Lapierre DH-720 Review

Aug 30, 2011
by Mike Levy  
 
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  Lapierre's DH-720 is built around the same frame that is used by the Lapierre International DH Team and is designed as a race bike to get you down the mountain as quick as possible.

Lapierre DH-720 details:

• Rear wheel travel: 200mm
• Adjustable head angle: 63/64 degrees
• Unidirectional carbon fiber swingarm
• Uses Lapierre's Pendbox suspension system
• Internal cable routing
• Built in fork bumpers
• Weight: 39lbs 11oz (w/o pedals)
• MSRP $5199 USD


Lapierre caused a stir last season when there debuted their new downhill bike, forgoing the virtual pivot design of the previous model for a single pivot, linkage activated layout that incorporates their interesting Pendbox floating bottom bracket system. The new bike not only looks drastically different, but it also proved to be quite capable under Cam Cole, Sam Blenkinsop and the rest of the Lapierre International DH Team, taking some impressive podium placings in its maiden season. But you don't have to be a World Cup threat to get your paws on the French flier, with Lapierre offering two complete builds to us mere mortals, the DH Team that resembles the spec used by the Cole and Blenki, and the less expensive DH-720 that we test here. If you want to go custom you can purchase the frame by itself and build it up to suit your style and local tracks.


  The DH-720's high pivot sits just slightly above the top of the bike's 38 tooth ring, and the Fox DHX RC2 damper is controlled via a linkage that allows Lapierre to attain the suspension leverage that they are looking for. The design looks quite different than what can be found on other bikes, but it is executed cleanly and functions in a similar manner, but the interesting bits have to be viewed from the non-drive side...

  Lapierre's Pendbox suspension consists of a floating bottom bracket shell that moves forward (once past the sag point) as the bike goes through its travel, working in the opposite way that other floating BB bikes have done in the past.

Pendbox explained: Viewed from the drive side the Lapierre looks to use a fairly standard single pivot swingarm and linkage driven shock arrangement, but what you can't see from that angle is the heart of the beast, its Pendbox suspension system. In a nutshell, Pendbox consists of a floating bottom bracket that is attached to the front triangle and swingarm via a series of sealed bearing pivots and a compact link. As the bike goes through its travel past the sag point, the bottom bracket shell actually shifts forward slightly, Lapierre says that it moves about 5mm, to increase the distance between the rear axle and itself. There have been a number of floating BB bikes available in the past, yet all of them have worked in the opposite manner in an effort to limit the chain's effect on the suspension - so, the question that you're likely asking yourself is why would Lapierre design a system that increases chain tension, even if it is ever so slightly, as the bike goes into its travel? This is an interesting question given the common train of thought that says you generally want your suspension to be independent of chain torque, especially if that action may look like it keeps the suspension from doing its job.

The answer, according to Lapierre, is that you want just the right amount of chain torque to help the bike pedal well. Too much and the suspension won't be able to properly absorb the bumps, too little and you'll find that it will pedal like a slug. In fact, many well known designs have a certain amount of chain growth designed into them for this exact purpose. The Lapierre DH bike has been engineered with World Cup racing in mind, a place where ultimate suspension performance can't be sacrificed for pedaling behavior, or vise versa. A tall order indeed...


Lapierre DH-720
  The DH-720 uses the same frame as the Team model and Lapierre has incorporated a number of interesting details. clockwise from top left: Fork bumpers are integrated into the frame to ensure that they are always in the correct position in the event of a crash, and a small fender is bolted to the underside of the down tube to help keep the spray off the pilot's goggles. Replaceable dropouts bolt to the bike's carbon swingarm, and it is nice to see that the bike comes with a proper aluminum axle out back. The long center section of the swingarm is constructed from unidirectional carbon and lacks the cosmetic weave finish that would only add weight. The seat binder bolt is integrated directly into the frame, something that has been seen on BMX and road bikes for many years, and makes for a clean look.

Sturdy, not flashy, spec: The DH-720 is the more affordable of the two complete downhill bikes that they offer, coming off the shelf with a mix of competent components that are designed to last, if not be overly flashy. An adjustable RockShox BoXXer RC fork is fitted up front, mated to a Fox DHX RC2 shock that should go about its job without a fuss. Both units are coil sprung and feature basic compression and rebound adjustments that offer a wide range of tuning on hand.

The drivetrain is a bit of a mix, including parts from SRAM, Shimano, e.13 and FSA in the form of their burly Gravity Moto X DH cranks. Funn looks after the cockpit with their solid looking RSX MKII direct mount stem and Fatboy DH bar, although its 750mm width may not appease those who are used to some of the more current, massively bars that are out there. While the bike's component selection is eclectic, it all looks to be chosen wisely without any unnecessarily expensive items to raise the bike's $5199 USD asking price.


Specifications
Release Date 2011
Price $5199
Travel 200mm
Rear Shock Fox DHX RC2 240x76mm
Fork RockShox BoXXer RC
Headset Alu S-Integrated Cartridge
Cassette Shimano HG61 11x28 9speed
Crankarms FSA Gravity Moto X DH (170mm) w/ 38T ring
Chainguide e.13
Bottom Bracket Integrated BB
Rear Derailleur SRAM X9 mid cage 9speed
Shifter Pods SRAM X9 9speed
Handlebar FUNN Fatboy DH 15x750 Black
Stem FUNN RSX MKII Bolt On
Brakes Formula RX w/ 203mm rotors
Wheelset Alex FR32 w/ Lapierre hubs
Tires Hutchinson Cougar 2.6 Barracuda 2.5 UST
Seat Syncros FL Black CroMo
Seatpost Lapierre Light 31.6x250



Lapierre DH-720 geo

Tailored handling: Lapierre has included a built-in head angle adjustment via an internal sleeve that allows a full degree of change, from 64° to 63°, if the conditions demand it. While they certainly are not the first or last to use this type of system, it is nice because it isolates the steering adjustments from other factors, especially changes in suspension dynamics that could take place if the adjustment had been incorporated into the linkage.




Mike Levy testing the Lapierre
  The Lapierre's inspired pedaling feel encourages you to find places to put a pedal stroke or two in, rewarding you with more momentum through the next section.

Putting the power down: Any downhill bike worth its salt has to not only tame the terrain, but also pedal extremely well. The Lapierre doesn't disappoint when the time comes to put down the power. In fact, I would argue that the French race rig stands head and shoulders above the competition in this regard - the bike simply accelerates bang on, no fuss and no wasted effort. Swapping back and forth between other machines that are themselves known to pedal quite well, doing short sprints on both rough and smooth ground, it was easy to feel that the DH-720 simply had more jump to it than the others. A lot of song and dance is made about how certain bikes corner well (or don't), and this is no doubt a huge factor in a bike's performance, but it is easy to forget that a potent pedaling bike can be just as much of an advantage given the right course, especially on those short tracks that make you pay for the smallest of mistakes.

As impressive as the pedaling was, and it was truly stunning, the Lapierre never felt harsh when sprinting over rough ground as you might expect. The rear end seemed to be free to do its thing, track the terrain, and didn't feel the least bit upset about it all. It only took a few minutes aboard the DH-720 to see that there certainly is something to the Pendbox design.

What about that moving BB? The question that I was asked the most when on the Lapierre is if I could feel the bottom bracket move as the bike went through its travel. The short answer is no, I most certainly could not. The total movement adds up to just 5mm at full travel, an insignificant amount when you include all of the other factors in the picture: tire pressure, suspension movement, flex, not to mention the fact that the bike will be at full travel when the bottom bracket has moved to its most forward position, meaning that you'll be most likely concentrating on the trail ahead and whatever hit just bottomed the bike out. While I never once felt the slight change in bottom bracket position (and even I'll admit that I can be notoriously sensitive), another tester swore that he could. At the risk of offending him, I am going to go ahead and say that it must have been a bit of a placebo effect. In other words, if he wasn't aware of the 5mm change, he wouldn't have '"felt" it either.

But isn't it complicated? Not counting the shock mounting, there are seven pivot points on the Lapierre, each one using sealed bearings, which is certainly more than many other designs out there. Is that a bad thing? Certainly not if the bike can stand up to the abuse without an excess amount of maintenance required. Sure, all bikes need some love and care, but who wants to be rushing about after practice or before a race run to sort out their bike? Thankfully, that won't be an issue with the Lapierre - we never once had to tighten or look after any of the bike's suspension hardware from new.


Mike Levy testing the Lapierre
  Testing the DH-720 in Nelson, B.C.. The Lapierre begged to be slid into corners, taking advantage of its stunning pedaling ability to power out of them.

In the corners: The DH-720, while gobbling up rough terrain with ease, took a different approach when it came to carving corners. There are some bikes that simply want to turn, but the Lapierre takes a bit more effort to get around bends. While we can't say for sure why, we suspect the bike's somewhat tall bar height, combined with the Fox shock's position high in the frame, played a part in this. Did it slow the bike down? Not likely, especially once we became familiar with what it took to get the most out of the DH-720. It isn't a bike that rewards a neutral and relaxed position, but rather it wants you to get over the front and throw your weight around and lean into corners more than you might at first. The rear of the bike doesn't rate too highly in the stiffness category, flexing a noticeable amount in the rough, but seemed happy to follow the front around when using this technique.

You'd be mistaken for thinking that I'm taking the DH-720 to task for its corner working skills, that isn't the case. Just like any other expensive toy, be it a pair of running shoes or an expensive sports car, different downhill bikes will respond differently when pushed to the limit. The Lapierre can get through those corners just as fast as any other top tier race bike, just ask Blenkinsop or Cam Cole, but this isn't a machine that will perform at its best under a timid rider. Jump aboard the DH-720, grab the bike by its horns and throw it around a bit. You'll discover a fun, fast bike that rewards aggressive riding.


Mike Levy testing the Lapierre
  The DH-720 is shod with a RockShox BoXXer RC fork up front and a Fox DHX RC2 out back, both of which are easy to tune and can look after business when it gets serious.

Suspension for the people: The DH-720 is the less expensive option of Lapierre's two complete bikes (there is a frame only option as well), and as such it comes with suspension units there are a few steps down from what you'll find had you spent more money. But don't worry too much, they don't hold the bike back in the slightest. Up front is the RockShox BoXXer RC, a coil sprung slider with easy to understand compression and rebound controls. The 8" travel RC uses the same chassis as its lighter and more expensive brothers, but comes fitted with a simpler Motion Control IS damper that lets you dial in both low speed compression and rebound. The RC fork came to life after a short break-in period that saw it go from out-of-the-box to slippery smooth within a few rides. While this may be RockShox's 'budget' BoXXer, it didn't flinch when it was time to get rowdy on the Lapierre and didn't have any issues keeping up to the terrain. The adjustments, particularly the low speed compression, are so effective that care has to be taken to not go overboard on the settings. Make your damping changes one click at a time and you'll arrive at a setting that is sure to work well for you.

The Fox DHX RC2 shock felt well matched to the Lapierre's rear end, which tracked rough ground in a controlled manner. Although the rear of the bike occasionally felt as if it wanted to snag on large holes more than I would have expected, a trait that no amount of shock tuning seemed to remedy, it was wonderful at simply going about its job. Because the bike pedals so well, not requiring any band-aid shock tuning, the rear end could be left as active as possible to deal with the roots, rocks and chatter. The bike was supple enough on top as to surely help traction when conditions were lose and marbly, but stiffened up gradually enough throughout its stroke to prevent a harsh bottom.

The Lapierre's suspension, while looking complicated, uses dampers that certainly don't require a Ph.D in tuning to get the most out of it, a plus for those who are more interested in going fast than talking compression and rebound settings in the lift lineup.


What about those parts?

• The SRAM shifter and rear derailleur, once again, moved the chain through the gears absolutely flawlessly. The bike's X9 running gear may be two steps down from their premier group, but you won't know it by how it performs.

• The Hutchinson Cougar and Barracuda tires were a near unknown to me prior to riding the DH-720, but I was never let down. No flats, no tears and awesome traction all around. As is always the tradeoff, they were showing more wear than I would have expected after just a few weeks of solid riding.

• The Formula RX brakes have power to spare and were silent during my time on the bike, but the feel at the lever was a bit indefinite for my liking. The bite point was firm, but more modulation would be appreciated.

• The Fox DHX RC2 damper certainly isn't going to get people too excited, which is too bad given its excellent and consistent feel. Yes, it is short a few dials compared to the RC4. No, you likely won't be missing them. Sort out your spring rate, the sole rebound and compression dials and get on with it.

• The DH-720 sits differently than the current crop of 'lower is better' thinkers. The Funn bars (which have a very comfortable bend and sweep to them) sit relatively high, and are attached to the bike via a sturdy looking Funn RSX MKII bolt-on stem, both of which put the controls a bit taller than I have come to expect. The tall position is ideal if you are a taller rider or spend your saddle time on steep tracks, but I can see others wanting the grips a bit lower.


Mike Levy testing the Lapierre
  Mike Levy aboard the Lapierre DH-720 high above Silverton, B.C.

Pinkbike's take:
bigquotesWhile some bikes can be ridden in a neutral manner, allowing anyone to feel at home quickly, the Lapierre is a different animal. The 8" travel bike can no doubt be ridden well by most anyone, but it will do best under a pilot who is willing to hang it out a bit, spray some dirt and not be afraid to show the bike where to go. Pedaling is the bike's specialty, and it does it with an eagerness that we've never seen from a downhill bike, let alone something with an inch or two less travel - mind blowing, really. The DH-720 is an ideal choice if you race on tracks that feature a solid amount of pedaling, although any assertive rider will have a blast aboard the Lapierre. - Mike Levy




Have you ridden Lapierre's downhill bike? Share your thoughts on the French flier below!


Visit the Lapierre website to see their entire lineup.


88 Comments

  • + 57
 Certainly one of the most aesthetically pleasing DH sleds imo. And being a beast that performs certainly won't hurt. tup
Amazing writeup Mike.
  • - 139
 pleasing? IMO one of the ugliest and complicated GT I-Drive system ripoff.
  • + 31
 i-drive ripoff or i-drive improvement? i'd say improvement.good job guys nice bike
  • + 5
 i think it looks stunning as well. Ive yet to see a review where someone doesnt claim whatever is being reviewed is just a rip off of something else. Give it a rest bud.
  • + 7
 @viatch, everyone has their own taste in terms of frame design/looks. If its ugly for you fine; but I'd take it over a Fury, ANY DAY. So shush Blank Stare
  • + 3
 Agree with your first sentence, not sure about the second. Sick bike regardless Smile
  • + 2
 I respect that Big Grin
  • + 2
 Looks fantastic imho. And although it looks like i-drive, it works differently. The two shouldnt be confused...
  • + 2
 Wheelbase?

Theres no wheel base at the geo ..
  • + 1
 in pair with Devince Wilson is the most gorgeous and original frame on the market :love:
  • + 2
 The bottom bracket looks high... But I make maybe a mistake but it looks like it is...
  • + 1
 I know a few people with these and they seem to like them, but there is a ridiculous amount of sideways flex in the back end- 2 of the guys with them have big black marks on the swingarm from where its been hitting the crank! However they do have some tidy looking features like the intergrated seatclamp and that disc protector
  • + 1
 my mate had to test one for sram/dirt and it cracked after 3 days out in France, they have a carbon back end which cracks, Cam Cole at the bottom of Fort William jumped into the bottom of the pit bit right? Well, his chainstays where hanging off in the pits from where he had done that in race runs haha
  • + 1
 I know of pretty average riders that have crack the back ends on these things Smile Pretty bikes no doubt , but looks count for f*ck all when you are in a tough game
  • + 2
 I was talking to someone about getting one of these but said the carbon rear end makes me hesitant. Call me naive, but I am not sold on carbon for harsh riding yet. Looks like I am not wrong.
  • + 1
 mate came back from two weeks in france and had worn through the swingarm where it flexed and rubbed on his cranks. Seems like it needs a wee design review!
  • + 1
 so in conclusion, should i hire one of these for 99 euros in morzine tomorrow or go with the santa cruz demo 8 for 83?
  • + 2
 You mean Specialized Demo 8? Or Santa Cruz Driver 8? And the answer is if you are just renting it, get the Lapierre. You dont have to worry about wearing it out and having to pay for replacment parts. You just get to enjoy it.
  • + 1
 yeah i realized that as soon as i logged off. i meant the driver 8. i got the driver and it was mint. really good at corning and i didn't feel shit even in the rootiest parts of Morzine.
  • + 2
 Super Manzine is for men, its so roots it blows your face apart
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  • + 7
 Interesting review. I've never really been sold on Lapierre.

My main gripe is the linkage, I'm a big believer in reliability > performance. I don't mean sacrificing one for the other, but I believe they are worthless without one another. This is obviously a pure race bike and as such is going to require tedious maintenance anyway but SEVEN pivots points excluding the shock mounts is ludicrous and I dread owning and working on something that convoluted. Every pivot is something to wear out and develop play. Play in rear suspension on a bike with so many linkages (and is already behind in the stiffness department) would be a nightmare in my opinion. YMMV though, like all bikes.

I will admit they look the goods though... the French touch at it again.
  • + 1
 To add to the good look discussion... would a saint groupo (or parts as necessary) add to the bling colour combination or would it take it too far? The colour scheme is perfect for Saint but would it be too much?
  • + 3
 Supposedly the extra pivots of the pendbox suffer very little wear and tear due to the tiny amount of movement in them, only a few degrees in rotation, where as a normal pivot is probably doing a lot more than that. Thats what Ive read anyway.
  • + 1
 here's the 1st Lapierre DH bike i've ever seen...its the Lapierre BlackDH and i;m still riding mine...its a great bike... =D

panchoy.pinkbike.com/album/my-DH-bike
  • + 1
 Stiffness isn't an issue for the pros, but a mere mortal like me is certainly sceptical in the longevity department...

As for looks, the folks at Lapierre certainly have taste. Saint would probably look sweet but its a matter of opinion really. I personally like to mix things up i.e. I'm ordering red Royal Blast shorts to wear with my blue Blast jersey. Some people will think its friggin' sweet, others might think I'm off my rocker. Personally, I love the design but don't want to look like a smurf... In the end, it's all about taste Wink
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  • + 6
 Owned one of these for a couple weeks now. The pedaling is unreal, it feels like a hardtail while standing sprinting. Everyone who has a raz at local tracks is amazed by that. Eats rough stuff, looks stunning, and does corner better than any bike I have owned. Not many other bikes I would want right now. I like the fact the money is in the frame, because this was my price limit and Id rather be able to slowly upgrade over a couple years than be stuck with cheaper frame.
  • + 1
 I tried one out this morning for ten minutes, back to back with a 2013 Glory 2. I have to agree with you about the pedalling efficiency of this frame, unreal. I'd say it feels like a hardtail, but it's still absorbing the bumps. It feels like a hardtail on a smooth surface, when actually you're on an 8" travel bike on rocks. Unreal.

The Glory on the other hand, with the new 63 degree head angle, felt like a dog. I felt like half of my energy was wasted in bob, the front end was very distant (Small size) and the bloody linkage kept twatting the inside of my knees.

It has made me respect Danny Hart even more. Not only does he get loose as diarrhea, but he does it on that shit box of a bike. Cam cole and Loic Bruni, on the other hand, are underperforming on a vastly superior bike.
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  • + 3
 The author isn't sure why it requires aggression to corner- look no further than the head angle. The tradeoff of slack angles for stability is less agility with cornering. The other factors mentioned are influences as well, but head angle is probably the most significant factor in cornering, with center of gravity being #2.
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  • + 1
 When the author comments on the Boxxer RC, he states ''The 8" travel RC uses the same chassis as its lighter and more expensive brothers'' - But the Race (6.35lbs) is actually lighter than the Team (6.63lbs). Small point, but thats one nice thing about the Race, if you can live without the extra dials.
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  • + 1
 I love mine. You can definitely feel the flex in the rear end but I find a bit of flex can help with keeping it under control when u break traction I find if its too stiff once it lets go its good luck if you get it back. Its a dh bike not a freeride bike! If you want to hit big road gaps and shit like that get a mountain cycle shockwave and try ur hardest to snap it but if your gonna race dh I wouldnt worry about it and give it a go cause its a fast bike that feels more comfortable giving it everything you got to get it down that hill as fast as you can. And as for the cranks touching the swing arm id need a photo to believe it. 'Personally I think ur full of shit' (this section is for opinion right?)
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  • + 1
 Raddest bikes ever, gets all the looks. If you're in New Zealand and interested in one of these I cant sort you out with a brand new one from BikeTech NZ (my sponsor) for under 6000NZD, which is a freakn good deal compared to the RRP.
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  • + 2
 "this isn't a machine that will perform at its best under a timid rider". Are there DH bikes that reward timid riders? Wouldn't that be like a sword designed for people with a fear of blood?
  • + 2
 Don't take the comment out of context dude. No bike 'rewards' a timid rider in any discipline. He's trying to say a rider who is say a weekend warrior or not the most experienced or greatest rider is going to almost be disadvantaged riding the Lapierre as opposed to something more mainstream and less specific in it's characteristics like a Glory or Demo.
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  • + 1
 i find it odd that they used a carbon swing arm and an aluminum front triangle. why did they use a carbon swing arm? even santa cruz had doubts using a carbon swing arm before they fully converted to carbon. any ideas?
  • + 1
 Because it lowers the unsprung weight of the suspension, thus improving performance. This is the ideal set up if your going to have half the bike being carbon, obviously in a real world most manufacturers would be worried about possible damage to a carbon rear end.
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  • + 1
 I was thinking about changeing my sunday for one, but i have a zesty and im going on my 3rd frame due to cracks, they make great bikes but they don't last, I think a demo8 or a TR 450 will be my new DH bike
  • + 1
 I think the Demo would be a better option than a TR450. TRs are overpriced for the tech you get. The Lapierre rides a lot better than the TR too. Not sure about the Demo, they ride very well. Maybe not better than this though.
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  • + 2
 Not keen on the price for the parts spec. I'm guessing that the frame+shock and fork make up the majority of that price choice.
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  • + 1
 Im thinking of changing my Norco Shore for one of these,but im worried about the frame issues,ie them snapping. Im 6ft 4 and 16 stone,is this gona the frame issue even worse? Cheers Jack
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  • + 1
 Great looking frame. Now, I see Lapierre lists dealers in the U.S. but aren't most of the other bikes in their line utilizing a Horst link design? What's the status of this? Is Specialized's patent finally up?
  • + 0
 The rest of Lapierre's trail bikes (froggy/spicy/zesty) use a design that infringes on the VPP patent in the US, not the Horst/Specialized patent. Santa Cruz and Lapierre settled their patent dispute by letting Santa Cruz have the US and Lapierre the rest of the world, which makes me sad as the trail bikes get rave reviews across the pond.
  • + 2
 That is not true. Their old bikes with fps2 suspension had problems with Santa VPP patent - ie their old dh bike and enduro bike. Froggy, Spicy, Zesty are FSR bikes. FFS look at them. They are horst linked 4 bar bikes. Also it wasnt really settled - santa still sells their bikes in europe so dont spread false information. The reason they are allowed to sell their fsr and vpp bikes outside of the us is that those patents are US only.
  • + 2
 Lapierre doesn't use FSR completely, the upper link rotates in different direction, though in general it's the same shyte.

Lately it came to me that apparently Merida uses "VPP" system in their UMF bikes bauahah
www.tri-ride.com/en/bike-industry/merida-umf-gravity-bikes-2012

WhoCares suspension inluding FkThat linkage are the future I think
  • + 1
 Waki - the fsr patent was pretty wide from what i remember. Same for many older patents
  • + 4
 I must agree with Jehova Witnesses here: "why can't we just stop seeing the differences between us (like patents) and start loving each other"

We are all confused... on the fifth day when Izaak made the full suspension bicycle, god saw his making and thought it was good. Galgameh who was a confused man, having a wife, a father of two, yet finding pleasure looking at naked men, a stepbrother to Izaak, heard gods voice and felt jelaous. As his soul became weak of that sin thought, the dark spirit spoke within him: make 4 pivots instead of 1 and god will cherish your design better. But god knew that Galgameh was confused and didn't like him very much, yet liked the bottomless feel of the design. And said to Galgameh, that even though even Galgameh is a human a design of himself, he disgusts him greatly, yet the bottomless faux bar is great indeed. Then the devil spoke to Izaak while he was shaving his scrotum in hiding: god liked Galgamehs design more, you need to work out one that pedals better. And then he made one, and god got angry that his children allowed their souls to get confused by the filthy dark spirit Master Baeshon. Yet he liked the designs so he didn't want to destroy them, but decided to make them not understandable to anyone who wants to possess them, even Tom Cruise. He also made these friends fight against each other using strange acronyms fro whom no one understood sht. Like Very Piccolo Pehnis, Fkn Stupid Rambling or DubleWanking link
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  • + 1
 Built in bumpers for the forks and replaceable drop outs may be interesting, but it's not at all new. Still a great article tho. Just wished we would've spent a little more time on the floating bracket setup.
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  • + 2
 they look awesome and ride well but they break very easily i have seen about 5 broken frames cracked at the linkage system but still love the design just needs strengthening
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  • + 1
 Has anyone got any reports on problems cracks etc? pics would be appreciated picking one up on Monday so need to know, have been told they snap as well?
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  • + 2
 The question that doesn't get answered in the review is can you feel all that extra chain torque in the pedals?
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  • + 2
 Well , cainstays that elongate and flexy rear end.
The question is, would you buy it?
  • + 3
 I did buy it..
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  • + 1
 Wow this a real nice looking race frame. Those little push links are a bit sketchy for us weekend warriors but overall a solid bike.
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  • + 2
 The old one ate up bumps like no other. so hopefully this one is just as good!
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  • + 1
 Does anyoe know if they are also making one in the old chrome silver colour? I loved that colour more than this white
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  • + 0
 They don't get called Snapierre for nothing. The World team go through frames like inner tubes. An awful lot of people don't like the way they ride either.
  • + 2
 why don't you like the way they ride!? They ride fast! Thats all that matters
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  • + 1
 That down tube is mental. respect for the designer and CAD guy for drafting that.
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  • + 0
 Can anybody help? I'm getting one of these this week but want to fit my saint crank arms, will the BB7141a take them? cheers....
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  • + 0
 pedals really well, but of course we won't mention the massive amount of pedal feedback... -.-
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  • + 1
 Nice looking rig for sure !!
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  • + 0
 So pretty sure I watched one of these snap off the road gap at windham this year
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  • + 1
 This bike appears to be BANANAS!
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  • + 1
 1 OF THE NICEST BIKES AROUND Wink
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  • + 1
 Bad Ass! But it's no TR450!
  • + 1
 When was the last TR450 on the podium in mens WC DH?
  • + 1
 who cares? not me!
  • + 2
 TRs are overpriced and overrated.
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  • + 1
 i'm super happy with it. top bike
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  • + 1
 Thats so fuc#$%ing SEXY !
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  • + 1
 That rig looks like fun waiting to happen.
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  • + 1
 that bike is so great!
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  • + 1
 its turning Orange...
  • + 1
 true but still al ot different
  • + 4
 @slamman - How so? Besides the single pivot swingarm it is completely different suspension design to the production Oranges.
  • + 2
 I prefer apples.
  • + 1
 mmm, I want an apple now
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  • + 1
 for this prize is ok xD
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  • + 0
 7 pivots. Must you say much more? Over it already.
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