GT 2014: Four models of the Fury - and Two Trailbikes: 650B Sensor and Force

Jun 17, 2013
by Richard Cunningham  
 
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GT's timing could not have been better, with the Atherton's double-double downhill victory coinciding with its 2014 product launch in Park City, Utah this weekend. The festivities took place at the Chateaux resort, where we were shown GT's full lineup of its all new Fury DH bike at four price points - and two very promising 650B trailbikes. The vibe was that GT has re-committed to producing a range of bicycles that are worthy of the brand's heritage - when the marquis was a proud symbol of all things good in our sport. If GT demonstrates that it has the staying power to carry this effort through the present decade, the heavy hitters that are leading the market today will have to give up a top spot on the hot seat.




Two New Trailbikes

Two years after the first prototypes were being tested in Germany, GT released its 130-millimeter-travel Sensor and 150-millimeter-travel Force at Park City. Both are built around 650B wheels and there are no plans to offer a 26-inch model in either the trail or all-mountain categories now, or in the future. The Force and Sensor are framed around two different chassis designs that, while they may share some common parts, are designed with different geometry, and cut distinctly different profiles.

GT 27.5 M SENSOR CARBON TEAM L RAW WHITE
  Dan Atherton leads Hans Rey on a test session during the development of GT's 2014 Force and Sensor. Both athletes were essential throughout the process, with Atherton pulling hard for the 150-millimeter-travel all-mountain Force and Rey giving the major input for the trail-oriented Sensor. Hans has a signature Sensor model in GT's lineup.


The top offerings all feature high-modulous carbon construction, but GT also produced affordable aluminum versions to ensure that most of its core customers could pony up for a new Sensor or Force should the spirit move them. At the heart of the new bikes is a high-pivot rear suspension which is controlled by a simplified version of GT's Independent Drive four-bar linkage called 'Angle Optimized Suspension' (AOS). GT backs up its new chassis with trail worthy components too. The short version is; great pedaling, low bottom bracket heights, slack head angles, extended top tube lengths and much lighter overall weights than anything GT has fielded in the history of its dual-suspension trailbike lineage.



GT Force Carbon Team
  Dan Atherton, the spear point of GT's Enduro team, swore off 650B wheels at first, but after helping to dial in the geometry and ride of the new 150-millimeter-travel Force, he changed his mind. Atherton says, however, that he will continue to develop the 26-inch wheel prototype enduro GT he uses on the racing circuit.


The new Force is designated as an all-mountain bike that is more trail-oriented. GT was secretly testing and developing its 650B Force in Germany, where its design team, headed by Peter Denk, began with a list of performance demands and a blank computer screen. A number of aluminum test frames were built with adjustable suspension locations and in differing frame geometries to zero in on the right mixture of bomb-proof descending and XC-worthy climbing. Real-time testing by the likes of Dan Atherton and Hans Rey was backed up by electronic data acquisition in Germany and when the prototype Force was ready in principle, the final frame design was handed over to GT's Jeremy Mikesell, who took the suspension hardpoints and frame numbers and crafted them into a sleek, high-modulous carbon frame. The result was a medium-travel ripper that feels low and slack - but won't disappoint in the climbing and acceleration department.

GT force Carbon Team
  GT's 2014 Force Carbon Team. Complete geometry and final prices were not forthcoming at GT camp, but the most important numbers for the medium frame size are: head angle - 67.2 degrees, seat angle - NA, top tube length - 59.9 mm (23.6 inches), bottom bracket height - 347.9 mm (13.7 inches) and a wheelbase of 1162 mm (45.75 inches). The Force Carbon Team frame is reported to weigh 2.89 kg (6.36 pounds with shock) and the bike is said to weigh under 30 pounds.


New Suspension Platform

Force frames feature an exaggerated high-pivot swingarm (technically, the frame's seat stays) that is large enough in all dimensions to resist the torsional stress meted out by a pro downhiller. GT's Independent Drive system was redesigned and simplified and is now called 'AOS' for Angle Optimized Suspension. The effect is exactly the same, however, with the bottom bracket swinging slightly back and forth to track the swingarm's rearward arc'ing axle path to eliminate all but a smidgen of its unwanted chain-growth effects. More about that later, all you need to know now is that AOS keeps the suspension moving without adversely affecting pedaling action and that the high-pivot swingarm gives the suspension superior performance over ragged terrain.

GT Force Carbon Team details
  Closeup views of the Force Carbon's triangulated head tube (top left). The AOS version of GT's Independent Drive system is built around a hollow aluminum rocker called the 'PathLink' which houses the bottom bracket. And and a look at the clevis-pivot at the rear dropout. The Force and Sensor share AOS suspension and also use direct-mount rear derailleurs.


Construction

The Force frame is built with lateral stiffness in mind, but it is one of the lighter dual-suspension frames that GT has produced. Large-diameter frame tubes and wide, 15-millimeter suspension-pivot axles keep the frame stiff and light. Cables run externally below the down tube and the dropper seatposts are internally routed through a port behind the seat tube. To keep the bike's weight low, the Fox CTD shock is driven by the upper end of the PathLink and through a seat tube tunnel. The 12-millimeter through axle uses a Maxle release system and all of the major frame pivots are clamped in place. The new frame design looks much cleaner and simpler than anything that has come from GT in a while - and the aluminum version is an identical copy. Sizes offered are X-small, small, medium and large.

GT Sensor Carbon Team specs with Pro Carbon and Expert aluminum models
  GT offers the Force Carbon frame at two more affordable price points: the Pro (top) and Expert may lack some bling, but we'll bet the performance doesn't suffer all that much.


GT got the parts right on the Force, with a Shimano XTR transmission, Fox's latest Kashima CTD suspension, headlined by a Float 34 fork, tubeless Continental Trail King tires, wheels from e-thirteen, a RockShox Reverb Stealth dropper post, and a 760-millimeter handlebar sitting on a 60-millimeter stem. The only questionable choice was the Shimano triple crankset, which GT's mountain bike marketing director defended as a choice that they made to cater to the booming European market. I must not have drank the same Koolaid. Dan Atherton's Force used a single, 32-tooth chainring and he was going pretty fast. I am sure that GT did their homework, but I would be happier with a 34/22, two-by crankset. The good news is that you can ditch the 40-tooth sprocket and switch it out with a bash ring.

Pinkbike's First Impressions

The new Force is everything we wanted its older brother to be: lighter, lower, slacker, better uphill and smoother on the downs. The component spec is almost perfect and the Force is targeted at the center of the mid-travel AM/trail market. The choice to go with the mid-size wheel format plays well with the wide-spread acceptance of 650B on the opposite side of the Atlantic Ocean, and for the building sport of Enduro Racing. It is good to see GT swinging for the fence again and the new Force should be a home run. We'll let you know when we get one home and complete a full blown review.



GT Sensor Carbon Team
  Hans Rey is a huge fan of the 130-millimeter-travel Sensor, and GT used his input to craft its performance to suit top bike-handlers who want a lighter, snappier handling trailbike, compared with a typical all-mountain bike. One that will respond to leg power in the style of a dedicated XC machine.


The new Sensor is targeted at XC/trail riders who want a fast-paced climber, but who demand good manners from the bike when descending, or when attacking technical trails. The blueprint for such a bike is well understood - what GT's sensor promises to bring to the game is its high-pivot AOS suspension. The same system as the Force uses, AOS adds more big-hit response to the Sensor's 650B wheels. It had better, because at 130-millimeters of suspension travel, the Sensor competes with the new crop of longer travel 29ers.

GT Sensor Carbon Team
  GT's Sensor mirrors the proffile of its Force, but the Sensor frame is simpler, lighter weight and its geometry is more in keeping with an XC-style trailbike. The head angle is 68.5 degrees, with a low, 344-millimeter bottom bracket, and a roomy, 600-millimeter top tube (medium size). Travel is 130-millimeters front and rear and the Sensor Carbon Team uses a lighter, Fox 32 CTD Kashima fork.


GT chose the mid-size wheel reportedly to escape the unwieldy sensation that long-travel 29-inch-wheel trailbikes produce when pushing them around tight trails. Reportedly, the Sensor Carbon frame weighs 2.7kg (5.94 pounds) in the medium size with a shock - which should work out to complete bike weights in the 27-pound range. GT sells three versions of the Sensor in carbon and two in aluminum, so there should be one to fit the wallet of most enthusiasts. Sizes are X-small, small, medium, large and X-large. MSRP tbt.

GT Sensor Carbon Team
  Sensor Carbon frames are designed with a more conventional front section (upper left), but they share many common components with the longer-travel Force, like the PathLink and the AOS pivot system. Sensors, however, use a flatter shock curve to assist pedaling feel. Cables switch from external to internal routing as they pass by the bottom bracket.


Components

GT chose e-thirteen wheels and Continental tires across the board for its 2014 trail and gravity lineups - which is a good thing, as both brands are pushing hard to impress hard core riders and, from the buzz out there, both are succeeding. Most riders will love how fast Conti's X-King tires roll, but the nature of GT's capable suspension and the Sensor's slackish frame numbers will encourage its owners to seek a more aggressive tread - up front, at least. Sensors get a slightly longer stem, but the bars are still out there at 760-millimeters, and GT keeps the stem-length constant by lengthening the top tube with each frame size. With the burlier Force in its range, GT chose 32-millimeter forks for the Sensor, quoting weight savings as its motivation. All but the least expensive Sensor model are equipped with dropper posts, however, with RockShox on top models and KS on its more affordable ones - all use internal routing. Most models have tubeless rims and tires and, once again, GT spec's triple cranksets on all Sensors.

GT Sensor Carbon Team specs and aluminum Expert and Elite Sensor models
  GT offers the Sensor in both carbon and aluminum frames. The aluminum Expert (top) and the most affordable Elite are both sharp looking bikes in person. The difference in frame weight is 2.7 kg for carbon and 3.38 kg for aluminum with the same shock.


Pinkbike's First Impressions

Most trail riders should find the Sensor to be the weapon of choice for every situation but the most technical trails. With slightly larger wheels, the Sensor should roll over a lot of stuff that a 26-inch bike might take offence with, and 130-millimeter trailbikes are petty darn capable these days anyway. I am sure that GT is banking on a lot of riders who either have resisted the move to a 29er trailbike, or who have one and wish for the pump and pop of their old and now dusty 26er. You can't pry Hans Rey off of his, and by the way, GT makes a Hans Rey signature model in black and gold. It's based upon the aluminum Sensor chassis, but with lots of Kashima, a longer-stroke, 34-millimeter Fox CTD fork and it's decked out with Crankbrothers components. It looks sweet.



About AOS Suspension

GT's AOS suspension is wonderfully simple, but it would not function well if the close-coupled linkage and swingarms developed excessive bearing play or flex. GT puts dual bearings at each clevis pivot near the dropouts and pinch-clamps at each pivot location near the PathLink to ensure that the stiffness of the oversized, tubular pivot-axles is translated to the frame members. The suspension pulls on the PathLink as it compresses, which causes the bottom bracket to move rearward slightly. By tuning the pivot locations on the PathLink, GT's suspension designers can eliminate all of the system's pedal feedback - or tune in as much as they need to optimize the bike's pedaling feel.

GT Sensor Carbon Team
  GT Frame Engineer Jeremy Mikesell pulled apart a Sensor frame to show us the 15-millimeter pivot-axle system and to illustrate how the latest iteration of GT's Independent Drive suspension operates.


The PathLink must handle the stress generated by the strongest cyclists, so GT forges it in two halves and TIG welds it together to form a lightweight structure with a wide cross-section to maximize its rigidity. The upper end of the PathLink drives the shock. The lower end is pulled by the chainstays as the suspension compresses and somewhere in the middle - at just the right point - the PathLnk rocks back and forth on a frame-mounted pivot. Watch the GT's video below to see AOS in action:

See GT's New Suspension in Action



GT Sensor Carbon Team suspension details
  The Sensor's carbon lower suspension arm (left), with the 15-millimeter aluminum axle assembly removed. A look at the partially-disassembled AOS suspension showing the three pivot locations on the PathLink. As the PathLnk is pulled by the chainstays, it drives the shock forward and shifts the crankset slightly to the rear of the bike. It is a subtle action that is rarely, if ever felt by the rider.


GT Sensor Carbon Team suspension details
  GT uses a pair of sealed ball bearings in each side of the rear-dropout clevis-pivots to arrest any play that may arise in due to excessive wear. The chainstay member is carbon - including the clevis assemblies.




GT Fury World Cup along with Team Pro and Expert models
  GT officially released the new Fury at the Fort William World Cup DH, where Gee and Rachael Atherton both rode it to victory. With a repeat performance at Vale De Sole, the Fury needs no further explanation. The news at Park City was that GT will be releasing four models of the Fury, with the top-range World Cup being spec'ed exactly as the team's, with the exception of its wheels. Shown below, from left to right, are the Team, Pro and Expert models. All share the same chassis as the World Cup model and sizes will be offered in X-small, small, medium and large. MSRP has yet to be decided for North America.


For full specs, geometry, and the Fury story, click here.

GT Fury World Cup details
  In case you wanted a closer look. (clockwise) The Fury begins with a Fox RAD air-sprung 40 fork, a look at the two-piece scissor link that is used to arrest lateral movement from the swingarm. Foes popularized the scissor link for the same purpose. The World Cup uses Shimano Saint drivetrian and braking components and Shimano Pro cockpit items. The Pro Stem is adjustable from 30 to 50 millimeters and the handlebar comes stock at 800 millimeters wide.



274 Comments

  • + 111
 Am I the only one who has a problem with the cables being on the underside of the downtube?
  • + 44
 Yeah, I see no reason not to use similar routing to that on the Fury. That said, they're some good looking bikes; good work GT!
  • + 38
 def seems like it could be an issue, but my specialized bikes have never had a problem with it
  • + 26
 GT's 2014 Force Carbon Team is hot! I love the top tube!
  • + 113
 I'd rather my cables take a hit than have a crack or dent in the downtube.. cables are easy to replace, downtubes not so much.
  • - 1
 It might look clean, but ride somewhere overly rocky and you could loose braking very quickly. A friend of mine who rode a big hit had a braided hose on his hope m4 split open by a rock mid way down his run. Scary stuff
  • + 10
 My cables run down there on my mission and, though I've been afraid the brake cable would get cut by a rock, it hasn't been a problem.
  • + 3
 SHort housing runs that are tight under or around the downtube/bb area I'm fine with. Its super huge exaggerated loops of housing, especially for the rear brake you see on some brands of bikes that bother the heck out of me (Salsa is getting notoriously bad with that).
  • - 3
 I hit my glory on a tree stump and it broke my mech by pulling it too far and ripped my brake hose too !
  • + 130
 Just call the brand GeeT now
  • + 27
 I have ridden spesh bikes with downtube routing for over five years and have literally never had a problem. I work at a shop and have seen hundreds of customers bikes with downtube routing and none of them have ever had a problem, it is the superior routing.
  • + 3
 If you look at Danny hart , he runs his on the otherwise of the down tube
  • + 1
 Had the rear derailleur shift cable on my Stumpy - running on downtube and under bottom bracket - catch on some stump (no pun intended). Barely noticed it during the ride until shifting became funny and the derailleur came off and was pulled into the wheel. Came out the pull on the cable had bent and weakened the derailleur hanger and ripped some of the shift cable strands. Stuff got replaced but shit can happen with cables running down there.
  • + 4
 Cables can be replaced, you can buy aftermarket downtube protection (or make your own). What worries me as far as damage, is the 3 inches of suspension linkage that hangs damn near straight down from the bottom bracket. IMO that will be the bikes rock catcher and weakest point, at least for the rocky trails I ride. What do you guys think?
  • + 9
 Lets not overlook the fact that GT decided to route 130mm and 150mm platforms by going under the down tube. Both are pedal bikes that shouldn't really ever see a shuttle and you probably won't regularly smash your local tech dh trails on them. I see nothing wrong with the routing
  • + 4
 I think that for certain applications like DH and FR cables on the downtube (such as on the Gian Glory) seems like an unnessacary risk because they are more likely to get f*cked from rocks and shit but for an Enduro/AM/XC bike or whatever the downtube cable routing shouln't be a problem. One might have the odd incident but it;'s not as likely to happen as it is with DH.
As for your point on the suspension linkage; I think it does look vulnerable but not much more than some others out there and I'm sure GT has thought about that and it's well protected.
I really like the way the BB is actually in the little piece of linkage. Definatley has some advantages like the limited chain growth and stuff. Awesome bikes GT!
  • + 5
 The cables aren't exactly under the downtube either. They're mounted to the sides/corners of the downtube so for the most part they're out of harms way. Seems fine to me, better than right under the downtube like spesh do, and still looks clean.

The new GT's look sick.
  • + 7
 Setting aside the arguments about whether or not routing under the down tube is a good idea or not, I'll bet one of the reasons GT didn't route the cables on the Force and Sensor like they did on the Fury, on the top of the down tube and through the linkage, is because they wanted to finally be able to put a pair of water bottle bolts on the inside of their frame triangle. Previous models had them on the underside of the downtube and no one ever wanted to put a water bottle down there.
  • + 2
 am not to sure bout the enduro designs but the new Fury looks sweet!
design something for this GT!

www.vimeo.com/68103497#at=0
  • + 4
 "Both are built around 650B wheels and there are no plans to offer a 26-inch model in either the trail or all-mountain categories now, or in the future."

So all of those saying that 650B wouldn't lead to a decrease in choice for wheel sizes and lack of 26" bikes, this is the first example. I hope other brands do not plan on killing off their 26" trail/AM bikes.
  • + 1
 Damn 800mm Moose antlers for bars as standard seems a little excessive, but I also don't design bikes.
  • + 6
 The question is... Does it come with Rachel? lol I kid... I'd love to try one out, they look sick!
  • + 1
 make some little makeshift cable protectors or something
  • + 1
 No you're not. After having them on my Stumpjumper, any bike with them now would have to blow away anything else in it's class before I bought another. If you ride in any kind of mud, the cable on the bottom just help collect more shit and make cleaning it more of a hassle. Plenty of good bike without cables on the downtube.
  • + 1
 Cable riding aside, it seems like the bottom bracket moving back and forth as the bike cycles through its travel would be annoying, wont know til we ride one.
  • + 2
 Amazing ligiron!!! With those asses they would ride brooks bike to victory at VDS!!!
  • + 1
 I'm pretty happy with lower cable routing. I would rather have rocks bouncing off my cables than my paper thin frame
  • + 2
 People at the beginning: Ohhh nooo he looks so ugly that's really f*cked up I won't buy it...
People after Gee & Rachel win: Oh... my... god... I'm selling my bike right now, I'm on my way to order the new Fury!!!

----> You know it's true...


Edit: And NOW people like it.... Amazing
  • + 1
 I realised that as well, it's actually really funny. I wont be selling anything any time soon unless I find it is a much better deal than something else.
  • + 1
 People said the enduro Proto type frame ridden by Dan was ugly, they weren't referring to these ones
  • + 1
 Had the last fury and it seemed very short, it felt like an old skool dh bike, this one seems much improved. And a few wins on its first few official outing can't hurt sales
  • + 2
 You know what I like about the cables on the down tube is that if a huge rock comes up and catches it, the cable housings are broken instead of having a huge dent in your frame. I would rather replace some housings and a hydraulic line over a new front triangle. Just sayin.
  • + 1
 . . .unless you get mangled in the ensuing crash from not having a rear brake. But still that is a valid point. Chances are you won't die, and a hydro cable is a replaceable item.
  • + 2
 Only problem with downtube mounting is haphazardly tossing your bike on an un-padded tailgate. It's another one of those dumb issues that people "think" will be a problem, but in reality, never experience any issues because of it.
  • + 1
 Yeah, it must be a Croatian thing lol.
[Reply]
  • + 61
 WOW, GT nailed it with these bikes. I never thought I'd be using the words 'GT' and 'stunning' in the same sentence!
  • + 6
 YES! Awesome paint job of the top models Looks rad!
  • + 13
 It sucks that companies give shit paint jobs to the cheaper models. It wouldn't cost more to give them nice colours.
  • - 2
 it all seems pretty good, but im not so sure about your feet moving back every time you hit a bump
  • + 3
 I don't think Gee Atherton minded!
  • + 1
 You don't even notice it. It moces every so slightly in the linkage which gives you an advantage which is having the capability to pedals over chattery brake bumps or rocks
[Reply]
  • + 22
 It would definitely be in their best interests to start shipping these while the Athertons' double double is still fresh on everyone's memory. Will these still be made in Taiwan?
  • + 21
 Hopefully so, the best carbon is all from the Far East currently.
  • - 10
 You mean the MOST carbon?
  • + 6
 you dont get good at something without practising
[Reply]
  • + 23
 previous Fury was sort of star wars stuff, now it's an ordinary bike and I want one
  • + 3
 The previous Fury is the big sister to the leaned out, meaned out little sis... Nothing wrong with the big sis, but little sis should always be an improvement. Just think of it as an upgrade; I know I sure am. I love my Lola, but lil' sis Leslie will have her place in my garage. Haha Smile
  • - 1
 That linkage system just looks unnecessarily complicated and a maintenance nightmare to me.
  • + 3
 A few allen key bolts and a bit of grease and away you go.Happy times
[Reply]
  • + 17
 It has been years since I have wanted any bikes from GT and suddenly I want their whole 2014 line up? Excellent job from their design team.
[Reply]
  • + 15
 I pretty much liked where the top tube and bottom tube meets. Also the cable routing is pretty clean but I think we can still argue on that triple crankset. It doesn't even have ISGC tabs. So what do you expect?
  • + 20
 What a rookie mistake to leave off the tabs. GT should really be better than that.
  • + 1
 There's nowhere to fit a guide, if you did the back plate would interfere with the chainstay pivot and bb link mount, they stick out almost as far as the bottom bracket itself. A frame for using a Bionicon guide I think.
  • + 2
 The ISCG mount on this bike would have to be on the bb-link. The link rotates through what looks like more than 45 degrees as you cycle through the travel... that means your chain device would also. This behavior would not play nice with a chain device and is probably the reason it was left off.
  • + 2
 Also a wider/narrower chainring and a clutch derailleur and you don't need one anyway. Raceface now makes rings that way and notice how the top carbon frame has a raceface next carbon crank on it.
  • + 5
 yup, that's right. raceface makes them 1X11 style chain rings and they even come in a 30-tooth configuration. the whole setup will look a lot cleaner without a chain guide IMO.

www.bikerumor.com/2013/06/04/first-look-race-face-shows-30t-narrow-wide-104-chainring
  • + 1
 Top carbon frame has Raceface Next crank but it's a 3-ring setup. Narrow/wide chainring won't work with a front derailleur, front shifts would suck.
  • + 2
 my point was... GT sources cranksets from raceface, and that will include narrow/wide single ring setups...
[Reply]
  • + 14
 People seem to hate on GT quite a bit, and maybe some of it was warranted, but at first look this new line looks pretty sweet. These are some nice looking bikes.
  • + 6
 Maybe %1 of the hate was warranted... The rest came from a bunch of people who had no idea what they were talking about. All of the whining about the iDrive? I've personally deconstructed mine twice and put it back together, just like new, and I'm not even close to resembling a bike mechanic. The creaking? Tighten up the pivot. So yeah, the hate was just that. However, those haters aren't going to have much to bitch about now, I think... At least not where GT is concerned. Smile
  • + 3
 I personally have never had any creaking coming from my Carbon fury,but that is down to good general maintenance of the bike.All bikes creak if there not maintained.You all should know that.
  • + 3
 The only people hating on them were people who had either zero engineering knowledge but pretended like they did because they did a stint as a shop monkey, or were reverberating garbage they heard from the first group. Of course they have never had the awesome cred that brands like NS, deity, or *insert random catalogue brand* have, even though they have multiple world championship titles in all disciplines of mountain biking and have been around since before most here were born......
[Reply]
  • + 12
 looks dope. all of it. finally, more than one price point for a legit full DH bike.
  • + 4
 Looking at the cheapest options looks like it's specced with a Domain. Means this is gonna be at a very good price!
  • + 5
 I agree. GT stepping it up. If you're old school, you know GT can make it happen in terms of accessibility to your everyday trail rider because they really listen to their pro riders for development
[Reply]
  • + 12
 Just hope they have elimenated the creaking!!
  • - 5
 creekiing?
  • + 3
 Oh, c'mon -- it's a pivot. That you tighten. With a wrench. It's not endless clattering, shaking and slamming, like that of a Giant or a Trek or God forbid, a Kona. I've only had to clean my bike and tighten the pivot bolts a bit and the creaking goes away. It's hyped up way more than it should be.
  • + 3
 To the people who have a creaky bike....learn how to service.
[Reply]
  • + 6
 Peter Denk is a genius. He designed the Force and the Sensor which are beautiful bikes and well designed. He also made the full overmountain range at Cannondale (also crazy bikes) and the supernatural Supersix Evo road bikes. Props to you Mr.Denk and keep designing awesome bikes!
[Reply]
  • + 5
 Yea GT back in action and keeping it real 26" style. Keep the bikes coming. Best part of GT for those of us in the sales industry is GT is always in stock. No b.s. like Giant uhh we sold out because only made 100 frames.
  • - 1
 Except that they are really kinda keeping it 27.5" style.
  • + 1
 Ya you sound like my ex girlfriend. Always chimming in with useless tidbits of information.
  • - 1
 You hated being corrected so much that she dumped you huh? Must suck being wrong all the time. Haha
  • + 1
 Thanks Dr. Phil, now you and Oprah can go discuss other effeminate nonsense.
  • - 1
 The effeminate non-sense you brought up on a bike website because you can't handle people making sarcastic remarks about your own posts? Now get off the internet and get back to that circle-jerk you and your buddies were having.
  • + 1
 That pathetic flamingo outburst is further evidence of the closet behavior your hidding in. Let Oprah come over and talk some sense into you before its too late.
  • + 1
 Flamingo's? Oprah? The irony in telling me that I'm hiding in the closet while you are fixated on Flamingo's and Oprah is amazing. Just to recap, this whole ridiculous exchange started because, after I READ the article, pointed out (to quote the article exactly) "Both are built around 650B wheels and there are no plans to offer a 26-inch model in either the trail or all-mountain categories now, or in the future." Next time, read the article you are commenting on, and instead of getting butt-hurt about someone pointing out the obvious.
[Reply]
  • + 7
 Dan Atherton likes the 27.5, but would still rather ride a 26er, hmmmmm
  • + 0
 Yes, apparently Dan got over his size phobia... now if only the kids here would also.
  • + 3
 i think you'll find the article says he RACES on a 26" wheeled prototype. strange considering bigger wheels are apparently faster.
  • + 1
 Exactly. A lot of guys are sticking to 26" even though they have the option. What's Fab Fabian running?.........
[Reply]
  • + 3
 Look at the height of that main pivot!! Looks like it wants to mow through rock gardens! Glad to see a company that sticks to their suspension design through out the years, unlike Yeti and Cannondale that seems to have a new one every year, and market it as the next big thing.
  • - 1
 The main pivot is high, but where do you carry your weight?

Most of your body weight is carried in your feet, then to the pedals and BB. The BB moves backward to keep the chain growth under control, but this means that most your mass also moves backward (relative to the rear wheel), so the effect of a high BB is not really expressed.
[Reply]
  • + 5
 AOS - the second coming of RTS (google it if you're too young)...or the love child of a Maverick and Mongoose.
  • + 1
 wow, the similarities are undeniable. Everything old is new again
  • + 2
 Negative. RTS had horrendous chain growth. It wasn't all that good of a bike.
  • + 1
 Are they the same? No.
The main difference is that the BB is on the link and not the front triangle, and the pivot at the drop out.
But there are undeniable similarities. High pivot, shock through seat tube, swingarm pulling rocker link below BB, etc.
  • + 1
 Yes but any number of such bikes have routed the shock thru the seattube, and that isn't really that high a pivot compared to what came before. There's been much MUCH worse examples of that.
  • + 1
 I agree regarding its similarities to the Maverick mono link- similar in appearance only though.
  • + 1
 I normally don't reply to old reviews like this even after someone else posts into it but to address a couple comments...

The RTS Team model (with the aluminium rear end) from 1994 had a dropout pivot at the "chainstay" like these new ones, while the ones with the steel rear ends didn't have any dropout pivots. Ironically had they used a seat stay mounted pivot they would have been actual virtual pivot 4-bars, albeit upside down ones compared to how most people expect them to look.

As to the Maverick mono-link, there's an irony there too... GT Sued Maverick & Trek (who licensed the Mono-Link for production under their Klein brand name) over they're supposed exclusive patented rights to floating BB link designs, and then Trek counter sued because they had a US patent for "Y" frame looking suspension bikes, which the GT I-Drives did bear a resemblance to. They settled out of court.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 My dear 2011 GT Avalanche. How I have loved the time we have spent together. You have bought me so much joy and happiness but after seeing the new GT lineup, you are wiped like a dirty bum. The Force will be with me, eventually. When I have saved enough and I have justified the need for another steed.
[Reply]
  • + 3
 Carbon Wheels on Force Pro, is nice touch, looks like you MIGHT be able to fit a e13 TRS+ DMB on it (chain guide) but obviously no sure until someone gets their hands on one.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 I know the rear pivot placement is different in relation to the axle and I know it will be very different, but I still find this interesting: www.adverts.ie/bikes/schwinn-rocket-comp/2667075
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Force frame is unbeliveably beautiful, but fury is really awful for me. Anyway, I'm totally stoked on Atherthons' wins, That's something I've been waiting for way too long, good to see them back on the top of the game, both at the same time, Seems like guys at GT have done some really great job with the new fury!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Ive had a disc brake cable on my old Evo Stumpy get sliced while riding, if downtube damage is an issue why not a carbon guard, like Ibis provide, not rocket science!
Does everyone these days ride like a plough and need rollover speed, how about skipping and jumping over stuff, faster than rolling through it, maybe DH riders need more plough, interesting Dans still developing the 26" Enduro rig, man who knows what hes doing, not marketing.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Wow, the sensor is 1lb heavier than the sc solo huh...
No xl, sucks for 6'3"+ guys, especially if these run small again. (Longer tt/short stems,..maybe fixed that)
150mm am bikes should only come w/2x10...most will become 1x11 anyways, eventually.
Lets see the pivot harware...will they creak when dirty? Too much white on force paint options.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Beautiful bikes, specially white gold, the rest not so keen on em. Think the sensor should be a 29er though. And it´d be beautiful to see a freeride with this susp design, maybe even 27,5 or 26 wheels at choice. The fury looks very cool unlike it does in the world cup, maybe I didnt look well enough.
good stuff gt
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Way to go Gt, I own a 2010 sensor and I have beat the living crap out of it on the trails. This new suspension platform looks very thought out and to my knowledge one of a kind. I am very happy with my Gt and may consider to keep buying them.
  • + 1
 I've got a 2010 force and I also beat the living crap out of it. But it is still running great so I can't justify a new one yet. I've even busted the boost-valve (pro-pedal) on the RP23 twice (though I think that is at least somewhat Fox's fault) but since it's an i-drive I'm just doing without it.
But I think after a couples years of this model, after they've worked out the kinks, it may be in my plans. I just hope the force has a better paint job in 2016
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Can somebody explain to me why tha frame have two links upon shock if they use a monopivot system?

If the shock is "bolted" in the links I understan it, but no, the shock is "bolted" in the rear triangle, exacly in the same stop as the link.

Or it realy make it more resistent or for me, its just a lose of weight.

In rest, is one of the most awesome bikes I have ever seen, I think they should name it GT Falcon, if Gee knows What I mean Big Grin
[Reply]
  • + 1
 def heading in the right direction. dh bike is dialed. 650 bikes could have a touch slacker ht. bigger rear shock cans and wider bars. most endure bikes are 160 not 150 now. 7.5 eye to eye is a bit old school (guess you could squeeze a 7.875 x 2.25 with offset bushings in there to fix the travel and can shortcomings). a lot of bikes have gone to 8+ e 2 e in this category. I seem to remember Dan running his older gt a lot slacker. should spec wider bars too. can always be cut. I run 785 on both bikes. after the fact I switched back and forth on the lil bike with a 750 but I missed the 785. I would love to try an 800. maybe on the big bike first. its a leverage issue not a size issue. if your smaller or have narrower shoulders get a bar with more sweep. wider helps with climbing too, especially slow tech
[Reply]
  • + 5
 Dan Atherton likes the 27.5, but would still rather ride a 26er, hmmmmm
  • + 4
 i found that interesting too, 27.5 is the way forward etc but he RACES on a 26" prototype, what happened to all the rolling faster bullshit.
  • + 1
 I don't think anyone can deny that larger wheels roll faster, but I find it strange that GT aren't pushing Dan to use 27.5 considering they are really trying to drive sales of their latest range. I think that this drive by manufacturers to develop 27.5/650b goes to show that they are relying on fickle consumers to panic buy because they haven't got the latest trend regardless of what's the better product for them personally. I'm not hating on wheel sizes, ride whatever you feel comfortable on and have the most fun on, but I would hate to see the demise of 26 inch wheels just for the sake of marketing over performance.
[Reply]
  • + 4
 that Force looks amazing. lovin the wings and the hole near the headtube surprisingly looks really damn cool
  • + 2
 yeah those are GTs finest works to date. id love to have any of them.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 GT is making some sick looking bike but being 5 9. I don't think I could fit on the sensor or the force, but they could just be larges.
  • + 1
 The Sensor AL will be available in XS/S/M/L/XL and the Sensor Carbon & Force Carbon in S/M/L/XL, so at 5'9" there is certainly a bike to fit you perfectly.
[Reply]
  • + 3
 "GT's new suspension platform"

Oh really?: img126.imageshack.us/img126/765/112uk9.jpg

:P
  • + 7
 Yes, really. In that picture the BB is attached to the frame, here it is part of the linkage, very small difference. The AOS looks like the suspension on the picture you posted mixed with i-drive
  • + 2
 Take a look at Mongoose's Freedrive
www.nsmb.com/2677-gear-shots-45-mongoose-transition-and-sugoi
The link is a lot shorter, but overall, it's the same design
  • + 8
 That's because the GT I-drives, Schwinns and Mongoose bikes ALL had the same designer, and all the brands are owned by the same parent company, so the I-drive patent is shared around. The Peter Denk mentioned in the review was also Cannondale's director of technology recently (he may still be), and cannondale is also owned by the same company.

www.bikemag.com/industry-news/industry-news-design-guru-peter-denk-joins-cannondale-gt-and-mongoose
  • + 1
 kinda like mongoose other than GT having a somewhat FSR looking chain stay pivot, mongoose having a short link ala dw-link instead.
  • + 0
 So when you bottom out your feet move backwards 3 inchs at the BB ? Sounds pretty strange to me
  • + 2
 Its not 3 inches but yes the pedals move backwards as the shock compresses forwards. The BB is in between the shock pivot and the lower link to the swingarm so the distance it moves will be somewhat in between the shock shaft travel and zero. You'd have to cycle thru the suspension travel range to get the exact number but I doubt its more than an inch. I can slide my feet on flat pedals that much while pedaling and I don't complain when that happens...
  • + 3
 3" in relation to what? The bike's front triangle moves forward too. You are the heaviest part of the bike and it generally moves around you.
  • + 1
 so is the new gt's chainstay pivot more like a faux-bar/seatstay pivot? b/c it's located on the brake link as opposed to the horst's location on the wheel link? don't recall them mentioning braking characteristics.
  • + 0
 Unless there's an eccentric pivot planned or hidden inside what looks like the main top pivot, behind the links they conveniently didn't unbolt from the frame for photos (like they did the lower linkages) then yes it could be considered as being a single-pivot linkage.
  • + 1
 The GT's axle is attached to the swingarm, which pivots directly on the main frame, so it is a simple single-pivot swingarm, just like the Orange. Under braking, it will act the same. Pedaling forces, however, are separated from the suspension action by the Independent Drive mechanism. It is clever.
  • + 1
 My first thought when I saw the design was that it was very similar to Freedrive. Same principle, slightly different execution. Freedrive worked well(but had reliability issues) Hopefully it works as good or better.
  • + 1
 it is a single pivot, but with the axle controlled by the pivot at the seat stay. Very different from a typical single-pivot frame. I would expect some squat, personally.
[Reply]
  • + 3
 Hey the Sensor Carbon's frame is only 1lb heavier than Santa Cruz's Solo (also a 650b, 130mm).
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I've seen people converting 26" to the 27.5, but would it be possible to put some 26" wheels on the frame without f*cking up geometry and everything? I would have liked to see the bike with the new Pike as well
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Thanks. Great information.
  • + 1
 Well i thought it was Hilarious....
  • + 1
 I think you've taken my comment the wrong way. It was funny, but it also had some great behind the scenes chatter. You had -1 props and I got you up to 0.
  • + 1
 Ahhh, sorry I thought it was sarcasm haha. No worries.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Ha. I designed a frame with the exact same suspension design as the new force about 6 months ago. Wasn't a big fan of it so i scrapped the idea and made a better one. I guess it must have been pretty good after all.
[Reply]
  • + 3
 first sick bike was a Zaskar...and I rode the shit out of that thing... loved it! good times GT ...good times indeed!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Why did they put the pivot on the chainstay instead of the seatstay? High pivot point bikes have huge brake jack problems as it is, but now the brake is mounted directly on the swingarm
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  • + 1
 Dans bike is still in proto...its gna be more like the fury( linkage)..so I heard.
Wouldnt be surprised if his bike takes 26" and 650.
I wonder,...Force weight vs bronson weight?
[Reply]
  • + 4
 Maybe Gwin should get one of these bad boys?
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  • + 1
 that force frame with xx1 instead of that triple set up with a -1.5 degree angleset would be insane and for really rough enduro i would love to see it with a fox 36 rc2 fit float insted! that would be perfect in my eyes
  • + 0
 i bet they come out w/ a 160 enduro bike down the road. dan's proto? it'll probably have everything you just asked for (slacker h.a., not angleset).
i agree, i'd want 160 fork and 1x11 on this force.
[Reply]
  • + 0
 GT says and RC reiterates "pedaling forces are separated from the suspension action by the Independent Drive mechanism" but what does that actually mean. As it happens, in principle at least, any bike with little or no chain growth and consequently negligible pedal kickback will ride through rough terrain (pedaled) without any reduction in the activity of the rear suspension from whatever would normally happen coasting. The reason is simple, the chain does not become excessively taut losing its flexibility and becoming an immovable binding-like impediment to the operation of the suspension. Attempting to pedal through pedal kickback produces exactly that result, but that problem never arises for bikes with no chain growth. So, there is nothing magical about Freedrive/ID mechanisms - they just cancel chain growth, wholly or to a degree. That is not proof that bikes using this linkage ride well or bob-free only no worse pedaled than coasting.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 the "new" AOS looks a lot like the old Mongoose Freedrive, or Schwinn ISO Drive...
But overall, the bikes look great and the suspension looks a lot better executed
  • + 1
 Yeah, they are similar, but look closely at the new AOS system and you'll note that the BB is not at the end of the arm the way it is on the present Mongoose Freedrive systems. This way they are achieve something other then a 1:1 ratio of motion between the BB and the rear axle. This is introducing chain growth, but there has to be a benefit somewhere else that they've not specifically stated.
  • + 1
 The Freedrive is based on the I-Drive, actually. It's not a coincidence that they are both owned by Dorel, operate under the CSG umbrella and have similar designs.
  • - 3
 GT could pay me the money they paid to engineer Peter Denk for designing pretty much the same thing than the Freedrive from Mongoose but with a pivot near the dropouts. For sure I would be able to do the same... www.nsmb.com/images/gear/gs39/khyber_linkage.jpg

Anyway, I've owned a '08 Mongoose Khyber. Suspension performed really well, but the frame weighed a decent 4.27kg with a Marzocchi Roco TST Air shock. A lot of weight for a 160mm travel frame. And the bearings on the black link that connects the rear triangle with the piece that holds the bottom bracket (wich now GT calls "Path Link") were ridiculously small, 8x16x5mm, so I broke a set of them every two weeks. In fact, I bought them on ebay in sets of 20 units...
  • + 1
 The Mongoose freedrive is a variation of the GT I-drive patented design. They're different brands owned by the same corporation and they share designers and technology.
  • - 3
 Yes yes...I knew. The thing is that they are trying to make us believe that they developed a lot of new things for his new bikes. 2 years of development, many riders involved, engineers, bla bla bla.... when is pretty much the same bike than a Mongoose with a more dialed geometry a 1.5" taller wheels.
  • + 3
 @Pichy: Since you keep mentioning it... The bearings that you are squawking about were only there the first year. An issue that was corrected after 2008.

And at 4.27 kg, it is heavy, which isn't something they were not worrying about when you get right down to it. The bike was intended to be a do it all tough bike. That do it all nature means there is going to be some compromise somewhere, even if that means extra weight from the beef needed to make it tough. If weight is the absolute bottom line, get carbon frame and ride XC to your hearts content.

How much do you weight that you were breaking them every two weeks? I'm 200lbs and have ridden the bike in some gnarly 5hit, including M, N, and O lines at Snowshoe Bike Park then turned around and jumped the frack out of it on Powerline, Ninja Bob, and Missing Link. Things aren't breaking on mine and the bike is one of the problematic '08 versions. You need to fire whoever is working on your bikes.

To say that the GT is the same as a Mongoose is ignorant. You've not taken a close look at the system if you believe that. The BB on GT IS NOT at the bottom of the arc, the way it is on the Mongoose. That last fact alone IS HUGE (!) and actually introduces chain growth, which the Mongoose does not have.
  • - 1
 Well....maybe language barriers are working here... What I tried to say is that the GT is very very very similar to Mongoose, but suspension system is revamped. If you BDKR believe they take 2 years to develop it...me don't. Pretty much of marketing more than anything.
[Reply]
  • + 0
 The bike does look like it is inspired by the earlier Mongoose design, but it is "simplified". This simplification will almost certainly turn out to be a bad idea. All IDrive/Freedrive/ID bikes had previously tried to put the BB on an isolated floating BB linkage. This bike directly connects the BB to one of the four bars of the rear suspension linkage. That is a very effective way of increasing unsprung weight (by introducing a part of the rider's weight into the operation of the suspension) which no one has ever argued is a good thing for suspension performance. Fresh from the impressive results on the DH track, where GT's FBB got re-implemented in a much more refined form you would have imagined there would be less desire on GT's part to shoot itself in the foot.
[Reply]
  • + 0
 After looking closely at the established/older Mongoose Freedrive linkage it is clear that while this new linkage updates (and probably improves on) the original, with structural improvements as well as revised pivot and BB positions, it does so without deviating from the basic idea in a significant way. The linkage would do a good job of cancelling chain growth and thus pedal kickback, but pedal kickback is only one way a rider might get "beat up" while traversing rough terrain. Poor compliance from the suspension will lead to the same result. Complaints about poor compliance from the Freedrive design are replete and putting the BB on that lower link (called the PathLink on the GT bikes) must reduce compliance (especially when riding out of the saddle) because rider weight rather than being suspended becomes unsprung weight. For a rider like Chris Akrigg this sort of suspension setup is perfect but it isn't necessarily so good for the rest of us.
[Reply]
  • + 3
 I think that BB moves around a little bit too much. Doesn't that make it harder to stay on balanced on bike?
  • + 3
 the bb feels centered so the front and rear triangle move around it.
  • + 3
 Nah its really negligable. Similar setup with the Lapierre pendbox, and I could never feel mine move.
  • + 4
 No! As I stated above, you don't notice it. Gee and Rachel ran the old system which had even more movement all last year and have since cleaned house with the competition this year. I don't think it's a hindrance where they are concerned.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 of course you cannot put a coil shock on the force...another model after all new metas...i don't like this new trend! i love bobbing around! Big Grin
[Reply]
  • - 1
 So GT has neutralized the brake jack of the URT, but added chaingrowth? Isn't this like taking a 1990s design and making it better but also worse? Personally I don't want my bottom bracket moving forwards and backwards every time the suspension cycles. My feet hurt just thinking about that.
No 26 present or future? I'm out.
Go Athertons though!
  • - 1
 They all sure look tidy, but my gripe here is A. I'll never be able to afford one and B. All of the Fury's pain schemes apart the Atherton's one are actually hideous.
  • + 6
 This design is closely related to the Mongoose Freedrive design that's been around for several years (Dorel Corp which owns GT also owns Schwinn and Mongoose and Cannondale so designs are shared heavily) in layout. They're not URTs, they're floating BB links. An URT has only a single pivot between the main frame and swingarm, and the BB is rigidly fixed to the swingarm and is always the same distance from the axle. They don't experience any chain growth at all and the brake jack/squat degree depends on the pivot location, but their worst problem was since the crank/pedals/bb was attached to the swingarm, the sprung/unsprung mass of the rear suspension changed with how much of the riders weight was carried thru the pedals. I-drive don't have that problem because the BB shell rides on a swing-link bar between the main frame and the swingarm.
  • + 3
 You actually don't notice the movement of the BB. My main weapon of choice (of the four bikes I own) is my Khyber Elite which uses a free drive system that is very very similar to the GT I drive. I've run that thing in places like Snowshoe bike park and never once noticed the BB moving while going over any of those tables or drops.

But this new iteration (with the BB not being in line with the bottom link of the triangle) makes a lot of sense if you ask me. Chain growth is there but it's minimal and most likely gladly introduced for a beneficial result of some sort elsewhere. Better pedaling feedback mid-way through the suspension travel would be my guess.

These I-Drive / Freedrive (Mongoose) systems really aren't that bad at all. :-)
  • + 1
 I owned a Khyber Super and noticed the bottom bracket moves when suspension works, specially pedaling with my ass on the seat. Not pedaling standing.

The reliability of the system was really a nightmare, specially the bearings on the small linkage that connected the swingarm to the "Path Link". I run now a single pivot SC Heckler...spending my spare time in fixing noises and free play is not for me. Plus the weight difference Khyber/Heckler frames was like 1.5 kg favourable for the SC.
  • + 1
 Didn't know we were comparing frames here. :-)

But rather then get into that, I'll just say that I noticed the BB moving too if I looked down at it. That said, I never "felt it" while I was pedaling, seated or otherwise, and never noticed it when landing jumps or drops.

So if you're saying you can "feel" it, you're the only person I've ever spoken too that was able to notice it. You must have a sensitve arse. :-)
  • - 1
 @BDKR: If you are not able to feel that your feet are moving backwards in relation to your ass, you have a problem man!.
  • + 1
 @Pichy: LOL!!! It might seem that way right?
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I still prefer to the stealth black prototype carbon frame of Gee's fury. Sick. I hope GT offers that stealth black with no decals. Razz
[Reply]
  • + 2
 "Optimized Rolling Performance." That sounds silly. Marketing gobbledegoo aside, these bikes look great.
[Reply]
  • + 3
 Last time I saw this "new" linkage was on a mongoose teocalli.
  • + 4
 The only difference is the length of the linkage part at chain stay, right?
[Reply]
  • + 3
 That Force is one of the best looking bikes I've ever seen.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I'm going to suspect, braking forces have been decoupled quite a bit more over the old design? I can't wait to hop on one and compare...
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  • + 3
 never thought i would say this but... I kinda want a GT.
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  • + 3
 Finally a bike with room for a bottle cage!
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  • + 2
 Damn, look at all that massive space inside the front triangle! You could put a suitcase in there ........or a tent.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Having seen the Fury take 4 world cup victories I would really like to try one!
  • + 1
 You forget about Marc beaumont winning the BDS series and many other races on the previous Fury.Aint nothing wrong with that one.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 I'd rather wait for the XL sized Demo that Gwin will unveil in Andorra.
  • + 1
 hahaha. . .funny indeed.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 because of the rearward axle path, the bb in the force bike may move about 3-4 cm horizontally... that may be a problem...
[Reply]
  • + 2
 holy shit! gt finally made a bike that looks cool!
[Reply]
  • + 3
 Bike Porn. Nuff Said.
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  • + 2
 Very pleased to see a decent length top tube on the large Fury.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 About time that E13 wheelset made a podium! I have ran these for a while now and they are great!
  • + 1
 The team runs Stans rims
  • + 1
 Ahhhhhhhhhh poop. There was me feeling special for a second.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 have same system on my mongoose bootr and u never fall of pedals its working realy good
[Reply]
  • + 1
 The forces suspension system kind of looks (slightly) similar to my sunn radical's... Kind of....
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Hmm, they are still copying the original idea, even closer. www.prototype.gr
[Reply]
  • + 2
 what the fuck I want a GT
[Reply]
  • - 1
 ohhh GT i was so excited to see some sexy bikes from u guys
but wtf is the bb moves back and foward

GT 2014=MONGOOSE/SCHWINN MADE WITH HYDROFORM

the old i drive is much better
  • + 5
 the old i=drive moved the BB too
[Reply]
  • + 2
 Waytogo if you wanna win some World Cups Hahaha !
  • + 2
 Nice bike. I like it way more than the old carbon one. Go ahead Athertons, win some races.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 top tube length - 59.9 mm (23.6 inches), SHOULD BE 599.44 mm (59.9mm is just over 2 inches hahah)
[Reply]
  • + 2
 I hope they are available in the uk unlike this years
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Whoa...you can fit 2 water bottles inside the front triangle of the Force!!!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 wonder what GT sales are looking like today since the Atherton's did it again yesterday?!
  • + 3
 They'll go up once the new bikes hit the showrooms.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 "wide-spread acceptance of 650B on the opposite side of the Atlantic Ocean"

????
  • + 0
 yes, opposite of which side?
  • + 1
 GT is generally considered an American brand
  • + 2
 Opposite of Canada where Pinkbike is from...
  • + 1
 That as well ^
[Reply]
  • + 2
 Gt have their game face on! Such nice bikes
[Reply]
  • + 1
 My question is can you ride it through water, or in wet conditions and not get the Gt pop?
[Reply]
  • + 1
 why aren't bushings used more widely instead of bearings when there is only a few degrees of movement?
[Reply]
  • + 1
 i wonder how many people would be drooling all over these if the atherton's weren't smoking everyone in the DH world cups?
[Reply]
  • + 2
 Peter Denk has done major design work for Cannodale and Scott (Ransom)...
[Reply]
  • + 2
 I wonder if the new Fox float x shock will fit on those trail bikes?
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I think I'm in love with that blue fury hopefully in the mid-low 3k range
[Reply]
  • + 1
 the force looks like it's going to handle like titties
[Reply]
  • + 1
 GT has got it right, I just love these bikes!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Am i the only to think these were inspired on Commençal V2 models?
[Reply]
  • + 1
 The new suspension is kinda tripy. Deff. different.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 i think that it is like Maverick Monolink system
[Reply]
  • + 1
 gt are looking amazing this year.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Whatever way they perform, these are nice looking bikes
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I sure hope put just the Fury frame on sale.
[Reply]
  • + 0
 i like that the suspension has somewhat of a rearward path compared to some.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Oh Gee I think I need to get all new bikes now (gts)
[Reply]
  • + 1
 The fource looks great just dont know about the rear sus system
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Anyone got the head angle on the new Fury?
[Reply]
  • + 0
 Nice bikes, but the rear shock is very exposed, and it will not be easy to clean...
  • + 3
 Gt includes a cool mud guard on the swingarm to keep some of the muck off the shock.
[Reply]
  • - 3
 Yet another different rear suspension pivot design....how many different iterations are we going to see before everyone agrees on a single design for trail bikes ! I'm not keen on the positioning of the rear shock - looks like it'll getter properly covered in mud, stones and crap. I don't like under-down-tube cable routing. I often hear rocks clunking against the underneath of the downtube - doesn't matter for cables, but I wouldn't want my nice braided hose to get mashed up. No good for Thule bike carriers either.
  • + 2
 Dealing with mud, stones and crap is what a rear shock has to deal with, and they are extensively tested to make sure they can deal with it.
  • + 6
 Wow... Yes, the last thing we want is lighter, more efficient, stiffer iterations of suspension coming out... I bet you ride an Ellsworth, don't you?!
  • + 1
 Aye Just let people complain... They think they're doing us some kind of favor lol
[Reply]
  • + 1
 How long are the chainstays on the Fury? I bet longer than 421mm.
  • + 6
 Protour + long chainstays. Get a room already!! Wink
  • + 1
 432.... which is still bloody short. ;-)
[Reply]
  • + 1
 man, this bikes are SICK TO THE BONES!
[Reply]
  • - 3
 so they didn't include that leverage ratio bullshit form vital MTB.
its the only think iv ever disliked about my sanction, and now it remains a rising rate, big mistake.
vitalmtb.com/product/feature/TheNewGT-Introducing-the-2014-Force-and-Sensor-650B,181?utm_source=facebook.com&utm_medium=referral&utm_campaign=spotlight
  • + 6
 I left that suspension graph out because it does not provide an explanation of how the different rate curves perform and why. Both suspensions feel very smooth through the mid-stroke.
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  • + 1
 2 win in row, and now new GT bike is rising
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  • + 1
 NBow thats a sorted design, Very clever
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  • + 1
 they are just...so nice ! Especially the new Fury !
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  • + 1
 Gt are making some good looking bikes these days, but no 26"? Come on!!
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  • + 1
 the fury does not look good, but the force is badass.
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  • + 1
 So when we getting Saint wheels?
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  • + 1
 good looking bike
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  • + 0
 suspension looks like mongoose system Smile
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  • + 1
 Looks like a.....RTS
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  • + 1
 You auto corrected Val.
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  • + 0
 No 26" AM bikes? Surely going to lose out on sales?
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  • + 1
 drink the koolaid.
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  • + 1
 Even want this!!!
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  • + 1
 The Fury is a Badass
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  • + 1
 That video was cool!
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  • + 1
 Very sweet bikes
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  • + 1
 the GT's Revolution!!!!!
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  • + 0
 does it have to come with CTD?
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  • - 1
 lower link will hit everything
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