Ibis Bikes

Dec 11, 2009 at 0:09
Dec 11, 2009
by Tyler Maine  
 
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It has become no secret that I fell in bike love with the Ibis Mojo this past season and for good reason. No other bike in recent years has made me want to get out and ride more than that shiny carbon two wheeler that I spent the better portion of my season on. When we find bikes like this we try not to get too caught up in them as we know that we'll have to move on to new pastures sooner or later - that's what we do as testers, writers and lovers of this sport. Once it was my turn to move on, I found out about the Mojo HD - since that time I've been looking forward to riding one and seeing if it would live up to my Mojo experience.

Inside we're gonna tell you a lot more about all the bikes that Ibis offers the mountain bike crowd,

It all began as a search for the next trail bike to build and after reading and hearing enough good things about the Mojo from Ibis, it was decided to see what the hype was all about.

Initial Build up Article

How to clean a dirty Ibis feature

Final review of the Ibis Mojo

As you can see the results were favorable and the bike stood out in my mind as one of my top rides ever and that is a tough list to get on to. Along the way I had the good fortune of getting to meet a few of the owners of Ibis, an engineer and their world renowned athlete Brian Lopes. Ibis has made a name and brand for themselves by not wanting to be the biggest, most bad ass company out there, but rather a company that makes high quality bikes that the end users (you and I) will love to ride on our local trails and beyond. The fact that the owners themselves are very approachable meant that I was able to ask them questions and tell biking stories too, with out feeling like I was being a grom. Heck I even learned that Scot can fly a plane and lived in Alaska for a while - frick that adds personality to a company.

Enough about thoughts and feelings, let's talk about their bikes now for a bit. The Mojo put them back on the map for high end, high quality rides, let's hear about the Mojo HD and the Tranny.

Scot talks about Ibis, the Mojo HD and working with Brian Lopes and Lopes talks about the Tranny:
Views: 7,053    Faves: 8    Comments: 2


Brian and the Tranny:




Ambrose filming a Tranny
Ambrose filming a Tranny








Brian riding a Tranny
Brian riding a Tranny

Learn more about the Tranny here.




Lopes talks about the Mojo SL, the Mojo HD as well as working with Ibis:
Views: 8,330    Faves: 7    Comments: 6


Brian's Mojo SL:








Learn more about the Mojo SL here.




Now for the real reason you've read this far, you want to know more about the all new Mojo HD. At 160mm of rear travel via the DW Link suspension platform, the HD is a whole new level of AM bike. Listen to Colin and learn.

Colin talks about the Mojo HD:
Views: 4,256    Faves: 5    Comments: 5


Prototype Ibis Mojo HD:

160mm of rear wheel travel via the DW Link Suspension platform
160mm of rear wheel travel via the DW Link Suspension platform

The tapered headtube is compatible with the new tapered steerer standard of 1 1/8th upper and 1.5 lower. <br> If you want to run your current straight 1 1/8th fork, you are covered too as there will be an adapter available <br> and you will be able to use a traditional headset top and bottom.
The tapered headtube is compatible with the new tapered steerer standard of 1 1/8th upper and 1.5 lower.
If you want to run your current straight 1 1/8th fork, you are covered too as there will be an adapter available
and you will be able to use a traditional headset top and bottom.

67 degree head angle with a 160mm fork (Brian's been running a 170mm fork, you can also run up to a 180mm).
67 degree head angle with a 160mm fork (Brian's been running a 170mm fork, you can also run up to a 180mm).


The chain guides will be proprietary and brands will be announced once the frame hits retailers. <br> The frame will not have ISCG mounts so it will not be HammerSchmidt compatible
The chain guides will be proprietary and brands will be announced once the frame hits retailers.
The frame will not have ISCG mounts so it will not be HammerSchmidt compatible

The leverage ratio on both the Mojo and Mojo SL is designed for air shocks. The Mojo HD comes with an 8.5
The leverage ratio on both the Mojo and Mojo SL is designed for air shocks. The Mojo HD comes with an 8.5" x 2.5" Fox RP23. Note - A DHX air will work on all but the small size. A coil shock is not offered because the linkage rates weren't designed for it. The top tube has be lowered to get slightly better stand over than the regular Mojo while having a higher BB because of the longer travel.

12 x 135mm Maxle rear axle
12 x 135mm Maxle rear axle

Post mount magnesium left dropout, carbon right dropout
Post mount magnesium left dropout, carbon right dropout

Dual row angular contact bearings in the front of the lower link that have less play than standard sealed bearings. Preload adjustment is not necessary. Large 28mm x 15mm x 7mm radial bearings in the rear for stiffness and long wear.
Dual row angular contact bearings in the front of the lower link that have less play than standard sealed bearings. Preload adjustment is not necessary. Large 28mm x 15mm x 7mm radial bearings in the rear for stiffness and long wear.

Front derailleur and adjustable seat post housing (if you use them) run along the top tube
Front derailleur and adjustable seat post housing (if you use them) run along the top tube

The HD runs full length cable housing. Rear brake and rear derailleur run on the down tube, <br> and there will be a cable guard made of foam-backed polycarbonate.
The HD runs full length cable housing. Rear brake and rear derailleur run on the down tube,
and there will be a cable guard made of foam-backed polycarbonate.

Additional Mojo HD Prototype Specs:

Price and delivery date are both to be decided.
•26" Wheels.
•Target weight for the frame and shock: 6.2-6.5 lbs.
•Chain stay length: 17.125".
•Top tube lengths are the same as regular Mojos.
•Max rear tire sizing - 2.35"-2.5" depending on brand and height of the side knobs.
•The bottom bracket height is 13.8"-14" depending on tires.
•The graphics on the production models will be different than that which is pictured above.

Learn more about the Mojo HD here.

As you can see there are some exciting things happening over at Ibis Bicycles right now and moving forward. You can be sure that we'll be getting our greasy paws on a Mojo HD in the new year, so stay tuned to see where we take it!

-Tyler "Brule" Maine
Must Read This Week









74 Comments

  • + 26
 Ha ha ha, I like the picture quote "Brian riding a Tranny". LOL
Oh ya, two of the sweetest rigs I could picture!
  • + 3
 yeah, nice bikes and a good article. But seriously, you either gotta be super rich, or smooth like Lopes to consider using a carbon Tranny as your DJ bike!
  • + 2
 Is his Tranny a one-off? The seams of the junctions on the seatstay and behind the BB look too flush for the rear end to be detachable. Maybe it's just me, but I don't think I'll dare use stock Trannies for dirtjumping, no matter if I ride as smooth as Lopes or not, and I know I don't. But not to be misconstrued, I do have a soft spot for Ibis. Smile
  • + 2
 yetidj, click on the link under the tranny photos to learn more - you'll see his is a normal production model. It looks so flush because his yoke is slammed up to the BB because he is running a normal derailler and therefore doesn't have to use it to tension a singlespeed chain. I picked up his Tranny and it was VERY light. I wish I had a set of scales on me at the time.
  • + 0
 I realy am so amazed they didnt realy think before naming their bike tranny.
  • + 6
 I don't agree. When you guys break carbon you always come out saying "Oh, I should’ve bought aluminium instead", but if it is aluminium you break, then you say "Oh, I shouldn't have pushed it that hard". Many riders think that carbon fibre, as it is a composite made from different carbon layers, won't withstand as much abuse as aluminium, but it is in fact stiffer (it's no flex at all), stronger (due to the way carbon layers have been put together) and lighter (the strength/ratio is every inch proportionally higher with carbon). About Ibis, I think it is one of the most reliable companies there is out there at the minute. They don't do a big range, but everything they do offer is simple, down to the point and no-nonsense. They also do off-the-peg fixed priced packages so your buy won't break the bank so and so much more as if you bought an ordinary aluminium bike. When Tyler got one of these for himself, I asked him whether he'd chosen it over his Slayer ride, but he said the leverage ratio was far better for the Ibis, most particularly, if you take into account how heavy Tyler was (I think he's shed off a few pounds now). As it all withstands, if you're on carbon you're right on the money son, whether you're a flying guy, an old-school DH racer or just and XC rider. You guys need to do some more research.
  • + 1
 ouch smeckma... don't you think you should put a bit more of your comment into parenthesis Big Grin plagiator!!! Wink

the truth is: CF frames are more fragile to hard hits (like stones) with no regard how they are made (in fact most are made in a same way). That's why Trek and few others start using shielding under downtube and chainstay around BB area in bikes being a subject to gravity oriented use (and the Mojo HD is one of them). Nevertheless even with shielding the weight loss factor is significant.
  • + 1
 What do you mean? If you come from my quote on carbon fibber, I must admit you are in the right, but it is true I've made it my own (the actual quote does not read like that). For the rest, it is all down to common sense isn't it? Say for example my Slayer ride. You know it comes with carbon swingarms. As a matter of fact I've managed to break the chainstay in the end (I am waiting for a replacement) but the carbon piece's never let me down. About off-the-peg deals you only need to visit "ibiscycles.com" and find out for yourself. I am thinking about selling my Slayer ride now and one thing I can tell you about it: this bike is on the top of my shopping list along with just a few others. I never trusted carbon because of its plastic like feeling (and lack of weight) but the more I think about it the more convinced and enthusiastic I become. On another note, Ibis really has it in it in a way other manufactures don't. Not only have their bikes beautiful head angles, but also that they come at good price on average. Ibis gives good value for money. The regular Mojo with X9s and a Fox Talas comes in only at $3,499.99 whereas the SL kit is only $300 difference ($3,799.99) for the same specs.
  • + 1
 No hard feelings man, recently I read exactly this argument in some review for some CF bike, I think it was on Singletrackworld or some review for SC Tallboy. Don't remember Wink I'd love to get the regular Mojo, but whatever you say about the pricing - it kills... I'm not that either that old nor rich to buy it Smile

With your Slayer... poo happens but some manufacturers just allways have had issues, and RM is one of them. At least they are one of those who replace broken stuff without problems
  • + 1
 I know man but exchange rate wise that price sort of halves for us who live in the UK. The only problem is they do apply a 17% import duty tax on it but some people can get around this under conditions (students, cycle-to-work schemes, tax rebates, etc). I don't know what the parity against Euros is, but this is pretty much how it works out as for British pounds.
  • + 1
 that's because you guys colonized the continent with the help of French, then you kicked them out showing them the finger, and when all the homeless from Netherlands came along with slaves from Africa, you agreed to give them independence if they lower the customs tax for you only Big Grin
  • + 1
 But I am from Spain.
  • + 0
 I forgot that you followed Spanish so you didn't need to send suicide expeditions to find the continent, and instead of trying to kill any single native american as spanish did - you cooperated with them - that makes you pretty smart country I guess and one of the good outcomes is cheap bike parts Big Grin
  • + 0
 Well, I guess you can say I am English in a way too. They were all f*ckers with the Spanish Inquisition but contrary to what you would've expected, Spain is nowadays one of the more advanced and foremost countries there is in the world in terms of social policies and human rights (this is along with Canada and California State). About the bike, I don't think it will go with a DHX shock due to its ratio leverage, but apart from that, the frame is spot on.
  • + 1
 Smeckma, your comment of: "(no flex at all)" about the carbon is absolutly wrong... for the fact is, if nothing flexes, then something breaks! All materials flex to a point! Plus look at how many frames use flexing carbon stays to eliminate the rear pivots!
  • + 3
 that's the beauty of carbon depending how you lay the layers you can make i flexible or stiff.
  • + 1
 GT new carbon Fury is the strongest bike they have built - ever. I read an article in a magazine where they broke the handle of a hammer trying to dent the downtube from underneath to simulate the hardest hit from a rock. Carbon can be tough, but most often it is built to be light hence its reputation.

I've had a few carbon frames and wheels and stuff and I love it. When I was a newb to DH I raced a carbon Trek XC bike (9600 pro) for a season and it stood up to the battering just fine.

Generally speaking, carbon can only move in an unintended way (I say unintended as it can be designed to flex) about 1-2% and return but after that it will snap. Aluminum can move a few percent more and return but any more and it will stretch or bend.
  • + 1
 Sure it flexes but the naked eye cannot see it. As a matter of fact, I have seen those Trek videos you guys say, but all impact tests have been shot with high speed cameras because of this. If you say for example that a head angle won't change depending on fork lengths, your statement will be both true and false at the same time. If you go deep into it you will probably realize your statement is wrong from a mathematical point of view but true when it all comes down to practical matters. The fact carbon won't flex is now being taken into account by many car a manufacturer to make the car's outer shell. Tests which have been carried out in the past have shown researchers most clearly how rigid carbon can be at high speed tests, which thing makes it easier for the car to cut through air.
  • + 1
 these are some sweet bikes. Loving the carbon, pretty much everything.
  • + 1
 well GT carbon fury might be "the strongest bike" ever but while being made out of CF it is heavier than some ALU frames so... as long as it is some step in CF DH bikes evolution its good, but as a current DH bike it is basicaly to heavy and to expensive.

BTW to which kind of force resistance do you refer by saying "the strongest"?
  • + 1
 WAKI,

By 'strongest' I'd have to find the article about the bike - I can't even remember which mag or site it came from. I do know that they measured the force needed to either deflect or break the head tube and the Fury took the most amount of force they've seen on any of their bikes - the previous record was held by one of their BMXs - they may not even have busted the headtube. I think BB stiffness was out of sight too.

The bottom line of the interview with the GT dude was that they were concerned about building a carbon DH bike that people would blame the material if it failed, so they made it as strong (in every way) as possible. Even though they could have made the Fury lighter than the Aluminum version and be just as 'strong', they made it the same weight but made it much stronger (stiffer, impact resistent etc) than the Aluminum version.

I expect that when people come to accept carbon DH frames and finally realise the material's benefits, then the manufacturers will start making the DH frames light as well as strong.

I've got a dollar on Giant making a carbon Glory in the not-to-distant future. I'd love to see that because they always want to take weight off the carbon version and the Glory is selling like hotcakes.
  • + 1
 What they claim is that the Fury is 10x stronger than its aluminum counterpart.
  • + 1
 When they say carbon frames are "stronger" than their aluminium counterparts, they're referring to force analysis based upon riding, not crashing. Stresses to chainstays, seatstays, etc which are similar to what is experienced in aggressive riding are what they're referring to... meaning you can hit the same drops and such without worrying that those carbon stays or headtube junction, etc are just gonna snap on you. Santa Cruz actually says the same of their Blur LTc, that it's the strongest bike they've ever made... even stronger than the V10. None of that is meant to refer to direct impacts, particularly from jagged or pointed objects... Unless you have video of someone who "broke the handle of a hammer" hitting a carbon downtube, I call BS...

Bottom line though, I dont care who "claims" what.. the simple fact is that carbon is more prone to damage from direct impacts than nearly ANY alloy material. It's not even debatable, it's a simple fact of the material composition. As far as strength to weight ratio and such, it's considerably stronger but the simple fact that carbon is essentially a woven fabric allows for more material displacement upon direct impacts. Put simply, the "threads" in the carbon can seperate much more easily than the molecules of an alloy material. No lay-up technique or anything else can work around that.
  • + 1
 Now they know how to apply layers on carbon to armour it against likely impacts; but again, I have myself broken bikes on use on the other hand, and not on impact like you say, so the issue can be argued. And don't forget an experienced rider knows how to fall off his bike.
  • + 1
 shielding of CF with different material in crucial areas makes a lot of sense and with that all that's left to say is that is the riders awareness of the fact that this is the characteristic of carbon - you accept it or not. It's like with airsprung forks with travel adjustment. U change travel fast, they are light and you can have good up/downhill performance in one - it's just their reliability issue playing in the back of your head when ramming Ur bike into the braking holes in bikeparks.
  • + 1
 enough with the CF shiat!!! diamonds are made of carbon, and everyone knows they're tough as nails! Razz
  • + 1
 So is human skin Razz lol (we're carbon based life form)
  • + 1
 carbon dioxide can be found in farts
  • + 1
 I never under stood how thay can call us a carbon "BASED" life form, if they say that our bodies are over half water, and there's no carbon in water???

Wouldn't that make us a hydrogen based life form???

Anyone care to explain??? lol
  • + 2
 Carbon forms the basis for ALL life on earth... Carbon supports essentially all of the biological processes which make life life... Critical to this is that it has four valence bonds and the energy required to make or break a bond is at just the right level for building molecules which are not only stable, but also reactive and the way carbon atoms are able to bond readily to other carbon atoms allows for the building of arbitrarily long and complex molecules. When they say 'carbon-based life' they dont mean we're made of Carbon... they mean that without carbon and it's versatility as a backbone molecular structure, life couldnt have evolved. The only other element even readily suggested to be as capable of supporting life is Silicon as it is similar to Carbon and falls on the same group in the periodic table and has four valence bonds as does Carbon... those bonds however are not as suitable to creating complex life supporting molecules and are considerably more stable than Carbon, meaning it would require significantly more energy to break the bonds a realign them in manners which do support the processes associated with life.
  • + 2
 badbadleroybrown please tell us you are a bilogist that rides mtb... otherwise I delete my account a\or at least don't comment anything more as U destroyed my hope in being the biggest smartass from any discipline in here...
  • + 1
 LMAO... No, I'm not a biologist by any measure. I'm actually an IT guy, just read a lot and have an interest in many peculiar subjects, biology among them.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 I had the opportunity to ride a Mojo at heartland forest in victoria, BC - great trails!! but what an awesome bike! It feels like it's got 7 inches of travel, climbs like a scared mountain goat and yet somehow manages to eat steep rock shoots for breakfast!! Just amazing, and a full build is really not a whole lot more expensive than a comparable alloy bike, in some cases less!

Many thanks to Bill at Horus Bikes in Victoria for the bike to try, he has a demo bike in all sizes I believe, so if you're in the area go take one for a spin, it's super fun Smile
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  • + 2
 I'm glad all the carbon haters stay away from it. My bikes have a real advantage in weight, strength, and ride quality. I heard disc brakes will fail, and suspension will be unreliable as well. Avoid change, keep riding steel fully rigids.

BTW, a bike "snapping" from falling over was probably pinned between the car and garage wall previously LOL.I weigh 265 and haven't broken a carbon frame yet. I did break an aluminum bmx frame though.
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  • + 2
 I have used my mojo sl at whistler, the local bike park, raced it in 4x. I have cartwheeled it, and hit a tree with it. With just a change of wheels and petals, I have ridden downhill one day, and xc the next. After a year of abuse, it looks new. None of my aluminum bikes before have held up as well. The mojo sl is the first bike out of the garage for almost every ride. With a joplin remote, and trail/xc wheels, it is 25,4 lbs with petals. This bike climbs almost as well as my 21 lbs carbon hardtail, and will require only one gear higher on any given hill. I will not buy another aluminum bike again. I plan to get a tranny for 4x next season.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 I suppose there might be another forum for this comment.. but...
I love the techy reviews I really do, but what about more reviews on things average riders can afford? Id expect these complete rides are in the 4-5,OOO dollar range, and myself liking to keep a few decent bikes in the stable just cant afford such candy.
I would also like to see just random bike checks instead of always seeing what the pros can and do ride, which is neat mind you, but what about just a pinkbike user bikecheck?
just checking out what, why and where we ride.
Just a thought.
But yes, I also test rode an Ibis mojo and it rocked my world, so big ups to Ibis.
I am shopping for a new big bike for next season but alas can only afford around 2500 or 3 large.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 The bike looks real nice, but having just changed from a 67 Degree head angle to a 66, I have to say that for big mountain biking, the 66 feels so much better.
I had a standard (8.75x2.5) and shorter (8.x2.5) shock for my 6 point. The 8.5x2.5 just feels more planted when you point the bike down.
I wish IBIS had engineered the head tube with changeable headtube cups like the Mondraker does.
  • + 1
 With a totem, which the mojo HD can take, the HA is 66.
  • + 1
 I have a Dh bike as a big bike though, putting a Totem on the IBIS would bring it to close to my Dh bike and the totem is much heavier than a 36 Float which is what this kind of bike suits. I have done the Vpfree/Totem (and 40's, Boxxers).
[Reply]
  • + 1
 ibis mojo's are so nice. but they are carbon fiber. so does that mean that if you dent the carbon you compromise the integrity of the whole frame? Ive always wondered that. If i bought one of these i would be broke, so i wouldn't have anymore money to go out and replace a dented frame.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Thats a sick lineup for 2010. Question, How does your testing work? I noticed in the article you stated when you were looking for your next bike to build and test...Do you have to build them out of your own pockets at PB? Or do manufacturers help you guys out?
  • + 1
 It all varies to be honest, some times we can get a loaner for a review, other times we buy bikes or products that we really want to try out. It's all different.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 for anyone worried about the carbon and still want a long travel (167 mm) trail bike with the dw-link and coming at a respectable 34.4 lbs with dh tires and wheels and 36 TALAS then check out the Pivot Firebird
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  • + 1
 I'd like to see a head-to-head-to-head test of the Mojo, the Enduro carbon and the blur LTc. We hear how sick all these rides are, but relative to what? And a sponsored rider's opinions may be a bit biased, eh?
  • + 4
 ditto - and because not a big carbon fan (yet?) add a Carbon to Aluminum relative feel comparison - add in an Intense Tracer VP, [SS?, UZZI-VP?], or SC-Nomad. Take all the components off each bike and test the same.
'bout time all these knucklehead mfgrs got down to 66-67 head angles with a 150-170mm Fork.
And Kudos to ROCK-SHOX for nailing what I think is best design for axles; 20mm Front Maxle and 135 X 12mm rear Maxle - bye-bye crappy old road bike Tour-de-France developed 9mm. Wink
  • + 1
 I think it would behoove PB to wait until SC releases the carbon Nomad, as the LTc isn't really in the same category as the Enduro Pro Carbon and the Mojo HD.
  • + 1
 Add the Giant Trance X Carbon to that list! Unfortunately for all four of us that won't happen because Brule said in a review recently that they don't do comparisons, they just review them.
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  • + 2
 Arrrr! Why are they filming the dude talking and not the bike! Very frustrating and stupid!
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  • + 2
 awesome. gotta love ibis, gotta love the new HD. looking forward to seeing the final product.
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  • + 1
 Hmmmm... Small Block 8s on the front, El Moco rear. Interesting tire setup.
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  • - 1
 I wonder how many frames Lopes gets through in a year after seeing how many frames one of the European distributors of Ibis had to warranty?!?!
Nice bikes, shame that they're not quite up to the job...
  • + 2
 The first generation Mojos had a problem or two, but the second generation had that fixed. Reliability-wise, the second generation frame is a different animal altogether.
  • + 0
 You think so? Think again, even the road frames fail.
  • + 1
 All frames will fail. I've had a steel DJ frame fail. What I'm saying is that there were some problems with the first generation Mojo that are no longer there. Ibis realized this and fixed the frame accordingly.

I know how many first generation Mojos I've witnessed fail (four) and how many second generation frames fail in the same way (none, and that's from a larger number of units).
  • + 0
 Naw....

My dad is a roadie, he said one of his roadie homies had an Ibis and it fell over (no one on it just bike fell over) and the chainstay snapped

sketchy carbon is sketchy
  • + 0
 Yes, all frames do fail no matter what they're made of and I'm in no way dissing carbon as bad choice of material for a frame, just that Ibis still don't have it quite right!
  • + 1
 Okay. Fair enough.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 Would love to be a tester. Smile Awesome looking bikes and great reviews!!
[Reply]
  • + 2
 When will we be able to get our hands on a Mojo HD? I want one.
  • + 1
 No release date at this time, just close and soon were all I could get from the boys Ibis, as I too am looking forward to giving one a root.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 No ISCG tabs? Thats a big mistake surely?
  • + 1
 It's hard to offer ISCG tabs on carbon frames because of the difficulty with bracing aluminum against carbon. Specialized holds the patent for the best design right now, so Ibis can't get their mitts on it.
  • + 2
 I prefer non-iscg chainguides. Let the chainguide rotate around the BB in a hit, and let the big hits be absorbed by the bb or chainring/rockring - in a big hit I would prefer to break a BB or a crank or whatever than my frame. Especially a carbon frame.

If you keep making parts stronger, eventually you get to a point where the thing that breaks is most expensive. ISCG is on that path. Bruce Lee would not have run ISCG: "Be like water, my friends."
  • + 1
 Of course, if you want to run a Hammerschmidt or Tribewerk, without ISCG you might be screwed.

[Edit] I'm guessing that ISCG adapters only rely on friction to counter the torque of a Hammerschmidt or Tribewerk and so won't work.

Anyone have experience with multi-speed crankset and an ISCG adapter?
  • + 2
 There is no way to run Hammerschmidt without ISCG, so there's no "might be" when it comes to being screwed.

I much prefer ISCG mounts to the alternative. When a non-iscg chainguide takes a hit and rotates around the bb, it will eventually rotate so far that it will smash into the chainstay. When it butts up against the stay, every hit it takes from then on will be damaging to the frame.
  • + 1
 One of the reasons that Ibis is not using ISCG tabs is because of the shape of their chain stays - I HammerSchmidt would in fact not clear the stays as the ring is too short. I think that we'll see some clever mounting that will involved the lower pivot / bolt area on the HD.
  • + 1
 IMO Ibis should resolve the HammerSchmidt incompatibility issue. HS is a requirement for my next bike. A slightly slacker head angle would be my preference, too -- 66 deg. or so. The "front wheel wanders on climbs" complaint is so oft repeated and so absurd to me.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 a lot of carbon.........
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  • + 1
 i love the hard tail
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  • + 1
 carbon bike for dj :/
  • + 2
 People said the same thing when the bike industry was going from Steel to Alum. People have to remember that carbon can be a lot of different things. From a very thin wall super light road frame... to an impact resistant, super strong member of an Air Bus. Carbon has been used as a very light weight material in the bike industry for some time. Within the next few years we will all get to learn just how strong and robust it can be as well. FYI... The skid plate for high end trophy trucks is made from carbon. It is from a lay-up and coating that is specifically designed to take rock hits at over 100 mph.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Ibis is tight
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