First Look at Scott's 2013 Genius and Gambler

Jul 9, 2012
by Richard Cunningham  
 
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Ian Hylands was at Scott Sports 2013 debut in Idaho, where he photographed the new Gambler DH bike and broke the news that the Genius, Scott's premier long-travel AM/trailbike, will no longer be offered in the 26-inch wheel format. The 2013 Genius platform is designed around in 27.5 inch (650b) or 29-inch wheel diameters - a bold statement, backed up by recent 27.5-inch victories in Enduro-type events and the fact that the 26 inch wheel is nearly a ghost on the pro XC circuit. Of course, the Gambler is still a 26er, as DH remains steadfast to the traditional wheel diameter. European correspondent Matt Wragg is currently riding both the Gambler and Genius at Scott's European press launch and his piece will follow shortly with riding impressions. Until then, feast on the following photos and tech information. Photos by Ian Hylands


2013 Scott Gambler

The new Gambler chassis is available in three sizes and is based around a 210-millimeter travel rear end and a 200-millimeter-stroke Fox 40 fork up front. The Gambler shares nothing in common with its predecessor, except a similar shock rate. The Floating Link suspension is a bit complicated looking, but the rear suspension remains a simple single-pivot swingarm. The new linkage uses a lower leverage rate and a longer-stroke Fox DHX RC4 shock to enhance the sensitivity of the suspension and to make tuning more effective. All bearing and pivot locations have been redesigned to be easy to maintain and the head tube is a straight 1.5-inch size to accommodate its AngleSet adjustable-angle headset. The swingarm pivot has been raised to create a more rearward axle path to better handle square-edge hits. The new pivot location flies in the face of present convention, because higher pivot locations cause chain growth issues, but in Scott's case, the decision came from the race team - who were happy to deal with a little chain growth in exchange for better big-hit suspension performance. Frames are available with either threaded or PressFit bottom brackets and the frame weight is stated to be 3.6 kilograms without a shock. A range of race-ready bikes will be offered as well as a frame-and-shock option. The new Gambler chassis is currently being raced on the World Cup circuit. Prices to be announced.

2013 Scott Gambler -
  New for 2013, the Gambler features a multi-adjustable chassis with two chainstay length options, two bottom bracket heights, three available AngleSet's for the 1.5-inch head tube for up to 4 degrees of adjustment in the head angle (60-64), and an all new low-leverage 'Floating Link' suspension design. The basic configuration is still a single-pivot swingarm, however, with a slightly higher pivot location to better handle square-edge bumps and rock gardens. The new chassis has put in a promising effort in this year's World Cup DH series.


2013 Scott Gambler - rear swingarm
   A close look at the Gambler's scissor-esque Floating Link system. The main benefit is touted to be lower bearing friction at the beginning stroke and the use of a longer shock at a lower leverage ratio. It also keeps most of the weight of the shock and suspension linkage centered over the bottom bracket, a benefit that has Brendan Fairclough stating that the bike whips better than anything else he has ridden. The use of a longer-stroke Fox RC4 shock means that the suspension will be moving a lot more oil through the damping circuits, making the system more sensitive to tuning inputs. Scott says that the 2013 Gambler's suspension's rate curves are very close to the previous model's. To keep the rear end tracking, the swingarm's main pivot uses large bearings and a huge, 25-millimeter hollow axle.


2013 Scott Gambler - rear brake mount
  The IDS-X 12mm through-axle is tapered at each end to lock it into place, and the axle is machined off-center, eccentric to the head, so that it can't rotate once it is tightened. Two dropout positions allow for 15 millimeters of chainstay-length adjustment. An extra set of brake caliper holes allows the brake to follow the chainstay adjustment.


2013 Scott Gambler - fork bump stops
  All the hoses and housings are external and full-length, so that mechanics can switch out components quickly. Lessons learned on the World Cup, no doubt. The aluminum chassis has built-in rubber fork stops and Fox suspension on both ends.


Scott USA Gambler geometry



2013 Scott Genius

Scott's elite-level trailbike is also all-new for 2013, and the big news, beyond the fact that the bike will not be sold with 26 inch wheels, is that Scott has abandoned its novel, three-chambered pull shock in favor of a lighter weight conventional air-sprung damper and a quite normal-looking rocker-link suspension. The carbon fiber and aluminum frame is offered in two models: the 150-millimeter-travel Genius 700 designed around 27.5 inch wheels and the 130-millimeter-travel Genius 900 designed specifically for 29 inch wheels.Scott retains the 'Twinloc' handlebar remote that reduces the suspension travel of the shock and firms up the pedaling feel of both shock and fork simultaneously. The three functions: locked, traction and descend are integrated into a DT Swiss 'Nude' shock in the rear and a Fox Float fork up front. Scott's reason for utilizing a conventional shock and frame design is to save weight, plain and simple, and with the bike's relaxed frame geometry, we expect a Scott assault on the European Enduro series next year. Prices and delivery to be announced.

2013 Scott Genuis -
  Scott USA's 2013 Genius 900 looks nearly normal by comparison to this year's model. Both the 27.5 and 29 inch wheel frames are stated to weigh five pounds (2.3 KG) with shock. The suspension is a single-pivot swingarm driving a rigid wrap-around rocker link to a DT Swiss dual-travel air shock. The bottom bracket is a 92-millimeter PressFit type fitted with ISCG mounts.


2013 Scott Genuis - head tube cable routing
  Internal cable routing cleans up the traffic jam created by Twinloc's extra two housings. The three-position Fox CTD damping system (Climb Trail Descend) fits perfectly into Scott's Twinloc strategy


2013 Scott Genuis - rear brake mount
  Post-mount caliper bosses are integrated into the inside of the swingarm. The 12mm through-axle is a simple DT Swiss thread-in type.


2013 Scott Genuis - travel adjust shifter
  Scott enlarged its Twinloc levers to reduce the force needed to operate the system. Genius 700 models use the Fox 34 TALAS fork with adjustable travel from 150 to 120 millimeters, while the 29er version uses a 32-millimeter fork with fixed, 130-millimeter travel.


2013 Scott Genuis - down tube routing
  Low gearing is rare on Scott trailbikes, but they got it right this time. The red aluminum guard bolted onto the ISCG tabs keeps the chain from destroying the carbon frame. The covered port is for the internal routing of a dropper post. If a Reverb Stealth Dropper post is used the housing re-enters at the back of the seat tube. (a dropper post is rudely missing on this otherwise wonderful trailbike)


2013 Scott Genuis - rear shock
  The DT Swiss damper is well made. The Twinloc three-position damping system uses the same technology as the complicated looking pull shock it replaces: travel adjustments are made by reducing the air volume in the spring, while lockout is simply a valve and a blow-off circuit. How DT Swiss packed all that into such a tiny space is a marvel.


2013 Scott Genuis -
  Just in case you wanted to see the 650b version: The Scott Genius 700.


Scott Genius 2013 geometry


Scott Sports 3 ROX Racing team rider Geoff Kabush is excited about the new Genius and will be riding the 27.5 version in the Trans Provence race this fall.
  Scott Sports 3 ROX Racing team rider Geoff Kabush is excited about the new Genius and will be riding the 27.5 version in the Trans Provence race this fall.

Stay tuned for a detailed riding impression of the 2013 Gambler and Genius coming up soon.


Must Read This Week

172 Comments

  • + 65
 That gambler is for sure sexy
  • + 4
 Seriously?
With a 62° headangle?
That's way too slack imo... Scott's just exaggerating the saying "The slacker the better"
  • + 32
 When I tried My Summum with the 62 deegree HA that was what came to my mind "holly shit,I can't ride that thing!"...
Maybe it's cool on a very very steep descents but it's not an option for most of the trails and for sure it's pure craziness for a tight and narrow cornering.

BTW I really don't like that frame design... :/
  • + 33
 The Gambler has 3 available AngleSets for one degree adjustments between 60 and 64 degrees.
  • + 2
 An AngleSet isn't the answer to a steeper or slacker head angle. The bike would probably ride terribly with a 60 or 64 degree head angle as it was designed to have a 62-62.7 HA. And besides, those AngleSets are rather unreliable...
  • + 1
 The bottom of the range gambler only comes with the 62 degrees cups I think.
  • - 2
 it looks amazing but the gambler is to complex for sure!
  • + 25
 I can't wait to see the massive pile up on Too Tight in WBP with all the groms trying to ride bikes with 60 degree head angles and 900mm baaaaas.
  • + 5
 It looks awesome, but it is simply a single pivot with a fancy progressive lever... Nothing drastically impressive... But it looks good and is a very safe coulour too!
  • + 1
 Really like the new Gambler, don't know how much i'd like to ride it (hopefully fill find out Razz ) and the rear post mount on the genius is neat but is it practical??
  • + 1
 only thing i dont like about the gambler is the fact how much of the seat post is showing...doesnt look right to me.
  • - 4
 sexy? seriously? this frame looks like a kindergarten committee had a go with the concept, and scott said "hmmm,, yes, ok, ok,,,BUILD IT!"
  • + 3
 The Gambler looks like an alien spaceship.. In a good way! And you can tell its a Brendog Bike, Lets get slack!
  • + 3
 Hopefully they price this bike good. looks like a killer. a big step up from there old gambler
  • + 6
 Sorry, but if you people can't wrap your heads around a 62 degree head angle, you're going to fucking slow.
  • + 1
 Carrot-Top Yeah, I have ridden 4 different bikes with anglesets and every single one clicked noticeably at the headset, and two needed tightening after every 15-20 bike park laps. I am not saying they can't be set up properly, just that I have never felt one that seemed solid yet.
  • + 2
 ^workscomponents uk makes fixed angle cups for a very reasonable price, no creaking or any sounds with mine, runs like a normal headset(aslong as you install it lined up properly)
  • + 4
 I have an angleset headset on my v10 carbon, having used chris king for years was a bit worried with all the reviews, mine has survived a british winter and this wet ass summer and ive had no problems or clicking. They take about three times longer to install but like with anything, you install it correctly, its going to work correctly.
  • + 1
 Gonna be at least £5000 plus Frown better start saving!
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  • + 10
 Not keen on the Scott Genius, should be called the new Spark. Loved the 2012 Genius, should of been an updated version of that.
  • + 5
 I think you'll find that this bike performs way better! I absolutely loved the 27.5 (650B) version, and I was quite surprised at how well the 29'er rode. And one great benefit of the new design is that if needed you can replace the shock with one from another manufacturer, it's non-proprietary.
  • - 2
 Yes, but they should have this design and should have called it the Spark. The frame design on the old Genius was great and super light. Unless they bring out a new line of bikes for the All-mountain epics and use the old Genius design.
  • + 15
 I'm sorry to disappoint you with the news, but the old Genius is gone, and this is the replacement. I can tell you from having ridden both that this feels a lot better than the old Genius, and it's lighter. It's called progress, don't hate on it until you try it....
  • + 1
 I understand what youre saying but I like how its a standard shock size. Makes it a little simpler
  • + 1
 hey guys back in march i saw all three prototypes, a 26" a27.5" and a 29" of this genius. all three bikes with all wheel sizes. I can tell you for a fact that they were testing all 3 sizes and the fact that they dropped the 26in version must be for a damm good reason. After trying a 650B bike the last days I can say that yes I think they probably made the best choice for AM use.... 27in feels near as dammit the same as a 26in except climbing and bumps are easier to roll over with no loss of changing direction becoming a problem,...I for one think the whole AM market will go 27.5" after riding one for the last 3 days...
  • + 4
 But what if im a stubborn 26 inch rider that loves the last genius and the genius LT because of its AM capabilities what will I do now?
  • + 1
 As the specialized proprietary top caps say, innovate or die. There's your answer.

On another note, isn't either Yeti 575 or asr-5 carbon more travel and equal weight? This thing looks almost like a specialized epic... not at all an all mountain bike. I'm sure that spesh's bike is lighter too.
  • + 2
 @IH4LIFE I can't say anything about the future of the Genius LT, I simply don't know, but I would guess that it might not change completely. Also this new Genius uses an almost identical pivot point and rear end to the old Genius, it's just the linkage and shock that has changed, and it has changed for the better from my experience. So it feels a lot like the old Genius, only better and with slightly bigger wheels.

@VTwintips I wouldn't compare this in any way to a Specialized Epic, closest comparison would be to a Stumpy EVO Carbon. And the 29er weighs in at just around 25 lbs, the 27.5 bike is slightly heavier because of the fork, but still under 26 I believe, both frame and shock combo's weigh in at 5 lbs.
  • + 1
 Oh my bad. I thought it said 92 mm of travel not 130 - 150 mm. Ya that's actually quite impressive. To be clear, it would be fun to ride that down Hellion would it? Not like a spesh evo or enduro I mean.
[Reply]
  • + 9
 Love the 2013 Scott lineup already! For AM riding you can't mess with the "Twinlock" remote.
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  • + 9
 my AM dreamlist just got updated. that 27,5 150mm baby is a musthave.
  • + 4
 It's amazingly fun to ride, up and down! And the twin loc works really well...
  • + 1
 What did you think of the DT Swiss shock @IanHylands? Never tried one.
  • + 1
 All I can really give are my initial riding thoughts, I only spent 2 days on the both of them 27.5 and 29, but I was pretty stoked with both. I had a bit of trouble getting the bike set up initially, problems that had nothing to do with the shock itself, but more the older shock pump I think. Once it was set up though, it rode really well, I didn't really notice the shock, which is a good thing. The bike feels lighter and more agile on the climbs than the older Genius (I didn't ride last years) especially with the twin loc, and it's performance descending surprised me. I thought I would really like the 27.5 more, as it's more like a 26" bike, but after spending a day on the 29 version I'm not so sure. I definitely need to spend more time on both.
[Reply]
  • + 3
 can anyone tell me how many companies are using the press fit bottem bracket these days? what's the benefit? brendog rolled past me at fortwilliam.... and the creaks coming from it were unbearable! no idea if it was the headset, bb or pedals!? and from what I've heard, angle headset are more hassel than there worth, great concept... but has anyone had 100% reliability from them??
  • + 3
 Benefit? The companies have it ($$$). Reliability? No. lol
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  • + 4
 There was a time when the old school Specialized Demo (Around 2005-2006) was like the sickest design for me..and everybody was gaga over it. But it still holds the same place in my list.
[Reply]
  • + 3
 At long last Scott have ditched the Equalizer, those things were awful... especially the pull shocks. (From personal experience)
But no 26". Thats brave, what will Faiclough ride? ... Imagine they'll release a Genius LT with 26" pretty soon though.
  • + 2
 "what will Faiclough ride?"

Wat?
  • + 2
 Think he means what will he ride if there are no 26" wheels since it might be easier for him to ride a bike with the same diameter wheels as a DH bike
  • + 1
 Sorry should have been clearer. What will Fairclough ride when he's not on the Gambler... during training, enduro races etc. I can't see him riding a 29
  • + 2
 well, why not the 27,5 version? i bet it feels almost as 26 in terms of geometry, but still rolls faster
[Reply]
  • + 4
 with the angle set scott provides, you could get the head tube angle to a super slack 60 degrees! i feel like that is a bit to slack for most stuff though. but if you need to plow downhill really fast you're covered!
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  • + 7
 Very nice 2013 gambler looks sick in green
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  • + 1
 Wonder if Cannondale is going to abandon their pull-shock design also? I kind of miss the unique look of the 2012 Genius.. looked a little more "all-mountain" and a little less "XC." Never had any problems with my 2010 Genius.
[Reply]
  • + 5
 Absolutely gorgeous looking bikes, regardless of wheel size!!!
[Reply]
  • + 4
 would love to see a video on the gambler, check out the new suspension.
  • + 2
 Yeah it would be nice just to see it being cycled thru it's travel to see what's going on , and yes I can figure it out but seeing it would be nice.
  • + 3
 Thanks man !
  • + 1
 Thanks for that video! I was super skeptical about how that much linkage would put less stress on the bearings etc but after seeing the video I am convinced. Pretty neat design considering how simple it really is! Still a bit too busy for my liking but good on Scott for trying something new. Good color scheme too.
  • + 1
 thats very cool, much more simple than I first thought, cant wait for it to come out.
  • + 1
 Hahahaha! Love the Transition "anti achronym" angle
[Reply]
  • + 4
 Flippin love the look of that new Gambler!
[Reply]
  • + 2
 sexy bike for sure !! BTW anyone note that the bike comes with ZEE brakes ?? maybe there is an explanation or it's just for the budget?
[Reply]
  • + 2
 I just love the new looks of the Gambler! That shock mount looks like an engine, if I had one i'll probably just go all the way down making motorcycle noises!
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  • + 3
 The old gambler is ugly, how this bike so good looking, so slack, so slick jesus i could just be like Brendawg! haha
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  • + 2
 obviously ima idiot but i dont like the new gambler and the genius is pretty sick...i liked the old geo and look better...will they still have a voltage fr and dh?
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  • + 4
 that gambler is the sickest looking bike ever!! wooooow yeah
[Reply]
  • + 0
 Both look amazing; love the new colorways!
I noticed the Gambler had brakes from Shimano's new Zee freeride line, despite having a Saint drivetrain. I would say that on a serious DH bike you would have to replace those with Saints.
I love the blue decals on the Fox fork on the Genius 7000! Where can I pick up some of those?
[Reply]
  • + 2
 No offense, but won't the 627.5 inch (650b) version of the Genius significantly limit tire choice...?
Not confident it's the right decision..... time will tell...
  • + 15
 No, because while right now (july 2012) tire availability is limited by quantity as manufactuers and racers the world over have been ordering every tire they can get their hands on to be ready for interbike/eurobike, the olympics, and every world cup race, enduro event, etc that's still to come this year next year every major tire brand has multiple models coming out in MILLIONS upon millions of production volume.

Right now we have three models covering four sizes from Pacenti (made by Panaracer), one from Kenda in two sizes, one from IRD (made by panaracer), one from Schwalbe and one from WTB. Next year Kenda is going to have at least 4 announced models, Schwalbe has three or four models, Maxxis will be producing them, Continental, Hutchinson, Michelin, Vee Rubber alone is going to have a half dozen models and they make more tires than anybody.
  • + 2
 Tyre choice simply needs to catch up with what us 6ft + people have been crying out for. There's only so much cross over that there can be/should be for a 15" frame and a 22" frame, wheel wise. Its annoying that there is yet another 'standard', but the reality is that it make sense, both for the consumer, and to be the first company to make successful 650b tyres.
  • + 1
 I ride a 2010 jamis 650b2 with with kenda nevegals in 27.5, do I really need anything else?
  • + 5
 A better bike and faster rolling tires...
Joking... Smile

But I do find the Nevegals kinda slow....
  • + 1
 The only people who LOVE nevegals and think they roll great are the hacks at mba.
  • + 1
 Konafarker hahaha that was good for a chuckle! I race and find my nevegals just roll fine for the muddy crap in my town, and hey, the bike came with a 5500 dollar price tag, and a full xo, joplin, noir cranks, and the sick ass white bros fork!
[Reply]
  • + 3
 gambeler is bloody beautiful :p
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  • + 1
 That genius is incredible, I've always wanted a carbon Scott but the hardtails are way too chattery and I hated the suspension set up of previous Genius'.
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  • + 1
 Really like the Gambler. Looked complicated at first, but actually a very simple concept. The styling of it is cool in that visually it strikes me as a pretty unique design.
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  • + 2
 Those all look incredible. I'll keep my eyes peeled for the demo truck in the NW!
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  • + 4
 worth a gamble.
  • + 5
 what a genius.
  • + 2
 aww i was hoping i would get neg propped Wink . ive scott alot of time for shit puns .
  • + 3
 your goin to need the patients of a saint with those cranks steve
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I personally think the old Gambler looked a lot better then the new one but that new one still looks pretty cool and I bet its amazing on the trail!
[Reply]
  • - 1
 Hmmm... the 29" version is the 900 and the 650b is the 700. I equate the number '700' with 700c, as in 29".

I would have called the Genius 29er version the 700 and the 650b version the 650.

I think the Genius has better 'rack value' than it had beforehand, well, in my eyes anyway. That old pull shock with all the canisters and dials and increment markings all over it just looked way too complicated. Some people mght like that 'technological' look, but I would say experienced mountain bikers have learned that complicated parts cause complications out on the trail - K.I.S.S. I know I am only talking about looks which don't affect the all important ride, but when you are selling a bike looks can be the deciding factor. If I had old stock on the floor with the new stock, I think smart customers would choose the new bike every time. The cafe posing set would go with the old one, methinks.
  • + 1
 Seeing as Scott is not doing metric there is no '650b' version. The 27.5 is the 700, and the 29 is the 900. 6, 7.5, and 9, that just makes way more sense...
  • + 0
 that would make sense if they were calling it the 750, but there not. 700 = 700c roadbike to most bike people.
[Reply]
  • + 4
 holy knucklebox batman!
[Reply]
  • - 1
 The Genius looks pretty slick. Nice clean lines. But, as a 6'6" 220lb rider if you're going to stick me with a Fox 34 then I may as well go all the way and ride a 29er. The biggest reason to go 650B is to get 36mm forks.

Also, if the upper linkage is anchored by the top tube/seat tube junction doesn't the suspension geometry change in the XL size? Given that it's got a taller head tube and 27mm less standover it stands to reason that the XL size won't be created by using a taller seat tube mast.
  • + 4
 Have you actually ridden either wheelsize? I'm 6'6 and I prefer my 650B bikes to my 29ers.
  • + 1
 I'd be keen for a Spark 650...
  • + 2
 I don't get it ... your problem is the Fox 34's on the 650b version and your solution is goin to the 29r with Fox 32 ? That's a weird choice ....
  • + 1
 @alexsin, I have been surprised by the number of 160 bikes that are also going to the Fox 34 at 160mm with the 15mm axle for 2013. (so keeping this bike at 150 in the front was a design/market decision, not a limitation of the fork choice)

The strength/stiffness part of the equation has started to catch up to the lighter weight part of the equation. win/win for all of us! Funny, I thought the 34 was designed to get longer travel 29er bikes going. But I've seen the fork on just as many 26 and now 27.5's.
[Reply]
  • + 3
 According to other sources the gambler frame weighs 3,9kg without shock.
  • + 2
 Quite possible Tabletop84. We pulled the Gambler's weight figure from Scott's info, although it is quite possible that there is a considerable difference between the weight of the small and large frames. RC
  • + 1
 I didn't get a chance to actually weigh the frame, but I asked them about it this morning and they assured me that it was 3.6kg
[Reply]
  • + 0
 To be honest, I'm not a huge fan of the Gambler, it would be the type of bike I'd have to take a GAMBLE on buying. Also, the Genius's design isn't very genius, I don't like the head angles.
  • + 1
 One of the advantages of using bigger wheels is that you can have steeper HA, have the same rideability of a 26'' bike with slacker HA and still get the benefits of having a steeper HA. It would be dumb to build a 650b and 29r's and not reap the benefits of them.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 I dont feel that the 32 mm Fox fork on the 29er Genius is good idea, Einstein.
[Reply]
  • - 1
 Nice Gambler - they took a Voltage and moved the main pivot up 3cm. I set up my Voltage like that a year ago. Slack 63 degree and 61 at 35% sag, low BB and 250 spring rear, silver front. Flatbar with short directmount. Setup rear is to minimize the built in platform. It does not pedal well but is buttersmooth and fast dh and on heavy drops the rearwheel rubs on seattube ;-)

The new complicated looking shock linkage is trying hiding the fact that it is just a Voltage link.
The headweld is timeproven and virtually indestructible. Same goes with the rear triangle and the upper shockmount.

All in all a very nice effort and as modern as the new Commencal.

Might get myself a frame and set it up with the budget sram stuff and a Boxxer at 61 degree.
  • + 1
 This is not a 'voltage link'
  • + 1
 Look at it closely - check the main pivot and divide the two links, subtract the Voltage`s platform. There you go. Otherwise geometry, lowness, welds, reartriangle pivot location is pure Voltage. Which makes it most likely a very good bike. My tuned and lowered and lengthened Voltage looks remarkably like this gambler - runs dh like dream.
  • + 1
 I don't see how it is a voltage link. The rear triangle is one piece where as the voltage has bearings in the rear. Also I think the pivot on the gambler is quite a bit higher than the voltage.
[Reply]
  • + 3
 Dude. No pivots on swing arm. That's very interesting and looks sick.
  • + 1
 There is a clevice type seatstay pivot just above the axle.
  • + 1
 I said no pivots on swing arm.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Does the Gambler have a lower model like how theres the specialized demo 8 1 and 2
[Reply]
  • + 2
 it's about time somebody let homer simpson design a bike.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 almost all new bikes look like my 2000 Santa Cruz Superlite. That 650 is dope.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 If i was to spend up large for a new rig, the Gambler would definately be my pick.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Nice...high viz bike so people get out of the way when your blasting it down trails!!!
[Reply]
  • + 0
 Who came up with the bright idea to paint every bike in Kawa green...?? That was soo out of fashion in 2004 already and now its coming back??
[Reply]
  • + 2
 The new Genius Frame looks like the Spark Frame!
[Reply]
  • + 2
 Hurry up with the prices!!! haha
[Reply]
  • + 1
 The new 2103 Gambler. Wauww. Things hasn't changed much the last 90 years? Razz
  • + 2
 Didn't even notice that till I read your post Smile
  • - 35
 the pivot system on the gambler is so gay looking
  • + 28
 Big-JD, Congrats, you have just won the award for "most insightful comment" of 2012. Keep up the good work
  • + 8
 It probably gave Big-JD an erection. The linkage design marks it almost near impossible to put a water bottle cage on it though... Hahah
  • + 6
 I like the look of the gambler, but that pivot system is going to be a bitch to clean.
  • - 12
 Looks like a trek Smile
  • + 1
 i was thinking it looks like the linkage system the Cannondale Moto bikes have, wich works awesome! New Scott downhill bike looks A+!
  • + 2
 that linkage must weigh a tone, time to get the drill out...
  • + 4
 Really all thats happened is that the linkage and pivots etc have all been moved together into a central location under the rider. Overall weight hasn't changed much (it's actually lighter), and the bike has a much better suspension feel, while the weight distribution is better as well.
  • + 15
 @Big-JD-
Please elaborate on how the pivot system is so "gay looking". Is the pivot system sexually attracted to other pivot systems? Are you using the word gay to mean happy? If so, why is the pivot system looking so happy? Your truly intellectual usage of the word "gay" has me befuddled as you triumph as one of the most insightful users on pinkbike.
  • + 3
 I can find humor in your comment(= dm.....
  • + 2
 Ian did you buy this bike?
  • - 1
 To gareth judson and the 12/13 others who neg propped me, was it not obvious that my comment was a joke aimed at others who comment that every downhill bike looks like a trek?

If however you didn't like the joke then that is fine and please continue to neg prop me.
  • + 3
 Neg props are not the end of the world bud.
  • + 1
 No but idiots will be buddy
  • + 1
 If the joke requires an explanation afterwards then it wasn't a good joke and the people who didn't like it are not idiots.
  • + 1
 Learn to read, I wasn't saying anything about people who didn't like it
[Reply]
  • + 1
 thank god finally a dh bike that isnt similar to all the other ones
[Reply]
  • + 1
 60 degree HA is no slack enuf, who needs to turn?
[Reply]
  • + 1
 So stoked to get this bike. It's gonna take a while though
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I think they are just running out of ideas now in regards to design.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 think i was just sick in my mouth! that is no way as slack as brendons!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Sometimes as in music - the big step forward is TOO MUCH TOO SOON
[Reply]
  • + 1
 anyone have a clue as of the release date for the gambler???
  • + 1
 Brendog suggested in the next month or two
[Reply]
  • + 0
 so... when will we get a first look at the carbon Gambler, I feel its long over do!
[Reply]
  • + 2
 Do want Gambler. Now!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 that gambler looks absolutely amazing i seriously need it in my life!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Gambler looks nicee and the shock system looks just awesome! Smile
[Reply]
  • + 1
 absolutely love the genius, such a sexy beast Razz
[Reply]
  • + 1
 i'm so glad scott went bright green for the gambler. looks sick!!!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 really nice graphic integration across the Genius's frame/linkage/shock
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Sweet lord, could there be any more links on that gambler!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I will have this Bos equipped please ha
[Reply]
  • + 0
 That DH bike shock linkage is nasty, and it just looks like scott tried too hard
[Reply]
  • + 1
 that gambler is dank shit
[Reply]
  • + 1
 in comparison to the old ones the frams are so ugly shaped
[Reply]
  • + 0
 Think I'm in love Razz Gambler looks so sexy but 62 HA is too much .
[Reply]
  • - 1
 Does anyone think that Gambler.... I don't know...... has a few too many pivots? Sweet bike though!
[Reply]
  • - 2
 Damn, this thing is still F-ugly !!!
[Reply]
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