Exercises To Improve Your Standing Pedaling Power

Nov 6, 2012 at 0:05
Nov 6, 2012
by James Wilson  
 
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I'm a huge advocate for standing up more to pedal for two reasons - standing up allows you to apply more power to the pedals and to better flow over the trail and execute your technical skills. In other words, you can ride faster and have more fun when you are standing up to give 'er. Unfortunately, though, most riders have that instinct stamped out early when they are told to only stand up if they have to because they'll tire themselves out too fast.

Bull crap, I say. Seated pedaling isn't "better", it is just easier and since when was taking the easy way out a good excuse? Standing pedaling does require a different type of core strength and leg drive than seated pedaling does and a lot of riders who lack this type of strength mistake the excessive fatigue caused by standing pedaling as a warning to avoid it, not a call to work harder on it.

Once you've built the right type of core strength and leg drive you'll find standing pedaling much easier to execute, as well as finding much more power in your pedal stroke. One of the best exercises to work on this specific type of strength is the Airborne Lunge:


However, this is a very difficult exercise that few riders can do without working into it. In this video I show you the exercise progressions I use to help riders learn how to do this essential exercise to increase their power and endurance when standing up to pedal.

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MTB Strength Training Systems is the world leader in integrated performance training programs for the unique demands of mountain biking. As the strength and conditioning coach for World Cup Teams and 3 National Championships, his programs have been proven at the highest levels. James has helped thousands of riders just like you improve their speed, endurance and skills on the trail. Visit www.bikejames.com to sign up for the free Trail Rider Fundamentals Video Mini-Course.

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97 Comments

  • + 74
 Huh, another neat looking exercise I'll try at the gym tonight. Then I'll get more weird looks from the half wits who just work their chest and arms that have tooth pick legs. lol
  • + 7
 Amen to that!
  • + 39
 Friends don't let friends skip leg day!
  • + 4
 haha so true. posers with their wife beater shirts and jeans Razz
  • + 5
 P90 x was awesome for all the above responses^^^
  • - 11
 Disagree, I only work upper body at the gym because mashing on my bike accounts for the lower body. The best way to pedal harder out of the saddle is to get out and ride your bike.
  • + 2
 That's why hoy doesn't squat...
  • + 3
 If that was true, no athletes would train in a gym and they'd focus on their sport but it's not the case for most of them.
  • - 3
 In this sport, not necessary since the motions are similar depending on riding position and style. I believe technique on the bike is more important. There is a limit to the force of the "squat" you can exert on a bike pedal because your body is not fixed, and there is NOT a direct tradeoff between force exerted and endurance, that is dependent on a number of other factors (white muscle, red muscle, VO2, etc.). Power output is the product of speed and force. Look at Jan Ullrich v. Lance Armstrong riding styles......
  • - 1
 Yeah, I've read a bunch of article about strength coaches saying that once you reach a certain strength level, your focus should shift to getting better at the sport you're training for as getting a, lets say 3xBW squat, will do very little compared to staying at 2xBW for all the time (and risk) invested in getting there.
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  • + 22
 If I do these exercises my knees will simply pop out of my legs...
  • + 2
 Haha I just did 5 (with my rear foot on the ground), and I just crumbled under my own weight and lack of strength Big Grin was fun tho
  • + 4
 These are some really difficult exercises and they give me an idea that using weights for training is pointless unless you can do those with ease. If I have trouble with handling my body in such way, how exactly does weight lifting help?! Then you go to the gym and see a couple of boys swinging around some big weights on machines, then go to the side and can't even do a good push up.

Prejudice is a bad thing but I'm still gonna say it. I am pretty sure that following goes through minds of many: the bigger the toy the bigger his penis seems to others - men should go out to the gym naked, less injuries guaranteed, no appearance deception, no exagarations! It is what it is!
  • + 1
 I could squat 260lbs this spring, at 145lbs bodyweight. Great form, very stable, great depth.

I tried single leg bw squats just for the hell of it. I can hardly do 5 mostly due to poor balance but they also felt extremely heavy on the quads. From what I read once you get the stability part, the weight go up fast though. I've seen people single leg squat with 200lbs+ dumbbells in each hand. At a point you don't have the choice to increase weight to gain strength.

Don't forget leverage also. If you do a straight pull up, it's much easier than a L pull up, which is much easier than a planche pull up. No weight is involved, its all about increasing leverage with arms angle.
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  • + 5
 I spent my formative years riding a jump bike for everything...and I lived at the top of a hill. Now I pretty much never sit down to pedal!
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  • + 3
 I can easily do full 1 leg squats, so what is the recommended exercise to further development? Is it to add additional load/weight? Or should it be to increase reps?

I do 1 leg squats with my leg out in front so that I can go all the way down to the point my bum touches my foot. Is that extra range worth working on or is the exercise above more constructive?
  • + 1
 try the overhead pistol squat...
  • + 4
 Put weights in your hands...Dumbbells, or smaller plates
  • + 6
 All this functional single leg squats is all well and good for determining strengths/weaknesses/muscle imbalances/muscle tightness etc but you will not develop as much strength or power as basic traditional exercises. E.g back squat or front squat, or basic plyoimetrics e.g. squat jump/jumping lunges.

I agree that it is a tough exercise to do and not many people will have the coordination or range of motion to do it. But compare this exercise to Heavy 5rep max back squat supersetted with 12 jumping lunges (3-4sets) that done 2x a week aded into a normal program will get far greater increases in power output. Then 30sec standing sprints on a turbo trainer 2min rest x 4-6 sets then you're really onto a winner. Don't believe me try it for yourself!
  • + 2
 @ oliverody, totaly agree, I do a lot of power movements (dynamic squats, lunges, max squats, deadlifts), this exersise seemed pretty easy to do for 8-10 reps when i tried it. I think starting with the basics will give people the greatest gains.
  • + 3
 @rejean exactly many s&c coaches try to go too specific with exercises replicating sporting movements. The transferrance of traditional simple exercises will result in greater performance, the exercise James shows is very specific in relation to a pedalstroke but I doubt that will increase leg power or core strength as much as a select group of traditional exercises such as heavy squats or plyometrics that target those aspects. If you want specificity then get out on your bike, turbo, or exercise bikes and take on a program that uses standing all out sprints.
  • + 1
 Totally onboard with oliverody. I haven't watched many of James videos but my impression is he likes exercises that require minimal equipment and that will be beneficial for most of the AVERAGE population. For the more advanced then the big lifts are key(squats, deadlifts, lunges, etc.).

For what he proposes, were talking strength and building up our lactic acid thresholds. This works well for skiing too but I like a 5-10-20 or 6-12-24 I call them. Essentially a heavy lift followed by two exercises to really induce lactic acid build up, i.e. 6 heavy squats to failure-10 sec rest-12 weighted lunges-10 sec rest-24 jump squats(legs, especially the quads will be fried) and follow with a few minutes of easy spin to flush out the lactic acid.

unclesomebody-I believe he promotes the airborne lunge over pistol because the pistol has the weight further back on ones heel so is more glute biased versus the airborne lunge has the weight more forward and is quad biased and more similar to the standing pedal.
  • + 1
 @ oliverody

Agree about the plyo stuff, but I've heard some concerns about back problems related to compressing the discs in your spine over time with heavy-weighted squats. I know a few people who stay away from them, instead doing leg-presses as not to put pressure on the spine.
  • + 1
 Those people are Soft. Squat till you puke, then Squat some more. The squat is the basis for every fitness program. There is a reason why you can leg press more then double what you squat, because its easier. Your body builds up a tolerance for the weight on your shoulders.
  • + 2
 @ frolosophy

If you believe that then you're exactly the person the video above is targeted for. Squats and deadlifts DO need to be performed correctly (good form and appropriate weight) to avoid injury and if you want to learn then seek out a competent trainer and not your close buddy who 'lifts'.

There are just too many benefits from squats/deadlifts to ignore them from your life. They are the ultimate and most functional "core" strengthener, will help in fixing your posture from being stooped over your bike and work desk, strengthen both the anterior(front) and posterior(back) of your legs, not to mention the increased testosterone production, etc, etc. But again, they NEED to be done properly to get these results.
  • + 1
 @frolosophy squats are only dangerous when not done correctly, if you have the correct weight for your ability for a select amount of reps you will be fine provided you're warmed up and ready for lifting. And @robnow absolutely agree that squats and deadlifts should be done by all who are able to.
  • + 1
 Thanks for the good quality discussion, agree completely with the effectiveness of a more traditional gym based program - well worth considering if your serious about your riding and currently not doing weights.

The only thing I'll add is plyometrics has limited value to a cyclist as there is no stretch / shorten cycle in a pedal stroke.
  • + 1
 @smuggly plyometrics is used to increase the explosive power in the muscle and it also increases the neuromuscular recruitment and coordination of the muscles. I can see that there is little comparison to something like squat jumps to cycling but the power increases developed through the plyo training will transfer across to vast power increases in the pedalstroke.
  • + 1
 @cepon

The reason you can leg press more weight than you squat is simple physics. You have more leverage in a leg press and you don't have to lift your body weight in addition. Simply add more weight to compensate; your leg muscles will still have to do the same amount of work in the end. Also, the discs in your spine don't strengthen over time.

@robnow & oliverody

Incorrect form, though a big issue, is not exactly what I was getting at. Squats put an abnormal amount of pressure on your spine regardless of form (though incorrect form greatly increases the pressure at certain points). While they are a great exercise, the human spine isn't designed to have a lot of weight put on it vertically. It doesn't really matter how strong you are, your spine still takes the same amount of weight.

If you squat say 200lbs, that's 200lbs of force on your spine. If you leg press a comparable amount to make up for the increased leverage and lack of bodyweight as mentioned, your spine is under no additional compression. Between the two, the leg presses are clearly less strenuous on your spine.

I know that squats can be extremely beneficial for some people in some ways. It just seemed a pertinent point to make when obvious lifters recommend something that isn't necessarily beneficial for everyone in the long run, when there are other exercises that can substitute for squats without the added compression of the spine.

Thanks for the replies, though. Always interesting to see other peoples' perspectives/experiences.
  • + 1
 @frolosophy - thanks for input, interesting stuff!

@oliverody: Lately I had a luxury of meeting a functional movement specialist - man I thought I knew something about squats and deadlifts as I train for 3rd year with James program (that involves all exercises you mention and maaany more). That woman showed me I didn't know shit, and it scared one out of me. She made me do squats with no weight, in a proper way correcting me all the time, and guess what, I barely did 12 vs 8 with 120lbs I tend to do later in the season. Does that ring a bell? There are so many details and checks to make when working with weights, not only, doing it wrong exposes you for an injury, but for it should be most interesting for you, does not bring as good effects as proper execution. Just as 10 well made push-ups bring more effect than 50 whatevers. Watch some guys doing gymnastics and tell them that bodyweight is for beginners. Trust me 99.999% weight lifting people have no clue what they are doing, I am one of them, if you are on this site you have a high chance of being one as well.

I do use lifts in my training but I work harder on bodyweight exercises, because if I can't handle well the weight of my body, how good am I then? James has put out a tough and heavy thought once - MTB is not a good way to get fit and healthy, but it's a good motivation to do training that will contribute to your health, true strength and fitness
  • + 1
 @wakldesigns if its any help I have a masters degree in applied exercise physiology and a batchelors degree in sports science focussing on strength and conditioning and physiology. I am now a self employed strength and conditioning coach and personal trainer and work with professional sports clubs and elite athletes including a national champ dh racer in the uk. So I have a little backing up to my points. (Please don't take that in the wrong way)

I feel people are misunderstanding my points however, @frolosophy yes leg press is still a good exercise I never said it wasn't but the issue people have when standing pedalling is core strength which a leg press won't improve which is why I suggested weighted squats for quote above "those who are able to".

The main aspect with standing pedalling is to increase power in the pedalstroke so to improve power I would suggest that weighted squats combined with a plyometric exercise will provide the greatest improvements in leg power outputs. Bodyweight exercises are great too I am a great believer in them as I use them all the time with many of my clients, I just had a different view to improving peoples ability for out the saddle riding.
  • + 1
 God, I hate that crossfit-ish "work until you die and then work some more" mentality. Highway to injury much? Not everyone is on steroids either. Most COMPETENT strength coach will tell you that leaving 1-2 reps in the tank will be more beneficial if you're doing heavy work. Intensity is key but you have to respect your body's limits. there is no point in overdoing it. Everybody is different so everybody should train differently (body types, stress level, sleep quality bla bla bla).

As for leg press, my main gripe with it is that it pretty much ignores your stabilizers which are extremely important. Unilateral exercises (1leg) are much easier on the back than your conventionnal deadlifts/squats and they also work your stability a lot.

Also keep in mind that the biking disciplines have very different needs. With a winter spent doing deadlifts/squat/bench/rows I felt like DH was so much easier but when I got on my AM bike, "pathetic" was an euphemish to describe my cardio and endurance.

Not a big fan of indoor cardio either. It's so boring and after a winter of hiit on a stationary bike I felt my cardio hasn't got any better when I got on my bike. Trying a different approach this winter.
  • + 1
 Oh and don't forget that squats and deadlift take a lifetime to master and even then. I've spent years in gyms and I've only seen like 3 people squat/deadlift properly and even if my form is lightyears ahead of the average gym trainee, a competent strength coach would probably tell me my form is terrible. I can see why james doesn't want the average biker to drink the deadlift/squat coolaid.

Getting your athletes stronger and more powerful is great but even the strongest most powerful athlete is useless if injuried.
  • + 1
 @oliverody - don't fire your "crediblity" weapons too soon, what's left if the enemy is still standing? Wink I am an architect (quite a broad subject as well) and have some coleagues in trade with 10yrs+ experience who make very far fetched statements on many issues. No disrespect to your merits in the field but your approach is of a less safe one. I am a rookie but already know how easy it is to overtrain and overStrain. I haven't got any serious injury but I take it as graduation of smart approach to training instead of being called a pussy by a bloke who lifts double my stuff and still stays behind on uhpills... and I know a few... James approach is indeed a careful one, and if people were doing such exercises, bridges, chin ups, push ups, even sun salutations, on regular basis in a mindful and disciplined manner - they would get much more out of their training than by going to the gym in unregulated way.

Because going to the gym is a pain in the ass, the process of getting to and from is taking more time than I take to put a good work out at home with body weight, yoga matt, few dumbbells, kettlebells and jumping rope. So it requires strong mental commitment and preparation and true, deeper motivation - most people lack that and that's why they fail, their motivation is: I buy a gym card, I spend lots of money so it will motivate me to use it. For instance, please ask some random non-pro client a couple of months into the process whether he/she stretches after own work out. This dull anf painful activity after the "challenge" is over, that they don't understand and don't see effects of at all.
  • + 1
 @wakldesigns I wasn't firing my qualifications at you I was merely stating that I have knowledge in this area as I felt that I was being tarred with the brush of a typical gym bunny. Like I said I use those bodyweight exercises with many of my clients they are very good exercises! Yes many people try to lift heavy weights and don't what they're doing and get injured etc but if you know how to do them safely and properly, they work.

Again I feel people are seriously misunderstanding my points. I am of the absolute belief that people should only perform exercises that are within their own capabilities with correct form and technique. I have suggested squats and plyometrics as a counter suggestion to what James has recommended which I believe will be a superior training method for those who can do it. I do believe squats deadlift etc are very important exercises for everyday life not just training BUT I understand full well that not everyone has the facilities or abilities to do such exercises and shouldn't if they have anything that will put them at risk of injury when doing these exercises.
  • + 1
 @PLC07 if you're referring your comment to any of mine I do not believe that people should train until they're sick or can't walk as that achieves very little as you have rightly pointed out. The methods I was suggesting was 5reps (5reps with correct form and range of motion, generally 80-85% 1rep max) supersetted with squat jumps either bodyweight for 10reps or weighted at 30% 1rep max for 6reps do 3-4 sets 2min rest between sets, this I know for a fact works and works with a variety of people including myself and about 10 of my clients the majority of whom ride. I did suggest 30sec sprint intervals to increase power and increase aerobic capacity and there's a S#@t load of literature supporting the effectiveness of that BUT I agree that is very intense and not for everyone and should be done with a reduced lifting program. Other than that I haven't mentioned or implied that anywhere in any of my comments about lifting until you're sick so appologies if you weren't talking to me.

The exercises I suggested should only be done within a program for 4-5 weeks as 1) the body adapts to those exercises and you will plateau and 2) you do run the risk of overuse injuries if you prolong programs. I didn't realise people would be of the impression that you should do this all the time in your training! Varying load, reps and rest is essential to improving.

I was just suggesting an exercise that will be an alternative to those given in the article which I believe will benefit people (who are able) more.
  • + 1
 @oliverody

Thanks for the input, again. I should point out that I have no real stake in any of this as I do almost exclusively bodyweight calisthenics and gymnastics-style exercises. I should have addressed the issue of core strength in retrospect. Yes, squats recruit a ton of muscles and are very good at increasing core strength. However, all the stabilizing muscle strength in the world won't save you from compression based injuries and strain, which I think is lost on many people amid the lore surrounding squats. What it seems to come down to is whether you feel the short-term benefits of squats outweigh any potential long-term problems. Like I said, I wouldn't be doing them anyway as I almost never use weights, but my core is plenty strong regardless.
  • + 1
 @oliverbody - ok, sorry for misunderstanding Wink
  • + 2
 I was refering to cepon3 mainly.

Squats/deadlift variations are key strength program exercises. I absolutely love those exercises. You have to keep in mind that the average pinkbike user probably never went in a gym though. I feel it's kinda like bringing a dh newcomer into a bike park and telling him "if you wanna race downhill you gotta start hitting those 50ft jumps".

I also used to read that unless you're an olympic athlete it's pretty much impossible to overtrain. Well I've overtrained for sure doing heavy strength work with a program that seemed somewhat light. I'm still paying the price today so that's why I'm saying you have to be careful with what you say to new trainees.

And as I said, strength is great but it doesn't really carry well to all disciplines. I'm a big fan of 3x3, 4x6, 5x5 and the such with proper intensity but since I switched from dh to enduro, I find that strength did very little for me especially when I see girls I ride with blaze past me in the climbs when they never set foot in a gym and don't ride all that much (at least I blaze past them in the dh sections haha!)

If you look at the big names in strength training, they all have an extremely long list of injuries they're not too proud of and most of them retired and just train to stay somewhat fit today because they just can't bear the load of str training anymore. Personally, I figured I was on the path to end up that beaten up in the end and I still want to ride my bike for the next 40 years so I figured I had to change training philosophy.
  • + 1
 Heh overtraining is easy while you get into training for real. I've turned up intensity on work outs 3 times a week, being 4 months into James program, with interval and sprint training twice a week from work to home , then 1-2h rides twice a week - then one weekend went for a really intensive 3h ride. Never felt so God daeemm strong, did it 1h shorter than two previous rides on that trail, haven't even hit the wall. Yet I woke up devastated and haven't got back to the same level for a month or so. Mental breakdown caused by it is the worst, as I sort of didn't know where to start again and how - lost confidence. I just liked how great were the results with the normal training, I felt I can try harder and turn up the heat and get reaaaaal strong - yhm...
  • + 1
 @wakldesigns no worries!

@frolosophy I would be very interested to read the literature linking weighted squats to spinal injury, I know a lot of spinal injuries through lifting comes from insufficient core strength allowing the spine to flex (when the back "rounds") which can lead to damage to the intervertebral discs and them herniating.

When you squat you should engage your core so it is rigid and breathe in on the lowering phase which will help protect the spine from flexing during the lift. It would have to be some seriously heavy weight lifted regularly over a long period of time to compress the spine (I would class heavy as over 1.5 to 2x a persons bodyweight). I doubt many people would be lifting that on a regular basis. When you lift you can engage the core ready to lift, people I know who have compressed their spines have done it in accidents when they were unable to react against the impact at high speeds, myself included (jump over-clearance to otb to faceplant next takeoff in a set of large rhythm jumps, tsg lid in 3 pieces!) very contrasting effect to a squat.

I still believe the importance of squats as I feel they don't just have a short term effect but can benefit all people. As I guess 90% + of elite athletes wouldn't be doing them if the medical/training/physio support staff were worried about the risk of injury I doubt they would prescribe the exercise to do in their training?
  • + 1
 @frolosophy (still) I agree what you say with bodyweight exercises being beneficial they link in well to any program. At the end of the day the power when pedalling comes from knee and hip extension which does occur in a leg press., so you can do the same style of heavy leg press bodyweight plyometric training and substitute in some core exercises in to make up for what squats achieve. There are many ways to skin a cat Smile !

The point I was initially making is that it is hard to achieve power increases just through a complex bodyweight exercise and that it is better to do a heavier weightbearing method eg squat/leg press + core training, however you want to achieve knee and hip extension!
  • + 1
 @oliverody

Thanks for the reply. When I speak of compression injuries and strain, I am mostly talking about squats as a regular exercise done over a long period of time (though compression occurs as soon as a force is applied--I mean compression in the physical sense, not the medical sense). When speaking of heavy weighted squats I assume we're talking about 1.5 - 2+ x a person's bodyweight - I imagine you have beginners doing much lighter weight. But yes, what I said was meant as more of a footnote to what was being said about squats in general than a totally contrary point. I'm not entirely opposed to it.
  • + 1
 @oliverody

The thing is that elite athletes usually have good coaches. Unless you go to a specialized gym with a focus on strength or you find the rare trainer in a commercial gym that has a passion for str training and has a clue, it's hard to have a sound program that fits you. I find that if you spend an hour reading tnation/elitefts you have more str knowledge than 98% of the trainers out there. You can't blame them though because hardly anybody trains for pure str.
  • + 1
 @plc07 I know what you mean with some trainers, in the UK people can do a 6week crash course on PT with no previous knowledge and get qualified they're the ones you find sitting on equipment in gyms with no knowledge of training or human physiology. If anyone is to get a trainer they should always ask for a cv of quals or testimonials from clients as there are many "trainers" who are very inexperienced and lacking proper knowledge.

You can apply a variety of training goals to various exercises it just depends on rep range and load you can use squats to build muscular endurance not just pure strength.
  • + 1
 guys any tips on exercises for strenghtening up neck and wrists for injury prevention? planche progressions and head stand?
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  • + 4
 just speaking from experience here. the best way to become a stronger pedaler is to practice sprints from a stand still. helps you outa the gate tremendously
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  • + 4
 I Just found out that I can do this exercise - Happy!!
But in my last race I could not find the strength to stand up and sprint a fireroad near the finish - Sad!! Razz
  • + 7
 im hearing you bro....you are not alone
  • + 6
 moved to enduro from downhill... i know where you guys are coming from haha
  • + 4
 Yeah same here...its like i have two spagghetti pieces for legs after a short while hahaha and by the end of the stage i am completely numb.....love it
  • + 2
 get yourself a big ringed single speed to train/commute on, combine that with James' workout tips and the queen will invite you over in no time
  • + 1
 Me too, i can do the thing, my legs are fine i guess but my left foot gets tired after 1 minute, maybe pedal or shoe problems? Damn i need to go faster.
  • + 2
 I just can't sprint for more than a few tens of yards ... then my legs start burning, and if I keep pushing beyond, they just fade away like a bunch of noodles ... and I do have a big ringed singlespeed comuter bike (might switch to a smaller cog), but I'm gonna start doing this. I love all these exercices you can do at home without any fancy equipment !
  • + 2
 ok,just woken up after doing the work out tip...i cant fucking move hahaha....gonna stick at it though.If this can help me enjoy the ride more im in.
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  • + 2
 cross-training with a little MMA works really well. kicking a heavy bag for 30 minutes does miracles for core stability/strength and leg power/endurance. plus it builds confidence like nothing else. the only problem is if you're not careful you might wear out your hands/wrists if you're not used to proper punching technique.
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  • + 3
 I try exercise last night with weight of woman on back, soon I will have legs as strong as oxe.
  • + 1
 That could be the best Borat style comment ever!
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  • + 4
 Thanks pinkbike, we need more for the winter!!!!!!!!!!!
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  • + 0
 that's shit, standing and pedalling is WAY less efficient!!! if you ride xc or road at all you would know this. Try standing and riding beside someone who's sitting and riding. you can apply way more power to the pedals with sitting, and smoother pedal strokes as well!!
  • + 1
 It may well be less efficient, but when you can do it well it becomes a valuable asset to you riding ability. Its hard to do when you start but with practice you WILL be amazed at how fast it gets easier. Its really helpful to get up shorter steep sections during a long climb and you actually feel fresher when you sit back down. Also for race starts, passing and looking awesome. I use it often as my local super d races tend to be only 5 to 15 minutes long so if you want to win you better get sprinting and standing!
  • + 2
 haha you got me all wrong! I mainly ride DH and stand up and pedal all the time! and I do stand up alot when needed, and for giving the legs a stretch on the road, or an extended climb.
  • + 1
 sitting and riding is fine for fire roads, etc - but not single track. if it's real single track expect undulations, variations, obstacles, sudden steep downhill/uphill sections etc. so the more easily you can shift your weight forward and backwards while applying power, the faster you'll be.

i'd say you'd be better off riding than doing these exercises. the main challenge you'll have won't be the leg muscle, but the lung muscle, as you'll be damn outta breathe if you sustain maximum output standing up for an entire ride!
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  • + 3
 get yourself a roadbike ..enough said!
  • + 4
 just stand up and do sprints up hills on your dh bike, weight training is good yes but this is far more real world
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  • + 1
 thanks for that awesome exercise!
it really helps a lot, i do 30 on each leg before going to sleep and i can really feel the difference! Smile
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  • + 2
 I can do the left leg not the right , im messed up Smile
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  • + 2
 That guy has the most annoying accent! Good video though
  • - 1
 yeah hobnobs he doesnt have an accent...hes just american.
  • + 1
 you're either a jackass... or just stupid.
  • + 3
 Americans have accents too. Everyone has an accent.
  • + 1
 Crewmember, thanks for a laugh either way.
  • + 2
 Lol. that brightened up my morning. Good joke crewmember. We hope...
  • - 2
 Whats america?
  • + 3
 I'm glad a few of you got my sense of humor. Lol
  • + 1
 beats a southern accent
  • + 1
 you have an annoying accent
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  • + 2
 Pump tracks also work and are way more fun.
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  • + 1
 just did a couple in my office, a lot of down time to sit here and wait for 5 to roll around and hit the trails!
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  • + 2
 Gay artical Frown
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  • + 1
 This is the first tip you've put up that I agree with! Congrats!
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  • + 1
 Anybody needs a TRX Trainer?, coz I am. Smile
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  • + 1
 Interestig exercise. Maybe I`ll try it out.
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  • + 0
 Yeah, I know this excersize for 2 years, I do it with 10-15kg on my back. It's not bad.
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 XC MADNESS !
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 Full squats will help your riding more than this waste. Concepts are few, methods are many...suckers
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 you should listen to this guy, he may sound like a quack after his "clipless pedals are evil" crap but the rest is very useful
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 well then, I really did think he was anti clipless! he does have a great point though you have to be a good rider on flats before you switch to clipless, hell im still switching back and forth constantly!
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 Oh James is a bit prejudiced towards clipless, and you know why certain people hate prejudices? Because there's so much truth in them Smile
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 that and way too many riders think clips will make them faster when most never get as confident as they were on flats, sam hill for example could ride clipped in just fine but i doubt he'd be anywhere near the same speed otherwise he'd be on them by now
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 Vast majority of amateurs riding clipless for XC think they are more efficient, while probably never training their pedal stroke. Then vast majority of DH riders use them so they feel that they help them stay on the bike and are more efficient on pedalling bits on DH races, while they usualy have no power left due to lacks in skill and fitness comparing to winning guys. Problems in staying on the bike is mostly about riding stance being not good enough for the speed you are at on certain stuff. The only place I can think of that amateur can take advantage of clips is pedalling on rough stuff.

Clipless give the edge to those who came to the level where they they can see "the edge" or at least have a good picture of it. I don't think that clipless cover for lacks of skill, as they don't do absolutely any good for unskilled and unfit ones. They just make lacks in skill seem non-present, while they are still there slowing them down, thus not motivating to excel in riding, making learning curve flatter. The things that cover for poor riding and fitness with true increase in performance is suspension, dropper posts and 29" wheel size.
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