage to make my heavier, aluminum rimmed wheelset feel as if they were quite low on spoke tension. I tend to ride my 6" travel bike as if it had much slacker angles and more suspension, pushing it harder than it was really intended for on many occasions, but the Havens were more than up to the task. Despite plenty of sideways action and probably more abuse than Easton intended them to be put through, the Haven Carbons are still as perfectly true as the day that I took them out of their box. I tested a number of different tires during my time on the Carbon Havens, using some with low enough air pressure that hard rim strikes were routine, and the carbon rims proved to be far more rugged than any other aluminum option that I've put time on. I am confident in saying that any aluminum rim that I would have had mounted during this time would now be sporting multiple dents and dings, but the carbon rims used on the Haven wheelset have come through unscathed. The wheels have also held their spoke tension throughout it all. While I knew that the Haven's carbon rims were robust - this was evident by Easton's confidence in them - I am still very impressed with how they have shrugged off any and all abuse.


The stunning hubs rotate on ceramic bearings and can be converted to fit virtually every axle standard out there.
The stunning hubs rotate on ceramic bearings and can be converted to fit virtually every axle standard out there.


Unfortunately, I did run into a reliability issue with the Haven Carbons far earlier than I had expected. After just a dozen rides on them I discovered that the rear wheel's bearings had become slightly loose and required a small amount of tension to be added via the threaded preload collar - not ideal, but at least it is an easy fix. Or so I thought. After adding only the slightest amount of preload, just enough to remove the play and no more, the ceramic bearings quickly became notchy, slow rolling and needed to be replaced. Easton suggested that there is a good chance that I unknowingly rode the rear wheel with the bearings slightly loose, fatally damaging them in short order, after which removing the bearing play only made them feel terrible. Fair enough, but I would hope that the wheels would have gone much, much longer before needing any sort of bearing adjustments. To make matters worse, my near new bearings that Easton replaced for me have just now needed to nipped up again, even though it's only been about two months. Our aluminum Haven wheels, which use the same rear hub, but with non-ceramic bearings, have also required bearing preload adjustment far too soon. I would be disappointed even if these were a $500 wheelset, but with an MSRP of $2300 USD, I, along with most consumers, would surely expect to have zero issues.


Pinkbike's take: When talking about all-out performance the Haven Carbons have no peers. Not only are they lighter than many cross-country racing wheelsets, they are also stiffer than other wheels that weigh a full pound more. While I was let down by bearing issues in the rear hub, there is no denying that the Haven Carbons brought an element of performance to my bike that wouldn't be possible with a more standard aluminum wheelset. The bike simply rode better: it climbed and accelerated faster, was more playful on the trail and also felt quite a bit more rigid thanks to the wheel's impressive stiffness. Are they worth the $2300 USD asking cost? That's a big price to swallow, especially considering that that amount of money can buy a very decent bike these days, but next to upgrading to quality suspension on the front and rear of your bike, these wheels are possibly the biggest game changer that you can purchase. Keep in mind that price is relative - anyone unfamiliar with mountain biking would gasp at the thought of spending even a few hundred dollars on a set of wheels. No, you don't need the Haven Carbons to go fast on the trail, but they sure do make it more fun.

Check out the Easton website to see their entire lineup.


What do you make of Easton's carbon rimmed wonder wheels? Let's hear what you think - put those thoughts down below!
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136 Comments

  • + 56
 Did anyone else notice the typo ?
They added an extra 0 by mistake and said $2300 USD wheelset, not $230.

Actually...hang on...... NO !!... FOR REAL !?!?!?
  • + 3
 who needs to afford it? each rim weighs about 150g under steelies? is it really worth it?
  • + 43
 There are plenty of people who can afford these. However, none of them are on Pinkbike Razz
  • - 1
 what the hells the point spending that much on a wheel set, even if it is to do with weight reduction...its just outragously priced!!
  • + 53
 As I said, there are plenty of people who can afford it and are willing to pay for it. The benefit to us who are not rich is that these high-end technologies (funded by the deep pockets of the technogeeks who need the lightest and the latest) will eventually trickle down to more affordable products in the future. Look at CF road bikes now - affordable. 10 years ago? Not so much. Look at 2011 XTR - pretty expensive. Yet, the same technologies (Ice-tec, 10-speed etc) is trickling down to SLX and even Deore for 2012. Innovation is good. It benefits everyone, not just the rich. The poor just have to wait a little longer, that's all.
  • + 1
 thats good point actually
  • + 39
 My position hasn't changed. I'd rather spend $300 on a decent wheel set and take the rest to Vegas for hookers and cocaine. Pimp
  • + 5
 @aoneal - While I can certainly understand the hookers and blow reference, it is all about priorities. There are plenty of people who would be astonished to discover how much you or I have spent on our bikes, and in many countries people simply couldn't fathom the amount that we've paid for our vehicles. Sort of like how I don't understand why people buy big expensive TVs or fancy watches, but would seriously consider buying these wheels. Keep in mind that the $2300 price is the suggested retail... there is a good chance that a local shop would sell them for less than that =)
  • + 1
 Uber pricy, but they are hand built and tensioned by dudes with special headphones on to get the perfect balance of tension and true-ness. Still more than I will ever spend for wheels, but not more than some Super D pros will go for.
  • + 2
 @ mikelevy there has go to be a formula to figure out how bike crazy your are.
How about a ratio of total spent on bikes in the last five years to annual income.
I got 1:5
  • + 0
 this year i've spent just over 10,000 GBP on bikes, summum team pro, yeti 303 and now on legend , Tbh 1400 odd isn't bad... look on CRC wheels, there some 2000 GBP ones!
  • + 4
 yes is great that the technology will trickle down to lower product classes but so does the expectation that people will pay increasingly more on a year by year bases
  • + 1
 @ smike, good point well raised. some rich kid buys them now, i get them 2nd hand when something else shiny hits the market. dont take the piss out of rich kids, we need them!
  • + 1
 That's a fairly average price for a corbon mtb wheelset though...
  • + 1
 My hub failed on the 1 week test ride. I was going to write a review for my company but thought I should try another pair before throwing Easton under the bus. The other rear wheel suck worse then the first, I would NEVER spent that much on a wheel set, let a lone one that fails on some light up hill. The rim is fu**ing amazing tons of off center landings didn't even mess the spoke tension up. Review: Hub is worthless, rim wow, price highway robbery (even if you proform them or wholesale).
[Reply]
  • + 21
 I guess we needed a review of a product that none of us could afford to offset the budget dh bike which was reviewed yesterday haha
  • + 1
 These wheels are pricey, no doubt about that! You'll see more budget minded components tested (like the Saracen DH bike) in the future as well though.
[Reply]
  • + 9
 It's not that much money considering the game changer factor these wheels bring, and having in mind the fact that some people spend more on drivetrain, brakes and controls, which above certain level, bring nearly no gains for actual ride.
  • + 9
 "Not that much money" Seriously??
  • + 6
 I just meant: if you have 2500 to spend on upgrading your bike: then do it with such wheels, rather than Sram XX drivetrain, Ti pedals, Ti bolt set, CF brakes, seatpost bars or some stupid ~100g stem.

People "invest" thousands in stuff like Tune or CK hubs, Edge/Enve components, buy 400$ pedals, 100g lighter than ones for 50$
  • + 4
 Very good point. Many people spend on stuff that really doesn't drastically change biking. Wheel rotational mass and stiffness does.
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns nailed it. If my bike had X7 or X9 components and I had some money to spend to upgrade it, it would make WAY more sense to drop that cash on these wheels than a new grouppo. You would literally be buying speed.. which isn't so much the case with a new drivetrain.
  • + 2
 The thing is that it's a lot easier for someone to spend over $2000 on drivetrain by doing it a little bit at a time. $2500 is a lot to spend all in one go. Most drivetrain upgrades don't cost $2500 all in one go. A couple hundred here, a couple hundred there...eventually you end up with a very high end drivetrain. Even at employee purchase prices, I don't think I could justify spending that much money on a wheelset all at one time.
[Reply]
  • + 4
 Are you kidding me, if I spend $2,300 on a wheelset the bearings better last more than a dozen rides. And it happend to the author twice - non race riders - think about where you are when this wheel set fails because of Eastons lack of RD into thier hubs! They spent all their time on the rims and then upgraded a poorly designed hub with ceramic bearning just to impress everyone. Dang, I've had my CK hubs for over six years and never an issue - still run smooth and look like new. If I was a pro racer - well then I need these Easton Carbon rims for each race and since I'm a pro get them for free. Light weight wins races but quality allows the average biker to end the day on the bike not carrying it off the mtn. I guess all you smucks that purchase them for $2,300 can keep Easton suppling the pros with a new set of rims. I'm beginning to think these are disposible just like F1 race engines. Let the comments start.
[Reply]
  • + 3
 I have been running these for a few months and they have completely changed the feel of my bike. I have done multiple Shore laps and ridden them hard. Multiple crashes, hard landings and general abuse have done nothing to them. I am 200lb + geared up. As for the price, shop around. I picked mine up with a full build kit for jusy over suggested retail.
[Reply]
  • + 3
 Easton says Nicolas Vouilloz is using this as his downhill wheel set. Of course he also uses Dura Ace cranks. If we all had enough skill we could run road bike wheels. If we had enough mechanical skills we could run this wheel set with out ruining the bearings. Idiot proof and bomb proof rarely comes with light weight.
  • + 1
 I don't think that it's mechanical skill that played a part in the bearing issue, but rather a finicky design that is hard on bearings.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 I'm sorry, but I could never bring myself to spend this much money on a wheelset, nor on a drivetrain group. There are so many great aluminum wheels out right now which cost a hell of a lot less and perform like champs. Yes, I know that continued production of carbon wheels will lead to better and cheaper carbon wheels, but at this current price tag its just too much to spend for most riders. I'm sure Easton konws this well and is obviously catering to riders with deep pockets or ones as was said above, who have different priorities than other riders. I'm not being critical of Easton, they are simply making a product that is meant at least at this stage of carbon wheel development for a different set of riders. Its great that there is all this new technology and Easton should keep at it. For me and probably most riders, running a good old set of aluminum wheels is just fine.
[Reply]
  • + 4
 I'd love to have these on my bike if the internal width could be more of a dh width Tires tend to fold a bit a that width. Another 5 mm in width at least would be great.
  • + 1
 There are whisperings of a carbon DH wheelset in the works, with them being spotted on some WC rider's bikes.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 I've been riding these wheels for about a month now. No problems at all. I took them through a rock garden a couple of days ago with about 28psi (I'm 195lbs) and banged them around pretty good. Cringing at some of the impacts. They hung tough! Extremely smooth rolling hubs. Also noticed that they are quieter than aluminum, more of a knocking sound than pinging when rolling through debris. Lots of looks and questions on the trail. So far I couldn't be happier with them.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 I have a set of the standard aluminum Haven's and really like them. My only complaint/disappointment with them is that the front hub is not convertable between 15mm and 20mm. The same is true of the Carbons. Their marketing BS says that they were more concerned with optimizing the hub for each axle standard separately, rather than having the ability to switch back and forth. Considering that these wheelsets are aimed squarely at the trail/am category it should have a convertable front hub as well as rear. My two cents. Otherwise I love the Haven and Haven Carbon, as well as the EC90 wheelset.
  • + 2
 i bought stan's flow wheelset 4 $ 500.00, 1715 grams, 15 and 20 convertible, tubeless and they will take a 2.7 tire, 3 months everyday, not one problem! super happy with them!!! 25/28 psi f/r 220 lbs rider rocks roots stray cats!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 bit off track but..., could anyone tell me why carbon is used for lids? I was under the impression that carbon was known for its poor(er) abilty to handle compression and/or sharp impacts, both of which tend to happen to lids? doesnt make sense to me?

cheers
  • + 1
 no matter what a helmet's made of, its recommended to chuck it after one big crash anyway. whether its carbon or not doesn't make much of a difference other than weight because its only designed to withstand that first big hit
  • + 1
 It's the eps liner that saves your head, not the carbon. And not all carbon is as delicate as people think it is (especially on these forums).
[Reply]
  • + 2
 I don't like carbon-fibre clubs :p
  • + 4
 @deathchr - I don't think post photos of a smashed carbon rim (that was/is in prototype form FYI) is really relevant. First, we have no idea of the smashed rim's history. Just because it failed on that rock at Fort Bill doesn't mean that that is really the root cause of the failure. And second, aluminum rims implode all the time, and while the failure may look somewhat different (they usually don't smash into many pieces), they are often instantly un-rideable and cause a crash if the rider wasn't already going down. Parts fail, carbon or not, and many times it is catastrophic.

This would be similar to you posting a photo of a cut tire on a review of the same model...
  • + 1
 Having been at that point on the track for a few years I have never seen an aluminium rim fail in the manner that the carbon rim failed. Now I think about it,I have not seen an aluminium rim fail in that rock section.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I wonder if u could run one of these in the front for dirt jump right now i have atomlab super lights laced to profile hubs and they are awsome ive taken a lot of hard cases to im 185 pounds and they are great i wonder if u can just get the front wheel alone
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I bought em... and I love em! Unfortunately tho, I too am facing the same rear hub issue. It seems impossible to get them tight enough to stop the movement without practically locking up the hub! Taken to my LBS and they told me that its what I can expect from a high quality wheelset, and that the small amount of play is not causing any permanent damage to the hubs. So.... I just keep an eye on it and give it a little tweak every now again again.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I bought these wheels on sale for 1,000 a set. New with warranty. Now the wheels they replaced were Chris King/819. I love those wheels, but thought I'd go for something lighter and mor carbon-y. I don't have TONS of extra money just laying around, but I do love riding, wrenching, thinking about riding, and sometimes I just sit and look at my bike. For me these are worth every penny. I don't race or strava, I ride to have fun. I like to go fast, but going faster isn't always necessarily more fun (I learned this riding a 29er). I like my 5" 26er trailbike, and these wheels just make it more fun to ride. Bottom line.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 OMFG!! pro downhillers break a wheel in a rock garden at 30mph and 24psi!!!!

You can find thousands of pics of broken DH aluminum wheels. How many Stan's XC wheels could make a single DH run without blowing up? It seems for the weight carbon is WAY stronger. There is simply no comparison. Maybe we should go back to steel rims or the really old school wooden rims LOL!.

I have a set of non branded carbon rims on my Mojo SL and they are the stiffest, lightest, strongest wheels I have. They take way more abuse than my previous aluminum AM rims which were 150-200g heavier each. They take abuse like a true DH rim, but at almost 1/2 the weight.

The MOST IMPORTANT performance component on a bicycle is the wheels. You would be far better off with a 1-2 pound heavier frame for under $1000.00 with these wheels than a $3000.00 frame with cheaper wheels. Smart spending rather than flashy spending.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I'm not about to go out and spend $2300 USD on rims, but does the year warranty (no questions asked) still apply if you use them from DH, seeing as they say they are intended for All-mountain use. I can't believe that a company could be giving away sets of rims to every person who breaks them. "I feel like getting some new rims. Oopps!.......... I backed over my back wheel in my car (not)!" Have they figured a way around this?
[Reply]
  • + 1
 i would love to see that wheel explode, maybe they will or, just a plain break. bottom line is, the day will came for us simple mortals to afford a cf wheelset. i think that cf wheels will have to prove in time on serious mountainbiking and that is why the warranty they offer.
would you ride those wheels on a bottlerocket?...i would be afraid on mine...
[Reply]
  • + 1
 "2 year, no questions asked warranty" - thanks again for the honest take.

Like your wheels, my aluminium Havens have notchy bearings in the front hub. Would that also be covered under warranty?

Should I order up a set or rear bearings just to anticipate the rear hub also frying?
  • + 1
 I wonder if you can get all the small pieces separately like the good hubs!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 why is everyone hating the price? $2300 is not outragous for a crazy strong/crazy light dh wheelset. they are like almost 2 pounds lighter than your average dh wheelset and the streangth of these is wayy up there. and if im not mistaken these come with a 2 year no questions asked warranty? i think that may say something about their strength and reliability. if you ask me 2300 is a dam good price..dont hate on them for their price just just you love them but cant afford em.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Does any one have any info. about EDGE carbon rims and how they compare to these?, I think that the syndicate DH crew have been running the carbon EDGE rims for some time if I'm not mistaken. I'd love to know how they compare as the price per rim is up there as well.
  • + 1
 You won't find any comparison since these are AM wheels. ENVE's are aswell, but they explode after a few runs by Steve Peat and Cedric Gracia. I don't think carbon rims are meant to be used in the DH specific world anyway.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I prefer my C Kings with many options axles, my spokes sapin custom cut for each side and depends the trail the dusters TLR or the Ex721 or the FR600. Then my beer and rims laced by myself nobody can touch my rims! For this you pay no more than $900
  • + 1
 Your wheels are also flexier and heavier than the Haven Carbons.
  • + 0
 for $1400 more you get only 180 gr lighter and .3% harder? I do not think that´s a good deal, and I do not think the easton rear hub will feel like a Chris king does, and every little scratch that you make on the super expensive ones will be a pain in the "wallet"! For me the carbon represents the era of disposable bike, and now available on wheels!
  • + 1
 Oh you did the math and it came out as 0.3% stiffer? I'm pretty positive that carbon is a lot stiffer than that compared to aluminum. I'm also almost positive that Kings on EX721s aren't 1630g. Hope Pro 2s on ZTR Flows with DT Supercomp triple butted spokes and aluminum nipples are 1800g, and those rims are already 120g lighter each than your EX721s.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 this will piss allot of people off but i am going to say it anyway

WHY ???
why would somebody really spend that much money just to save a few grams
(if your really that much of a weight weenie then maybe you should just be a road cyclist)
and why does everyone love carbon so much ???
my experience with cf has resulted in pure failure
(very pricey parts shattering or cracking after a hit that the part i originally had (that cost a third of what the cf did) would have barley been scratched )
have fun neg proping me ... i really dont care
anyone who has ever used cf for any hardcore riding will understand what im saying
  • + 10
 People like me, who drive a Honda, might ask "why would anyone pay 10x as much for a Porsche, when my Honda has 4 wheels and gets me from point A to B?". The answer is: people have money, and people like nice stuff.
  • + 2
 yer dude theres a line on everything, and the price for this wheel set is 6000miles past the line!!
  • + 1
 I'd happily buy them if I earned a bit more than bike shop wages, to be honest.
  • + 4
 @shijinkamisai - Again, it is just about priorities. The Carbon Havens make a massive difference in how the bike performs, much more so than upgrading to a new drivetrain or even going from quality mid-level suspension to the best out there. I'm not trying to justify their price, but it is important to keep it in perspective. There are a lot of people out there who have money to spend but drive around in a $2,000 car instead of a $10,000 car, but ride only the best when it comes to mountain bikes.

As for using carbon for "hardcore" riding, I have to disagree with you!
  • + 4
 I think another point to bare in mind is that this is still early days for carbon wheels. Sure they're expensive now but give it a few years and the prices will start to fall. A $2k wheelset is a necessary step towards affordable carbon products in the future. Look how expensive mobile phones were when they first came out.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 Lovin my Havens! No issues yet with the rear wheel. Paired them up with some Happy Mediums and can't believe the speed,roll and cornering of this combo! Fantastic and worth every penny.
  • + 1
 Happy Mediums?
  • + 1
 @andreasmoser - Good to hear! I've been wanting to get a set of those tires for awhile now. The trails are drying out and they are starting to make sense. Care to share some thoughts on them?
  • + 1
 Easy install, roll very fast, and are nice and sticky in the corners.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 You guys wanna know why the warranty is only 2 years? Because after 2 years the resin starts to break down from the elements and eventually it will crack. These are really sweet wheels for those with DEEP pockets because you'll have to replace them every few years.
  • + 5
 I assume you have ridden a pair of these for about 2 years now, and they started cracking?

My mechanic is one of the few dealers of Santa Cruz in Belgium. He spoke with Cedric Gracia and Steve Peat at a race in Scotland and the only thing that lets them down on their carbon v10's are the carbon rims. Now here's my opinion:

If the frames can hold the pressure and abuse that professional riders throw at them, then you have no reason to fear using carbon for anything. Nobody here can keep up with those riders, nobody has better technique. They manage to crack Enve's rims, riding about 50kmh or 30mph over rock gardens on a bike with suspension plusher than Jenna Jameson's mattress and tyre pressure lower than the one of the average car tyre. OF COURSE THEY CRACK!

At 2300$ a set, only people with money can buy them. Smart people, who can ride and know some technique will buy them, ride them for what they are meant and keep them spinning. Other people, will buy them only to show off and they will abuse them in some cases. Those last people are the ones who'll end up like Svard75 mentionned above.

I ordered a set and I can't wait to use them for AM, not DH.
  • + 2
 @Svard75 - Care to back up those thoughts with some facts? Or experiences?
  • + 2
 Gentlemen read about composites here en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Composite_material#Mechanics. It's the resin that is the point of failure in all composite materials. That's why I said it begins to break down from the elements UV, heat, cold etc.

@RobbyBriers - I know what you are trying to argue here, however ask these pro riders how long they keep their carbon equipment for.
  • + 4
 The Wiki article (not that Wiki is the be all and end all of correct info) states that polyester resin "is UV sensitive and can tend to degrade over time". If you continue reading the Wiki article you'll see that there are many types of resins that can handle UV and heat much better and are used in the aerospace industry. Is Easton using polyester resin in these wheels???
  • + 1
 Check the section on failure due to repetitive stress. Search for De lamination in google and you'll understand my concern with carbon composite materials. I'm not trying to be negative with my comments and I digress if I have till now what I would like to argue is that I still don't see LONG term evidence that composites are a better material. Even though I just dropped some money on a custom carbon road frame myself Facepalm
  • + 2
 You also have issues regarding repetative stress on aluminium and steel. For some inspiration and very relevant to thissubject try reading the article series by Scot Nicol: www.ibiscycles.com/support/technical_articles/metallurgy_for_cyclists The series gives a good argumentation on why we shouldn't fear CF.
  • + 2
 No doubt aluminum has its deficiencies if pushed hard enough. I am talking about repeated normal use stress to composite material which causes a condition called delamination. It doesn't happen shortly after buying them but rather over time. There was something else which I didn't want to bring up. How can one tell the consistency of the composite? There are special tests which military and aviation composites undergo which I doubt bicycle manufacturers can afford the time for.
  • + 2
 hence a thing called a warrenty
  • + 2
 Gotta love that Wink . And 2 years of it too. What I would do is just before the 2 year mark smash them up to get a new pair. I know I'm bad.
  • + 1
 It's highly unlikely that easton is using polyester resin for carbon fibre. If memory serves, polyester is the cheap resin that you use with fibreglass for fixing the rusty fenders on a pontiac sunfire. Carbon fibre is actually known for having better fatigue resistance than aluminum. Inspect for cracks often, if you see one, retire the rim.
  • + 1
 No doubt they are using a better resin, however composite materials still face the undeniable delamination effect over time. That's what causes the material to eventually shatter. Anyway we're arguing a mute point since most hard core people who would drop $2300 on a wheelset usually won't keep it for longer than 2 years in favour of the next new shiny thing Smile
  • + 1
 Apples and Oranges.

Whilst not a Carbon Wheelset, I do have a Carbon canoe ( Swift Winisk - Carbon-Kevlar layup)
and an older plain Kevlar boat ( Swift Kipawa ) Regarding the Winisk - This thing sees a lot of sun - like days on end being paddled thought water with the sun baking. There are no issues with de-lam due to UV exposure in the boats I or people I know have. Now going back a few years - there were some issues with the early resins - but that is long in the past. These things are not babied, they hit rock, get portaged for miles thru the bush - getting dropped, banging trees, get used as tables and shelters as well as carry hundreds of pounds of gear and people. I have had to replace wood trim and structural pieces but have never had an issue with the Carbon layup.

I can not see Easton or Enve using a carbon / resin system that would have UV or de-lam issues.
If they had to build a new test machine to break their new carbon bars, the wheels are probably in the same catagory as well. ...and the two year warranty, well, alot of riders go through a set of rims a year not racing. So if they feel they can back them up for two years against anything then they should be good enough for us everyday hacks. I don't think they will self-destruct on two years + 1 day.

either way, time will tell.

michael
  • + 1
 I would hope that Easton would coat the rims with something to block UV radiation if it was damaging. And about UV degradation: it definitely happens to carbon, but within the normal lifespan of an expensive wheelset, it would probably be mostly cosmetic. And like mykel said, a good layup won't delaminate under any circumstance.
  • + 1
 Fair enough. I agree time will tell. I am hoping you guys are right for my sakes as well as others. If these prove their value over time I may just spring for a set. I love easton products as you can tell by all the parts on all my bikes. The quality is phenomenal for the price.
  • + 1
 My carbon wheels are almost 2 years old. OMFG!!! They're going to delaminate next week!!!!! Sorry- no signs of wear at all. In way better condition than any of my aluminum rims which have paint chips or scratches all over them. Some even can no longer be trued. Its a good thing they're not carbon which will catastrophically fail next week with no other signs of wear.
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  • + 1
 I'd buy the rims if they sold them separately and build with King or Hadley hubs. Now that would be a great wheelset. not with Easton hubs. They're not known for hubs or bearings.
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  • + 2
 there is lots of worry about the spooky carbon - for you folks don't buy it. for the rest of us that have the priorities to get this stuff and trust the technology - hooray!
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  • + 3
 easton should make a carbon DH wheel set. but have to say those rims look amazing Salute
  • + 1
 I almost think that wouldn't be strong enough, or if it was it would have to be heavier and it wouldn't be worth the small weight save.
  • + 7
 They had carbon rims on the Lapierre DH team at Fort William. Cam Cole experienced the problem of Rock/Carbon collision when his back wheel exploded in the first rock garden!!!!!!!
  • + 4
 The rims are nothing special, but the HUBS are!!! Big Grin
  • + 2
 ouch! suppose the 2 year warrenty is a good thing but it would be pretty shit waiting on a new set to come. not a wheel i would buy tho. i wouldn't trust carbon wheels at all.
  • + 3
 Nice shots surfermed
  • + 3
 surfermed: i wouldnt say thats just because its carbon, how many other wheels did people go through? fort bill is just a wheel destroyer. plain and simple
  • + 1
 should I say that Mavic Deemax Ultimate is crap, because Matti detonated one during a crash in Leogang last year?! Give it up baby!

The only reason we are so affraid of CF is because we see what happens to roadie gear - and as everything with roadies, it's wroooong and all their exports to MTB, screws it up for all of us. It's good we start to have more and more stuff of our own. It's like comparing golf clubs to baseball bats...
  • + 2
 You should have been stood there when it went. He left the last bit of board walk at full spead, then the minute his tyre lost presure the wheel just disintigrated. No warning, no riding the rim to slow down!!! It just went and he ended up travelling the full length of rock garden with jst one wheel. Amazing that he held it. I'm not dissing carbon wheels, just an alu one may have at least survived long enough to regain control and stop. Imagine if that had been his front wheel!!!
  • + 0
 @surfermed - That photo does look pretty gnarly, but it doesn't tell the story of what happened. We don't know what sort of abuse those wheels got put through before that incident, just that that particular section was the straw that broke the camel's back. It also sounds like he had a flat tire prior to the failure which obviously also played a big part.

Loads of riders, including myself, have detonated aluminum wheels in an instant. Like I said, your photo in interesting but it doesn't tell us the entire story =)
  • + 2
 First off, you need to be fast enough to put your bike into such situation... My B.O.N. theory nr#254 states the following:

A bicycle component explodes in following circumstances:

- a PRO or half PRO rider during a race practice or race run
- a brainless, fearless Rookie in any situation

Every equipment used accordingly to it's purpose ridden by riders of skill and self preservation instinct level in between those stated above is safe. At least as long as they don't put it into situation where anything else would fail
  • + 1
 syndacite team has been running carbon rims for over 1/2 years now with few problems as far as I am aware
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  • + 1
 Those are freak'n sweet. It would be cool to have a comparison with these Havens and ENVE/CK wheels. If I had the money I would most definitely buy these.
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  • + 1
 I'd love a pair of these just for xc riding thats about it. ill stick with my chris kings laced to mtx 33's for a 3rd of the price. Smile
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  • - 1
 OK, who would pay 2300 for rims? and if the break? your out 2300. rims don't have any warranty at all. you would have to order them. that money could be used for a down payment on a sick truck. rims are meant to break. wooppy do i save a pound of weight on my bike? but it cost me 2300. this is my economic rant about stupid rims.
  • + 3
 Did you read? There is a 2 year warranty on the wheels that covers everything, no matter what. One pound of rotating weight is a lot for certain people. And a lot of people, including myself, think that using that money towards a vehicle is pretty silly. Then again, I realize that different people spend their money on different things...
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  • + 1
 Polyethylene is not the same thing as what most of you would consider carbon fiber. As such it isn't going to have the same issues with delamination and epoxy strength.
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  • + 1
 Pieces of crap. If the spokes don't blow out on you, the freehub will be sure to blow out sooner than later. Saw two sets blow up at the Hood River Super D.
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  • + 2
 ide be afraid of braking the non carbon set dont think il ever touch these, but they do look sweet.
  • + 3
 So the 2 years no-questions-asked warranty doesn't speak for its durability?
  • + 0
 I think it speaks more about how desperate they are to sell these rims , time will tell though
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  • + 2
 At this price does Easton throw in a night with a high priced escort of your choosing?
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  • + 1
 these wheels look to be wicked, would love to know how they compare to the EDGE carbon rims laced up? any thoughts on a review on them?
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  • + 2
 My pre ride pooh weighs more than 300grams so I'll be looking at that as a cheap alternative to carbon rims
  • + 5
 Unless you smear your feces on your wheels when you ride, the loss of fecal matter from your body/bike will not equate to the loss of rotational weight you gain with the Haven Carbons.
  • + 1
 Haha well put sir
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  • + 1
 I ordered mine about 3 weeks ago. The rear wheel isn't in stock so I have to wait. I can't wait to fit them into my Nomadc!
  • + 2
 Nomad C + Carbon Havens = drool!
  • + 1
 It's a porn that is! Checked some nerd stuff... With Nobby Nics SS + sealant, you can build it under 11kgs... Even with 36 Float or better: Bos DeVille...
  • + 1
 A Nomad under 11kg? Built like a xc bike that is... No dropper post, 1x10 and so on... While a Nomad truely is a AM/EN rig.

- A pair of Nobby Nic 2.4 SS EVO = 1540gr
- Nomad carbon frame + seat clamp + chainstay protector + E-thirteen Heim 2 + Fox Float RP23 + Rock Shox Reverb incl remote + Fizik Gobi XM K:ium = 3720gr
- 2012 Fox Talas 160 Factory + Easton Haven 55mm stem = 2310gr

Rest is inc.


Supposing that the wheels do come in at 1450gr, the total so far is a little more that 9kg. I don't believe that the Haven carbon bar, a Cane Creek 110 headset, point one racing pedals and a full 2x10 XTR group (incl brakes and XT rotors) will only weigh 2kg.

cassette (11-34t) = 255gr
brakes = 475gr
shifters = 225gr
derailleurs = 310gr
crankset (28-36t) = 645gr
chain = 260gr

That already is 2170gr without outer cables / BB / rotors. Still need the bar 175gr-ish, the headset and the pedals... and the grips! haha Wink

Even without dropper post, it would still weigh 11.5kg or so. Under 11 it wouldn't be enjoyable i think...
  • + 1
 My Nomad C was 27 lbs without carbon rims and with a 2x9 X.0 setup. I could easily build a 24 lb Nomad C as long as money was no option.
  • + 1
 We'll see when my bike is complete. As far as now, 26.5 lbs is what it looks like it's going to be.
  • + 1
 I just meant going weight nuts... I could never sacrifice not having a travel adjustable fork, waste of the potential of the bike, if you ask me. ta fork on nomad= great xc/trail capability with no sacrifice to mini-dh performance. If you ride lots of up&downs, and price is not a problem i couldn't sacrifice a dropper post either. Though i must say that even on tech trails 1x10 32x11/36 is all I need, and i have the old Nomad. NomadC must be even better climber. And skipping the front mech, no matter what kind, is 1lb + straight off the carriage. The only downside is to get some decent chain tension on such wide cassette, you need the long cage rear mech and... For beginning you need Two chains, as even with 32 up front, standard 114 links is not enough for the mid cage. Short cage will be completely retracted on 11t sprocket, and on 36t, is at max extension considering subsyantial vpp chaingrowth,
  • + 1
 Waki, you don't need a long cage mech for a 1x10. I am running a short cage X.9 derailleur with a 34x11-36 ratio. I have always run short cage derailleurs on my 1x10 and 1x9 drivetrains regardless of the cassette range.
  • + 1
 I run a short cage X9 at full 114 chain length now and it doesn't do the job well as to my liking. Broke chain once already, after riding down a high stone step, having the chain at 36. Then in bikepark, the chainslap is really irritating, so i ride somwhere on the middle cogs with no pedalling. I can use last two smallest sprockets only for commuting on asphalt home>woods
  • + 1
 I run a SRAM PC-1071 chain, SLX 11-36 cassette, E.13 34t chain ring, and an X.9 short cage derailleur. I have never broken a chain, and I get virtually no chain slap. On my Nomad 2, I was using a 36t E.13 ring, 11-34 XTR cassette, PC-991 chain, and an X.0 short cage derailleur. No problems there either.
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  • + 1
 When is that BC Bike Race essay contest gonna be finished, i wanna win a pair of these!
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  • + 1
 Had my SingleTracks little over 2 Year ......Still going and going . No Problems.
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  • + 1
 I wish Evel Knievel could have used these for his Snake River jump. He would have made it.
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  • + 1
 Carbon rim lasted only few days at Bootleg Canyon in Nevada (pro friend). Cracked instead of bending or flat-spotting.
  • + 1
 THIS particular carbon rim? Or another carbon rim?
  • + 1
 @cableguy - Yes, which rim? And what was the actual reason for the failure?
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  • + 1
 Patience. Couple years and we'll all get to ride them. Hub issues will also be rectified.
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  • + 1
 I just got a set of these on a used bike and the bearngs are toast. Frown
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  • + 1
 i guess pinkbike had to pull something out of there ass.
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  • + 1
 why is the font soooo massive on this page ?????????
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  • + 1
 The cats ass them there are! Pretty pretty pretty...
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  • + 1
 If they're anything like their road wheels I'll pass
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  • + 1
 Very Bling,BUT WHY?
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