Fox iCD Suspension: Electronic Warfare Begins in Earnest

Oct 15, 2012
by Richard Cunningham  
 
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Fox Racing Shox filed a number of patents for electronic suspension controls in 2010, and by the 2012 racing season, its iCD remote control suspension was secretly competing in World Cup XC competition. With the planned release of iCD this Winter, Fox pits its manual-remote electronic suspension against the equally impressive Lapierre/RockShox 'e.i' computerized rear-suspension system which was released in June. With two well-engineered electronic suspension designs on the market from such big hitters, it is prudent that we take a long hard look at the concept.

Fox Racing Shox iCD Hero photo
  (Clockwise) Fox's iCD shock has a large servo motor that switches its low-speed damping between 'Climb' and 'Descend' modes. The red clicker is its external rebound control. A look at the iCD fork's crown-mounted servo and its two waterproof connectors. The iCD remote switch can be placed on either side of the handlebar and only takes up ten millimeters of precious space.


Introducing Fox iCD Electronic Remote-Control Suspension

Fox's iCD is a simple system that uses powerful servo-motors to operate Fox's well-proven manual low-speed compression damping circuits. ICD features a simple ring-shaped slider-switch at the handlebar that simultaneously opens or locks down the fork and shock damping with a flick of a thumb or finger. The entire iCD system only requires three wires to operate both ends of the bike's suspension, so it looks much cleaner than a cable-actuated remote system. ICD isn't cheap - Fox sells the system (fork, shock, electronics, battery, and charger) for around $2000, and offers a fork-only system for $1500 USD. Weight is pegged at 1860-grams (4.10 pounds) total weight for the dual-suspension option, with the fork-only system coming in at 1555 grams (3.43 pounds).

Fox Racing Shox Patent application by David Earl for electrically controlled suspension partial
  A look at some of the details of the Patent filed by Fox indicates that its iCD manual remote system may only be the tip of the electronic suspension iceberg.


iCD Back-Story

While Fox already offers a mechanical system that accomplishes the same function with a series of levers and cables, the party line is that computer-controlled electronics are a much simpler method to get the job done. Perhaps more importantly, the ring switch takes up less real estate on the handlebar and also requires less attention and effort from the rider than a dual-lever mechanical device that must overcome the friction of two cables and housings. ICD's ease of operation reportedly encourages riders to use the system much more frequently in high-stakes racing situations. The useful life of the lithium-ion battery is stated at over two months and recharges are said to take only 1.5 hours. Should you run the battery to death or cut a wire, the system defaults to the open 'descend' mode. Reliability of iCD is assured by the fact that Fox partnered with Shimano to develop the electronics using the same single-wire PLC computer controls and battery system that the industry leader developed for its Di2 derailleurs and shifting. Presently, iCD is only available for XC -racing, packaged with Fox's Kashima-coated 'Factory' 100 to 120-millimeter Fox 32 Float forks and Float shocks, but insiders say that Fox is already working on a long-travel ensemble which will be racing the European Enduro circuit next season.



Santa Cruz Tallboy Meets iCD Suspension

Santa Cruz Tall Boy set up with Fox iCD electronic suspension
  Santa Cruz's versatile Tallboy 29er is a perfect platform for a trailbike evaluation of Fox's made-for-XC-racing iCD electronic suspension. The Tallboy's 'mistake-proof' handling enabled us to push the new system to its limits over a wide variety of terrain.


With a long-travel system in the works, we decided to build up a test bike with iCD to test its merits on trail, where most PB riders live. Fox agreed to set Pinkbike up with an iCD system that included a 120-millimeter fork. To take maximum advantage of the shorter-travel suspension, we chose a Santa Cruz Tallboy for the test because of its legendary handling, and the fact that larger-diameter wheels augment the suspension, which would help us to better evaluate iCD's benefits for the wilder side of the sport.

Santa Cruz Tall Boy set up with Fox iCD electronic suspension Formula The One brakes and Shimano XT drivetrain.
  While we are at it, take a closer look at PB's Tallboy iCD test bike. (Clockwise) Sturdy tapered head tube and semi-integrated Cane Creek headset keeps the handlebar height low. Formula's 'The One' Carbon brakes are as good as they look. The Tallboy's forged rear dropout incorporates a super rigid derailleur mount and a bottle opener. The VPP suspension's angular-contact bearings are adjustable.



Fox iCD Installation

ICD kits arrive with a battery charger; a water-bottle-mount battery holder that also integrates the computer functions; the remote ring-switch; an in-line LED indicator; and a number of wires with pre-applied waterproof connectors. Cables are available in a number of lengths to avoid unsightly loops and adhesive conduit tape is included in the kit to help keep the assembly looking professional. Instructions are minimal - route the wires so they don't interfere with moving parts and then snap the connectors firmly in place. The battery box mount has an aluminum extension that fits beneath a water-bottle cage. This requires longer screws to mount the bottle cage, which are the only items not included in the kit. We have no need for a bottle, so we opted to cut and shorten the battery mount to clean up the installation.

Fox Racing Shox iCD battery plugs into a frame mounted receptical. Both parts are identical to Shimano Di2.
  Shimano provides the iCD battery box and waterproof wiring system, which is exactly the same as its Di2 road-bike shifting system. The lighter gray battery module plugs into the frame-mount and latches closed. A safety button (right) releases the battery when the latch is opened.


Our Factory Float shock already had low-friction bushings and hardware dedicated to the Tall Boy's VPP suspension, so it simply bolted up. The servo motor module is quite large, but not obtrusive. Tucked in the center of the black box is a red rebound dial. Low-speed rebound and air pressure are the only manual adjustments on both the fork and shock. The fork's servo-control is integrated into the right fork crown, where the familiar blue compression and lockout dials usually rest. The plastic cap has two sockets for the wiring and that's it. Fox said that the Factory offers 20 different tunes for iCD forks and shocks that range from full lockout to various levels of pedaling platform. Our suspension setup had an aggressive 'trail' tune, which translates to a healthy amount of pedaling platform in the closed 'Climb' position and smooth, nearly wide open compression damping in the 'Descend' position.

Fox Racing Shox iCD shock
  Fox limits the iCD Factory Float shock to Climb and Descend functions only.The severity of the 'Climb' function can be factory tuned from a firm pedaling platform to near lockout. The two wire leads can be interchanged without altering the correct function of the system. In the event of an electronic failure, iCD reverts to the open, 'Descend' mode.


At the handlebar, the remote switch slips over the bar and is fixed in place with an Allen set screw. The switch has an on/off indicator on two sides, so it may be used on either the right or left side of the bar, and it measures barely ten millimeters across, so it takes up very little space. The switch has an anti-friction washer that faces against the rubber grip. The last piece is a small in-line LED indicator that is wired to a short lead that sprouts from the remote switch. The indicator turns green when the servos are in action and then shuts off. As the battery is exhausted, the LED flashes green when the charge is below 50 percent, steady red below 25 percent and then the red LED flashes to signal the battery is completely run out.

Fox Racing Shox LED indicator noted shifting activity and changes color and modes as battery is depleted.
  This little guy is an LED indicator that displays battery life. Shimano sells a computer app that allows iCD users to program a third function - shock on and fork off, or the reverse - which is the LED indicator's secret purpose. We used aviation safety wire instead of the supplied zip ties to fix it to the shift housing.


Wiring it Up

The LED indicator is zip-tied to a brake hose or gear housing near the handlebar. A short wire runs from the LED box to one of the two sockets in the fork servo. A second wire runs between the fork and the shock servo, and finally, the third section of wire spans between the shock servo and the battery. It's pretty fool proof. The wires that enter and exit the dual sockets at the fork and shock servos can be interchanged, and the the single cable that connects all the elements carries both the battery current as well as the digital signals from the computer controller. The one warning worth noting is that the waterproof connectors fit tightly and take a good deal of force to remove or install. Shimano sells a tool to remove them that was not in the Fox Kit. Be sure not to pull the connectors out by the wire - do this only by grasping the connector body.

Fox Racing Shox iCD fork detail
  Fox did a good job of hiding iCD's wiring and servo mech inside the Kashima-coated 32 Float Factory fork. The in-and-out wiring reduces the system to only three wires from the handlebar-switch to the fork, the shock and to the battery. The manual low-speed rebound clicker is in the standard position, under the fork's right slider.


The last bit to do is to secure the wires to the bike. Fox provides grooved adhesive backed plastic tape that can be used to hide the wires along the frame, but that won't survive the repeated pressure washing that most race bikes endure, so we suggest pairing the three runs of wire with a nearby cable housing or brake hose and fixing them with small zip ties. The host hose/housing will help to protect the wires and your bike won't have black band-aids all over it. Because our Tall Boy chassis was bare aluminum, I ditched all the plastic zip ties on the bike and routed the housings, hoses, and iCD wires with stainless steel aircraft safety wire to continue the bare metal look from tire to tire.

Setting Up the Suspension

Once the wires are snapped in tight and checked, install the battery and he iCD system should jump to life with a click of the remote switch. The servo motors are quite loud indoors, but less noticeable outside on the trail. Dialing in the suspension is straight forward - turn the remote to open (descend) to free up the low-speed compression circuits and add air pressure to establish 25-percent sag with you riding weight aboard (You, your gear and all the water and stuff you plan to carry.), Then take a bit of a ride to establish the proper low-speed rebound damping with the red dials beneath the right fork slider and under the servo box of the shock.

Riding Fox iCD Electronic-remote Suspension

Electronic servo motors powerful enough to reliably operate the Fox low-speed damping controls are not the silent type, so the first thing we noticed was the 'zip-zip' sound of the motors each time we tapped the iCD's remote switch. The iCD processor operates the fork first and then the shock to reduce the draw on the battery. Immediately after each use, the entire system then shuts down, so there is no on/off switch. ICD is always at the ready. Once underway, the zip-zip of the servos faded into the background noise. Functionally, the slim ring switch is spot-on, with a short throw to affect mode changes and a nub that lets the rider operate the switch with the index finger instead of the thumb. The tactile feel of the iCD switch, however is a bit cheap and plastic-like. We would have expected Fox to replicate the feel of its machined aluminum suspension clickers in this new application. Perhaps weight savings was a motivator, as iCD is targeted at the sport's most elite XC racers.

The ease of operation that Fox advertises as iCD's essential benefit is a reality. We reset our initial suspension settings much softer after we realized that we could firm up the suspension instantly, even for two or three meters on a climb if we felt the need. The iCD switch is like the 'push-to-pass button' that modern race cars feature. We could firm up the suspension, take five hard pedals out of the saddle to get by a rider, and then settle back into the saddle and spin the cranks with the suspension comfortably opened up. In fact, most of the time spent in the 'climb' option was for out-of-the-saddle pedaling efforts. Santa Cruz tuned the Tallboy's VPP suspension to pedal efficiently with the shock turned on, so when seated with the suspension locked out, any benefits that a rider may feel are perceived - not real.

Those who have experienced lever-type handlebar-remotes have confused the shift levers with the controls that operate the suspension. Regardless of how much practice, the human brain cannot reliably discriminate which lever is which in an emergency. Fox's ring switch has a completely different feel and function than the shift and brake levers, so the brain has no problem adapting the new technology to rote memory. The ease of which we learned the iCD system, though, was not as much of a surprise as the iCD's ease of operation. Call us lazy, but three minutes of push-button suspension control made us wonder why we ever thought wrestling with cables and hydraulics was a good idea.

With iCD, you only need to ask the suspension to switch from climb to descend mode, you don't have to make it happen. There is more to it, because with a mechanical device, after each action you must check to ensure that the levers have moved far enough and that the suspension actually did what you asked of it. With iCD electronics, you hit the button, hear the zip-zip of the servos and that's it - job over. Even in the event that you forgot which way you moved the ring-switch, all you need to do is reverse the switch and give the suspension a check bounce. ICD is about an instant and sure response from your suspension, any moment that you may ask for it.

Is iCD a Useful Tool for Trail and Gravity Riders?

After spending time on the Tallboy with and without iCD, we found that the difference it less marked than expected, but that had more to do with the fact that the Tallboy's short-travel suspension pedals quite well wide open. That said, we used the Fox electronic suspension control far more than we did with say, the Scott Genius, which is a long-travel bike that lives or dies by its mechanical-remote suspension controls. The instant and sure response of iCD had us imagining how much more effective the push-button suspension control would be for a mushy-pedaling 160-millimeter-travel AM/trailbike. Arguably, the addition of electronic controls to a traditionally mechanical device like a bicycle is a questionable leap, but in its defense, many of iCD's potential anti-technology detractors have no qualms about packing an i-Phone, recording every ride with a GPS, riding a 1,200 horsepower electric uplift, or shuttling all day in a computerized, fuel-injected truck. After a very positive test with Lapierre's e.i active electronic suspension and now, an equally promising trial of the new Fox iCD manual remote electronics, we expect to see battery-powered controls on long-travel production bikes and perhaps for DH racing in the very near future. And if anyone is listening, we want a push-button electronic remote dropper post that goes up and down. -RC



What's your take on electronic suspension controls?



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256 Comments

  • + 72
 I'm honestly stoked the industry is pushing forward so hard. For all the haters, you dont have to buy it, but maybe in 5 years time electronics will start appearing in suspension in a more appealing way. Heck I bet when gears were first brought out maybe people wouldn't put a derailer on bikes because it looked butt ugly. Times change people. Gearboxes and electronic suspension would be sick!
  • + 72
 but isnt the whole point of a bicycle to be powered only by the skill and strength of the rider? next thing you know, it will just be "hover bikes" and you wont have to feel anything at all... LOL
  • + 2
 Yeah i understand what you mean. I wouldn't like ABS braking to appear on bikes... or automatic gearboxes. But I think suspension is still (as much as rockshox/fox will protest) a pretty crude system... all it is is a spring to take the hit and oil to slow it down. I've always wondered if there could be a sensor within the fork that somehow tracks the ground... so much that if it feels as square edge hit it literally blows through the travel to keep you stable... I dunno.
  • + 16
 there's motorbikes.
  • + 6
 the ICD is an amazing product. I just don't think a majority of the people on here would find it beneficial to their riding.
  • - 18
 Bullitproof- when was suspension powered by the rider? Your point makes no sense, haha. I like this step forward because it improves on suspension design in that it helps it act more appropriately in situations. I guess the ones opposing this are against every advancement in suspension performance... like avalanche dampers for instance.
  • + 14
 RC is right, the real potential for this is on mushy DH and long travel bikes. Part of me doesn't like it because its a band aid for bad suspension designs and it over-complicates mountain biking, but it is an improvement. Expect to see DH racers it in the next few years, maybe even at World's this year. I would be interested in a system that lowers the seat to a predetermined spot and stiffins the suspension with one button, less distractions.
  • + 2
 Wouldn't that be pretty similiar to Fox's CTD?
  • + 12
 5 years time? Noleen (on proflex bikes) brought out electronically controlled suspension in the late 90's! Fox have also done it before in conjuction with Cannondale on the Lefty ELO. This is a step forward, but not into something new...its just a refined version of what they tried to do before.

I can see the benefit in XC racing but not much else. I just want to grab my bike and ride, not fuss about with batteries etc.
  • + 7
 I think this is a great point and one that entered my head when i first read about these. My main bug is the cluttered cockpit, I love the simplicity of a single chain ring and a 1x10 or 1x9 at the back with your dropper post on the left. It would a real win win if it was simplified to seat post down, suspension descend mode, seat post up suspension climb mode, all off your dropper post control. Computer gadgetry hidden in the bottom of the post and out of sight. With increasingly clean frame designs with internal routing it could really look and possibly work awesome, and I for one would spend money on that.

It seems like such an obvious way to do it you wonder why they didnt do it like that..ahhhh V2.0 more money!

But with the fox post being whipped by the reverb you think fox would look into that. Fox make this happen (pretty please)
  • + 0
 @ stuflair ... that and when electronic shifting inevitably finds its way onto mountain bikes (officially), the battery will already be present. Efficient.
  • + 13
 Also, why not include a gyroscope in the frame so it knows the angle of the bike, and automatically re-adjust seat post, switches gears, locks/unlocks rear suspension, and calls your mum if it senses an endo.. Lol.
As far as suspension, Fox could just improve the feel of their forks (try a MZ 44/55 to see the difference !) instead of wasting our time with useless, cluttering gadgets. Gearboxes I am all for ! Then again they have have now been around for over a decade, but not catching on, probably due to their cost and micro mechanism which renders them fragile perhaps in the long run. Pinion seems on the right track, not. We are not ready to spend $3K on a german XC frame just to have their technology. Lol.
  • + 5
 I still say its not needed. What's next, iPads mounted on the handlebars and tires that tell you when the pressure is too low. I'm all for innovation but this is unnecessary and dumb. I would prefer they figure out ways to produce things more efficiently so everyday people can afford them
  • + 1
 Is it just me or has this caused a riot Razz
  • + 5
 Whoa Protour with positive props! haha. @ Bryanbobo ... roadies already ride around with their iPhone mounted to their handlebars. So i guess the iPad isn't far off?

This stuff is nuts. I won't buck progress, just gonna wait and see. I just finally thought I understood my CC DB , and this is a whole new level! Less wire the better in my opinion.
  • + 1
 I think this is just amazing!! I want them to make it for the dhx 5.0 air shock!!! i would buy one!
  • + 1
 I wont use it,

But, please give to Mr.Nino Schuter, let's see how he whip this thing off and slap the other competitor Big Grin
  • + 1
 i dont like all this electronic stuff, why not keep it simple and let the rider do the work instead of computers taking over. i certainly won't be going to the electronic side of mountain biking for a while
  • + 0
 I have to sat that through all my years of riding I've never used lockout. Half the time i dont even care how much pressure is in my forks. So for me, this system is kind of useless. But for some people that actually pay attention to their bike and like to fine tune their settings i can see this being a winner.
  • + 3
 All I want to hear more about is the bottle opener on the rear dropout.
  • + 1
 AdmanMTB, sensors in suspension have been around for quite a while. Specialized's Brain and Fox's TerraLogic both rely (relied) on inertia valves, and if they didn't work the Specialized Epic would not be renowned as such an epic bike, no pun intended. It's not electronic, but the valves do "sense." Cars have been using electronically sensed and controlled damping for more than a few years, too. Platform damping (Curnutt, SPV, Progressive Suspension's 5th Element) is a bit different, but the end aimed at is the same: changing damping rates for varying terrain. Platform damping is perhaps near a decade of having been around?
  • + 1
 i think some touched on it already...this is the prelude to automatic suspension tuning. looking at the patent with all the input sensors, this system could easily be setup for full automated actuation, this would be quicker and smarter than human action. it would know much torques going through the pedals, off the saddle and cranks are turning, frame attitude, definitely a climbing situation. high speeds, cranks not turning, out of saddle, probably downhill situation. they could add a crank position sensor and fork pressure sensor to know when its bobbing. and someone mentioned using a gyro, this is a simple approach to measure climbing induced bob.
i personally don't see using this system just to replace the cable system, cost/weight/complexity all increase, but i do see this being the forefront to a fully automated suspension system, just like cadillac and corvette's magnetic ride shocks, which are fully automated because the speed to adapt is far too quick for human control.
this icd system, when fully automated, could have different tailored settings similar to the automotive applications.

lithium batteries last much longer than 2mths. they don't mention how long a charge lasts which is one of the most important aspects of this system.

and i also thought the VPP bikes don't need lockouts on the rear.
  • + 1
 Yes the point is to power yourself in mtb and with remote sus or electronic sus you still are, nobody moaned when full sus bikes came out 20 years ago, the only difference with remote sus is that just on the point of hitting a knarly decent you dont have to start reaching down trying to find the sus lever while looking up steering with one hand becoming immediately irate at the fact that your missing out on enjoying the decent, youve worked so hard to get to, while actually slowing down to find eventually find the lever move it into decend mode, then reach over the handlebars to do the same with the front...... oh wait a minute we're at the bottom.... BRILLIANT! Fuming... so no, nobody wants a hover board to mountain bike I just wana be able to access the 20 year old idea of full sus on my bike without getting pissed off and wondering why nobody has invented some kind of handlebar mounted lever where I can operate my sus from my handlebars.. nobody moaned when they put gear change levers on handlebars, how about taking them off and reaching down to the derailleur to change gear!!! Awsome man...let me know if the hover idea comes to fruition...
[Reply]
  • + 59
 This is horrible I hope it disappears quick.
  • + 24
 This very much. Isn't needed, expensive and yet another thing to make mtb easier when i'm already looking for new challenges! Surely trying harder and harder things should be the aim of mountain biking to keep it fun and spending $2,000 on some wires is only going to make your local loop easier!

Where's the fun in that?
  • + 27
 I agree, with all this tecnologies, some day, bikes will be motorbikes.
  • + 11
 So, how much will it cost to have someone pedal for me. Like really, how far do we have to go with this until a bicycle is no longer a bicycle?
  • + 18
 Same was said about shimano's Di2 when it came out, Di2 works incredibly well. This is high end stuff intended for the elite level rider, I agree most of the pinkbike users don't need or want this technology, but i think someone can gain an advantage from the system. I'm sure FOX is going to have lots of demo days for people to try out.
  • + 19
 How does this possibly make mountain biking "easier"? You still have to "ride" the bike. You know what made mountain biking "easier"? Suspension. This is no different than mounting fork/shock controls on the handlebar, only there's more control and it's more ergonomic. You still have to know what to do with it. Trigger shifters were met with the same resistance when they came out too. What kind of shifters do you use?
  • + 3
 And the $2000 price tag includes the fork and shock. Which is really not all that much more for a high end system.
  • + 18
 ahhh my brain hurts...
  • + 7
 so its basically an electronic option for lockout right? Was there a problem with linear or hydraulic remote lockout or something?
  • + 6
 I knew most people would be hating on this when I looked at the comments. It's fair enough, I won't be buying it. And I can't see the people this is aimed at - XC racers - willingly strapping up to 4 pounds of kit to their bikes either.

But regardless, I am all for this sort of development & innovation, it's what makes mountain bike technology interesting & continuing to develop.
  • - 1
 Electronic suspension, lordy may. Suspension technology is already good enough, didn't they watch Rampage. Fox can talk some shit.
  • + 3
 It would be good for enduro races. I cant see it being good for anything other than racing where every pedal stroke counts.
  • + 4
 Motorbikes are not covered with ridiculous gizmos. .... Jokes aside, this is a cool idea. But it is far from practical. A four lb servo motor to do the job of reaching down and turning a knob on your fork crown, it's a little silly. Looking at the patent illustration this is just the beginning of something much more complex, similar to what has been done with automotive suspensions... and I can appreciate the thought that goes into something like this. But do we need it? To be honest once I get my fork set up the way I like it I rarely touch it. I do use my floodgate switch on my Monarch shock, but rarely, only to firm things up for long fireroad climbs or smooth flat trails I may use the mid setting. I really don't ever get annoyed with having to reach down under my top tube.
  • + 7
 Unless you can genuinely say that you prefer riding a rigid MTB from the early 90's as opposed to a modern day trail bike, it's stupid to be against technological developments like this. Mountain biking would not be where it is today without companies pushing the boundaries. Things as simple as suspension forks and hydraulic disc brakes, that are now standard on most mountain bikes, wouldn't exist if it weren't for innovation like this.
  • + 0
 HT-sauce...your right enough, but there is still a case for technology going too far for some people. Its a personal preference thing. Some will buy it others wont. But a problem for me is escalating prices from FOX, of which some of this cost is to cover technology R&D projects that non-adopters of these new technologies are paying for when they buy regular products.

Also wheres the comparisons to other products that dont have this technology, trialed on riders with various skill levels...emm..MIA as usual.
  • + 3
 Pabail, I can see where you're coming from, but it's the same with any suspension company. If you can't afford to fund R&D to get the edge on your competitors then your company will fail. Fox products are more expensive than some other brands because they hold a position of higher quality in the market, this is the same reason BOS forks cost a bomb.
  • - 3
 All these haters who claim to want it to be simple are the same people who will spend lots of time dialing in their suspension set up, and spend the rest of their time talking about it.
  • + 12
 You guys DO realize that the 4 pound weight INCLUDES FORK AND SHOCK, right?
  • + 6
 I am not against technology, and I have ridden mtn bikes since the early 90's so I know how far we have come..... but you can not honestly tell me that this kit as it sits is not a little ridiculous. Im not against technology but is there not a line? When does innovation turn into automation? Of course some people will dig this, and I encourage Fox to persue it. But don't deny that there are reasons we choose to ride a mountain bike...... reasons much more profound than the technology beneath us. There is a pure simplicity to riding bikes that appeals to our souls. I am not against tech, please do not misconstrue. This type of automation just does not appeal to the mountain biker in me.
  • + 6
 But it's not automation of any kind. Same way Dura Ace Di2 does not shift for you, it's just the method in which the shift gets translated from shifter to derailleur. Doesn't matter if it's cable, hydraulic or electronic.
  • + 13
 But when will it become self aware!
  • + 5
 ^psml. ...whats next, Cornering Assist Technologies built into the headtube.
  • + 3
 some day just like the difference between the ipod and iphone we'll have nothing left to upgrade without sticking an engine on the bike (or a phone on the ipod)
  • + 1
 people are forgetting that few years ago downhill used to be fire road decents. And suspension adjustments are what brought it to where it is today. This is just next generation in the development
  • + 1
 If ti means I can go faster on a downhill track eventually, I'm all for it.
  • + 3
 This isn't "electronic suspension". It is the normal fox suspension with a manual, electronic control of pro-pedal/compression adjustments. It does the same thing as a remote cable actuated lockout/propedal lever. It doesn't do anything different than the usual lockout lever that has been around for many years. The difference is that it uses electricity to control the servos that move the dials on the fork and shock, which is easier and more efficient than cable actuation.
  • + 0
 ...and still ...its pointless techno gunk Wink
  • + 2
 "But a problem for me is escalating prices from FOX"

Solution: X-fusion!

Also, I love how everyone is bitching about it and says they dont want it for themselves, when the article clearly states "iCD is targeted at the sport's most elite XC racers." Are all you guys the sport's most elite xc racers? No? Quitcher bitchin then!
  • + 3
 I dont know about you guys but this is a big mistake :/
  • + 11
 Where are the limits? Formula 1 is the most intense sport on the planet in terms development of race winning technologies. Race machines are developed from race to race flushed with unimaginable sums of money at an incredible pace. Yet, the writers of the regulations in that sport, writers of the formula, know exactly that there is such a thing as over-development that threatens the future of the sport and therefore they impose regulations so that those borders are not crossed. No one wants to watch a race where driver is just a figure, as the car does all the job for him. If there were no limitations, driver would become simply obsolete. All the regulations in F1 are there so that driver elment still remains the important factor in winning the race. Ironicaly to this story, the turning point in F1 came from the side of computer controlled, self balancing suspension of Williams car from 1990.

So a difficult here to considered here, that one has to embrace idea that technology has its limitations, no matter how advanced it is. Human factor is what makes all of this exciting. We might get sub 10kg DH bikes by 2020, and so what? Fabien Barel has drawn thin unfortunate analogy in the Tipping Point movie. "DH racing is the Formula 1" of cycling. Nowhere close, I say. In every single form of cycling human body and brain performance is absolutely THE most decessive factor, any form of doping will outperform any technical solution. In every form of cycling toys give winning edge to those in the first ten. Technology in biking does not make you any more faster and fun having, than confused and willing to spend money...
  • + 4
 That might be the best comment of yours I have ever read WAKI......I fully agree 100%

Lets just ride our bikes for fun, laughs and pushing ourselves to the point of adrenaline overload.....last time I checked I didn't need a computer for that. Can't wait til the day comes when I ask a buddy to ride and he says he can't cause he forgot to plug his bike in.......
  • + 0
 Biking is biking, we dont need electrical stuff to make us have fun, I thought biking would be one of the only things that is safe from the high technoligy like all the carbon bikes are fine but adding cables and stuff to forks jus isnt right...
  • + 6
 Yeah! You know what else isn't right? Cables on seatposts! Oh wait, everyone on pinkbike loves those now... Facepalm
  • + 0
 I know just buy aa bloody carbon SDG seatpost...
  • + 2
 So horrible. I mean what's next, lithium powered led headlights on a bike so you can ride at night? These kind of technologies are getting ridiculous. I know what's best for everybody and people should listen to me, u know!
  • + 1
 You want technology to improve so you can ride harder terrain, otherwise you could just ride a crappy bike to make it more challenging, but I do agree you don't need this.
  • + 1
 lithium battery isnt a horrible idea, tho probs already done obviously
  • + 2
 No, lithium battery on a bike is a horrible idea, end of discussion! Now, excuse me as I go shred at night with my 3000 lumen lithium powered led light.
  • + 2
 Got to say im not a great fan but don't see why that means that they have to stop research and shit into it. Some things some people will like and others people won't. If we stop them looking into new bike technology then no one is going to benefit, if you get what i mean.
  • + 1
 Exactly, I'm not a big of this either but I respect the choice of other riders who will go for it and I don't think they are any less biker than I am only because they have servos and lithium batteries on their bike. It's all about choices! We're all different type of riders, riding different trails, so it's very naive to even think that one knows what's best for everybody. It's as simple as that!
  • + 3
 the lapierre design seemed alot better tbh...
  • + 4
 In general with all those latest things, hype galloping at us as never, the best thing to say I think is: certain things are reserved for certain people, in good hands almost anything can be used well, in bad hands . It takes lots of consideration, self consciousness and humility to determine whether I can use a certain thing or not. It is a big misunderstanding I believe to think: "this and that is just an improvement, why not use it if I can afford it".

The best analogy will be the soldier and the knife and a kid with the knife. Think what each of them can do with it - I think if you are on this site, you are most probably just a kid, soldiers are in the war zones of gyms, trails, meetings, briefings. It's good that industry tries lots of different stuff, some of that will stay, some will die - what is not good if someone puts too much faith into what it can do with his riding. I went through this false logic of looking for "magic bullet", but I was also blessed with next to no money at the beginning of the sport, ridign really shitty bike and slowly progressing through better and better gear. People who jumped straight on a great bike just missed that very important lesson. For instance dropper posts,as great as they are, they rob you of important experiences if you buy them too soon, same with putting on clipless pedals, same with too much suspension, and so on

Make sure you master the knife before you pick up a bazooka. Soldiers won't survive long in the woods without a knife... Knife analogy is also good, because kid can cut himself with it. Take note, that all those super bikes, make it easier for you, with the same bag of skills you can go way faster o super bike than on an average one, but consequences of crashing at high speed are way worse. And hehe, you big boys able to afford those super bikes, you have lots of responsibilites, you can't just work well with broken right hand or collar bone (in the best situation)...
  • + 3
 So Waki... Are you looking at getting that novel that you wrote published or now. I know a guy.
  • + 4
 Don't fuck with Rambo!
  • + 1
 waki, seriously go and ride rigid bike because you would have said exactly the same thing when they introduced suspensions. the difference between this and F1 is that any of the riders can get their hands on this kit. This is team independent, this isnt developed for a single team advantage. anyone on the starting grid can use it. And the limit is actually the rider funny enough, because even if i was given all this top end stuff i still wouldnt attempt rampage stuff
  • + 1
 he wouldnt have said that because suspension makes you faster in rough terrain, using an electronic instead of a mechanical remote doesn't it only makes your ride more luxurious so you dont have to put "huge strain forces on your fingers" to overcome "excess cable friction"
  • + 3
 Georgy I am not against this stuff anymore, because it doesn't matter what I or all of us here think about it. They made an investment and offer it to us to buy. We choose whether we want it or not. It is quite clear that we might expect electronicly controlled suspension on downhill bikes, things like brake dive might become non existent. Probably XC bikes will get less travel as it will be used in better way by computer calculating stuff thousand times at a second. Downhill will benefit greatly from ABS for brakes. I think it is inevitable... I don't give a fk, I just rolled for the first time on my 29er. I see certain possibilities for me, huuuge see of opportunity for very strong and skilled riders, and a giant pitfall for a poor rider. People want EASY, and easy does not lead anywhere. This stuff is of use for people who don't mind SUPER HARD.
  • + 1
 then, I may have misunderstood you sir
  • + 1
 Here's another way to look at it. All the criticisms here are focussed on how new innovations make mountain biking easier, and that it's no longer a challenge. But what really happens when new innovations are introduced (such as suspension), is that people don't get lazy and exert less effort - instead, they push the limits of what is possible. They go faster, harder and bigger.
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  • + 22
 For me mountain biking is an escape from the world of coursework, texting and facebook. I don't have an iphone, gps or uplift. It's just me & the trail and I intend to keep it that way
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  • + 21
 Dear Bicycle Industry, Please work on something useful first, like getting rid of the derailleur. Computerized gadgets can come later. Thank you, Everyone
  • - 2
 I think this is useful, but agree that getting rid of archaic derailleurs should be a higher priority.
  • + 4
 Since FOX is a suspension company who doesn't make any drivetrain components, I don't think this is on the top of their list of priorities.
  • + 1
 @smike - yes, obviously. The point is that we are fed hype on all kinds of the latest & greatest (and mostly useless) gadgets all the time, when what most of us really want badly first is a durable, reliable shifting system that doesn't weigh a ton or cost a mint to buy.
It's like getting pumped-up about a car that has heated, 6-axis, voice-activated headrests but wheels that wobble and fall off after every two drives. The very best derailleurs these days perform just *ok* IMO, and only when they're new. Don't say "oh yea well my new Saint clutch system is awesome". Yes, it's better than the old stuff, but how good is it after a season of shredding? A high-end complete drivetrain (derailleurs, chain, rings, cogset) costs $500-700ish. Can't we get something that works well and lasts for that kind of cash? If your transmission fell out of your new car after 3 months, wouldn't you feel gypped?

As I see it, the technological challenge is this: build a drivetrain component system that is retro-fittable to existing frames, at a similar cost and weight to a conventional system. Make it durable, strong and precise. Make it's service intervals fairly minimal. Make it's setup easy.

Who knows...gearbox that fits in a BB.
Or something similar to Nuvinci, but lighter.
Maybe CVT system mounted at the front ring.

I don't have the answer - I'm not the engineer. But that will be the first really worthwhile advance in modern bikes, since the disc brake and suspension fork.
  • + 2
 Icd is stupid all it is is a little remote to turn propedal on and off. It take me less than a second to move my hand to the fork/shock to flick a switch. And if you dont want to move your hand then go buy mechinal lockout switch for $50.
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  • + 12
 Am I the only one who actually liked it?
I mean, it's ridiculously expensive, but it will get cheaper, and imagine it on a DH bike? Ultra soft suspension for that dam rock garden, extra stiff for that pedal-as-hell session. Everything we have is now computer aided, why not our bikes?
  • + 12
 People don't like this idea for the same reason that electronic RD where not allowed in XC competitions many years ago.
MTB should remain as mechanical as possible, it is precisely that interaction between the rider, bike and terrain that makes thing interesting and enjoyable, plus it really tests the rider's ability.

Outdoor sports means that you need to adapt to the environment, enjoy it for what it is, be creative when things get tough or simply endure the moment. What's the point in being aided all the time by computer or electronics, that's just another way of ruining something that is already great. (In our case MTB)

As for your "dam rock garden" and "pedal-as-hell session" I recommend setting your bike correctly and try over and over again until you reach that point where those sections are just a piece a of cake. Then look for more difficult tracks.
  • - 3
 You just contradicted yourself. If you set your bike up to be plush in the rock garden then it pedals poorly in the pedal section, and vice-versa. The point is to be faster and not everyone agrees with you that it ruins the experience of outdoor sports. Some think it enhances it, by making the bike more efficient.
  • + 4
 MasterOfStone you said that I should adapt myself to the terrain, interact with the environment, so why do you even use a suspension then? Why do you even use a bike?
You say that bikes must be kept as mechanical as possible. Sorry, but many other people said that many times already, about many other subjects. One great example is your car. About 30 years ago it was unthinkable to use a computer on a car, many factories said it would destroy the concept of a car to use any kind of computing on it, for cars were mechanicals. Well, look at cars today... Why in the world would you go against a most logical improvement on bikes, in order to keep it fully mechanical?
I do agree, as a Mechanical Engineer, that fully mechanical machines are pure art, but they are no match for a computer aided system.
  • + 3
 And it wont be popular in other categories either. People don't really like cable jungles, but its my personal opinion. Think in wireless, and this system has a future.
  • + 2
 I agree, it would be kinda cool to have a wireless-controlled gearbox and dropper, with front brake run through the steerer and maybe a hydro gyro for the rear.. Super clean bike you could do anything on. If such a bike existed, my skills still wouldnt justify it, but cool in theory nonetheless
  • - 1
 @caiokv the thing is that the suspension should be good enough in the first place that you can dial in very firm lsc without loosing any bump eating in rock gardens.
  • + 1
 Caiokv, suspension is something that requires some knowledge and patience to have it dialed and the settings changes depending on the terrain. True it does help/aid the rider but that bit of time spent on your bike to have it ready makes things more interesting when we are out on the trail/track. As to why do I even use a bike, well last I checked this sport is called Mountain Biking, it requires the person to use a bike.

With regards to your car analogy, car and mountain bikes have entirely different use and purposes. Agreed, computer aided machines do improve/help people on a day to day basis but is precisely that improvement that when achieved without any sort of electronic help makes things more interesting for example setting-up the bike and making down with what we have, and I don't need to be a "Mechanical Engineer" to say/know this.

The bottom line here is that we have two different views on how to enjoy MTB so have a blast putting that system on your bike ( if you can afford to do so ), I will keep mine as it is.
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  • + 11
 I'm not a fan of the electric suspension controls. The patent however does interest me, it looks like they've gone ahead and patented a whole data logging system similar to the ones used on race cars. It could prove useful for teams and serious racers to help with setting a bike up to a specific track (DH).
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  • + 10
 Dear fox, please make me a more complicated suspension design. If you can add electonics and more wires that would be great. I really need a usb connector in my next rear shock so i can download porn at the mountain. I also want some heated underwear.
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  • + 5
 What ever happened to simple, raw, man (or woman) and machine biking? I understand adjustable shocks and forks; that is needed. Improvements in materials, stronger things etc...

But there is a line. I mean, it's CYCLING after all. Not a motorcycle, not a car, not a plane, not some high tech vehicle. It's a bicycle, which should have as little interference between rider and riding, as possible.

Whatever, maybe I am old school....
  • + 2
 I agree. Ive heard people telling me to buy another bike because mines is harder to pedal uphill than theirs, i tell them 'but that makes me stronger in the long run' and call them 'a pussy'.
  • + 2
 And the goal of this tech is to make less interference between the rider and riding. I think they've got a ways to go but it's good that they're pushing.
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  • + 7
 Remember this isn't anything new. Noleen suspension did this in the late 1990's! Fox seems to have perfected it to a degree.
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  • + 4
 Does no one else find that their enduro bike climbs rough trails best when left in full open settings? Sit back and spin smooth and the bike does all the work for you. Adding heaps of LSC does nothing but kill effective traction at the tire and mask bad pedaling technique. The only time I ever flip a switch is on a long road climb.
  • + 1
 My rear shock offers 3 different levels of lockout. In my experience the lockout has more benefit than leaving it open. I get uphill much faster and easier.
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  • + 3
 Look at patent to see the future. You folks are annoyed by electronics simply replacing a mechanical operation. Just think how much you'll hate it when a computer is sensing the trail, how hard your pedaling, how hard your braking, how fast you're going, and automatically adjusting the suspension for you on the fly.
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  • + 3
 This is the future. It's here and it's happening.

I love the "haters" who denounce technological advancement in bicycles, as if bikes somehow need to remain immune to the progress that propels every other industry forward. These naysayer neophytes are always proclaiming how pure bicycles are, that they should not be violated by the technological currents that permeate every other facet of our lives. These Luddites are always promoting the handbuilt, singlespeed, vegan-made frames that come out of a revered craftsman's garage, yet they require that you ignore the fact that they're rolling up to the trailhead in their 2013 Porsche Cayenne Turbo S's, and not in a horse-drawn carriage. "Awww man, electronics don't belong on a bike, man!" they proclaim, while they rush to the store to get the latest Blu-Ray of "Star Wars."

The second these hypocrites ditch the cell phones for cans and a string, I'll buy their old-world nostalgia. Until then, shut up and ride.
  • + 4
 I think that's a pretty extreme spin on this debate.
  • + 5
 until the hardware (forks and shocks themselves, both chassis and damping) is good enough, there's no need for any active electronic gadgets. and it's not good enough yet.
  • + 1
 Yes, that's an extreme spin, but not irrelevant.
Even the simplest aluminum frames we ride are designed on computers, and hydroformed (or shaped in other ways) by CNC machines run by computers.
Every party of out bikes - with the notable exception of handmades - is designed or crafted with the aid of computers, so we can't deny the involvement of that medium in the arena we all love.
This will take the same type of burning-in that a lot of other technologies have, and we'll see what comes out in the wash.
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  • + 3
 i just bought this sick frame that weights as much as a feather... and now for 20lbs of suspension. bah! bring me carbon lowers... or carbon switches.... make it lighter faster, stronger. if i want a "motorized" bike, ill get a moto.
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  • + 3
 This is a massive waste of time and money. All this does is flip your pro-pedal switch by using a servo instead of you flipping it with your fingers... Let me know when they develop something useful like intelligent damping, on the fly sag adjustments , etc...
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  • + 3
 why not make a combination of the electronics and the magnetic dampening fluid used in high end cars and the military. then you do not have to push any buttons. the sensors react to the force of the impact and react with the correct amount of compression and rebound. There is a cool video out there of a humvee with and with out this technology.
  • + 2
 go to the 6 min mark of the video

www.youtube.com/watch?v=SBXQ-6uI8GY
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  • + 3
 Mixed feelings :I Why not to develop new stuff for guys who feel they need it and are willing to pay for the joy of having the newest gadgets on the market. I don't see myself buying this, but for some reason the case is totally different with electronic shifting of which I can't wait to get to test the mtb version. Maybe it's about how I use the suspension lock outs or Pro Pedals - Never.
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  • + 2
 the fork might be useful for xc racers, but many bikes have suspension designs that do not require much of a platform for the rearshock. I think the ei is probably a better usage of the technology (at least for gravity riders) because it is an automated response to the terrain.
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  • + 2
 This apparatus will not matter for racing, since every single racer will have it if it's any good. So it's back to square one, or more precisely to the best rider on track. Which is what's it's all about anyways.. for the rest of us -without mechanics at hand at every ride- who want a simple, as maintenance-free as possible set-up, this is definitely not the path to go.. Thanks for trying Fox, how about seals that last more than 18 hours now ?
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  • + 2
 Ehm I never use the propedal on my RP23 or Monarchs. Most bike geometry have FSR (Specialized) a like system. Sit down on the way up and keep a smooth thread and you will not have any bobbing.
I really dont undertand this over engineering. I once had a fork with lockout and it was reachable with out and special skills, even took the remote lockout of because it always failed, preferred manually.
Dont get it.... but hi go spend money and think you will ride better....
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  • + 2
 I like the idea of just hitting a switch. No Im not a lazy SOB but on many occasion I have hit a bomb run after a long climb and said "fak" still locked out! It would be a nice option then. It will be interesting to see if it catches on and what actually trickles down to what the hard working man can afford.
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  • + 5
 i need an electronic soul to get me to heaven because my guts are telling me im in hell.
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  • + 2
 My comment got deleted. Mods obviously don't like debate...

My comment: "OK, I may be being thick but surely what Fox have invented is:

A electrical system which turns a lever.

As opposed to a cable which turns a lever... (which is cheaper, simpler, lighter and easier to work on).

It doesnt seem like it actually does anything else? Oh well at least it's more useful than "autosag"..."
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  • + 2
 This idea is neat but crude and low tech to test some technologies. This is really heading to on board diagnostics and no manual adjusters needed. Package a gyro and accelerometers in the same space as the battery pack and then we have something cool. Full Auto and then I am in on the gig. I hate the CTD lever on my shock now and I got a Fox Float to avoid the same on my forks.
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  • + 2
 I say make bikes as advanced as possible go to new hights. Just don't take away my bare bones options. You can't cheat with this. You would probably just have to get on and off the bike for proper adjustment before accents and before decents
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  • + 1
 this thing would be nice if you could program suspension presets (it would have to be able to affect all settings, rebound makes a huge difference in the liveliness of a ride) so you have a preset for max absorption and stability (race run), a preset that rides lively and jumpy so you can change the character of the bike with one flick of a button.

but making these presets would require quite a bit of riding and tinkering, if you really want them to work good, you have to do it yourself.
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  • + 2
 Now imagine if only someone made a lightweight regenerative braking system for bikes, you could run iCD, night lights, heated grips, etc and never have to charge your batteries!
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  • + 1
 Not quite sure what all the fuss is about this is nothing more than a electric powered lockout. That is intended for Pro XC Racers. I personally don't see it as innovative. Especially if you compare it to Rock Shoxs electronic setup on the LePierre bikes. The Rock Shox system as I understand adjusts the dampening as you ride no button pushing required. Were as this system does not do anything but change the compression dampening when YOU push the button. Rock Shox is defiantly ahead of Fox on this one.
In any case if you have a bike that requires a lot of lever flipping to get it to do what you want it to do, this is a great idea. Scott,Cannondale, and other single pivot bikes come to mind. But if you own a bike with a well designed suspension it's not necessary. I look at this the same way I look at CTD. My Ellsworth Does Not Need It! Nor does that Santa Cruz Tallboy, Pivot 5.7, Ibis Mojo ect. So don't shove this shit down my throat, and not give me another option. Forcing me to go to another brand. The competition for high end suspension is starting to even out. I'm currently in the market for a new bike, and because of CTD I've been forced to look into other options.
Is this necessary to go fast. In a word No. My friends and I regularly stomp spandex clad clowns on niner hardtails into the ground on our 27-30 pound, 5"+ travel trailbikes with 2.4 tires and my bike doesn't even have a lockout on the shock.
Can't say that I have ever ridden a hardtail that climbed technical terrain as well as a full suspension bike either. Oh as I recall last week in Crested Butte the only people we saw pushing their bikes up the climbs were guys on 9er hardtails.
I know this is for the Elite racers, but there are how many of them? Not nearly as many as there are of us Trailriders. Need I remind you that we make up Over 80% of your customer base? We Pay The Bills Dammit!!!!!!!
What we really want is the Same adjustments for our Trail Bikes that you give the DH guys.
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  • + 1
 Its weird isn't, some how i can jump on my santa cruz heckler, 160mm of xc capable travel, ride anywhere no problem, the shock has rebound damping, forks have rebound damping and believe it or not, its perfect and got 10 out of 10 when tested, its simple and works. If any bike needs fancy shocks its for one reason only, to make a bad design work!!! Bikes should be simple! Theres no reason they can't be. The only things that are a natural evolution are the dropper post and gearbox. Once they get sorted thats it for bikes. Sorted.
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  • + 1
 There is so much more than can be done with suspension without turning to electronics. IMO its a sub par cheat compared to creating high end dampening systems. The bicycle has always been and should always stay purely mechanical. If I want electronics and gizmos I'll go ride my fuel injected moto.
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  • + 1
 . It might just be that I don't know what I'm missing, but my bike pedal well with a flip of the propedal on the dhx 5.0 and descends beautifully. I don't need to mess with the suspension a whole lot to go from one mode to the next. Maybe for racing enduro it would be cool to have an ideal set up for climbing and another for descending. An electric post seems wasteful. Plenty of mechanical ways to do that that haven't even been explored yet.
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  • + 1
 Why do I feel the same thing could be done mechanically with far less clutter?? Oh because it can and has. Now you have to deal with batteries, servos, electronics ... what if you have to go through water? How bad of a crash can this take? No thank you
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  • + 5
 Sweet. Keep it coming fox
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  • + 1
 I get the points of both sides,but when i saw it i got this feeling inside that i just did not like it.Maybe its because i just got my new shocks and i don`t wanna replace.Anyway i think that a lot of people are saying that we don`t mind using electronics everywhere else.Well that is the reason why i MTB.To get away from electronics and just go outside jump some dirt shred some trails go back home to phones and computers! Its like i don`t mind electronics as long as they don`t interfere with my bike,because believe it or not i find that tuning your bike properly is part of the sport and i don`t think a computer should do that for you.It breaks the connection.I`m not sure i made my point,but it`s there if you look Big Grin
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  • + 3
 Proflex did this aready in the late 90's on the 955 if i remember correctly. they had an electronic shock tuning thingy. So it is not new at all.
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  • + 2
 this why i love my SS 29'r. brake levers and pedals only are bliss. don't get me wrong. i love my other bikes too, but the 29'r is worry free. and that is why we ride. to be unencumbered by all the other hassles.
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  • + 1
 I think it's all about personal preference after all. I ride an all mountain hardtail with a coil fork and I love the simplicity of that setup. On the other hand I chose a dual position fork so I can have a basic "climbing" mode and a "downhill" mode. I would also consider a droper post if I had to tackle mixed terain often. See how technology is creeping up even in the more basic builds? Technology is like the sugar on your coffee. Everyone must find the dose that tastes better for him. I am drawn to simple bikes but I wouldn't mind owning a super techy bike as well if i could afford it. Anyway it's we the riders who decide what we'll buy so I guess the market will weed out the useless inovations leaving those who have something substantial to offer. As for me, if it has two wheels and two pedals I'll give it a ride before dismissing it. Smile
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  • + 1
 I purchased the Shimano Di2 electronic shifting system for my road racing bike last year and discovered that it allows me to concentrate on the riding and not have to deal with the idiosyncrasies of mechanical shifting. Electronic shifting is faster, more precise, and more reliable - period. I can see the benifits of electronic suspension as well, allowing me to ride my trails faster (not easier), and I can see a future when XC bikes have both electronic shifting and suspension. The manufactures will eventually get the weight down to where these systems will be adopted by the top riders. Of course there is the adoption curve to deal with but fast forward a few years and trickle-down technology will soon flood the consumer market, just like all progressive technologiy has. Is it right? I guess that would be a personal choice. Just like those that perfer single speed bikes over geared bikes. For the record, I like ALL bikes! :-)
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  • + 1
 This new system doesn't seem to do anything unique except now it's using electricity. it would be different if the interface were offered so that you could take a picture of the trail and feed it gps track information and it adapted the damper according to the GPS data on the trail. Then, it could talk to you in a soothing voice and say, ok, pick your line wisely, I'm only suspension, I can't make you a better rider.
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  • + 1
 en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Transient_response

For those of you who are trying to shit on this concept, I suggest you do a little bit of research into what this system actually does.
Here are some response basics.
Using these fundamentals, dampers can be tuned to create damping curves that are good for most situations.

If this electrical system can constantly change these curves (damping properties) to be optimal for different riding conditions (taking into account things like braking, seating, speed etc.) as the diagram suggests, this is the step towards something called "automated suspension". Google this (maybe in addition with cars/formula 1) and see:

a) how incredibly awesome and amazing this system is if implemented properly.
AND
b) how messed up it turns competition. (based on who can design the best suspension algorithm rather than rider response skill. banned in formula 1)
AND
c) how great it is that the bicycle is not as complicated or as dangerous as a car so this system can be easily implemented and therefore possibly made affordable. and therefore create a new innovation in the industry. Which I think should always be the goal in industries constantly trying to improve their products every YEAR!

Awesome job RoxShox and Fox. This gets my dee hard!
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  • + 1
 This is absolutely ridiculous. I'm probably repeating allot of these comments, but the point of a mountain bike is to pedal and operate it ourselves. When we go out in the woods to ride our bikes through nature, we pedal and support ourselves by our own experience and physical ability. If we go fast, it should be from our own fitness and practice, not because we have electronics or computers on our bikes. And yes, there are always advances in technology for bikes, but bikes are made of metal and rubber, not computers or "automatic" (it hurt me to type that word) components. "Biking" is a verb last time I checked. How lazy can we get? Honestly, will we have trail robots to change our flat tires next?
  • + 2
 So, how do you get to the trailhead? Do you drive a car? Why? Why don't you leave the car at home and "pedal and get there yourself?" Why rely on technology to help you ride? So, Fox can't promote technology in bicycle suspension design, but Ford can make a badass truck that you drive to get your "Keepin' it real" bike to the trailhead?

I don't get why people want bikes to remain immune to progress, while everything else is surrounded by digital. If we revere the "old world" so much, why do we wear wristwatches and not sundials?
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  • + 1
 It will get a lot of hate, but it's all part evolution of the bicycle. Im sure when suspension came around, some people turned their nose up at it, and still do. In a perfect world, where money grows on trees, I would throw this on my newly purchased race bike. but then again, if money grew on trees, I'd have a bike for every day of the week.
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  • + 1
 The more we get all this new tech the less I want it. Has my suspension run out of batteries? Has my adjustable seat post developed play? Maybe I'm getting old, but I'll just get a 1x8, 9 or 10, HT, medium height seat, ijust want to ride and enjoy it and avoid these hassles.
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  • + 1
 Biking has always been the freedom to setup your bike the way you want it. Some people like 11 speed and then some like single speed. People just can't their head around the idea that they can't tell the rest of us what biking should or shouldn't be.
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  • + 1
 OK, I may be being thick but surely what Fox have invented is:

A electrical system which turns a lever.

As opposed to a cable which turns a lever... (which is cheaper, simpler, lighter and easier to work on).

It doesnt seem like it actually does anything else? Oh well at least it's more useful than "autosag"...
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  • + 1
 Interesting....i'm kinda 50/50on the idea...con: just something else that can go wrong, Pro: allows for better tuning. It'll be awhile before I have something like this...and by the time I can afford it...all the kinks and bugs will be worked out.....so I'll buy it then.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 That's a pretty weak response from Fox. Nothing more than an electronic version of a mechanical on/off CTD switch, no active suspension control like the Lapierre system.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 more cables= less clean look
added compnents= more weight
Batteries= Shouldnt be on a bicycle, or then it should no longer be called one,
Other Lockout systems= Work just as well.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Mountain biking = WATER a lot of times. Water + Electricity = FAIL. Oh yeah, my battery or its contact just went down while i am in mid-air.. Oops. I hope they also put an air bag in the system.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I really don't see why you couldn't have done this with a cable at half the weight. I just see fox falling further behind its competitors, with no real performance improvements and gimmicks like this to boost sales.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 Can we go back to spending time on possibly getting a inverted dh fork to market vs a bunch more junk to hang on the bars.......
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Its an interesting idea and its not changing anything. All that is happening is instead of nobs that get dusty and are not precise you use a little electronic switch much easier and precise.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 K I S S..... Keep It Simple Stupid.... I'm rather happy with my Reba Solo Air. Good middle of the road quality and price. Just get back to biking!!!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 This thing only makes a hard airshock suspension harder. Not much tech involved - certainly not worth 2000. Servo, machined nut, zipties, cable and solenoid probably run around 20USD...
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I'm confused. So should I keep my Fox shock with my manual Pro Pedal lever and spend the $2000 on partying, riding and generally goofing off. Or buy an electric one? It's a tough call.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 This is not for me. But if the suspension companies can make tons of benefits selling it, and use the money to improve the basic suspensions and maybe make them cheaper, I am fine with it...
[Reply]
  • + 0
 This new tech might make suspensions work better, but I'm not thrilled about electronics on bikes. I might be old fashioned, bikes use to be simple and reliable powered by the rider. Specialized made it happen with their Brain cartridge witch isn't controlled by electronics. I've tried out the new electronic Shimano Ultegra set, tho it works fine it's heavier and switches slower between gears compared to the same Ultegra mechanical version. I don't mind if they make their electronic trendy-shmendy bikes in the future, but I would like if they had a man powered manual version too.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 HA! $2000 for a remote compression adjust that weighs 4 Lb.... I will happily continue to use the long wiggly bits attached to my shoulders to reach down and flip the switch on top of my fork thank you very much.
  • + 1
 you can't read, can you?
  • + 1
 Can you?

"Fox sells the system (fork, shock, electronics, battery, and charger) for around $2000"
"ICD features a simple ring-shaped slider-switch at the handlebar that simultaneously opens or locks down the fork and shock damping with a flick of a thumb or finger."
"Weight is pegged at 1860-grams (4.10 pounds) total weight for the dual-suspension option"

All it does is change your compression settings between open and closed, albeit on both the shock and fork at once. for $2000, and weighs 4Lb. I stand by my previous comment.

Please show me the enlightening information I apparently missed.
[Reply]
  • + 0
 This is a horsesh#t of an idea, they are taking alot of the purity out of riding a bike. electronic dropper posts make sense, and we will see these soon, but this electric shifting and suspension controls and lets not forget the rumours of electric over hydrolic brakes is going way too far. Honestly, all this does is increase our footprint on the environment. Totally direction, lets think more about drivetrain reliability, how about a lightweight XTR internal rear hub so we can get rid of these front and rear derailleurs!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 This would only make sense if they made it wireless....or else its just a more expensive hydraulic lever Id like to see something along the lines of electronic shifting...im tired of adjusting and replacing cable and housing
[Reply]
  • + 0
 How can Fox be pursuing this? How about they build us an adjustable seatpost with a compact lever and a cable that attaches to the static part of the post? At least that's something the average rider could benefit from today. Remote electronic suspension controls?? Seriously?
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I can just see the missus saying ...you want to buy what for what??? Egads! I can barely afford to buy a new set of forks for the let alone this gizmo...... but I suppose to each his own
[Reply]
  • + 2
 Just another try of the bike insdustry to rob our money !did you guys all forget that its about the rider not about the bike a good rider can do well on a shitty bike too
[Reply]
  • + 0
 I understand the push in technology, but all I can think of is why?
If this was on a motorcycle or ATV I'd be welcoming it with open arms, but we're talking about bicycles here. To me, we don't need anymore "bling" to our bikes. it's just anything to go wrong and cost almost as much it fix it as new. This falls into the same category for me as Shimano's DI2 shifting technology.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 you're pretty much retarded & have no bike skills if you need a digital hand job. bikes have come a long way in the last 8 years, i'm going to enjoy the way technology is now, i'm still stoked on my KS seatpost!
[Reply]
  • + 0
 bikes are becoming to complicated now. just like cars its getting to te point that unless your an expert you cannot maintain or service your components yourself. its getting rediculous. i feel that the companies are going overboard on the technolagy and its not worth the extra money you will spend on it. i see what they are trying to do and i respect that they are trying to innovate the sport but is it really worth reinventing everything again? im sticking with the stuff that i have now and i dont think il be getting anything this advanced EVER. i like being able to mailtain my components myself and not having to ship it off to a company everytime i need a tune up.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 while you guys are crying about batteries i am trying to figure out how to get one of these youtu.be/5_h-WxZgMfM
  • + 2
 I saw that a little while back. It looks like the tits! I could have so much fun on one of those!
[Reply]
  • + 3
 soon they will have full f1 style telemetry in XC racing
  • + 3
 they've had telemetry on bikes since the mid 90's mate
[Reply]
  • + 1
 The only electronically thing on my bike will be my brain and that's it ( apart from the nerv system and muscle system but I didn't want to go fancy science on everybody )
[Reply]
  • + 3
 Wowsers! It's the top secret Gadget Bike, Go-Go Gadget shock!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I think I will just grab my shock pump and go thank you very much. An innovation, probably, but you won't see me with one any time soon.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I think I would like to give it a try, but I would not like to ride with it on my own bike. Same as electronic shifting, the only batterie on my bike is for my garmin!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I don't like the idea of electronic aide on MTBs. These things will deteriorate skills. When I go out biking, the electronic i want to deal with is my cell phone.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I'm not against this, but it just feels like one of those things that could happen later on. There are a lot of things on a bike to improve before this needs doing.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 The technology is cool but ridiculous, the more pressing question on my mind is, why on earth are their formula THE ONE brakes on a tall boy?!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 im so glad this is coming out. im tired of reaching all the way down to the fork or under the top tube to flip a switch. to me, that's worth whatever they are charging. Smile
[Reply]
  • - 1
 Lol, the cables and wires on the bike weight more than everything else put together. Well when someone has a nice crash and they end up without brakes, forks and sus that doesn't work and all the other stuff I'll be laughing my head off. Two brakes and a gear cable does me fine.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Plus, is it that difficult to move your hand the extra couple of feet to adjust your suspension setting from your actual suspension components? Sheesh.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 How will you ever learn anything about how to handle your bike if its already doing it for you! This is mountain biking not moto gp
[Reply]
  • + 2
 Curious how many people are going to be dumb enough to waste their money on this garbage...
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Well it's some thing for the mid-life crisis , over weight trail centre riders who really should not be wearing lycra to masturbate over while they stand in the coffe shop.
  • + 1
 Haha me thenBig Grin
I joke I joke!!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 They should produce a dynamo option to power the electronics. Like this: talk.maemo.org/showthread.php?t=85651

I remember those on bikes. I'm too old!
  • + 1
 I do think dynamo hubs seem like a good idea for powering lights (as opposed to gadgets / gimmicks) so long as the cabling is hidden away as much as possible
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Would love to see this implemented on my Fox DYAD RT2 on my Jekyll! That'd make that shock even sweeter than it already is!
[Reply]
  • + 3
 Zzzzzzz....Not interested.
[Reply]
  • + 3
 its like the bike now has a pacemaker haha
  • + 0
 THAT, was funny
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I don't get the point, mechanical lockouts work just as well and are lighter, the Commencal Meta SX for example. Why over-complicate?
[Reply]
  • + 2
 What about just doing shocks and forks with damping that works, that are reliable and not race-like intensive?
[Reply]
  • + 2
 Fox's engineers think like: "Why make it simpler, if it is easier to make more complicated?"
[Reply]
  • - 1
 what the hell no electronic breaking, no electronic limit switches to tell me when something is about to pass its breaking points. Damn i want electronic ball barrings that roll on the own but softly. what about electronic built-in tire pumps.
[Reply]
  • + 3
 I was just thinking i needed more shit on my handlebars.
  • + 1
 Are you aware of the fact that you don't have to buy or install anything on your handlebar that you don't want. I don't think so!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 we live in a wireless world and this setup still need cables??? this is not evolution!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 No doubt GPS will be involved down the line, then it will adjust your setup automatically as you ride
[Reply]
  • + 2
 How will this work on my hardtail singlespeed niner? *snicker*
  • + 0
 not very well im assuming
[Reply]
  • + 2
 no no no no no no nononono nooooooooooo
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Why they just don't use the rotation of the wheel or the chain to charge those electronics?
  • + 1
 because that would be even more complicated with more parts that could break.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Fuck the E shit on mountain bikes, you almost have to do a study first for riding a bike.................
[Reply]
  • + 1
 bateries... only if they are in lights.... so i can ride even when the sun isnt on my side
[Reply]
  • + 1
 my brand new CTD blew after 2 and a half months dont even wanna know how long this will or wont last
[Reply]
  • + 2
 This electronic stuff is work of the devil!
[Reply]
  • + 2
 that's not a bike that's a ciborg
[Reply]
  • + 1
 mountain bikers are lazy as f*ck, you can yeah under 1 foot away and flick a switch?!?!?!?

get over yourselfs!!!!
[Reply]
  • + 2
 cables, cables, cables, more and more and again.. nahhhh..
[Reply]
  • + 1
 So, are they electric engines that automatically turn the compression/rebound knobs?

That's what it looks to me
[Reply]
  • + 1
 My first reaction was... this is Gayer than a fanypack full Ken dolls. Then I thought about it and I think I am right.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 A new cardboard bike just got invented. There is some low tech. I want to see that.
[Reply]
  • + 3
 keep it simple stupid
[Reply]
  • + 1
 they are trying to put a bicycle cokcpit into a aeroplane cockpit, wires, more buttons and sh1t but it´s progress aint it
[Reply]
  • + 1
 the kashima on that cruz's rear shock looks soo dark?!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 bottle opener derailleur hanger?...now why doesn't every bike have that?
[Reply]
  • + 1
 what next traction control
[Reply]
  • + 1
 lets see it on some fox 40's
[Reply]
  • + 1
 This is the evolution of something that's going to be great!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 In future no battery no ride sucks
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Hey! These pics where taken in my home town. Lakeside! Big Grin
[Reply]
  • + 1
 nothing an old trusty Monster T cant do,if not better.
[Reply]
  • + 0
 I'll say it again ...

NOooooooo !!! (They deleted my last comment because I didn't say what they wanted to hear)
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Build a system that a fool can use and only a fool will.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 just one more thing to put on your bars
[Reply]
  • + 2
 I power my bike.
[Reply]
  • + 0
 If I were wealthy I'd give it a try.
  • + 1
 Exactly mate,this is for people who are loaded,people who say they dont like it,aint loaded.lol
  • + 2
 i wouldn't buy this even if i had a mountain of cash and needed to spend it in a short period of time for some odd reason. I'd hate to have a battery and a load of extra wires and crappy black boxes on my bike. Plus you have to charge it, clean it all, blah blah blah.
  • + 2
 ralphdog I take it you don't do any night riding then? what with you're distaste of battery's and crappy black box's on you're bike, oh and having to clean and charge it!!
just asking!
  • + 1
 @1trick haha I'll admit that I don't. Used to have some shitty lights that matched this description and I disliked those too. I haven't done it recently as I don't have any lights (need to buys some really). However when I do get around to purchasing some I will go for something like an exposure so I dont need the external battery! Plus i wouldn't mind charging lights as they are 100% necessary where as this technology isn't. Plus you only use lights for night rides but this would be attached all the time.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 How nerd is that?
[Reply]
  • - 1
 those saying batries don't belong on bikes what about ur lights or don't u u them either
  • + 3
 Lights are different.. do you need lights to see in the dark? Yes.. Do you need batteries to adjust your suspension.. no..
  • + 6
 Actually, you can mtb without lights, but you have to go extremely slow. Lights allow you to go faster....just like suspension enhancements.
  • + 3
 Slanham, You could always use a candle buddy!
[Reply]
  • - 1
 Bring on the cheater bikes!
[Reply]
  • + 0
 Here we go again...
[Reply]
  • - 3
 We just hit the $10,000 dh bike, how long before the first $12,000 one with this?
[Reply]
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