First Ride: Air-Sprung Fox 40 Float RC2 Fork – The Truth is Revealed

Mar 26, 2013
by Richard Cunningham  
 
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Fox 40 Float fork

Fox Racing Shox has all but ditched coil springs in favor of a new air-spring system that it developed over a two-year period, first in the original 40 chassis and later, inside the new, lighter-weight RAD chassis that made headlines when it debuted at the 2012 Leogang World Cup. Is it good? Fox reported that in its early development, some of its female racers switched back to coils until Fox could tailor its negative spring system to lighter weight riders, but since then, none of its riders have gone back – and the heresy continued as Fox announced that only its ‘entry-level’ OEM 40 will retain the coil spring, and that with the addition of new lowers, the Air 40 will be ready for this season’s onslaught of 650B DH bikes. The Air 40 is presently in production, it weighs 5.98 pounds and with the steerer tube cut for a direct-mount stem, it is 521-grams (1.15 pounds) lighter than its predecessor. Its official name is ‘Fox Factory 40 Float RC2’ and it’s not going to be cheap. Fox pegs the MSRP at $1700 USD. They will be in stores this summer.


Greg Minnaar testing the RAD porototype 40 Float RC2 at
Leogang, 2012. Tomas Dietze photo
Fox 40 Float RC2 Highlights:

• Travel: 203-millimeters (8 inches)
• Adjustable air spring system with titanium coil-type negative spring
• Air-volume adjustment feature to control end-stroke spring rate
• RC2 damping system
• Lighter weight: 482 grams less than 2012 40 (521g w/direct-mount stem)
• All new chassis: Taper-butted stanchions, new lower casting, new crown design
• Air-bleed buttons on sliders to equalize internal fork pressure
• Kashima coated stanchions and RC2 damper shaft
• Low-Friction SKF seals throughout
• Post-type caliper mounts
• Wheel options: 26 or 27.5-inch wheels (different sliders)
• Stated weight: 5.8 pounds
• MSRP: $1700 USD
• Available: Summer 2013



multi image

After three days of testing, we wouldn't want to return to coil springs either. Fox invited Pinkbike to a pre-season suspension testing session at La Fenasosa Manor near Alacante, Spain, where we were briefed about the inner workings of the fork, before sessioning the private bike park’s chunky downhills for a back-to-back comparison of the previous coil-sprung 40 and the new air-sprung model. Guests were treated like sponsored pros, with Fox tuners waiting at the race truck to chart suspension performance and to make necessary changes between runs. With a half day in the bank on 2012 suspension, Fox switched out the bikes to the 2014 fork and shock and we continued. The comparisons were not subtle. The good news? Fox says that its air system will retrofit to existing 40 forks.

Why Bother With an Air Spring?

Fox states that better adjustability and lighter weight were the motivating factors to develop an air-sprung 40 and like all good things from Fox, it didn't happen overnight. Two air-assist systems were developed previous to the air-sprung 40. Most know about the hybrid air/coil system that Fox co-developed with Trek, but few know about the exclusively Fox PABLO system – an acronym for ‘Pneumatic Assist Bottom Load Optimizer.’ Basically, both versions use compressed air to give a coil-sprung fork a progressive spring rate near full compression, and both aptly demonstrated the value of a micro-adjustable spring rate for downhill.

Platekill
  Aaron Gwin at Plattekill during 2012 testing. Gwin, along with the Athertons, were instrumental throughout the development phase of Fox's Air-40 program and reportedly, Aaron has been racing them since day one. Matt Delorme photo


PABLO was raced by Fox’s Elite RAD (Racing Applications Development) riders throughout 2011, when Aaron Gwin reportedly won five World Cup races and the overall title on the PABLO fork. The success of the air-assist led Fox to move directly to the development of an air-sprung system. By 2012, all RAD racers were on air-sprung 40s, including the current World Champion who admitted that when the Santa Cruz Syndicate switched to Fox they began with the air-sprung fork – Greg Minnaar mentioned that he has not tested with the coil version. The air spring reduced a good measure of the 40’s weight, which encouraged the design team at Fox to redesign the ten-year-old chassis to carve even more weight from the fork. More about that later.


Pressurizing the fork's air spring pushes on the white seal head (upper left)
and completely compresses the blue titanium negative spring.
Secrets Inside the New 40

Two key elements that Fox engineers developed for the new 40’s air spring make its action equal to and in most cases, superior to a coil-sprung fork. The first is an advanced negative spring system that employs a long, titanium coil-spring. Air-type negative springs release abruptly in the first 15-percent of the fork’s stroke, but the linear rate of the titanium spring creates a seamless, soft-release of the air spring at 50-percent of the fork stroke. Negative springs will be sold in four levels of stiffness, but the medium, green-colored spring that will ship with the Air 40 is reported to be perfect for almost everyone. Most of Fox’s elite racers are on the green spring.


bigquotesWant the feel of the original 40? Simply set the spacers to raise the volume-adjust piston as high as it goes and it will emulate the linear compression rate of a coil spring.


To cause the fork spring to be more progressive, unscrew the retaining bolt
at the end of the shaft (lower right) and lower the piston by rearranging some
of the eight spacers on the shaft.


The second half of the Fox 40 air spring system is a simple volume-adjustment piston assembly that sits beneath the left-side top cap. By switching spacers to change the location of the piston on the shaft, nine volume options are possible. Want the feel of the original 40? Simply set the spacers to raise the volume-adjust piston as high as it goes and it will emulate the linear compression rate of a coil spring. A more progressive spring rate is accomplished by lowering the volume-adjust piston. The progressive option allows the 40 to be sensitive over the chatter, which greatly improves traction, yet still firm enough at full compression to eliminate bottoming during maximum events. Switching out the negative spring requires dropping the lowers from the fork, but adjusting the air volume stack can be done in ten minutes by removing the left top cap.

Anti-Friction Strategies

Seal friction is always a detriment to air-spring systems, and Fox has paid particular attention to eliminate it. The 40 chassis has room for a large-volume air chamber, which reduces the pressure necessary to suspend the rider and puts less squeeze force on the seals. Only 70 psi is required to suspend a 200-pound rider and the pressure range between the heaviest and lightest riders is 45 to 80 psi. Fox uses the slippery Kashima coating on the stanchion tubes as well as the shaft of the RC2 damper cartridge, and
Suspension Product Manager Bill Brown said that all of the seals are specifically engineered for the 40 by SKF, in collaboration with Fox to minimize friction.

Damping Improvements

Damping forces are still controlled by the RC2 damping cartridge. Because the air spring system can better resist bottoming, the hydraulic bottom-out function has been eliminated from the new damper which, beyond its new seals and slippery Kashima-coated shaft, remains essentially unchanged from the 2012 40. All of the damping adjustment dials are their familiar places. Compression damping has been adjusted to be lighter because the new spring system takes away much of the damper’s workload in the second half of the fork’s stroke.

Chassis Redesign

Fox had ten years to find ways to improve its flagship DH fork, but beyond the slenderized magnesium lowers and a couple of air-relief buttons, the Air 40 appears at first glance to be nearly the same as its predecessor. However subtle, every component of the new chassis is essentially a new part. Fox says it took something from almost every component of the fork to achieve its remarkable 512-gram weight reduction. Many changes in the chassis, however, were instigated to create some flex in the 40, which has been criticized for its rigid ride over chatter sections.

Fox 40 Float RC2 forks
  The entire 40 chassis has been redesigned, but remarkably, the internals of the air-sprung 2014 40 are retrofittable to the original. Thomas Dietze photo


bigquotesHowever subtle the changes may be, every component of the new chassis is essentially a new part.


Crowns: In its quest to reduce weight, the cavities under the upper and lower crowns have been redesigned to eliminate X-webbing and the stanchion clamps have been reconfigured with thinner sections near the tubes to prevent stress risers from forming. The clamp-bolts have been moved to the front and the clamp-angles have been reconfigured to improve grip while using less material. Fox anticipated that some racers will use a splash guard, so it added threaded bosses on the underside of the lower crown.

crown details Air-Sprung Fox 40 Float RC2 Fork
  The transition areas where the crowns meet the stanchion tubes have been made thinner to relieve stress at the clamps. Underneath, the webbed structure has been removed in favor of a smooth transition to the outer walls of the crowns.


Taper-butted stanchion tubes: Air-pistons sliding up and down inside the left stanchion tube required an ID as smooth as the tube’s OD. The Kashima-coated tubes are tapered internally to be thicker near the lower fork crown. The tubes are tapered thinner both above and below the lower crown, which encourages the stanchions to flex a little. This gives the new 40 a welcome degree of comfort over the original. Both the right and left stanchions are the same, and the internals of the original will retrofit into the new chassis.

crown detail Air-Sprung Fox 40 Float RC2 Fork
  Fox carved some magnesium from the back side of the arch and then used most of it to reinforce the front of the 40 Float sliders with a wrap-around ridge. Pressure relief buttons equalize unwanted pressure under the fork seals.


Arch-Brace: Fox took some material from inside the brace arch by hollowing it where it intersects the seal heads on the sliders and then added some metal in the front of the arch across the face where it would do more good. Like the RAD prototype sliders, the area around the seal heads has been visibly pared down. Threaded bosses are provided for arch-mount splash guards.

Sliders: Nearly invisible, but important to the 40’s performance is a taper cast into the sliders. The change in wall thickness reinforces the lower bushing area without making the magnesium sliders overly rigid. The axle clamps are completely new, formed with less material and the sometimes problematic stainless steel thread inserts have been replaced with a rectangular chip that can be easily removed should a pinch bolt snap off in the threads. The caliper mounts are now post-type that are direct-mount for eight-inch (203 mm) rotors.

slider details Air-Sprung Fox 40 Float RC2 Fork
  Subtle, but important, the new 40's lowers are tapered to provide a small amount of compliance. The dropouts are lightened significantly and a new rectangular threaded insert for the pinch bolts has been added for better serviceability.


Pressure-relief valves: Downhillers who regularly bled the fork’s internal pressure by slipping a zip-tie between the fork seal and the stanchion tubes will no longer have to risk damaging the seals of the 40. Pressure relief buttons on the back of each slider are provided to equalize the fork’s internal pressure, which can be three PSI higher at the top of some uplifts due to the lower ambient pressure at altitude. Fox showed a cross section of the fork seal to illustrate how a minor increase in air pressure inside the fork can impart significant squeeze force on the stanchion tubes. Internal pressure buildup can also be caused by off-gassing of the suspension lubricants, or by an increase in temperature, so Fox recommends pressing the buttons before altering the spring or damping settings, and before the start of each DH run.

Fox Air 40 and 650B Wheels

Early season testing by a number of teams has put the stamp of approval on 27.5-inch wheels for DH. Fox insiders admitted that the low-ball time savings over a 2.5 minute course was 1.5 seconds, with many riders running significantly faster. Fox will offer a 650B-specific lower for the new 40 that has been reconfigured to fit the larger wheels and with a seven-millimeter longer offset to correct for proper trail geometry. The 26-inch fork uses a 45-millimeter offset, while the 27.5-inch fork has a 52-millimeter offset. Both share the same crowns and stanchion tubes.




2014 DHX RC4 Shock

Along with the new 40, Fox revealed its redesigned DHX RC4 shock. Changes in the current suspension configurations from nearly straight rates to a variety of rising rate linkages has all but eliminated the need for building a progressive damping curve into the shock. This was the primary motivation for Fox to revamp the DHX.

Fox DHX RC4 shock 2013
  Internal improvements to the RC4 shock, like new damping circuits in the IFP chamber and the replacement of the boost valve assembly with an adjustable air-assist system to control end-stroke spring rate are the big news for 2014.




Fox DHX RC4 Shock Highlights:

• Damping sources balanced between the main shock piston and the reservoir circuits
• Kashima coated shaft
• High-speed and low-speed compression and rebound damping adjustment
• No more boost valve
• assist and air assist volume adjusters to tune the spring rate and progression
• Shaft reduced from 5/8 to 1/2-inch to reduce friction and improve small-bump compliance
• Increased oil volume
• Redesigned valve system
• MSRP: $600 USD
• Available: May, 2013


RC4 2014 multi image
  Fox redistributed the damping forces of the new DHX RC4 shock more evenly between the main damping piston (lower right) and the IFP compression stack (upper left) to give the damper a more seamless feel. An adjustable air assist piston replaces the Boost Valve in the reservoir. Pressurizing the IFP reservoir now gives the coil spring more of a progressive curve, while turning in the blue Assist dial adds more or less progressiveness to the system.


The new RC4 retains its coil spring (for the moment) and for the most part, it appears unchanged externally - but inside, the shock has been completely reworked to take advantage of damping strategies used by the Fox Factory motorsports division. Suspension engineer Brian Anderson said that they balanced the ‘distribution of damping’ between the shock’s main piston and the adjustment circuits in the IFP reservoir. Three standard tunes, each based upon performance curves collected during the 2012 race season, will be available for aftermarket shocks. Of course, custom tunes will be available from the factory for riders with special requests.

The shock shaft diameter was reduced from 5/8 inch (16mm) to 1/2-inch (13mm) to reduce the volume of fluid that is displaced into the reservoir. What resulted was less internal pressure, which eliminated much of the shock’s seal friction and provided a seamless interaction between each phase of the damping circuits as the shock cycled through its stroke. The boost valve function has been eliminated, and in its place is an air-assist function. By adding or subtracting pressure to the IFP reservoir, and by controlling the volume of the reservoir with the adjustable piston, the user can alter the progressiveness of the spring rate near bottom-out.

The result of the lower internal pressures and balanced damping is a shock that feels smooth and consistent throughout its stroke and it seems to remain that way regardless of the shock tune. Perhaps having the Fox race techs doing the setup and subsequent tuning of the shock during testing oversimplified the process, but the end result was that the new DHX RC4 proved to be an awesome feeling shock under a wide variety of riders and suspension systems during the session.





Fox suspension superman Mark Fitzsimmons charts suspension adjustments
as we progress through the second session of testing.
Learned at Fox Camp:

• Torque the clamp-bolts on the 40's fork crown to exactly 65 inch-pounds to keep the stanchion tubes parallel.

• Heat buildup does not affect the Air 40. Fox techs say that a 20-degree (6.7 C) change in temperature results in only one-half psi change in fork-spring pressure. In testing, the riders could not perceive any changes in performance due to heat.

• The most common damping setup error in DH is that riders use excessive low-speed rebound damping to keep the bike from bouncing their landings. Mark Fitzsimmons says to back the rebound dial off to smooth normal chatter and terrain, and then to increase high-speed compression damping to correct the bounce.

• Work on your suspension setup in small increments – one click or five psi – and pay close attention to the fore/aft balance. Use the suspension to tune the ride height of your shock and fork to get the bike to settle at an angle that gives you the most control.

• Pros often ask for separate training and a racing suspension tunes because their race tune feels to stiff. Once you’ve shuttled all day and worked out a great setup, it probably will feel too harsh next week on your first run down the mountain – leave the knobs alone and you will ride into your tune as your intensity increases.


bigquotesA 20-degree (6.7 C) change in temperature results in only one-half psi change in fork-spring pressure. In testing, riders could not perceive any changes in performance due to heat.



testing

Testing With Fox at La Fenasosa

La Fenasosa’s terrain is arid and rocky with plenty of stepped limestone to put the suspension’s square-edge performance on the line, as well as a number of smooth berm turns to rate grip and stability. Where there was soil, the tracks were peppered with gravel of various sizes. Recent rains provided more traction than is usually the case there, but most of the tracks quickly dried. Fox chose a downhill with small jumps and features so we could get consistent runs and maximize the time available for tuning opportunities and to compare suspension components. It was a quick turnaround and a pair of military troop carriers with bench seats that towed trailers for the bikes ensured that there was no waiting for shuttles.


Fox suspension engineers chart the progress of each
session with rider comments and tuning info.

bigquotesThe plan was that the Fox RAD engineers would run the same type of test session that they would use to dial in the suspension of its Pro athletes or key suspension customers.

Team testing for amateurs: The plan was that the Fox RAD engineers would run the same type of test session that they would use to dial in the suspension of its Pro athletes or key suspension customers. Each run would be documented and any suspension adjustments would be notated. Fox even provided electronic timing for those who required it. We would ride a morning session on the stock bike to familiarize the DH course and about noon, while we ate a hearty lunch, the Fox team would switch out the fork and shock to 2014 items. Day two would be spent exclusively on the 2014 components.

Bike setup: My test bike was a Pivot Phoenix set up with a Fox 40 fork and 2012 DHX RC4 shock. The Phoenix, like all dw-link suspension designs, is quite sensitive to ride height and damping adjustments, so I took advantage of the services of the Fox race truck and had my settings tweaked with each successive run. By noon, the Pivot was riding pretty level over the bare stone of the upper section and was tracking well over the smoother dirt below. I was impressed by the fact that Fox’s tuners made small adjustments to the suspension, concentrating more on the balance of the fork and shock rather than trying to solve the issue by adjusting only one side of the bike.

First ride on the Air 40 and the new DHX RC4: Buoyed with confidence from the first session and anticipating perfection from my new Air 40, I crashed my brains out mid-course, down a relatively simple section of rocks on my first run. I had plenty of warning, as the front end had been dropping into holes and lifting the rear wheel, but I figured that the mighty 40 Float would save me. Three shuttles between the mountain and the Fox truck had me back
on point – the Pivot was balanced and the sensation of the bike and its suspension faded to background noise. Successive runs felt seamless and in control, which encouraged me to try alternative lines. By day’s end, I was considering a stiffer setup, as the extra comfort and confidence of the new tune had me riding more aggressively, using most of the fork and all of the shock travel. Others were experiencing the same effect. By late afternoon, speeds down the rocky upper section were increasing and most everyone was bottoming their rear suspension there – a rare occurrence earlier in testing.

fenasosa spain


bigquotesCliche as the word is in the context of mountain bike journalism, if I had to capture the performance of the air-sprung 40 into a single word, it would be 'seamless.'


40 Float RC2 - First Impressions

Cliché as the word is in the context of mountain bike journalism, if I had to capture the performance of the air-sprung 40 into a single word, it would be ‘seamless.’ Most of the time when I am on a big bike, I am aware to some degree of what the fork and shock are doing. Sure, with a good setup, there are segments of a DH run where I am not conscious of the suspension, but the fact that suspension setup is a compromise, there are always sections that fall outside the capabilities of the fork and shock that upset the balance of the bike, however slight, and they call attention to the offending component. The air-sprung 40 has a much wider range of performance. It sucks up the bigger hits without feeling harsh, and yet its small-bump compliance is beautiful.

As wonderful as the original 40 performs, in a side-by-side comparison with the Air 40, it can’t make that claim. When Fox got my coil-sprung 40 dialed, it skipped over the chunder in the upper rocky section with ease – which is exactly what I wanted from the fork - but I could sense the compromise in the smoother, lower sections, where the coil-fork rode a bit high in its travel and skipped over the gravelly turns. By contrast, the Air 40 rolled the upper section quite easily without much skipping and stuck to the trail like glue on the smoother segments of the course. In the end, after we got the Phoenix matched up to the 2014 suspension, I used most of the available travel and, instead of concentrating on the bike, I was sizing up the few features on the course where I had to pick a good line. In short, I was riding the course, not the bike. That is my definition of ‘seamless.’

The 40 Float RC2 needs no stamp of approval. It’s already racked up a World Championship and a closet full of World Cup victories. Downhillers who want to argue the merits of a coil-sprung downhill fork should start looking for alternative transportation, because the big black bus with a bushy tail painted on it – the one takes pros to World Cup podiums – has been air-spring-only for two years running and it just left the station. Humor aside, if the 40 Float fork can beat or match its performance, and all points of the compass support that notion, then there are no arguments left that can support the use of a coil-sprung fork within the context of downhill racing. Fox’s 40 Float RC2 fork takes over a pound off of the bike and offers adjustability that far exceeds the measured increments that coil-springs afford. Consider that the original Fox 40 represents ten years of racing development and that its air-sprung successor – barely two years old – can out-perform it. It’s only going to get better with time. Expect an air-sprung shock soon.

DHX RC4 Shock - First Impressions

Adding the 2014 DHX RC4 shock to the equation is especially important because the performance of the front suspension largely depends upon that of the rear. In the sensitivity department, Fox’s modifications to the 2012 DHX shock paid off. Because the new RC4 shock moves more freely, it feels like the spring rate is softer, so there is a tendency to start turning in the low speed compression to ensure that the tail end will not wallow – but that is not necessary, as the shock’s high-speed rebound and compression damping are speed sensitive. Santa Cruz Syndicate rider Josh Bryceland, who was also testing that week, mentioned that '...the new suspension doesn’t feel like it’s going to be right in the car park, but on the course, it is great.' Fox revamped the damping curves for the new DHX shock to compensate for rising-rate linkage trend, so that may also be a factor in the shock’s improved feel. Add the quicker response of the smaller shock shaft and the revised damping circuits to the new shock and the result is a wider performance range than last season’s RC4 out on the course, which makes it a good match for the new fork

rock testing
  There was no shortage of places to test rear suspension at La Fenasosa - it must be Spain's paradise for square-edged impacts.Thomas Dietze photo


That said; the RC4 shock does not seem to be able to match the breadth of the new fork’s performance. Where the fork required a small modification of the volume adjust feature and some clicks of its external damping clickers, the shock required a re-valve to sync perfectly. Others who were testing had similar stories. The Fox guys could tune the stock 40 Float to adapt to a wide range of bikes – I counted seven different brands – without disassembling it, while the majority of the shocks there received a re-valve.

How many of those re-valves were done strictly for demonstration purposes, we will never know, but the proof was on the trail, where the fork always seemed to have an edge over the shock on at least one side of the performance envelope. As speeds began to increase, the fork seemed to handle the additional stress, while at some point, I could sense that shock was being pushed close to its limits. If this sounds like a slam on the new DHX RC4, it is far from it. The improvements over last year’s DHX are palpable. The RC4 feels smoother at all shaft speeds and it rides as if the rear end of the bike is being controlled by a precision instrument. Shortly after its release to select teams in 2012, DHX RC4 riders took all five podium spots at the Vale di Sole World Cup – and top female as well. No further introduction is necessary, but after riding it with the 40 Float RC2 fork, I can’t help asking: ‘When will we see a DHX Float RC4 shock?’

289 Comments

  • + 316
 Maybe this is the missing link between my speed and Gwin's, this must have been whats been holding me back....
  • + 166
 for sure. im putting these forks on the new cam zink endorsed hyper bikes at wal mart.... game on !
  • + 86
 now all i need to do is sell my rig and i can have this sit in my garage for another year until I have enough for a bike
  • + 7
 Only problem with that is I'm sure Gwin will be running it too. We can all dream though!
  • + 106
 I'm just gonna upgrade my 40's bit by bit Smile

First the air cart, then the lowers, then the crowns. By about 2016 i'll have a set of 2014 forks!
  • + 6
 I didn't understand much of that, but I like that it retrofits!
  • + 2
 Your stanchions aren't polished on the inside so it wont retrofit without the new stanchions
  • + 1
 he said he missunderstood ! but yea Im on BryanBobo ' s bet too !
  • - 26
 Now that the marketting hype make you believe your 2013 Kash 40 is a piece of shit, Can i buy it from you for 200$... This is all BS imo. There is always newer technologies. They want you to believe it is the evolution. That is it is so much better. You need it so bad your just gonna ditch your hard earned 2013 40... Im pissed at the mountain bike industry. Always reinventing what works good....
  • + 27
 They have to try and sell the forks somehow....They are never really that negative about the old fork in the article, but this new fork certainly has some massive updates from previous years. Why wouldn't they provide the best product possible to consumers if they're capable of creating it? Pull your head out of your ass, this company has to compete with others so why not make an existing product better?
  • + 8
 @xetal,
*reinventing what works wellWink
  • - 2
 Isn't that guy an XC-Rider? And of course this fork would be presented as the new benchmark.
  • + 2
 @DragRider; My RC4 is coming back from Avalanche soon. Can't wait to test it out!
  • + 5
 those spring system inside the fork you can find them in my umbrella
  • + 6
 @ziggyzuggy: I wouldn't believe you, but since you're from Japan I think it could be possible that the inside of your umbrella is engineered like that Wink
  • + 1
 @UncleCliffy My fork already have the Ava kit since last year, awesome performance can explain you have to fill it Smile , but tell me when you do RC4 upg how is the performance then after ?? Frankly, my RC4 old model 2010 has some guts replaced to fil my custom Commencal and does very well but I'm curious how better it can goes after Ava one of the Ava kit's show's boost valve removing with i conciser "as useful on high speed". Smile
  • + 5
 "Two key elements that Fox engineers developed for the new 40’s air spring make its action equal to and in most cases, superior to a coil-sprung fork. The first is an advanced negative spring system that employs a long, titanium coil-spring."

This sentence is priceless. I'm going to rewrite it.

"To make this air fork feel like a coil fork, we've put a coil in it."

What a load of shite!
[Reply]
  • + 101
 At least over 3% of riders can buy it
  • + 8
 But will they be able to tell the difference or feel the benefits ? Ah f*ck it , they have gold bits tho right ?
  • + 12
 Where are the forks that a average guy wih a mortage payment car payment and every other god damn thing that needs to get paid out which in return has us punching the clock monday through friday can afford. Seriously 1700 is what needs to come out of my pocket to throw on my bike just so i can possiably hit a rock or crash which might destroy the fork. How about this develop a fork that you can drop off the empire state building and be able to ride once they hit the ground. That seems worth the money.
  • + 12
 The best bit is that you only have to service it every other run!
  • + 6
 UpstateNY...: Marzocchi Monster.
  • + 1
 UpstateNY... that is what the coil, cheapest Boxxer and an air conversion kit are for
  • + 3
 Focofox: I would say that's not the best application for dropping off empire state building,actually from my experience thedamper in a boxxer rc is rather fragile,which is why I would rather update the damper to r2c2 than the spring.
  • + 3
 The empire state building comment was a lil over the top. My bad. I guess you cant get away from the fact if you want the best you have to pay for it. Or get your ass sponsored.
  • + 2
 Or you buy a slightly used fork....
  • + 4
 I would not buy a DH fork that any of my friends had used!
  • + 1
 fix the spade, Nylon and other ``plastics`` are commmon in valves that are used in much much more severe pressure,cycle duty, media and environement, as long as its well designed, those plastics are lighter and make for less friction (less friction=longer life/better perfomance) than ``metals``...
  • + 3
 Upstat: Domain DC is the model you are looking for. Its been available for a few years now.
  • + 1
 I have looked at the domain dc. I will just stick with my 2010 boxxer team.
  • + 1
 notice where Gwin is testing that $1700 fork....that's right, East Coast DH is the REAL test for suspension...
[Reply]
  • + 63
 Was someone smoking crack in Fox's PR dept? $1700? Really? How about they make a dual crown under $1100. I understand Fox is top of the line, but they need something the weekend warriors can afford.In the words of dave chappell " I got kids!"
  • + 22
 Its still likely cheaper than the DVO fork will be.
  • + 10
 the biggest ripp-off is that the 2013 model already is 1800€ in germany... i dont even want to know how much of our hard earnd cash thhy will try to steal out of our pockets for 2014.... Seems like a good fork but not worth it for me
  • + 14
 Nevermind that, $1700 and plastic internals?! How about no Mr Geoff and Mr Bob, I'll spend my money on the cheaper X Fusion that isn't using cheap white nylon in it's internals.
.
@Deeight, bet the DVO's the same or less and doesn't use plastic parts.
  • + 10
 The main problem with DVO is their stuff is not tested by anyone and its just a fairy tale at the moment, as for the cheap plastic parts trust me fox will find a cool name for those to make it sound like its space tech plastic (see keronite space craft primer and K(C)ASHIMA). and from what i heard dvo is at 2000+$.

for 1500+ $ market i would go BOS or 888 with some elka parts Smile .
  • + 58
 IM BROKE NIGGA IM BROKE!
  • + 9
 you said it yourself...if you want "weekend warrior" gear - dont buy a brand new tech filled fox40 air DC. fox has never and probably will never make a lower priced range of products. there is no need to at all. low price products are risky and can fail and perform terribly and damage brand rep. high performance/dollar products are easy to make and fox does an excellllllent job of it.
  • + 12
 let start by saying $1700 isnt that bad, old 40s, RS boxxer world cup and 888 ti are all around that price plus plastic isnt that bad aswell RS use plastic in their forks, its strong and light so what wrong with it.
  • + 7
 You should wait and see the price tag in our beloved Polish dealer. I guess it will be about 2500$, and we earn like 4 times less then you in the USA.
  • + 11
 What's msrp on zokes 888 cr? $650-$700? And it gets the job done for under $1000! It may not be the rc3 damper, but zokes open bath catridge is still well known. That's the weekend warrior shit I'm talking about!
  • + 6
 There's plenty of deals out there for still top-end forks! More 40's will be out there for sale, then retrofit a few pieces in. RS Boxxer is still decent, Marz makes good forks...etc. Who says you always need literally the top top crap? Especially a weekend warrior. Past 40's is still amazing and will get the job done more than enough for the average rider. Don't get caught up in all the new release's and instead look at the stuff that's already on your bike..it's more than enough. You can still kill the trails/tracks just as hard as everyone did w/o that "new" fork.
  • - 2
 I'd go for bos suspension if I had a DH bike now. Much less weight and from what I've been told if rides much better than fox stuff!
  • + 11
 no one "needs the news sh*t", they just "want it"

this is my Fox 40RC2 from 2006:

gp1.pinkbike.org/p4pb834040/p4pb834040.jpg

I would have no issues, still riding this fork today, was awesome 7 years ago, still awesome today Wink
  • + 2
 @RatHunter83 they built it for the pros not a weekend warrior and quite frankly any weekend warrior does not need a precision built machine on the front of their bikes. Yes it would be great to have one for $600 less. But it wouldnt be that nice.
  • + 2
 It just still surprises me to hear someone refer to a particular brand as "top of the line".... Does that mean my VanR would be better than any other brand's offerings? No, that's ridiculous. Like saying a brand is "top of the line".
  • + 4
 I always loved the "plastic internals" argument. Do you really think a brand selling a $1700 fork aimed at people either skilled or with deep enough pockets to buy it just *skips right on over* the engineering of materials that go into these things? The game is weight vs. strength vs. function and I'll guess that these guys pick the materials that work best. No, it isn't for everyone. Yes, it is okay to be bitter than we aren't sponsored and have to pay for the stuff we use. But please, save the "plastic internals" pitch for when we bash on Marzo junior-Ts from 2002... not here.
  • + 4
 Most mtb-parts are overpriced but fox just tops it off: www.pinkbike.com/photo/9365993
  • + 3
 @Aibek
CG is testing the DVO
  • + 6
 You think 1700usd is bad, I'm sick of companies almost just swapping the currency sign when they bring products to the UK (gopro are bad for it) this years 40s are £1450 here, if you convert that straight to USD it's pretty much 2200, that's 500 more!!! What's the deal there? It's ridiculous an that's the current coil ones not even this new one , no doubt that will add another hundred at least.
To be fair they look pretty dam nice an obviously well developed and thought through, just wish the top kit wasn't becoming so expensive, its just making the sport less accessible to people who don't have mega bucks, as much as I do like the great technology advances, suppose it all comes at a cost
  • + 3
 @Aibek, DVO has a quite a few riders testing out their products, and the price point has not been established, your speculations are merely rumor.
  • + 1
 1700 is average for hwat 40's have been retailing for years.
  • + 2
 In 2016 I'll be buying a used 2014 Air 40 for a fraction of the new price just as I do most of my top tier stuff. Brand new and latest /greatest is for pros and trust fund kids... I'm happy to take their well cared for leftovers.
  • + 1
 I'll wait for the euro to be a bit more powerful, something like 1,35$ for a euro, then I'll bring my 40 back from the USA and get the cheapest of all forks on the market Big Grin
  • + 2
 ^ Always thought of that, but by the time you fly over here, etc, you lost whatever currency gain you got.
  • + 2
 @b-mack: ....or people with good jobs.
  • + 1
 fox will def be taking my money in the summer for this fork..
  • + 1
 Actually rockshox uses kernite.
  • + 1
 @Willie1: Count yourself fortunate to have the kind of expendable income that allows you to pick up top-end gear every time it gets updated. It's not always about just having a good job... add in kids, house payments, outrageous American medical insurance and used stuff starts to be a smart choice. More power to ya though if you can afford a new fork of frame all the time.
  • + 2
 Priorities. I make 2/3 the average american household income, live by myself in a shitty 1br apt/flat, forgo the smartphone and cable, bike everywhere, drink PBR, and am generally thrifty EVERYWHERE but the bikes...... allows me 5-6k per year for this stuff. Fortunate? Nah, just slanted towards bikes. Even then, I keep a close eye on stuff, it's not like i'm on carbon or well, ANYTHING top-end.... I wait for the trickle-down.
  • + 2
 Tax rebate will be paying it for me. Overpay taxes throughout the year.. get by on what I make. Tax rebate comes in spring.. money to spend on bikes.
  • + 1
 Amen! $20 a check adds up!!
  • + 1
 More like paid $200 over in taxes per paycheck...
[Reply]
  • + 66
 I bet the guy that sings the 'I'm Faster Than You' rap already has these on his bike.
  • - 6
 ^we gotta +prop the shit outta this^ LOL
  • + 5
 Nah he was so quick that he rode right past them..
  • - 1
 Neg propped for trying to give props? wow.
[Reply]
  • + 33
 So Marzocchi got ride of the M arch and Fox adopted it. Makes sense.
  • + 4
 You are right, thats looks like the futuristic M arch...
[Reply]
  • + 31
 Too many new forks this year. I think I'll stick with the old one till next year when any potential bugs are exposed.
  • + 10
 Something weird happen on the way of development of these new, recently announced forks - while Marzocchi is getting rid of their 'M' bridge the Fox is actually re-inventing the 'M' on their new chassis Smile WTF?
  • + 10
 But i'm sure fox will tell you it makes them 25 percent stiffer and 15 percent lighter while Marz will be saying their new round arch has the same benefits that Fox are touting of the new M arch...we live in a world of bullshit.
  • + 3
 i could not have said it any better bigburd...."we live in a world of bullshit"
  • + 1
 The pros testing them get them rebuilt after every race we'll see how reliable they are in real world conditions, I'm wondering if maybe they are like the boxxer wc and don't feel too plush unless you rebuild them all the time.
  • + 1
 Let's not forget that products like this eventually trickle their "bullshit" down the line and make average joe's bike better. Rigid anyone? I'll wait....
[Reply]
  • + 15
 Did anyone else not bother to read this and just jump straight to comments?
  • + 3
 I read the whole thing. Sounds awesome, blah, blah, blah, expensive, blah, blah. I wouldn't be able to tell the difference except how hard it hits me in the wallet. I laughed my ass off when I read your comment!
  • + 4
 isn't that what you do with most articles on pinkbike? esp the 29er articles. i click on those just to go to comments to see the hater convention.
[Reply]
  • + 11
 I dunno. I remember when Zocchi tried to go lighter and Boxxers break left and right... I wonder how many of us would honestly notice a difference. WC pros, sure but regular joe that rides? Dont get me wrong, I love the Solo Air that RS has but still. Will the seals become sticky in time getting rid of that supple plushness at the beginning of the travel? From what I know, air forks require a lot more servicing to keep them primo. Time will tell!
  • + 1
 but as soon as gwin tried he never went back. I think your point is valid, but everyone is saying that its a "night/day" difference. There has to be some truth to that eve to us "average joes"
  • + 8
 Remember that Gwin's were probably getting a full rebuild every other run Wink
  • + 4
 ... and when the manufacturers make the point that only 3% of riders will feel any difference, everyone has a freakout. LOL!!!
[Reply]
  • + 7
 QUOTE "Most of the time when I am on a big bike, I am aware to some degree of what the fork and shock are doing."

I find it hard to believe that someone would be thinking about their suspension whilst riding down sections of a DH, instead of concentrating on the trail?! Maybe the reason your not going that fast is because your thinking about your shocks and NOT concentrating on the trail!?

I think people put too much on suspension setup. Don't get me wrong, for the elite on the competitive edge, I imagine these tiny incremental changes MIGHT be noticeable, but to most people I think that any fork can be made to do the job. I used to love tweaking my suspension, but then I got bored and realized that it made very little difference to how I rode. Sure, these forks are probably better (should be anyway) than the old 40's but, do you think it would actually make you faster? I think that if it does it psychological and you could probably have gone faster in the first place if you hadn't been so obsessed with your shocks!

Try it, when your mates not looking adjust his rebound/compression/preload what have you one click, and see if they can tell not knowing anything had been adjusted. Large adjustments, yes, but small changes? I doubt it.

Don't get me wrong, I can tell what I like in my suspension, but I also can hammer my Lyric Solo Air and be just as happy as on my old 888 RC3 WC, sure they were different, and I could notice, but I don't think that made me any slower over a section that both forks could cope with. Actually, thinking back, I always hated the way my Fox 32 Van R felt.. So maybe not ALL forks can be made to work for everyone..
  • + 6
 hi I'm a Mac, I can multitask Smile
  • + 3
 I have to disagree a bit. Im nowhere near a pro, I ride for fun like any other average Joe, yet I have recently switched from Boxxer RC to WC, and I can sure tell the difference while still fully focused on the trail ahead of me. The RC could definitely handle pretty well, but as I got quite abit faster after a season in BC, I just couldnt make it sit in a comfortable depth running a fast rock/root infested section, it either felt harsh or rode too deep in travel messing with the handling and not leaving enough travel for obstacles ahead. Admittedly, I did have too soft spring up there, cos the harder one I had before didnt feel right either, but I blame the damper side for not being able to tune it to my liking. Now with the WC, oh so pimp expensive for 3% of people I guess, I just feel the fork does what I want, no matter the conditions.

What Im trying to say, I believe the quality material matters even for us average riders.
  • + 1
 I see what your saying, and I would agree that, like my lyric which rides too far into its travel most of the time which the higher model may well fix with the Mission Control damper, I have to wonder, has it made you a faster or better rider? You yourself admit to a too soft spring anyway, and I'm sure the right weight spring would have made a difference too. Obviously a better damper is a better damper. I'm not really disputing that forks do have better dampers etc, but that does all that jazz actually equate to a much faster ride?

I'm sure you can tell a difference between your forks, but honestly in a tomed situation do you think they have made you noticably faster?
  • + 2
 Doesn't matter. Duck likes the WC. Solved his issues with his previous fork. He'll probably less time thinking about mid-stroke rebound or whathaveyou, so here comes confidence. Call it fortitude, balls, cojones, whatever, THAT"S the shit that makes for turning oneself into a faster rider.
[Reply]
  • + 8
 I'm getting this fork right away and build me the best dam $1700.00 full suspension pogo stick in the world since i wont be able to afford the rest of the bike.
[Reply]
  • + 9
 nice! and it's great to hear 'the internals of the air-sprung 2014 40 are retrofittable to the original'
  • + 1
 Yea I was pleased to hear that since these forks aren't cheap and I have a nice Fox 40 coil sitting on my current bike.
  • + 2
 ^ Yeah, always a welcomed change..especially when you don't have to completely ditch that fork you might have just bought, etc, which always sucks when new stuff comes in.

I wonder what's the best route to go if you're retrofitting. Air Cart -> Crown/Lowers -> Stanchions, if necessary? I have much older stanchions (PTFE) which feel really smooth/polished inside (w/o oil residue) and personally reamed the sharp ends/edges. I wonder if the older years they polished the tubes differently inside?
  • + 1
 For me the I'd probably only replace the spring. I'd really only be most interested in the performance/adjustability of the air spring. I think that the biggest thing. Much of the other stuff seems like further weight savings which overall aren't as important to me.
  • + 5
 I am a little confused how the internals of the air sprung 2014 fork are retrofittable to the original?

If the air spring is operating inside the fork stanchion, the fork stanchion of a previous coil sprung Fox 40 will have micro scratches and abrasions from where the coil spring has constantly contacted the inside surfaces of the stanchion during every fork compression. For any rider who owned a coil sprung Fox 40, you will know that from time to time, the fork could get noisy and the remedy was opening up the spring stack, and pulling the rubber sleeve back up the coil spring, as it tended to slide down during normal use, exposing the metal coil spring to the inside surface of the aluminium-alloy fork stanchion, causing unpleasant noises

with its little brother, the Fox 36 series, you could not convert a Vanilla (coil sprung) into Float, because of scratching from the coil spring, causing the air spring sealing to fail during normal use. You could only convert from TALAS to Float (both were air sprung) or convert Vanilla to Float by expensive replacement of the entire CSU (Crown, steerer, upper stancions) unit as this gave you new (unscratched) stanchions suitable for air spring use

anyone from PB or Fox care to explain this dilemna for converting coil sprung 2013 (or previous) to 2014 air sprung? or do you replace the fork stanchion at the same time? (at extra cost)
  • + 2
 You would have to re-polish the ID of the stanchions again or buy a new one (1) I would have to assume, almost like the process of converting a RS Boxxer R2C2 to WC. Kinda glad I shrink wrapped most of the coil a while ago.
[Reply]
  • + 4
 What's with all the DVO nut-swingers? Their product isn't even out and people are lauding it as the best thing since sliced bread.

Fox has gone insane with their pricing. At least now I'll be able to buy some rich kid's barely used 2013 40 for a steal.
[Reply]
  • + 4
 Did fox spend two years developing this with Trek or did they just spend ten minutes looking at the Manitou web site ? Please mountain bike press please climb out of Foxes butt.

Im not a hater results and sales count but there are other brands
  • + 2
 I am a LONG time Manitou fan, they dont get nearly the rep they deserve. They have been rocking an air spring on the Dorado for years now and no one would listen. Now Fox swaps swaps to it and Im going to guess everyone will jump on the bandwagon.
  • + 1
 You are so true Ninjatarian
[Reply]
  • + 8
 But does it come in green?
[Reply]
  • + 8
 I'll still take a Dorado over it...
  • + 7
 My Dorado has been great this far!
  • + 4
 Still the best fork money can buy and their customer service reps are not jackasses.
[Reply]
  • + 4
 Ha, this looks like a standard 'lash up' approach. The use of spacers to alter the volume is an absolute joke, it's as if they don't design these things and just knock them up in a school workshop. The Rockshox Boxxer World Cup has a far more elegant approach to this problem (and is lighter) but don't look as nice as Fox... it's interesting to see that the market goes for looks over performance.

Just so you know, I have no bias either way, my bike came with Boxxers and they are fine. I don't need anything more or less than that, just through extensive research (you'll see what for within the next year or so), I have seen that Rockshox have a significantly more professional and technology led approach than Fox.
  • + 1
 P.S. I doubt that much of the weight saving is down to the air spring, I reckon if you weighed it all out, the majority saving is in the lowers.
  • + 2
 its because most kids go for form over function. they drive the markets. its too bad really. i'm also a function over form kinda guy and i'm loving my 2009 boxxer wc - it's one of the lightest plushest dc forks around.
[Reply]
  • + 3
 So basically theyve made the 40 the same as the Boxxer WC except you need tools to adjust the volume and you have air bleed buttons. Hmm well done fox for managing to come out with more stuff that's already been done and claiming its an evolutionary step.

Think someone needs to make them aware of a lil company called DVO.

Dont get me wrong fox stuff works great when its new and all but what funky tools am i gonna need to service one of these? and am i more likely to come across rocking horse s**t like with the talas 2 ifp tool ?
[Reply]
  • + 3
 Fox forks look beefy, like the lower design. Been using Fox rear shocks for a long time. Coilspring DHX 3.0, RC2 and RC4 and a Fox Float. Trouble free so far. Least I like is the Float. Sticky, on/off feeling. If they only would sell them in raw...
[Reply]
  • + 2
 Fact is, any one of the World Cup qualifiers could beat any one of us pink bikers with a set of original 40s on down any track. Innovation is good but it will not give you the natural talent that most of the pro's have. All the gear etc!
[Reply]
  • + 4
 Ill wait for X-Fusion RV-1. Theyll be sub 6 and air sprung next year. and $1200. And, as far as I have ridden, fox blows, and xfusion works.
[Reply]
  • + 5
 I'll wait a little while for it to be proven before I run out to sell a major organ to be able to afford it.
  • + 1
 By then the NEW 40's will be out... back to the drawing-board.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I bet that a dorado is still the best performing fork there is on the market, you guys only but fox because it is fox!!! Why would you buy a fork that isn't better as the rest but every month needs a rebuild with seals drying up like water in the desert? Go f*ck 40's i only buy the shock
[Reply]
  • + 1
 shit!!! FOX RC4 become Manitou REVOX, a lots of marketing on Boost Valve, and Manitou take the Win, Air assist is better, FOX MARKETING gets a lot of riders with shit tec, but now i brought a Manitou REVOX 2013, not pricey and as good as 2014 RC4
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Interesting will wait to see more feedback from aveage joes, my question is why the hell dosent Fox provide four negative spring options for the 2013 single crown Float 160?

[ qoute: Negative springs will be sold in four levels of stiffness, but the medium, green-colored spring that will ship with the Air 40 is reported to be perfect for almost everyone. Most of Fox’s elite racers are on the green spring.] the standard float suffers big time in midtsroke and while it can be fixed you lose small bump sensitivity, I like the sound of the above technology, but even they got it wrong on one of their setups causing the tester to crash, lest it can be tuned to fix this issue. 2014 is going to be interesting!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I'm so grateful to the industry for convincing people to sell their barely broken in components for cheap. It allows me to spend a lot of money for doing what I actually like: RIDING! A couple of years ago FOX actually made a huge innovation and discovered that air is lighter than oil and moved the fork bladder to the top. They called it "the new Inverted FIT cartridge". One day they will even discover engineers and use them in the R&D department.
  • + 1
 slooooow release of tech is the name of the played out game, just like apple did with the iphone. in three or four years fox will release a "revolutionary" titanium version.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I couldn't help but laugh at this statement: "and the heresy continued as Fox announced that only its ‘entry-level’ OEM 40 will." The word heresy means adherence to an opinion contrary to church dogma or, more generally, a deviant opinion. I think you meant the word "hearsay" which for the layperson (not the lawyer) generally means information conveyed verbally from person to person.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Hmmm... "To cause the fork spring to be more progressive, unscrew the retaining bolt
at the end of the shaft (lower right) and lower the piston by rearranging some
of the eight spacers on the shaft." Why not to have a adjust dial knob that would move the piston by threads?
[Reply]
  • + 1
 so they are only selling the 40 in air format but the 36 is still available with a van option...??????????????????
What they should do is make the 40 float as a race option and sell a van 40 in their "performance" teir without kashima coatings or fit damping and make it a few hundred cheaper... they would take loads of the market from other manufacturers as there are loads of people out there that love fox's products but just cant wedge that much out on a fork..... i know lots of people with 888 rc3's or boxxer teams that would have bought a fox equivalent if one was available.

MAKE A 40 VAN R PLEASE!!!!!!!!
[Reply]
  • + 2
 So.

Fox, in it's neverending quest to 1up BOS in the pricing departament has released a product that was inevitable due the direction DH market has taken.

(deflated voice) Yay.
[Reply]
  • + 3
 Just a heads up, it's probably SKF who did all the seals since they did the revised dust seals. As far as i am aware, there is no such brand as SKS
  • + 2
 Well spotted, but SKS actually is a company! They make things like mudguards and pumps. Just a coincidence in this case though.
  • + 0
 SKF make seals SKS make pumps
[Reply]
  • + 5
 5.8 lbs? Yeah, sure. We'll see...
  • + 1
 That's crazy light though.
  • + 3
 Hence my skepticism.
  • + 1
 Fill em with Helium.
[Reply]
  • + 4
 ahaha just saved enough to afford the 2013 rc2 fit...but that's how this game goes.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 makes everything else seem affordable, DVO, X-Fusion....new Marzo's Fox need to just price things coorectly and get back in the real world, they DO NOT NEED TO COST THIS MUCH!!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 If Fox comes out with a dual position model and a company like santacruz made a pedal-able 200 mm bike with a dropper post, could it be a down hill bike that can be pedaled uphill? What will the future hold for our sport?
  • + 1
 That's called enduro...
  • + 1
 Hmmm...I think you missed my point. I own an Enduro bike (160mm w/36mm Sanctions). Can be an extremely fast combination when pointed downhill. However a 200mm w 40mm Sanctions bike would be able to take that same line faster because it can handle the forces easier. My question "What will the future hold for our sport?" was simply; will be all be riding 200mm bikes with 40mm sanctions as their weight becomes less and less with the introduction of carbon fiber and air springs?
  • + 2
 Sure it's possible, but when competing with a enduro bike, it will still be faster on the uphill. Downhill geo isn't the best for climbing, and I doubt you're going to stop at the top of the hill to change the angle on your angleset. Am I saying they won't be making more pedal-able downhill bikes, no. But they aren't going to go back to 68' degree head angles and high bb downhill bikes; which means they will never be as good on a course with both ups and downs as a enduro style bike.
  • + 1
 I was dreaming of adjustable geometry too. Thinking to far into the future, I watch to much Star Trek, Haha! NERD!
  • + 2
 jgreermalkin, what about Bionicon? Push a button on the bars, then lean forward and the fork travel the angles are reduced. Pedal up the hill. Then hit the button again and lean back and, presto, you are in DH mode again.

www.youtube.com/watch?v=YcVXz8U6UWY

You can watch all the videos of a Bionicon changing from uphill to trail to DH mode, but you need to feel one change in real life. They are amazing. They also have the best thru-axle design in the business, IMHO. The downside is that the bike is almost 100% proprietary - i.e. you have to use THEIR forks (I'm not saying they are bad, I wouldn't know, but you don't have a choice to go to Fox, RS, Marz etc).
[Reply]
  • + 1
 The weight is decent for dual crown with this travel. Cost $$$$? Questionable!? $1200-1400 would be actually good price range for it.I don't see any actual gold on it. Well if pro-riders will earn gold with this. Thumbs up!
  • + 0
 I don't think titanium spring is necessary, should be an option.
[Reply]
  • + 4
 Straight up Badass! I like how they added some flex into the fork.
  • + 4
 Which is funny with how many people are uber obsessed with silly stiff forks.
  • + 2
 After one race weekend on a Fox 40 a few years ago...I though the same thing and went back to a Boxxer. Unless you're a World Cup racer, nobody needs a fork that stiff on a mountain bike...and apparently world cup racers don't need a fork that stiff either.
  • + 4
 yet i doubt any more than 20% can actually feel a difeerence
  • + 3
 Stiff forks are for the top 3% I heard.
  • + 1
 @cranxwork: I think that's just fancy air shocks...this will obviously make you as fast as a WC racer for the price of a Hyundai.
  • + 2
 Probably less.
  • + 1
 Saw the increased compliance coming... this subject has been well hammered out in moto
  • + 2
 There was an article on Pinkbike many years ago about the new Boxxers. They tried increasing the diameter of the stanchions to 40mm and the test riders did not like it - there was less fore/aft compiance and they actually went slower. So the stanchions stayed as they were.
  • + 1
 I'm quite a light rider and I can feel some flex riding my boxxer, while I don't feel any on my f36 160. I like the stiff feeling better overall but I must admit I don't find the flex being that much of a dealbreaker on the boxxer. I'm not sure I'd be happy on a f32 though...
  • + 1
 Moto forks stopped chasing stiffness in the early 2000s. Even among the top pro's only 1 or 2 guys liked the stiffest designs.
  • + 2
 Now, since Fox admits their fork was too stiff, will they drop the 40mm stantions and go to 36 or 38 mm stantions to decrease stiction? Seems like a logical next move. Between, their kashima coat and SKF seals, less seal to stantion surface area would make their fork even slicker. Uber small bump compliance.
[Reply]
  • + 4
 "only the OEM 40 will remain coil" lol coil lovers your life sucks.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 With the sudden increase in fork market competition. This was a good move. Still think DVO takes the cake. Curious to see what rock shox fights back with. This is the innovation driving competition we all will benefit from.
  • + 2
 DVO??? It's all hype right now, not been proven in the real world whatsoever.
  • + 2
 Yea really. Not to knock what DVO is doing, it looks really cool, but like you say at this point the stuff hasnt even been tested yet.
  • + 0
 they already have a production version finalized. it has been tested. no one aside from testers and a lucky few have ridden this new 40 either.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 is this gonna be the season that the world cup dh switches to 27.5" wheels? very interested to see whos running these this year. anyone else thought about a 27.5" front with 26" rear wheel ala moto style???
[Reply]
  • + 1
 For that kind of money I will surely stick to BOS Idylle air. It is a great performer and if you look at the shorter service intervals of FOX you can easily understand the lower build quality.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 Looks like a great fork for a pro or a real pinner; the rest of us will be having just as much fun on an older fork and not worrying about it.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 1700 fork? Ha! Why not just buy a KTM? A dirt bike will hold its value WAY better than any DH bike. Buying a DH bike these days is for 1 percenters.
  • + 2
 no i think youll find that dh suspenion is for 3 percenters
[Reply]
  • + 2
 Be prepared for Pink Bike and Ebay to be flooded with coil Fox 40s for sale so riders can have the latest must have Fox accessory.
[Reply]
  • + 3
 Now let's see an RC4 air. Come on fox, Cane Creek DBAir and Vivid Air are killer shocks, love the sag adjust-ability.
[Reply]
  • + 4
 good coverage RC
[Reply]
  • + 1
 They're touting the use of air in dual crown dh forks as if it's the latest innovation. Rock Shox world cup dh - how long has this been around?
[Reply]
  • + 2
 Cant wait to see air springs in 5 years, this technology is only going to get better and better.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 Phew, cause a Fox40 wasn't expensive enough, thanks for tackling that problem
[Reply]
  • + 1
 let's be honest: 99% of non-pro riders will not notice any really noticeable dufferense between spring and air versions of fox40 in the eyes-closed-test.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Carbon bikes, carbon rims, now carbon dropper posts and mega expensive suspension components. More bang for your buck to buy a decent used car filled with midgets
[Reply]
  • + 2
 new crowns and lowers are fairly disgusting to be honest. they have the crude looks of a super monster fork...in my opinion
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Really sexy,but with this price, you might aswell check out DVO's Emerald.Which is exactly what I'mgoing to do when my Boxxer dies.
[Reply]
  • + 0
 "Fox insiders admitted that the low-ball time savings over a 2.5 minute course was 1.5 seconds with many riders running significantly faster."... I predict in the next 2 years most of the field will be on 650B
  • - 2
 That's a no-brainer given how many are switching this year already, The real JUMP ship moment will come after the first major World Cup DH race of the season probably (as happened in the days after the first world cup XC last year, by the Tuesday following the weekend... Kirk Pacenti had taken orders for FIFTHTEEN HUNDRED of his 650B rims) but so far, just going from the USA Cycling 2013 Pro Gravity tour... 650B is off to a great start in DH podiums with a 1st (logan binggeli) and a 5th (Danny Aiello) place.

www.usacycling.org/pro-grt-2013-pro-gravity-calendar-blasts-out-of-the-gate.htm
  • + 2
 2 seconds over two minutes highlights the fact that there is NO real difference for any normal person.

But, yes, folks will trip over themselves to "upgrade".

That's fine, if this becomes the new standard, not a bad thing at all. Maybe it will end the silliness of shoving 29" into long travel application.s
  • + 2
 For all we know it could be that 650b makes more difference to the times of riders below the pro level. That would make more sense than what you said in your 1st sentence.
  • + 0
 The 24hrs of old pueblo is an XC event where you don't need any suspension... hell, you don't even need gears. Its not in anyway comparable to what works for a DH or Enduro race.
  • + 2
 Yeah bro and you already calcuated that 650b is xx seconds faster down track xy while it has a marginal bigger wheel diameter than 26" and the marketing-hype suggested that 29" would be way faster on xc-tracks. You always believe what the industry tells you...oh wait.. you're probably one of them lol.
  • + 1
 The switch to 650 is gonna happen quickly, I wouldn't be surprised to see at least 10 to 20% of the World Cup field on them by the end of the season, with nearly all the top guys on them by Worlds at PMB.

All the haters will want them by the end of the year, just wait.
  • + 1
 It is not hate. I do not hate 650b at all. It is just the fact that the actual difference for pretty much all of us is marginal. No compelling reason to "upgrade".

29" on a hardtail is a much, much more noticeable and positive change.

I got a frame last year that accepts 650b - with 10mm reduction of travel, front and rear. (Optional +3mm front shock mount and another hole on the rear swing link) Decided that I do not care for now. If it is the the only choice around, sure, why not. Not that it has all the drawbacks of 29".
  • + 0
 Do you even ride dh or are you just a dentist?
  • + 1
 Whom does the question refers to?
  • + 1
 2 seconds is the difference between winning and not making the podium. In moto, to get a 2 second improvement in lap times, bikes go from a 25k tuned machine to a full factory 150k machine for that kind of difference. look at the last 2 years of WC results and see what a difference 2 seconds makes.
  • + 1
 Here I looked one up just for curiosity: 2 seconds was the difference from 4th to 1st.

www.sicklines.com/news-images/DHI_men_Results-ftwilliam-2011-downhill.pdf
  • + 2
 Yep. And the guy who is not first to the parking lot will miss all the beer, right?

Nobody cares about 2 seconds. Its folly. Just buy what is being sold when you need a new bike, that's all.
  • + 1
 the 2.5 seconds difference was brought to you by hypebike.com with friendly support of fox racing-shox. Seems legit yeah.

@Axxe

protour
[Reply]
  • + 1
 That is just insane! Fox prooved again that their products are no. 1 in the world. Nicely done
[Reply]
  • + 2
 That's alot of PLASTIC in there....
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Never wanted to get a full on dh fork more than this ever before......dream onFrown
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Now I'm waiting to see what RS release high end wise, and PB I'm waiting on the nukeproof pulse review !!!!!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 People crack me up bitching about price. They do make cheaper forks like you say you want, go buy one and shut the hell up!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 is anyone still waiting to see what Dt Swiss will put on the table in terms of long travel suspension? i know i am
[Reply]
  • + 2
 Rockshox needs to get their shit together
  • + 0
 no they dont because they ARE not made out of only plastic dog sgit this sucks
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Aaron Gwin at Plattekill....they know East Coast is where forks get a real test.....
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Nice insight and explanation of the new technology and cool pics. Great article.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Looks flexy. (had to!)

Seriously looks pretty cool, curious to see if they really come in at 5.9lbs though...
[Reply]
  • + 2
 You mfuckers i just orderd the old shit to full price!!!!!!!!!
  • + 3
 You shouldn't a done that. He's just a boy. Poor little feller.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 Still going after the new Marzocchi ti 888 C2R2.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 And the best comment goes to........ VW4ever! Rock what ya Got, gear addiction syndrome is real
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Its fox did u guys not expect a price like that I wouldn't have been surprised if it was more.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 anyone know if they are planning on adding this fork to the line or just replacing the coil 40 altogether??
  • + 1
 Is it possible for you to actually try to READ the article. I know its an odd idea, but you may find the answer in the article Wink
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Anyone know the service interval of these? My 09 40s need a rebuild every 3-6 Whistler days.
  • + 2
 I think the 2012 is every 10 hours.. Probably does need more service to feel as good as new. Don't you love to work on your bike more than riding?
  • + 1
 3-6 hard days is about right, especially if you are in wet conditions.
[Reply]
  • + 0
 Well, the the new fox RC4 shock is not only going to be sold to pros. that means it CANT be anywhere near as good as rockshox new vivid Wink
[Reply]
  • + 1
 i wonder if fox will sell the cartridge separately as an upgrade for the previous model
  • + 1
 The answer is no, the article was pretty clear on that!
[Reply]
  • + 0
 With all the advantages,i still wonder if it worth the price,a test on both of the suspensions will solve the issue.. :\
Also,great work-FOX always been impressive.. Smile
[Reply]
  • + 2
 I will continue to ride superior Rockshox suspension.
[Reply]
  • + 3
 I prefer coil.
[Reply]
  • + 0
 gonna be sweet for next season....FOx going to be lighter...competing with Boxxer?
  • + 1
 looks good on a sesion
[Reply]
  • - 2
 Man, that 40 is nice!!
Anyone know where I can find spec sheets on these or other similar fork and rear shock? I wanted to design a bike in Solidworks but need the specs for these items.
[Reply]
  • - 1
 Seeing that Fox has already put this technology into Motocross and most every riding is running them, I guarantee these are on point!
  • + 1
 Fox is a no name in MX. Showa, KYB and WP are the three biggest players in North america. Marzocchi has a lot of European support though.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I guess we can't upgrade 2012 or 13 forks to Air system .
  • + 3
 Fox says you can put the air spring system in the 2012 40. As I understand, the system was first used in the 2012 40. RC
  • + 1
 Ok thanks man good info, now we have to find out when they going to start upgrade the oil forks.
  • + 1
 RC - Any idea what the retrofit kit will cost? And is it something the average rider can do on their own?
[Reply]
  • + 1
 The 40 Drops over a Pound of weight.. Oh yes!!
  • + 25
 New fox 40, now shipping with less oil... Lol
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I'm gonna stick with my 66's..
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I know all about fox now!
[Reply]
  • + 0
 Hate to know how much they'll cost! Times like this when I wish I was loaded with money...
[Reply]
  • + 1
 The pressure bleed buttons are cool.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Hell yeah!!! Time to start saving!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I love my dorados!!!!!!!!!!!!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 it sucks to be poor seeing prices of components and bikes nowadays.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 SIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIICK..!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 $1700 for plastic internals. Unbelievable.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Quién quiere Whistler teniendo La Fenasosa a 40 km de donde vives
[Reply]
  • + 1
 well, butter my butt and call me a biscuit.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Not to bad of a price it's a lot of money but I was expecting I'm the 2's
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I want a job that sends me to fox suspension camp.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Nice looking rigs....I will still stay with Avalanche.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 what bike is that thomas guy riding
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I can afford this 4 years from now!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 gonna sell my bike to buy the forks
[Reply]
  • + 1
 i got 5 of those and i use helium not air in all my forks.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 £600 more i could get a nice set of foes... so smoooth.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 waaaaaaaaaaay to expensive just for some plastic
[Reply]
  • + 0
 wow amazing... air rocks !
[Reply]
  • + 0
 I was at that bikepark last weekend! =D
[Reply]
  • + 0
 Always was better than the other fork compenents
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Looks like a session
[Reply]
  • + 0
 Are you sure that we can upgrade the 2012,2013 forks
  • + 1
 @jptico. yep. its in the article. read it again.
[Reply]
  • + 0
 WHAT ! you dont have to be in the top 3%
[Reply]
  • - 1
 Did you hear that? That want he sound of the game changing
  • - 3
 Or was it the sound of Fox finally caching up to Rock Shox...
  • + 7
 No, I didn't hear anything. If I did, it would be the sound of an evolutionary refinement. More game changing would be whether the 1.5 second time saving on 650b wheels is repeatable everywhere...
  • - 7
 1.5 seconds? How do you get that?
  • + 16
 He read the write up instead of just looking at the pictures.
  • + 1
 Hahaha good looking out. Whe I get home from work ill have to read more than the first half
  • + 3
 Well 4mm is a huge difference (the 650b lowers for the 40 will have 7mm longer offset), and it will sure make you about as fast as Gwin. It was said on the interwebz!
  • + 1
 We'll just have to see how this fork works out and whether the claimed weight has any substance in it. Still doesn't make sense to drop their coil models that have been so successful for them over the last few years.
  • + 2
 I see it now, my apologies psyickphuk
  • + 0
 fox catching up to rs lololoollolololololl
[Reply]
  • - 1
 I hope RockShox is taking notes
[Reply]
  • - 1
 I wonder how much it will be to retrofit an older 40?
[Reply]
  • - 2
 Looks awesome! It's about time Fox offers the 40 in air to the public without using Trek
[Reply]
  • + 0
 To the Buy/Sell!
[Reply]
  • + 0
 2013 fox 40 for sale!
[Reply]
  • - 3
 They gotta pay for that nice new building they just got
  • + 5
 That's fox head, this is fox suspension. They're two different companies.
  • - 4
 money is still money Wink
  • + 5
 Yeah and stupid is still stupid!! Wink
[Reply]
  • - 2
 She will be mine
[Reply]
  • - 2
 Boxxer WC for sale...soon!
[Reply]
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