TRP, DZR, HT, and MIO - Interbike 2013

Sep 18, 2013 at 21:50
Sep 18, 2013
by Mike Kazimer  
 
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TRP Quadiem Disc Brakes

TRP's cyclocross and road bike brakes have a strong following, but the company isn't as well known for their mountain bike lineup. They're looking to change that with the Quadiem series of four piston hydraulic disc brakes. The Quadiem (shown) is the base model of the series, and uses mineral oil as its hydraulic fluid, with an in-line master cylinder to activate the four piston caliper. There is an external reach adjust for the alloy lever blade, along with a hinge style mount for to affix the lever to the handlebar. Weight for the brake without mounting hardware is claimed to be 350g per wheel, and the MSRP is a very reasonable $160 USD per wheel. TRP will also be offering the Quadiem SL, a higher end version that gets composite pistons, a composite lever blade, and a two piece rotor for the still-budget friendly price of $200. Weight for the Quadiem SL is a claimed 314g per wheel.

www.trpbrakes.com



DZR Sense Shoes

DZR's history as a shoe company began in the Swiss Alps, although they are now based out of San Francisco, California. They offer an extensive lineup of flat pedal and clipless shoes designed for everything from bike polo to World Cup downhill racing. The Sense is designed for flat pedal usage, and has an interchangeable flex system that allows riders to choose their preferred stiffness by selecting either a stiff or soft insole. The tread pattern of the sticky sole is patterned after a bike chain, with beveling to help provide additional grip. Available in sizes 41-47 EU, the Sense retails for $105 USD.

DZR Terra Sea LTD Shoes

Want to have the same shoes that Tahnee Seagrave, this year's women's Junior World DH Champion wears? Now you can, with the clipless pedal compatible Terra Sea LTD. The shoe uses a fiberglass shank to provide enough stiffness to handle hard pedaling, but the sole still has enough traction for off-bike excursions. A hook and loop closure prevents the laces from snagging on crankarms and chainrings, and adds a little protection from the elements. Available in sizes 41-47 EU, the Terra Sea retails for $129 USD.

www.dzrshoes.com



HT Kevin Aiello Signature Model Pedal

We first spotted a prototype version of HT's Kevin Aiello pro model earlier this year at the Taipei Bike Show, and the final version is now available. A 110x105mm platform provides plenty of real estate, even for those with big feet, and the low height of 11mm is intended to keep the number of encounters with solid objects to a minimum, a useful feature considering the low bottom brackets many modern bikes possess. Like a number of HT's pedals, the Kevin Aiello pedal spins on two internal bushings in conjunction with an external bearing. Weight: 390g. MSRP: $195 USD. Colors: Dark blue, light blue, green, gold, orange.

HT AE05 Pedal

HT also had a prototype of the newest addition to their AE series on display. If you're familiar with the HT line, you might be wondering why there isn't an AE04. Well, in China the number four is considered extremely unlucky, and rather than tempt fate, HT chose to skip it and move on to the AE05. The pedal has an improved bushing system designed to reduce the amount of side to side play in the pedal, and has pins that thread all the way through the body to help prevent them from shearing off. The amount of concavity has been increased, and the pedals have a height of 14mm. The final price is still to be determined, and they will be available in early to mid 2014.

www.ht-components.com



MIO Alpha Heart Rate Watch

MIO has been making sports oriented heart rate monitors for the last ten years, but for 2014 the company is breaking new ground with the Alpha watch. Claimed to be the world's first strapless, continuous heart rate watch, the Alpha uses two LED light beams and an electro-optical cell to determine the volume of blood under the skin, technology that MIO's testing has found to be as accurate as an EKG (electrocardiogram). The sensor is located underneath the watch, and sits at the top, center portion of the user's wrist. The fully waterproof, USB rechargeable watch doesn't have any built in GPS capabilities, but it does have Bluetooth 4.0, which allows users to sync it up with their smartphone, and the data can be uploaded to Strava or other tracking software. Different heart rate zones can be programmed, and an audible alarm along with a blinking light alerts users whether they are above, below, or at their target heart rate. We'll admit that we don't typically ride with a heart rate monitor, but the simplicity of the Alpha is appealing, and we can see this being a useful tool for the racer who wants to track their heart rate without messing around with a chest strap. MSRP: $199 USD.

www.mioglobal.com


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98 Comments

  • + 94
 So many ridiculously overpriced small-time pedal companies these days... all they're doing it grabbing blocks of aluminium and CNCing a cool looking design, it's not rocket science, but people pay an arm and a leg for them because they're anodised...
  • + 21
 It's getting ridiculous, and at 11mm they're needing less material than ever as well, and with only 2 bushings and one bearing......and is the axle just plain ol cromo for $195? But HT is anything but small time.......
  • + 40
 You are aware that HT makes pedals for a ton of established MTB companies? Couldn't be farther from small-time.
  • + 11
 Yeah pretty much what I was saying, the HT Nano is probably the most re-branded pedal of all time.....
  • + 3
 Lol yep it is, I have the FireEye version of the HT Nano... xD
  • + 21
 Get your arm and leg anodised...
  • + 1
 I say why waste your money on $195 pedals. Kona makes a killer pedal that has test the time over and over for half the price at $80

a href="url">http://shop.konaworld.com/products.php?product=Wah-Wah-Pedal#/a>
  • + 2
 straitlines for 80 bucks. thank you pinkbike.
  • + 3
 My comment wasn't actually getting at HT in particular, I've never heard of them, but I'm prepared to stand corrected on that front. Regardless, there are still so many brands, even large ones, that are making flash looking pedals, for not much work, and often at the cost of durability. Just look at nukeproof, straitline, twenty6, DMR, their top of the line pedals aren't much more than some basic machining work. You're paying for an expensive CNC lathe at the factory, and way too much time on CAD designing the aesthetics of the things.
  • + 7
 Shimano Saint pedals for $80.... Loving them
  • + 12
 CNC shop worker here. When bought in bulk, each block for the pedals could be had for about two or three dollars. Under five, for sure. But, with all the different angles and necessary cuts, it'd maybe even take a full hour to machine each pedal. I'd say the cost is 50/50 between the pedal body and the axle, unless the axle is titanium - in which case the axle would cost more. Now add anodizing, bushings, bearings, and pins and you have your final cost.

The CAD work is done by a person but the actual script writing itself is nowadays done by a program called Gibbs, in which you tell it how you want the part to look and it writes out the lines of script for programming the machine.
  • + 3
 Saints are great but I wish the pins were a tad longer.
  • + 2
 hey Adam,I'm not saying that you should pay big bucks for pedals, but i don't think you need to crap on companies that charge that. they need to buy machines worth a price of a small house, pay someone to program that pedal set up the machine pay for the over heads and blah blah blah. I personally am about to release a set of pedals and i'll be charging high prices, but i don't want anyone to say they are a rip off, i've put my heart and soul into them and i would like to share what i think is a great product. no matter what the company, we've all taken the time to produce something, gone out on a limb to give riders what they ask for and more. there is nothing wrong with cheap pedal, but when you step onto something good, why not pay. You'll always have the choice between cheap and nasty, but don't say it's a piece of cake to just whip up a set of pedals, till you go and do it yourself. i'll be releasing mine soon, i would be happy to send you a set to trial, and let us all know if you think they're worth the big bucks. your call.
  • + 6
 Since the price of the CNC machines has been brought up a couple times, I'll clarify. A good used one can be had for around $30,000 whereas a fancy new one is in the $1,000,000 range. I'd say most of them are in the $275,000 range.

Also, since markup has been brought up, my shop takes the cost of the product and sells it to retailers for double the cost, and the retailer will usually again sell it for double their cost. It's a fairly common practice.
  • - 3
 Well, at least we can save money on brakes! 350g, four piston, and $160! only disadvantage l see is mineral oil...
  • + 6
 Mineral oil vs Dot is irrelevant for mountain bikes, it's never hurt Shimano.
  • - 3
 That's just because of all their icetech stuff. mineral oil boils at a lower temp, and freezes at a higher temp than dot fluid
  • + 0
 Kona Wah-Wahs with Holzfeller replacement pins
  • + 3
 I don't have a problem with companies making cool expensive pedals, I just question the value to the rider in buying rely high end pedals. I just feel like the things that make the pedals so expensive, like a few grams weight savings, or a millimeter thinner, just don't benefit the rider enough to justify spending they money. Especially considering its s part that will be smashed of rocks constantly. I just feel that for those extra $$$ the money can be used elsewhere on the build to greater benefit.
  • + 1
 I'm running those too and I love them. Superstar makes a pair too
  • + 2
 @Mnorris, what planet have you descended from and where have you been the last twenty years?
  • + 0
 l descended from canada, where in the summer it matters what temperature your fluid boils at, and in the winter it matters what temperature your fluid freezes at
  • + 7
 The simplest way to end this discussion is simply this: Most people who complain about the prices don't actually have a f*cking clue how a business operates, its as simple as that, they don't understand what kind of costs are incurred and don't understand that people get into the business to make money (Shit that one must be surprising for a lot of you). If the price is to much... well its probably because the product cost more to make (Holy shit that one must be a shocker too). Stop complaining about prices and ride your bikes and if you break something suck up the expense if you want to buy something better, its as simple as that.
  • + 2
 Buuut Tate27, these are the internets. There's no rational thinking here. Look at that Aiello peal for instance.
Anyone with a keyboard knows better than any darn real company out there. We manufacture endless bitch slap sessions for free!
Imagine the power that could be be harnessed by each keystroke pushed, why we could power all the world's industry, solve world hunger and find a way for all peoples to live together in harmony.
Oh wait, we did that on the "lets discuss wheelsize" thread.
  • + 2
 Tate27, not everyone makes hundreds of thousands bucks annually and can easily afford to spend money for a PLUS sign by his pinkbike nickname, or for a new $190 pair of pedals.
I do have an idea on how a buisness operates and what costs are included, and still, those prices are bullshit.
  • + 1
 dude, pb plus is like, forty bucks....
  • + 1
 m8 thats a week of work for me
  • + 4
 holy shit, you are severely underpaid
  • + 1
 Haha Tate, real funny poking at the intelligence levels of people who need an explanation of why a price appears to be artificially high before determining that it isn't, in apparent defense of a company that refuses to use the # 4 because they're afraid of it!!!!!!!! Bahahaha, better have a Ti axle in that mofo 'cuz otherwise it's a straight-up rip-off. Fyxation Mesa MP, VP-001 & VP-Vice are all clearly better for about 1/3 to 1/2 the price & the 1st two are lighter. Straitline's are a rip-off too. Maybe that Kevin what's his name put his chicken scratch on there which would obviously make it $100 better than anything else on the market. :/
  • + 2
 There's this beautiful thing called "common sense" which is apparently not so common anymore. You can use this common sense when looking at prices. 'Cause, you know, generally when someone sells something, they need to make some profit out of it so that they can keep selling more.

HOLY SHIT, EH?

For the most part, pedals in this price range need not be replaced every month unlike $30 pedals. Pay now or pay later. You get what you pay for.

If you hate the price that much, shut up and buy a different product. You may as well tell a Lamborghini owner that his car is totally useless 'cause your Chevrolet Cavalier can do the same things that his Lambo does and at a cheaper price. Just... no. Just stop.
  • - 1
 ^Spot on Trozei Salute
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  • + 40
 Don't need a heart rate watch, as long as it's still beating, I'm good.
  • - 10
 Would you drive a high performance race car without a RPM gauge? same goes for your heart..
  • + 3
 Heart rate monitors are an invaluable training resource, they can show essentially how hard your working. This is brilliant for doing pieces over a time duration, and if you say I wanna go at a heart rate of 180 for 10-15mins you can consistently measure how hard to push for this duration, and when to push harder or softer
  • + 1
 I prefer to shift my heart by ear. People who monitor have their reasons. The hulk comes to mind. I personally measure resting heart rate (at the doctors annually) since it tells you how well you are doing at a baseline, but i guess to each his own...
  • + 2
 The watch is clearly not for you, this is a serious tool to have when you want to start training on a competitive level, and if you know anything about racing cars there is a sweet spot in the rpm range to get the best out of your motor, and like i said before your heart works the same way, but like you said to each his own.
  • + 5
 Ummmm, yeeeeaaaahhhh........if ya'll can just take my comment as a simple joke like it was meant, that'd be great.
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  • + 21
 when are the spiked shoes and rubber pedals coming out... someone should seriously do it.
  • + 4
 Have re-solable pedals. Slap on a new Stealth slab when they wear. Would be a bitch though if you forgot to remove your shoes before hoping in the car or walking in the house.
  • + 1
 the spikes wouldnt have to be big, it could be a mix rubber with spikes on both the pedals and shoes.
  • + 14
 That's an idea my shins dig!
  • + 1
 fantastic idea...right up until you get off the bike and walk.
  • + 2
 lol dude you nailed it
  • + 4
 Guys. they're called clipless. Stop trying to fix that whats not broke
  • - 2
 Except for the fact that people would actually be able to get their foot off the pedal when theyre eating shit. Theres a reason people dont clip in.
  • + 7
 You must have not spent much time, if at all, trying clipless. I've been riding clipless since I started mtn biking and have never once crashed and still been attached to my bike. When first learning you will fall over coming to a dead stop a couple times but in a crash you ankles will involuntarily twist that few degrees and you will pop right out. With that said, it's not for everyone, but crashing and not being able to get your feet out is really a non-issue. Don't knock it until you try it.
  • + 1
 (And p.s.-- some people might cqll it cheating or say if ypi were a better rider you wouldn't need it or whatever, but you can get away with quite a bit of extra rear wheel english when riding clipless. Really nice when you get knocked offline)
  • - 1
 ErikRC10, you've never had a fall in a position where you can't twist your ankle?
  • - 1
 Erik, tell that to one of the local riders who has been riding clipless for years and swears by them. Then ask him how his false front teeth are doing.
  • + 2
 I live and ride the north vancouver bc.(the shore) A lot of us that ride here use clipless. For the greasy roots and rocks being clipped lets you snap the back wheel in around easier. Since riding here is year round that little bit extra control is appreciated.
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  • + 11
 Everybody is talking about shoes and pedals when theyre missing the first thing......those brakes are sweet! Super cheap considering its a four pot brake and it uses mineral oil. (which is a big plus imo) Not too bad looking either!
  • + 1
 Is that a light weight for a 4 piston brake?
  • + 3
 Yeah actually. XO trails weigh a claimed 340 grams for about $300 a brake. I'd say this is doing well! I'm not concerned about its weight though. I couldn't tell you the last time that I've ever complained about a brake being heavy....
  • + 1
 At 200 pounds, weight isn't a big concern for me (which is why I'm ignorant about it). Just curious.
  • + 0
 we need more mineral oil brakes!!! DOT cause serious health problems and is very caustic! Save the bike mechanics!!!
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  • + 10
 160$ for a disc Brake. 195$ for a pedal. C'Mom Man!
  • + 2
 $160 for a disc brake it is actually pretty good price wise. Saints etc are $200 upwards usually. Will be interesting to see how they perform though compared to the larger brands
  • + 8
 I think GatoGordo meant to say that the price of the pedals is ridiculous, as you can get a nice 4-piston brake for $35 less and you can't really compare the tech that goes into brakes vs pedals...
  • + 2
 That's exactly my point.
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  • + 7
 Why does Pink Bike have to tempt me so much. DAMN YOU PINK BIKE!!!!........but thanks at the same time
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  • + 2
 TRP isn't well known to mountain bikers? ROTFLMSWAO !!!

TRP stands for Tektro Racing Products... they're the premium division line for Tektro, and chances are every mountain biker on the site knows who Tektro is. That'd be like saying people don't know who Novatec or Maxxis are, since they're the premium divisions of Joytech and Cheng Shin Tires respectively.
  • + 5
 This is a direct quote from the TRP crew. They realize that TRP is huge in Cross, but a lot of folks don't put TRP and Tektro together - Like FSA and Gravity as well. Brands trying to have branches sometimes take a bit longer to grow into the highend markets.
  • + 1
 mod fight! mod fight!! but yeah, i had no idea who TRP is, but know exactly who Tektro is. regardless, promising looking brakes...
  • + 1
 Cheng Shing makes Maxis tires? freaky.
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  • + 2
 I work in machine shop...I run CNC laths/mills...and when someone goes and says "it's not rocket science" has obviously never stepped foot in a machine shop... All factors need to be taken into consideration...you don't just put a piece of metal in a machine and start cutting...first there's designs/drawings/engineering..Once you get that then you have to take that design/drawing and have to write a program for it...(I use Mastercam, which is anywhere between $3,000-$5,000 just for the program) mind you, you can spend hours drawing and writing programs...then you have to prove the program (machines need to be set up with the right tooling or you may need to by new tooling)...I use HAAS CNC's (a decent one with no tooling with cost you around $60,000/$70,000.. then once the program has been proved and prototype has been made...Then you move on to fine tuning the programs to run the most efficiently..

Also take the Hourly rate for the employee ($30+) and cost to run the machines ( say $30 per hour) then theres the cost of the material, and that's why you get the prices you see...

so I guess the question is. if you are so inclined to complain about the prices...why not see if you can make a product that is of greater or equal quality and keep the cost down...
  • + 3
 Umm in the bike industry you pay a dude 10 bucks an hour maybe 15 now. To put blanks on the machine and take out the finished part. The programers might make 30 bucks an hour. Out side of the bike industry the guy that does the tooling and set up can made up to 50 bucks an hour. I did the tooling for an Okuma 4th axis milling machine for Race Face. They paid me ten bucks an hour. I have a real job now.
  • + 1
 Ive been there! I started as CNC set up $10 per hor...then went into programing I actually got kick backs for programs I wrote that when into production...and I made $12.00...now I do it all and money is a lot better...but I work in a small machine shop that my Father owns...so I can paid a little better then most machine shops...but he did tell me that working 30 years in a ship yard as a tool maker he made just over $35.00.. and told me overseas is where you make the big money...

I was speaking interms of the guy who can do all of it...ive had no expirence in any other machine shop except for the one my Dad owns..thanks for the insite...I really had no clue...damn..
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  • + 1
 let's hope those TRP brakes are better than their EuroX cantis, instantly recognizable from the sqealing sound and the sound of a guy with not enough braking power hitting a tree, but either way discs are different so worth a shot (not really considering I already have the old saints)
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  • + 4
 Mmmmmm yet another set of pedals I would like to own...
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  • + 2
 Can someone please run down to the Santa Cruz booth and let me know if there is new colors coming out for the Nomad C. Pretty please.
  • + 1
 Yes & No. Black, white, red, blue, yellow, green, purple, brown, pink, orange, mushroom, kidney, FU FOX!
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  • + 1
 If HT pedals were just "CNC aluminium" why so many brands are useing their experience? Kona, commencal, Nukeproof, fire eye and so on...
$195 is RRP price. For sure you can buy a pair for less than $195.
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  • + 1
 First meaningful pedal spindle design ever. Bushings beat the roller bearing variety. Its dust tolerant and developping slack can be countered from the outside. Wondering who came up with that assembly.
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  • + 2
 Ugh, I hate the strap for heart rate monitors. 'Bout damn time someone just put the whole damn thing into the watch!
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  • + 1
 KHS!!!! hell yeah i want those pedals just cuz they're Kevin's............. Thats sweet. and those new shoes are sick....DZR Sense Shoes
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  • + 1
 Those trp brakes are going to be a major oem WIN! Tektro rival shimano on $500 bikes and will soon rival them on expensive bikes too if they're any good
  • + 1
 You said it. " if theyre any good". Hows about a review PB?
  • + 5
 We have a set on the way. Stay tuned.
  • + 1
 Yey! Thank you! I think they look sharp and would buy them if they perform.
  • + 1
 Actually its because of Tektro and their Auriga Comp and Pro hydraulic brakes seeing such wide OEM spec that shimano now offers hydraulic brakes down to the Acera price levels. They're trying to get back the big money OEM share they've been losing.
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  • + 2
 Theres not enough acronyms. We need more acronyms.
  • + 3
 W.N.M.A.!!!
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  • + 1
 Rocky should sell alot of those thunderbolts, Can't wait to try one, see if its got enough bang for the buck
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  • + 1
 Those sense shoes look incredible! Not sure if they'd be worth getting though, as I already have Freeriders
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  • + 2
 I get a brand new pair of HT AE03's then these show up! Thanks...
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  • + 1
 the MIO tech is cool, but shoulda incorporated gps
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  • + 1
 I do love that shoes tread pattern!
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  • + 1
 Where can I get the sense shoes in the UK?
  • + 2
 Nojzilla, they have a good number of dealers in the UK. There's a link to the website in the article, under dealers you'll see the list. :cheers:
  • + 1
 cheers bud! theres a dealer in the next town over, just gotta wait for the shoe to be released Smile
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  • + 1
 those pedals look so nice
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  • + 1
 TRPDZRHTMIOWTF
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  • - 3
 Oh hello copy of shimano saint.
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