Eurobike 2013 - Good, Bad and the Ugly

Sep 3, 2013
by Richard Cunningham  
 
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Kore Magnesium Flat Pedals

Kore's magnesium flat pedals weigh only 266 grams a pair, with 40, removable six-millimeter pins, a chromoly axle and sealed ball bearings. The mid-width flat is concave, and you can get a pair in natural magnesium, or black. If you ride XC with flats, Kore's Mg option should be the trick.
  Kore's magnesium flat pedals weigh only 266 grams a pair, with 40, removable six-millimeter pins, a chromoly axle and sealed ball bearings. The mid-width flat is concave, and you can get a pair in natural magnesium, or black. If you ride XC with flats, Kore's Mg option should be the trick.

Kore




Casco Speed Airo Helmet

Speedair helmet
  In the interest of safety, and to prevent an unfair advantage, many Olympic sports, such as ski racing, require a spec helmet that all competitors must use. We saw the Casco Speed Airo helmet, with its full-vision flip-up visor and extra protection around the back of the skull, and immediately realized that this was the future of Olympic Enduro racing. Pinkbike sent a memo to the UCI and to the International Olympic Committee to get the ball rolling.

Casco



Syntace and Liteville

Syntace w40 wheels
  Syntace W40 MXS wheels are based upon a 40-millimeter OD rim. The rim allows riders to choose one size smaller tire and achieve the same air volume, at a lower overall weight. The big benefit, however, is the boost in lateral support that the wheels give to the tire. Cornering stability is remarkably better.


Syntace pioneered the lightweight, ultra-wide rim movement that broke through the surface at Eurobike. SRAM, DT Swiss, American Classic, and Alex had cross-country/trail rims in excess of 30 millimeters wide on display. Syntace's widest rim is 40 millimeters at the OD and measures 33.5 millimeters between the flanges. The science is that aluminum is lighter than rubber, so the wider rim adds volume to the tire at a lower weight penalty, and also better supports the tire laterally, which boost cornering performance. The W40 MXS wheelset weighs only 1840 grams and is rated for all-mountain use. Syntace makes a range of widths from 40 millimeters to 28 millimeters, with our favorite being the 35-millimeter-wide W35 MXS that weighs under 1700 grams in the 26 inch diameter. All wheel diameters and axle options are supported, and MXS wheels are tubeless ready.

Liteville 601
  Liteville is also part of Syntace, and this year, the 190-millimeter-travel 601 was boosted with 27.5-inch wheels. Reportedly, the big-mountain trailbike weighs around 28 pounds. Syntace offers the 601 in semi-custom form with 26 or 650B wheel diameters.


Joe Klieber
  The creative force behind Syntace's component range and now, Liteville, is Jo Klieber. Jo was on hand to explain in simple terms, how all three wheel diameters could be used more effectively to produce a lightweight bicycle that rides with equal efficiency for riders of tall and short stature. Jo used the pizza cutter to depict how the front and rear wheels of a bike roll over the same bump quite differently.

Syntace




Giant Reign X

Pinkbike covered Giant's leap into the realm of 27.5-inch wheels last month, and the announcement that it will only be offering 26 inch wheels in its Glory and Reign X models evoked some ire from PB members. That said, when we came across the 26-inch wheel 2014 Reign X and its component pick and burly geometry stood out. Up front, the Reign X has a 170-millimeter-stroke RockShox Domain fork - replete with a 20-millimeter axle. The matching, 170-millimeter rear end is damped with a RockShox coil-over shock. Wheels are Giant's wide, house-brand P-AM hoops, rolling on huge Schwalbe Hans Dampf rubber. The handlebars are wide, the stem is short. The bike's name doesn't do the bike justice. Giant should rename it the Reign FTW.

Giant Reign X
  One of the two remaining elite-level mountain bikes in Giant's stable with 26 inch wheels, the Reign X is nearly a downhill bike - but a lot more playful.


Giant Reign X
  The Reign X's Domain fork is well established favorite among park riders. No questioning the purpose of a bike with 170-millimeter-travel Maestro rear suspension, an MRP G2 chain guide and a straight-block cassette.

Giant USA




New Brakes from Formula

Formula R1 Racing brake
  Formula's latest R1 Racing disc brake system features an innovative pull-type master cylinder that reportedly reduces friction in the system under hard braking efforts. The forged, one-piece caliper houses redesigned pistons with seals that retract farther to further eliminate dragging - and aluminum-backed metallic brake pads which are domed to curb noise. The reservoir has been moved from inside the radial master cylinder to the back of the perch to provide better access.


Formula Brakes revealed two new models, the R1 Racing and the more-affordable C1, which is targeted at the OEM market. The new R1 Racing brake features a low-friction pull-type master cylinder and its reservoir has been moved to the back of the lever body. Gone is the carbon fiber lever option - replaced by a lighter weight forged aluminum blade, and the lever's geometry is improved to deliver a very linear feel. The C1 is built with a conventional in-line master cylinder configuration, and to keep the critical moving parts at precise tolerances, the master cylinder is a cartridge unit that slips into the cast-aluminum body. Both the new R1 Racing brake and the C1 can be flip-flopped for moto-style riders. Weight for the R1 Racing brake is stated at 260 grams with hardware and the price is $389 per side. Weight for the C1 is stated at 337 grams and the price is $149 per side. As with all Formula brakes, rotors are priced separately.

Formula Brakes C1 brake
  Formula's C1 brake has a cartridge-type master cylinder that enables the critical moving parts to be manufactured at higher tolerances for enhanced reliability. The conventional lever body is cast and it is designed to be flip flopped without altering accessibility to its bleed ports for easy maintenance.


Formula Thirtyfive Fork

The Italian brake maker also showed us a sweet looking XC/trail fork called the 'Thirtyfive,' that features 35-millimeter stanchion tubes and independent rebound, compression and lockout functions. Formula designed an adjustable blow-off valve for the lockout system as a protection for the internal valving and also as a tuning option for those who use lockout extensively. The damping unit is a cartridge system and the air spring is enhanced with a two-stage negative spring to boost its low-speed and small-bump compliance. Travel is 160-millimeters in the 27.50-inch-wheel version, and 140-millimeters in the 29er version. Reduced travel version are available. Weight for the 27.5 fork is stated at 1650 grams, with the 29er version at 1700 grams. North American prices are being determined.

Formula Brakes Thirtyfive fork
  Formula's Thirtyfive fork has adjustable travel from 100 to 160 millimeters in the 27.5 ich wheel size, and machined aluminum controls on the left crown adjust compression. lockout and lockout blow-off threshold. Rebound damping is tuned below the left slider. The air-spung system uses coil type negative springs. Formula's 15-millimeter axle has a pull-out lever that tightens the axle with an Allen key.

Formula Brake




Kraftstoff Edelbock

  Kraftstoff's fat-bike hardtail looks like any other bike from a distance - but up close, it becomes readily apparent that the Edelbock is a man's machine.


Kraftstoff's fat-bike hardtail looks like any other bike from a distance - but up close, it becomes readily apparent that the Edelbock is a man's machine. For starters, the seat tube extends over 200 millimeters above the top tube junction before the seat post begins. The Head tube is over 300 millimeters tall and it simply dwarfs the 100-millimeter stem that caps it. Who knows where they got the fork to go with it, but it appears to have a 160 millimeter stroke. Kraftstoff may have had Pinkbike's founder in mind when they made the Edelbock. Radek, who is six-foot, six-inches and an in-shape 300 pounds, would fit it perfectly.

  A close-up look at the one-off Kraftstoff Edelbock reveals its monster proportions. Kraftstoff made this bike custom, but it offers a range of fat bikes as well as conventional hardtails and dual-suspension models.

Kraftstoff Custom Bikes




Novatec Carbon Factor Wheels

Novatec Factor carbon wheel
  Novatec has been upping the ante for value-priced high-performance wheels and the carbon fiber Factor wheelset breaks into the elite realm, with a stated weight of 1550grams a pair in 26-inch, with a full, 23-millimeter ID/28.5-millimeter OD rim profile. The Factor wheel looks beautiful, with stainless steel, ovalized spokes and its hubs are toolless-compatible with quick-release or through-axles (15QR front and 142/12-millimeter rear). Rim width for 29 and 27.5 sizes are 21 millimeters ID. The rims have a special inner profile that seats the beads of tubeless-ready tires. Rim strips are required to seal the spoke holes. Novatec's rear hub has six pawls to provide three degree engagement points at the freehub. Bearings are stainless steel from Japan and Novatec offers the SRAM XD drive for eleven-speed cassettes. Weights for 29-inch wheels are pegged at 1625 grams, with 27.5 coming in at 1600 grams. Novatec says the MSRP will be below $2000 USD. Wheels will be shipping early 2014.

Novatec




KMC Chain

KMC makes more elite-level bicycle chain than any manufacturer in the world - often for other high-profile brands. KMC had a wide variety of chains, from industrial-strength half-link BMX types, to feather-light eleven-speed chains for Campagnolo road drivetrains. Thank KMC for spearheading the removable master link for derailleur chains. Perfecting the two-piece snap-together link to work in such a compact space was no small feat - and it was a small revolution.

KMC 11-speed chain
  KMC worked out a painting process that almost turns its high-end chains into jewelry. This eleven-speed ultralight series chain was aptly displayed. There was also a turquoise blue chain behind glass.

KMC Chain




Shimano's Hands-on Display

All eyes and ears were on Shimano for any news of its 2014 11-speed one-by XTR group, but in spite of the fact that Big Blue was hard at work at Eurobike, staging meetings with large OEMs and prominent dealers, nobody spilled the beans. We expect Shimano to announce the news before October, but the writing is on the wall. Mid and large-size bike brands are beginning to produce bikes without any provision for a front changer - something they would not do if they were not informed that BOTH leading component makers were committed to one-by drivetrains.

ICE rotor detail
  Ever wonder how Shimano gets those cooling fins on its ICE brake rotors? The fin is actually a skirt formed by the aluminum sandwich that is 'welded' between the rotor's stainless steel braking tracks.

Shimano Cutaways - trail caliper BB crank attachment and internally geared hub
  Shimano had a number of cutaway items on display, including a transparent Trail Brake caliper, a look at the bottom bracket to crank attachment and a transparent internally geared hub.

Shimano




Commencal DH Bikes for Youth

Commencal youth DH bikes
  Commencal's Ramones push-bike was the smallest of its youth DH series - a range of gravity-oriented park bikes that included every wheel size from 12 to 26 inches.


Commencal made the switch to 27.5 inch wheels this season, but it didn't stop there. The Andorra based bike maker debuted a range of youth DH machines that began with a 12-inch wheel push-bike for toddlers (complete with a mechanical disc brake) and continued upwards with 20, 24 and 26-inch-wheel mini DH bikes - each more sophisticated than the previous model. Cheers to Commencal for focusing its attention on the next generation of riders who will be fighting for podium spots on the World Cup DH circuit. This is how to invest in cycling's future. Commencal officially opened its online store give customers an opportunity to buy Commencal bikes and accessories where dealers do not stock their products.

Commencal




Mavic Wheels and Gear

Mavic Crossroc wheelset
  Mavic's new Crossroc wheel system includes Mavic's Roam tires, tubes, axle conversion parts, and a tubeless conversion kit for $500 USD.


Mavic partnered with French tire maker Hutchinson to produce the first mountain bike specific tire and wheel system. The Crossmax Enduro wheels, with Mavic-designed matching Roam rear and Charge front tires, captured the 2013 Enduro World Series overall title under Cannondale's Jerome Clementz. For 2014, Mavic will offer a lower priced wheelset called the Crossroc, matched with Roam tires for both the front and rear of the bike. Crossroc tires and wheels will come in all three wheel diameters, 26, 650B and 29. Rim widths vary, with the 26-inch Roam at 23-millimeters, while the 650B and 29er rims measure 22 millimeters between the beads. Wheels are built up with 24 stainless steel ovalized spokes and aluminum nipples, laced cross-two, and while the rims are tubeless ready with a UST bead profile, they require a plastic rim strip that is included with purchase to seal the exposed spoke holes. The rear wheel offers quick release or 142/12-millimeter options, while the front wheels are convertible to quick release or QR15 through-axles. Published weights are 1755 grams for 26-inch, 1825 grams for 27.5-inch and 1930 grams for 29-inch wheels. Price for all Crossroc options is an affordable, $500 USD - and the wheels come with Mavic Roam tires and tubes.

Mavic Crossmax baggy shorts
  Gravity oriented and trail worthy, Mavic's Stratos H2O rain short is long enough to get over knee pads, and its breathable two-way stretch fabric is comfortable enough for all-day trail riding.


Mavic expands its clothing range to include a sharp looking baggy short called the Stratos H2O, with a lengthened inseam to get over knee or shin pads. The water resistant fabric is two-way stretch and very breathable and construction is reportedly tough enough to handle gravity riding. That said, the Stratoe short feels lightweight and comfortable against the skin, underscoring its intended use as a do it all garment for enduro-style trail riding s well as go-to gravity gear for warm and cold weather riding. Construction is pro-level throughout, with taped seams inside to eliminate chaffing and welded pocket reinforcements. The legs have elastic, hook-and-loop cinches and the adjustable elastic waistband is fixed with a pair of strong snaps. Pockets are minimally sized and all the external seams are flush or welded. Price is $199 USD and sizes are small, medium, large X-large and XX-large.

Mavic


Corratechnoloy

Corratec test mule
  Corratec had a test mule on display that bristled with accelerometers and linear-travel measuring devices. The crank was outfitted with a SRM power meter, so that researchers could compare a rider's watt-output against suspension data.


Corratec, one of Europe's leading brands, showed a carbon test mule that was outfitted with a dizzying array of measuring equipment. I lost count of accelerometers, and noticed that the bike's front and rear suspension had telescoping, linear-measuring devices - all hooked up to a transmitter, presumably linked to a satellite, that downloaded real-time data to Corratec's research and development engineers. If you wanted to know how the big boys measure the effects of suspension and braking while a bike is bouncing over a trail - this is it.

Corratec side shot
  The results of Corratec's space age experiment was this beautiful looking, carbon fiber, short-travel, cross-country trailbike with 650B wheels - that, um, looked very similar to everyone else's carbon fiber, short-travel, cross-country trailbike with 650B wheels. Nothing revolutionary to see here.



Sugoi RSX NeoShell Rain Jacket

RSX NeoShell rain jacket
  Sugoi Marketing Director Jaime Williams takes Pinkbike through the features of its 'North Shore certified' RSX NeoShell rain jacket.



When the chamber below the two fabrics is pressurized slightly, the leading brand shows no
evidence of air passing through. Polortech's NeoShell fabric on the right bubbles the air,
while the fabric is dry to the touch on the opposite side.

Sugoi's RSX NeoShell rain jacket was developed specifically for use in the sopping wet forests of the Pacific Northwest near Sugoi's headquarters, and it introduces Polartec's most breathable NeoShell fabric. NeoShell fabric is a laminate like Gore-Tex, but unlike its competitor's breathable waterproof fabric, NeoShell has a two-way stretch function and it passes significantly more air through its internal membrane. The result is a truly waterproof jacket that stretches and conforms to the body like the 'water resistant' soft-shell jackets that most riders would rather wear.

The RSX Neoshell is designed to be a lifetime investment, with taped seams on the inside, welded seams on the outside and with waterproof zippers throughout. The side pockets are curved so their contents settle securely towards the back of the garment where they will not pendulum with every pedal stroke. Rubberized ports in the inside of the pockets allow access to personal electronics. Construction is as good as it gets and reportedly, user feedback unanimously supports Sugoi's claim that this is the most breathable all-day waterproof rain jacket that a hard core rider can buy. Sugoi offers the RSX jacket in black and sized in small, medium, large and X-large for $300 USD.


Sugoi RSX jacket details
  (From left) Sugoi used a small, but effective stretch-cord adjustment at the waist. Waterproof zippers and welded seams are used to keep the rain out. All inside seams are taped and rubber ports are installed for personal electronics.



What is behind the Screen?

Hugh Jass
  I was hoping to show you Lapierre's 140-millimeter-travel e-powered mountain bike, but, just as I snapped the shot, the entire bike was obscured by a rude man named Hugh Jass. The fleshy beast floated like a storm cloud in front of my lens for what seemed like eternity.




Lapierre Overvolt FS

Lapierre Overvolt FS
  Lapierre's entrance into the burgeoning e-bike marketplace was this sharp looking Overvolt FS. Lapierre must have intended the bike to be ridden off road at the highest level, because it outfits the Overvolt with 140 millimeters of suspension travel on both ends, and chose the powerful Bosch motor assist, backed up by a Shimano XT drivetrain. The single-pivot suspension and capable chassis design was one of the better spec'ed e-bikes at the show.

Lapierre



Hutchinson Taipan Tire

Simon Andre
  Hutchinson put on a presentation at Eurobike, where we met Simon Andre, a young tire designer who has been working with Hutchinson sponsored athletes to develop the French manufacturer's next gen racing tires. We spoke about wide-rim/high-volume tire development and Simon was all-over the concept - and indicated that Hutchinson was well into the research and development phase of the emerging trend. He was on hand to introduce Hutchinson's fast-rolling Taipan tire, which is intended to bridge the gap between aggressive XC and all-mountain.

Hutchinson



152 Comments

  • + 155
 Thank you Pinkbike for bringing the show to us. Personally, I really look forward to seeing the new product at shows. I may not ever buy any of it, but I do like to look at it. Cheers.
  • + 114
 No lappierre, not you as well. Electric bikes destroy the whole point of biking.
  • + 12
 Syntace 601 looks soooo nice.
  • + 21
 "Shimano had a number of cutaway items on display". That stuff looked cool!
  • + 71
 Does anybody else think that chrome stanchions looks like *$&#
  • - 4
 Actually Ebikes don't ruin the fun, have you tried one of these? Nico vouilloz told me when I asked him about it that they are actually great fun, but down hill they are s,lower as you have to be careful because of the weight.
  • + 5
 I'm happy about electric bikes because that'll mean I can keep riding off road for many more years to come!
  • + 0
 Electric mountain bikes will take dorks into the places where dorks should never have come. Wild pigs and bears will be excited to see fresh knocked out meat. Or it is only me who finds it impossible for a good respectful rider to use one of these? Middle aged, rich, fat, lazy pricks should stay in pubs watching football and cracking pathetic jokes about women.
  • + 35
 Dang! Who pissed in your Cornflakes WAKI?
  • + 43
 The same thing can be said about chair lifts taking lazy fat people to places the y should never get to. Just sayin............
  • - 25
 You can pretend how much you like, how opened minded you are, say how bad it is to be prejudiced and discriminate people, put them into slots, and all this you are told to think. It won't change a fact that MTBs with electric engines will be used in 5% by people who actualy need them, either because they are disfunctional or because they are just trying to make more laps per day on a hill without lift or shuttling assist. The rest will be disrespectful lazy pricks who should have never started mountain biking. Ruining the trails, the nature, blocking queues on ER and using money from my taxes. None of you would ever think well of a guy on one, it is easy to be tolerant to something you have nothing to do with, yes, continue thinking the way someone made you think you supposed to.
  • + 7
 Ok then,so the fact that E-bikes bring riding to people that maybe couldn't before is a bad thing?
So it's a bad thing for Gramps to go out riding with the grandson/daughter? I run a bike park and feel sorry for the rattly old puffins coming back shell shocked and hobbling while the grandchild is still buzzing and wanting to go out again.
The way I see it is that I'm not getting any younger and by the time my knees finally give out (not long now) E-bikes will be awesome and enable me to keep shredding.
  • + 5
 Electric bikes are just barely a step away from a dirt bike. Motorized vehicles are not allowed on most of the MTB trails in my area, so who cares if they go and use them on 4WD trails and jeep roads? These same "disrespectful lazy pricks" can go buy a 350cc bike and nobody would think twice. Do you hate on these people the same as electric MTBers?
  • + 7
 I have a new idea for you all to think about as your armchair pinkbike world isn't quite big enough. We make up a very very small portion of the buying market. I see thousands of bikes on my college campus every day and throughout the city. There are thousands of people in my city alone who cant afford a car and ride their bikes to work. Most of these are brand new supermarket bikes of all shapes and sizes. Bikes that most of us would consider "toys." One city close buy just recently bought 200 electric bikes for public welfare. Free transport for people who don't particularly like riding bikes but need a faster way of transport. Electric bikes fit this need in a profoundly perfect way. I ride every trail I can find in my local area almost every day of the week and I never have any problem with these type of people "invading my trails." Point being. Who in their right mind would ride an Ebike on a trail anyway? They were never meant for people like us to ride. @waki. If Ebikers are on your stomping grounds you should probably get into MOUNTAIN biking and get out of the sand box. just sayin.
  • + 3
 Wow Waki,

So much hate...

Seriously though most of those lazy people you speak of our already on the trails: they're shuttling, lift riding and filling the gas tanks of their MX bikes. They're a small percentage, but they are there none the less.

A lot of these A-holes are already trying to beat a DH KOm on a public multi-use trail.

If you think that the motor will brings the D--k heads, then you should try some of this education that you speak so highly against.

Because education would teach you that A-holes are constant and not something that is created by electricity.
  • + 5
 I have no idea why WAKI keeps logging on to PB, @Saidrick. He (or she?) has collected more downvotes that anyone else here. Dissenting opinions are one thing, but the pointless contrarian drivel that user barfs into the internet is another. I am glad that "below threshold comments" are hidden - they're usually WAKI's.
  • + 10
 I just dread the day that my local trail centres are full of these abominations, destroying the trails and ruining the enjoyment of real bikers.
  • + 8
 dont worry about ebikes they'll just hurt themselves on the way down.
  • - 4
 ^TROLLING^
  • + 0
 Saidrick, there is not an ounce of hate in me towards those. I just express my deepest resent with calmest voice. Im fine with Shuttling, lifts, MX or Quads in the woods - at least it's honest. Electric bicycle is like a vegan burger or green gasoline. Anyone wanting to buy those should consider building a lift to Mt. Everest. Would be awesome isn't it?
  • + 2
 What on earth is that helmet supposed to be?
  • + 2
 What's wrong with Vegan burgers?
  • + 7
 They don't have bacon or cheese....
  • + 2
 DragontalesDH - mostly understand what you're saying, except the second-to-last bit. I'm afraid that there is, or will soon be, a large number of people, to whom the prospect of a forgiving long-travel MTB fitted with an electric motor will fit the bill just about perfectly. I mean, "on paper, what's not to like"? On the uphills, you don't have to pedal, and on the downhills, you don't have to know how to ride, given the travel. So, in the mind of a rich newbie, the rider of such a machine has the advantage under any condition, which - I think - is a very appealing concept to the amateur who just doesn't have a clue what he's doing. In other words, it's just the perfect toy for wealthy idiots who think there's always a technocratic shortcut to glory. And given how much the manufacturers are leaping after this whole e-bike thing, there are bound to be a lot more of these people than we may have thought. Look at the first picture in the "Last Day Randoms Reach Around" - I was there in person, and Haibike were (by far) not the only one to proudly present such a ludicrous contraption to the rest of the world...
  • + 4
 There's also an issue that Europe is bloody small compared to NA and there's more people per trail. So I do understand why some of you don't get it why some of us are so concerned.

Mieszko - what's wrong with vegan burger? Nr1 check what that sht is made of. Nr2 Same with diet coke or electric cars. By wanting one it means that you are concerned about something like environment or health, yet you do same sht that puts those two in trouble in the first place. Just in another disguise. Let's say that wood is a more eco friendly construction material than concrete. Let's all be environmentalists now and build just from wood. How about we have no trees left on the planet within two years? The problem is not the solution, it is the need, and there is no solution to make that need better. A solution for car is a bus, a bicycle or a train - Not a cleaner car. It's like trying to find non-addictive, healthy heroine. I deal with this sustainability/ eco bullshit every other day. You can't have sustainable society, development when individuals have unsustainable needs. If you are a vegan, God and Science bless you, but stick to vdgan food cuz it's not only actualy healthier and more evo, but it also tastes 10 times better.

Biking is about recreation, forcing your body to exercise by exposing it to physical fatigue to be healthier. More you move healthier you are. We bike also to expose ourselves to mental challenges, to overcome dangers, and for fun - we do all this to be happier in the end. More tech you use without going through intermediate steps, the smaller your reward. By trying shortcuts to "higher fun", be it "only-ride-park", or el-bike, you have a higher chance to injure yourself than improving your skills, cardio or mobility to at least average level. If you get half of actual stimulation, no health benefits, while paying more money - why bother? Why create yet another piece of garbage?
  • + 3
 Waki is talking about this:
www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=A65dt-zLdSw

I definitely do not want see that in wood/mountain where I ride...
  • + 2
 That can't be any fun to ride...
  • + 1
 www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=A65dt-zLdSw

I'd guess that thing weighs 60+ lbs, and does not look fun to pedal at all.
  • + 3
 mezzv84: While I dislike the fact that it'll be extremely expensive, I'd be 200% for those things if it meant barring access to MX bikes and quads to trails, because those just destroy everything they touch as most of them just let the gas go and to hell with anything underneath, let those loose rocks and wrecked trail be a problem for bike riders and walkers. These electric bike things, while surely slower and slugish and sort of "cheating" when it comes to uphill, are still basically bikes, a lot lighter and surely a lot less agressive on the trail, so for those people who don't want/can't pedal up I like this option a lot better than those two.

Above all I hate quads, because people who drive quads are people who can't/don't have the balance required to ride a MX bike and just go for the quad and it's "car like stability" and aren't capable of anything else other than "full throtle" and trail wreckage, besides not being very respectful to anything else on trail. MX, while I like them, there's just a lot of "trail education" to be done and too many "weekend World Champions" so to speak, who just absolutely wreck trails. I don't know how it's where you live, but here it's very easy to notice if a MX group has been to a trail lately: you're no longer able to climb any of the tricky sections if it's not trial-style. They're all eroded, loose, destroyed and basically sort of like riding on massive-grain-sand.

All this goes to say: in my books, light and ecological e-bikes are very much welcome, if they're the alternative to trail wrecking MXs and quads. If it's just extra trail clogging and wrecking (after all they weigh 4x/5x a normal bike) and (to a lesser extent, since you still need technique up and down) not skilled enough riders getting to certain places they probably shouldn't be getting to (for their own safety) then not so much.
  • + 1
 JoseMPM, sorry but "ecological e-bike" is oxymoron..
  • + 2
 E-bike will never be an alternative to MX, it is a delusion. Tell it to some of MX guys riding trails and he'll laugh in your face. Until oil prices sky rocket it's not going to happen. Those people ride MX for the throttle, speed and flying debris, sorry none of those pathetic bicycles can ever give them even 10% of that sensation. So assuming them as target group is naive. It is nothing more but a slogan of those producing those bikes to soften the brain tissue responsible for critical thinking. Another one is, they will get better in time. They don't even try to target MX guys with their advertising. There is a shop we have here in town called "eco-ride" who sells e-city-bikes. They talk about three things: how easy it is to ride one, how it helps old people, and how eco it is cuz it makes people sell their cars. In the end their main customers are perfectly healthy people between 30-50, who rode bikes to work before. The people with disfunctions like obesity ride mopeds.
  • + 4
 Lightning won the overall motorcycle class at Pikes Peak this year, and only two seconds off the record set last year by the same rider. Power is not an issue, nor is weight, as an electric motor is much lighter than a 450cc four stroke, so there is room for battery weight on the bike. More intersting, is that the power could be preset to even the field, making suspension setup and rider skills the decisive elements of victory. The reason MX could go electric has more to do with noise. As urban development encroaches on popular tracks, residents will start closing them down. The push for green in Europe is also a motivation. There are lots of tracks unaffected by those issues, so it won't happen for a while.
  • + 1
 RC, you well know that there is a chasm between a motorcycle with electric engine and a bicycle with one. I talked with two engineers in car design and production about active suspension and ABS and I see little chance for it in a bicycle. Have you seen the size of those things in a motorbike? Simple things like ones on Nicos bike, yea, but full anti squat on DH bike? Not sure but maybe. We'll see. Right now I an ficing myself a rigid trail bike Big Grin
  • + 1
 @mezzv84: right where it hurts...

@WAKIdesigns: I am not advocating for a willing swap of MX for e-bikes, but an enforced ban on trail destroying MXs/quads, in which these e-bikes could provide an alternative for those people who want to ride outside actual, real MX tracks. Wouldn't be popular, wouldn't be easy nor I expect everybody to understand me, but I'm pretty sure more than a couple will see my point as they'll have had (or usually have) their favourite trails and lines on those torn apart.

@RichardCunningham: That'sa brilliant point, wasn't aware of that.
  • + 0
 Long live WAKI and down with e bikes!
[Reply]
  • + 22
 That Formula fork has the most beautiful adjustment knobs I've ever seen! That new Mavic stuff looks tasty too. Cool chainguide on that Liteville. Brilliant way to lessen the movement and strain on the derailleur.
  • + 8
 Some Specialized bikes or other big brands usually have the same thing on their XC-AM-Enduro models, it's pretty common.
  • + 0
 Never noticed it. Clever trick though
  • + 3
 Nothing new, I have one, its called CGuide. Simple and brilliant.

www.pinkbike.com/photo/9446175
  • + 4
 They are the evolution of the DCD (Dave's Chain Device) from the late '90's
  • + 1
 They work real well when they're on the bike. Sadly, they don't stay on the bike long if you shred with any seriousness. Lost two of them despite doubling up on the zip-tie attachments. Not recommended for gnar.
[Reply]
  • + 12
 you can say what you want about e bikes, my 63 year old mother loves her as her knees are not as good as they used to be and her ebike is permiting her to ride with her younger sisters and she is getting exercise and loving it!
  • + 4
 I don't think anyone disagrees with them being used this way.
  • + 3
 I intend on buying one in a few years. I want to extend my backcountry summer rides from 20ish miles to 30, 40, 50. To me, that's the beauty of such a bike. I don't want to use it for city riding, I don't want to use it at my local skills park, I don't plan to use it for the shorter local rides like Tiger Mountain and Tokul Creek. I want it for big alpine rides. I saw an EGO-equipped Canfield last summer and learned that the owner had put 550 trail miles on it in one month alone. That's super badass. You can't really disagree with that, can you Pinkbike users?
  • + 1
 No, I can't.
[Reply]
  • + 13
 My six year old son really wanted the Commencal 20" DH bike, but at 2200 euro it feels a bit over priced.
  • + 5
 I also checked that price. It is ridiculous, risible even. I was thinking 500 euro would have been the top price I'd pay... 2200 is a f*cking joke.

A couple of months ago I bought a Giant Pre run bike for about 70 euro. Full ally frame, 12' wheels, looks the business. Honestly, if you take that price, add Saint brakes and Fox suspension, it still doesn't come close to 2200 euro. How many people would be willing to splash out 2200 euro for a singlespeed bike for themselves if they knew it was only going to last two years?

They may argue the quality is high and production numbers are small but if so I would say why do you need such a high quality frame for someone who weighs 30kg and doesn't do jumps?

They are really taking the piss with that price. It's a shame because I really want to buy one. For that price I could buy two of those electric trials bike I saw at the Taipei show, and have money to spare to buy gear. Max Commencal, get your head out of your arse!
[Reply]
  • + 9
 Kore, what is the point of making a 'concave' pedal with a big fat pipe running through the guts that presses against your foot? The net result is that they are no longer concaved.
  • - 1
 Replace the pins with longer ones. problem solved.
  • + 4
 I fucking hate these pedals with the raised middles , the opposite of concaved , and adding longer pins does not really cut the mustard.
  • + 1
 totally agree with you on this one. you're gonna feel like you're stepping on some metal cigar the whole way down. What a pity, the weight is amazing though!
[Reply]
  • + 11
 Ewwww! That Hutchison name!!! Taipan can mean “placenta” in Chinese!
  • + 2
 It also sounds like an Asian city where many other tires are made.
[Reply]
  • + 10
 That Liteville is the perfect FSR. No ugly hydroformed aluminum bullish!t.
  • + 4
 Too bad that it's priced in the realm of Gods, 2600 Euro is a lot for a frame...
  • + 1
 That's what I was thinking, I really like the straight tube business. They make some of the best looking bikes right now.
[Reply]
  • + 7
 Lapeirre, What are you thinking?
[Reply]
  • + 4
 "We spoke about wide-rim/high-volume tire development and [...] the emerging trend"
Emerging trend... really !?
It's been almost 15 years I use it, and I don't speak about the guy who told me to try this.
  • + 3
 Ha yeah. It's what people ripped down the Repack on.... Gotta love marketing....
  • + 0
 It wasn't the trend. So the trend is emerging.
  • + 3
 for years I've been saying that 28mm rims are for XC but everyone thought I was nuts now look who's laughing! 2.5in tires need a 35mm rim not a 27mm! Remember the original Deemax at 36mm? WHY OH WHY DID THEY GO TO 27mm! Just for the weight!
  • + 2
 High volume tires my ass. BRING BACK THE 3.O" TIRE!
  • + 1
 Well you can still get the Duro 3.0 though it isn't as big as the Nokian 3.0! Funny how everyone is talking about 650b cause my duro 3.0x26 is 27.6in/702mm in diameter just a smidge less than my 650b highroller 2 27.8in/706mm!
I still rock a 24x3.0 on the back for most of my riding.
  • + 1
 haha funny you mention Duro. I have been slowly stock piling Duro tires as I know there will soon come a time when they will soon stop producing them too.
  • + 1
 That is a smart move! I just hope wide tires continue to exist for the foreseable future. Finding a tire wider than 2.5 (real 2.5 that is non of this Maxxis 2.5 BS) is hard to find.
I also hope Schwalbe comes out with a 2.5x27.5 tire for 2015!
[Reply]
  • + 2
 e-bikes might suck for some.. For me its being able to ride with friends. I just got diagnosed with serious lung issues, and my capacity to breathe properly is severely limited.. So seriously, E-bikes yes please, and for those who say they dont belong on trails, i just hope you wont ever need one.. id much rather not need one but looking down on others who do, and judging without having a clue.. your wonderful human beings.. MTB used to be about fun and diversity, now seems like a fashion show and the fashionistas trying to tell everyone there is only their way ..
[Reply]
  • + 5
 Giant Reign X - Good
Kraftstoff Edelbock - Bad
Lapierre Overvolt FS - Ugly (kill it with fire)
  • + 2
 Reign X - Good
[Reply]
  • + 6
 Those formula brakes look horrible
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Not convinced by the formula brakes at all, surely it'll be a lot easier to draw air into a system that is under negative pressure, than it is to force oil out of a system thats under positive pressure?...

Interesting though.
  • + 1
 And whoever designed the C1 failed by putting the lever bleed port facing the bar - you have to remove the brake to access it.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 I appreciate the coverage of Eurobike, but I don't understand why they didn't cover the Commencal Meta Hip Hop.. It seems different from most other trail bikes, and looks like a lot of fun too..
[Reply]
  • + 1
 @Waki...I disagree with you on the ebike. My beef is with the idiots putting a gas motor conversion kit on a bicycle and then riding it on the sidewalk. Wouldnt this be considered a motor vehicle at that point? Insurance? license? Every time I See one for sale in Craigslist in the bike section I flag it as miscategorized. Every time I see one on the street the owner looks like a godamned crack head
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Silly Jo Klieber. Using nonsense like 'numbers' and 'examples' to discuss the difference in wheel sizes in a rational and sensible manner. He should ditch that technique and instead join the screaming hordes in the PB comments crying about the death of the 26" wheel and how much 29ers suck. I know who I'd believe.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I was passed by an e-bike the other day on the trail during a sustained climb. It was by far the most disturbing thing I have ever seen on the trail. E-bikes do not belong on bike trails. Maybe on the road but definitely not on the trail.
[Reply]
  • + 3
 For me the biggest thing in here is what was not shown: Shimano XTR 11 speed... Good that I resisted XO1! (well, let's see what they show in the next weeks...)
  • + 3
 Maybe they will have only 10 speed with wide range or 12 speed?
  • + 1
 Or something else (skeptical). Yes we have no clue what's coming nor when. That's probably what I find exciting! No it's not rational, I know!
  • + 1
 There was that geared hub.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Good review, a few pics and a few words on lots of products. So mixing wheel sizes is new? Not really... Wider rims, more volume-650b over 26", also more volume-Clown Shoe, most volume!
[Reply]
  • + 4
 That Liteville is beautiful!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I have a mk2 601,i can say without a doubt it is the best all round bike i have owned,bar none.It climbs with relative ease and descends like a mini dh rig.Now i'm tempted to run 650b front wheel as well?
[Reply]
  • + 0
 Some comments in the Shimano section could be taken to imply that two (or three) ring cranksets are going away. That would be extremely unlikely. Firstly, not even extremely healthy athletes can push Enduro race bikes up steep hills. The rationale for getting rid of the granny ring isn't that it is not useful but rather that the drivetrain can be made simpler, lighter and more reliable, the same reasons that single ring drivetrains have made their way into XC racing. Simplicity, weight and reliability are important considerations for any bike but critical for a race bike. XX11/01 and whatever Shimano has planned in a one-by does not represent a compelling choice for a rider of average skill and fitness who is not happy with the idea of carrying their bike around a lot. One-by drivetrains may exert some influence on the future of two and/or three-by cranksets but that is only because pedaling has to be optimised for some chainring size and consequently it would be likely that the larger ring on a two-by or the mid ring on a three-by would be closely matched to the size of the chainring on the one-by, assuming these bikes are to share the same suspension geometry. Bikes appearing without provision for a changer gives a clue as to the purpose of those bikes, it doesn't necessarily have any deeper implications.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I'm really liking those magnesium pedals, I've always rode flats and would love to have those under my feet! That little shredder bike is cool too. Lapierre rear end reminds me of the one from the older gt.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I want some wide rims, to demo a liteville, an xtr 1x11, and that sugoi jacket on chainlove! Now that helmet...looks like a big target for branches..expensive lenses I'm sure!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I'm so excited about the giant reign x . I've got the reign sx from a few years back and it's awsome (apart from the fox forks) I havnt had an urge to buy a new dualy till now . It's time for an upgrade
  • + 1
 So that's definitely the new reign SX and not the reign X. I really wish the SX was still available in the US. Love that bike.
  • + 1
 From wat I could tell from the article it's a reign sx with more rear travel , rockshox Instead of fox and some new parts but its just called the reign x
  • + 1
 I thought so too but then went to Giant's website. That's definitely the SX. But isn't the SX just a beefier component spec then the X but same frame?
www.giant-bicycles.com/en-in/bikes/model/reign.sx/15136/66902
  • + 1
 This is indeed the Reign SX: the frame of the Reign X and the Reign SX are the same. The main spec differences are coil shock and fork vs. air shock and fork and second difference is single chainring vs. double. So, more meant for bikepark/lift use while the 'normal' Reign X is a bit more all-round due to the 2x10 (or for 2014: 1x11) drivetrain.
[Reply]
  • + 0
 What the heck have Formula done! Now the brakes looks like they were designed buy Italian Children. Its a real shame that they're going away from style but good they're heading in the performance direction.
  • + 0
 Heading in the performance direction?? They are already some of the best performing brakes on the market.
  • + 2
 Yes but they're obviously not that interested in making them look nice, so they're spending money on making them easier to bleed and service.
  • + 1
 How do they get any easier to bleed?Took me less than 10 minutes to bleed mine.
  • + 0
 Easier to service then......In any case you can't bleed them faster then hope brakes.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I'll have the pedals, the shorts , Two of those brakes, That bike in a Large, One of these , couple of those.......................
[Reply]
  • + 1
 The icons for rebound adjusting is a rabbit and a turtle on a Rockshox fork. That Formula fork uses a leopard and a .......snail??
  • + 1
 Jackalope, no rabbits on RockShox.... Just sayin'
  • + 1
 Oh! Just noticed there are horns on its head! Thanks for clarify. Here in China 99.5% riders says that's a rabbit! P.S. what interesting is that the Chinese name of a jackalope also contains the character for "rabbit".
[Reply]
  • + 2
 Who the hell would build a bike that big with 26" wheels? I had one, it handled like shit.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I prefer the look of these electric bikes over those - www.youtube.com/watch?v=m65ovR9N2VQ&feature=youtube_gdata_player
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Good to see more options for our up and coming youth. I will definately be buying my son a bike that size when the time comes!
[Reply]
  • + 3
 the liteville 601 has 190mm of rear travel... not 160....
[Reply]
  • + 3
 The Lapierre Overvolt is an abomination!
  • + 2
 It's fine with me as long as the eBike riders stick to ATV trails and roads.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 that overvolt thing must be a typo... should have said overweight... your choice if its in regards to the bike or the rider....
  • + 1
 or Overkill.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 If I wanted an all terrain bike that didn't require pedaling I would just buy a moto, I don't understand the need for an electric bike.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 the liteville looks awsome reminds me of the canyon torque though
[Reply]
  • + 2
 Does Hugh Jass work for a top secret lappiere lab?
  • + 6
 that electric bike would explain his huge problem...
  • + 1
 Yeah him and that other engineer Chester Field.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 I need that kmc chain in my life!!
[Reply]
  • + 2
 That new Reign X looks like a heavy old lump of lard.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 that head tube angle on the corratec bothers me
[Reply]
  • + 2
 Stop. Stop stop stop making electric bikes
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Mag pedals Sweet! They will go great on my E bike Smile . Only it would never see dirt I d ride it to work.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 w/o question that Casco helmet is the sexiest piece of enduro headgear in the cosmos
[Reply]
  • + 1
 novatec blah blah blah cheap blah blah $2000? Isn't that the price point for all carbon wheels?
[Reply]
  • + 1
 If it is going to be electric they could at least make it a gearbox bike with a better chain line.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 when I saw the corratec xc bike I kind of cringed because if the y ever produce it the price would be out of this world
[Reply]
  • + 1
 "Corratec, one of Europe's leading brands" is it?? new stuff is always great to see, even that you know won´t go far...
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Has anyone actually seen any Syntace wheelsets? They look interesting, but I don't believe they really exist.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Quit saying ebike it's a f'ing moped and they have no place on the trails. Mopeds belong on paper routes not on singletrack.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I was actually considering the reign x 0, but now, I don't want to buy a dh bike!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Those Mavic wheels are a bargain. With tyres and shit.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Will Marrzochi make the fork on the Kraftstoff available to the public.
[Reply]
  • + 0
 Thirtyfive fork paragraph title is mispelled Richard. Grammar police at your service. Great write up nevetheless.
  • + 14
 Shouldn't nevertheless have an r in it?
  • + 1
 Grammar police at my service too...
  • + 1
 grammar != spelling
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Novatec factor wheels and formula thirtyfive looks great!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Syntace 601 looks soooo nice.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Is Fox officially making a 36 for 650b bikes?
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Does that mean that Scott own Liteville as well as Syntace?
  • + 2
 you might be confusing syncros with syntace
  • + 1
 That I am! Thanks.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 like the the plastic shimano caliper
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Painted chain $130 us... Not Dope!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Taipan... Hutchinson, you're keep going in the WRONG WAY!!!
  • + 1
 You don't like the name or the tire?
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Liteville 601 ...... love love love
[Reply]
  • + 1
 What is Novatec frewheel engagement angle ?
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Electric bikes belong in hell
[Reply]
  • + 1
 That Kraftstoff is amazing! Looks kind of like an old hardtail huck bike!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Ha! Those 40mm wide rims got nothing on my 100mm clown shoe rims!
[Reply]
  • + 0
 Can someone please put a quarter next to that Euro?
  • + 1
 I actually had a US quarter in my pocket, but...'Euro-Bike' ; )
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Painted chain... Dope.
[Reply]
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