Norco Sight Carbon 7.1 - Review

Jan 27, 2014
by Mike Kazimer  
 
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REVIEWED
Norco Sight Carbon 7.1

WORDS Mike Kazimer
PHOTOS Colin Meagher

Back in 2012, Norco first introduced the Sight as an aluminum framed, 26” wheeled trail bike with 140mm of travel. In keeping with the changing tides of the mountain bike marketplace, 2013 saw the launch of the 27.5” version, and now, for 2014, the popular trail bike is available with a carbon fiber frame. According to Norco, going with carbon fiber allowed for a 25% reduction in frame weight, a savings that had our size large test bike weighing in at a very reasonable 26.6 pounds. There are four possible build kits for the Sight, two of which employ a single ring, 1x11 drivetrain. We tested the 7.1, which retails for $5252 USD. The base model carbon version is $3545, and alloy versions are still available starting at $2409.


Norco Sight Carbon 7.1 Details

• Purpose: Trail
• Rear-wheel travel: 140mm
• Wheel size: 27.5"
• Full carbon front triangle, seat stays, aluminum chain stays,
• 12 x 142mm rear axle
• ISCG 05 tabs
• Weight: 26.6 lbs (size L, without pedals)
• Sizes: S, M, L, XL
• MSRP: $5252 USD



Frame Details

Norco's Sight Carbon is a bike that looks fast standing still, attracting the attention of more than a few riders whenever we rolled up to the trailhead on it. The black
and fluorescent yellow paint job draws the viewer's eye from the generously sloping top tube all the way back to the chain stays in one continuous motion, and the 1x11 drivetrain combined with internal cable routing helps to maintain the clean and sleek aesthetic.

The frame's front triangle and seat stays are constructed from carbon fiber, while the chain stays are made from aluminum for additional durability. For their carbon fiber construction, Norco uses a process they call 'SmoothCore', which the company says helps eliminate any potential wrinkles in the material during the layup, and creates a frame that is as smooth and finished looking on the inside as it is on the outside. The process isn't just for looks though, and this extra attention to detail is meant to improve the frame's strength to weight ratio. Joining the carbon seat stays to the rear shock is a one piece aluminum link arm, a design that's meant to increase the bike's lateral and torsional rigidity.

2014 Norco Sight
  The Sight's frame is packed with features, including a downtube protector and a spare derailleur hanger bolt for those less-than-graceful bike handling moments, along with internal cable routing to prevent any unsightly rat's nests of housing.

A tapered head tube, ISCG tabs, and a BB92 press fit bottom bracket ensure that the Sight's frame design fits right in with the current crop of all-mountain and trail machines. Norco uses Syntace's X-12 thru axle to secure the rear wheel, a system that uses an aluminum pinch bolt to hold on the derailleur hanger. This aluminum bolt is designed to break before the derailleur hanger does in the event of a hard enough impact, hopefully saving the derailleur and the hanger from costly damage. Thoughtfully, a spare bolt is threaded into the downtube of the Sight's frame should it ever be needed. The bike's cable routing is well managed, with the brake, shift, and dropper post housing all tucked nicely inside the frame. We did find that the internal cable guides had a tendency to come loose from their press fit perches in the frame, slightly detracting from the bike's polished looks. A frame protector is in place on the underside of the frame to ward off rock strikes, and there is an integrated chain stay guard to muffle any chain slap noise.

  Norco's Holloform linkarm activates the Fox Float CTD rear shock, and Syntace's X-12 thru axle system keeps the rear end stiff and secure.


Geometry and Suspension Design


The Sight uses Norco's Gravity Tune geometry, a principle originally developed for their downhill racers. In short, Gravity Tune ensures that the balance between a bike's front and rear center remains consistent between all frame sizes. If you look at the geometry chart, you'll notice that the chain stay measurement increases slightly with each size. This is accomplished through changes in the front triangle geometry - as the top tube gets longer with each size, the bottom bracket moves forward, ensuring that the front center to rear center ratio remains the same.

The Sight's suspension design uses what Norco calls Advanced Ride Technology (A.R.T.), the company's take on a four bar linkage. The positioning of the rear pivot below the rear axle allows this suspension layout to be relatively unaffected by braking forces, and the rearward axle path is claimed to improve square edged bump performance. For their pivot hardware, Norco uses an expanding collet system that helps ensure that the bearing races are loaded evenly. A tapered shaft slides through a collet at each bearing, and when it is tightened down the assembly expands, uniformly loading the entire race.


Specifications
Price $5252
Travel 140mm
Rear Shock Fox Float CTD Performance B/V
Fork Rockshox Revelation RLT 140 mm travel
Headset FSA Orbit C-40-ACB
Cassette Sram XG 1195 10-42 11 speed cassette
Crankarms SRAM X1 X Sync hollow forged w/ 32 T
Bottom Bracket SRAM X1 PF BB92
Rear Derailleur SRAM X01
Chain SRAM PC XX1
Shifter Pods SRAM X01
Handlebar Race Face Turbine 760mm
Stem Race Face Turbine stem
Grips Ergon GA1 EVO
Brakes Sram Elixir Trail 7
Hubs DT 350 XX1 rear hub
Spokes DT Champion black stainless steel spokes
Rim Sun Inferno 25
Tires Maxxis Ardent 27.5 x 2.25 EXO
Seat WTB Volt Race with chromoly rails
Seatpost Rockshox Reverb Stealth 30.9 mm
2014 Norco Sight




Riding the Sight Carbon 7.1


bigquotes'Precise' best sums up the Sight's handling in technical terrain. The stiff carbon frame went a long way towards keeping it on track even when faced with sections of trail that required threading the needle through sharp rocks and even sharper cactus.

Climbing and Fit

The first thing we did before hitting the trails was to swap out the 90mm Race Face Turbine stem that our size large test rig came equipped with. For us, that's almost double the length we prefer, and in all honesty, we can't see why any modern mountain bikes are still showing up with stems over 70mm. It's become a refrain that we'll keep repeating until it's no longer an issue: short stems and wide bars are better. Period. Luckily, the Sight comes with a 760mm Race Face bar, so half of our cockpit preference was already met.

With a sub-27 pound fighting weight and a stiff carbon frame, the Sight was a quick climber, and made short work of the stepped rocky ledges that Sedona's trails are filled with. Even with a shorter stem installed, the front end stayed planted and predictable, and there was plenty of room at the front of the bike for shifting our weight where it was needed. We did find the rear suspension to be a little more active on the climbs than we would have liked, but switching the Fox Float's CTD lever to Trail mode helped to calm things down. By the same token, the more active rear suspension helped keep the rear wheel glued to the ground, allowing the Sight to scamper up anything that got in its way, especially after we swapped out the skinny 2.25 Maxxis Ardents for a wider set of tires. If turning the screws on your riding buddies for the last few hundred yards of a soul crushing ascent is something you enjoy, the Sight has enough gusto on the climbs that it seems to encourage this type of behavior; on more than one occasion we found ourselves standing and sprinting over the final crest of a hill, laying down a final burst of power to get to the top first.


2014 Norco Sight
  The Sight didn't have any trouble tackling Sedona's steep and chunky descents.


Technical Handling / Downhill

'Precise' best sums up the Sight's handling in technical terrain. The stiff carbon frame went a long way towards keeping it on track, even when faced with sections of trail that required threading the needle through sharp rocks and even sharper cactus. The response to rider input was quick but not twitchy, facilitating the last minute direction changes that are often required when riding an unfamiliar trail. Slow speed maneuverability was commendable as well, making it easy to navigate through challenging sections of rocks or roots. When it comes time to descend, the Sight's geometry lets an aggressive rider light up the trails, and the trifecta of a 67.5° head angle, generous front center, and relatively short chainstays comes together to create a bike that carries speed extremely well, and stays composed even on steep, tricky downhills. The nimbleness that the Sight exhibited on the climbs translates into a bike that can execute complicated technical moves with surgical precision. The Sight does falter slightly on rougher, high speed downhills, those choppy horror shows where the best strategy is to hang on and plow through. On trails likes this it was necessary to rein things in to avoid getting deflected off line, but after all, this is a 140mm trail bike, not a DH sled.

The one issue we ran into was that at times the rear suspension felt harsh, especially at the top of the stroke, and it lacked the plush, bottomless feeling that encourages letting off the brakes and firing the afterburners through the rough stuff. We thought part of this may have been due to the tires, since the 2.25” Ardents are on the narrow side, so we swapped them out for a set of Schwalbe Hans Dampfs we had on hand. This did make a difference, adding more rubber between the bike and the trail to soak up some of the chatter, but we were never able to completely erase the impression that the rear shock choice could have been improved, maybe with a reservoir style shock like Fox's Float X. Granted, this would slightly blur the line between the Sight and its big brother, the Range, but we're not looking for more travel, just more control and a better feel from the travel that's already there. The Sight's geometry begs to be pushed hard, encouraging a fast, aggressive riding style, so it's reasonable to want the rear end to be able to keep up.

2014 Norco Sight
  Ergon's GA1 grips still haven't won us over, and we had an initial issue with the Elixir Trail 7 brakes, but the DT Swiss hub and the SRAM X01 drivetrain were trouble free.


Component Check

• Wheelset – The Sight 7.1 comes equipped with a DT Swiss 350 rear hub and a Formula front laced up to Sun's Inferno 25 rims. While the wheels held true throughout our time on them and there were no hub issues, we would prefer to see wider rims spec'd, since the 20.3mm internal width of the Inferno 25 is on the narrow side of things, and this is a bike that deserves wide tires.

• Avid Elixir 7 Trail Brakes – During one of our first few rides on the Sight the rear brake leaked from the fitting near the rear brake caliper, contaminating the pads and making for a more exciting ride than we would have liked down a steep, switchback filled trail. Once the line was replaced and the pads were changed there were no further issues, and there was plenty of power and modulation on tap for everything we rode.

• Ergon GA1 EVO grips - We've mentioned before that these aren't our favorite grips due to the shape of the outer locking collar, and the sentiment still holds true. Trade these in before hitting the trails.

• RockShox Revelation RLT Fork – It may not have the cachet (or the Charger damper) of the Pike, but the Revelation held its own during out time on it, and we didn't have any trouble getting it set up to our liking.

• SRAM X01 drivetrain – The 1x11 drivetrain worked without any shifting issues or dropped chains, and the bike's light weight meant that the 32x42 gearing was low enough to get up the steepest climbs we encountered.


2014 Norco Sight


Pinkbike's take:
bigquotesThe Sight epitomizes a modern trail bike - stiff and light, but still brawny enough to charge on the downhills. Our dream build of the Sight would have wider rims and tires, along with a reservoir style shock in the rear, slight changes that would bring it more in line with the way that the geometry and frame stiffness allow it to be ridden. Of course, for many riders the stock build will be just fine, but we'd love to see some kind of 'Sight on steroids' kit offered. A build like that would bump the Sight's already high performance up to another level, making it an even mightier force to be reckoned with on both the climbs and the descents. - Mike Kazimer

www.norco.com
Must Read This Week

185 Comments

  • + 146
 A mostly carbon, 26.6lb, 11spd bike with a dropper post and Raceface cockpit for just over $5k - what are the other brands excuses?
  • + 15
 I'm in the market for a new bike and the Sight is a leading contender. But I must say I'm a little pissy about the USD/CAD difference. MSRP in CAD for the 7.1 is $6300, $500 more than the USD MSRP when you factor in current exchange. Does Norco think the CAD dollar will plunge another 10% this year or they just gouging us? French manuals and lettering on the shipping carton can't account for that much cost difference...
  • - 14
 I wonder how much money they save in manufacturing costs when they compromise their customers with the crappy press fit BB?

How ever much, its not worth it and this bike is a no-go for me and many others for that reason alone. The industry has not justified this engineering failure which only appeals to people who believe everything they believe in advertisements. Does anybody want to lose the debate on this issue with me today?

The bike is light and a good deal, but they probably don't need to be putting icgs tabs on these types of bikes anymore.
  • - 1
 @robwhynot: Aren't the US prices without tax because of the differences between the states? I'm pretty sure the prices are similar when you take that into account?
  • - 3
 Just over $5k? I see $7 k. Still best bang for your buck!
  • + 16
 I remember the days when the only bike around 5000 in Norco's lineup was the Team DH. Ohhhhh how the bike industry has evolved.
  • + 10
 $5252 for the top of the line and under $4k for the base carbon version!

SHUT UP AND TAKE MY MONEY!
  • + 2
 Get my order in today Smile
  • + 2
 I was thinking Range...sorry guys
  • + 7
 It's true, the value on this bike is ridiculously good. Most XX1 carbon bikes are closer to $7k and upwards. I would ride this bike for sure.
  • + 38
 RANT: Prices are higher in Canada because Canadians are used to paying more, ie. 'willing' to pay more. Many industries argue that the extra costs of doing business in Canada (French/English translations, different laws, import duties, exchange rate...) is the reason, but even after all of those figures are tallied, many industries simply add another 10-50% (retail)... because they can. This is all too apparent when a Canadian company like Norco, charges more in Canada than in the US. Canadians are suckers. Sadly, one way to complain about this is to buy US and bring it over, thereby hurting the Canadian economy. A Toyota Corolla made in Canada, 45min from my home, would cost me $22,547CDN. The exact same Corolla bought across the border would cost me $19,467CDN (at current exchange rate). Why? Because we're 'willing' to pay the extra, ie. we're all suckers. Sorry for the rant. Gotta go outside now in the -20C, and drive in my $3000 extra Corolla to buy a six-pack of Molson Canadian for $12 (which costs $7 across the border because it's 'imported beer'). Sucker.
  • + 2
 @VPS13.
At least the bikes have evolved as well though. We pay more, and we get more.
  • + 4
 @megatryn - not at all, the prices quoted are excluding taxes and since the bikes are Cdn made I assume terrifies and duties aren't a big culprit either. I suspect @Togeone is right, we just get hosed and take t, like true hosers.
  • + 9
 @ Togenoe, dude if you wanna complain about high prices you should and buy your stuff in the UK, I think on average we pay the most of any nation, you gotta love 20% VAT.

The base Sight 7.1 costs £4000.00 pounds in the uk, coverted at todays exchange rate thats $7319 canadian dollars. Smile
  • + 16
 @tobwhynot: Norco bikes are NOT Canadian made. While Norco is a Canadian owned company, their bikes are manufactured overseas like the vast majority of all other mass produced bicycle brands.

Canadian brands pay between 8.5% and 13% import duties on bicycles coming into Canada, depending on country of origin. Compare this to the USA, which only pays 5% to 11% import duties, and our bikes are going to be more expensive from the get go, even if they're the same brand. Tariffs and duties, along with GST in some provinces, play a HUGE part in how expensive shit is up here.

Did you know that the government wants to raise import duties on bikes to make it an even 13% across the board, regardless of country of origin? Don't feel like being a "sucker" anymore? Not "willing" to pay for it anymore? Than ignorance and apathy are no excuse. Educate yourself on why stuff costs what it costs. If you really want to help then print out this postcard and send it to Finance Minister Flaherty to help the Bicycle Trade Association of Canada (BTAC) get rid of import duties on bicycles! (btac.org/index.php/en/resources/?option=com_content&view=article&id=46:postcards&catid=2:uncategorised)
  • + 0
 @ Toge one: prices are higher because we only have around 40 million people vs the US which has almost 320 million. Basic economics, not that we are "willing" to pay more, the market (i.e. supply and demand) dictates prices. Prices are not just made up like you think they are. Brand new diesel trucks in Calgary or Edmonton cost around 75-80k or more and the exact same truck can be purchased in Wetaskiwin (or other small towns) for 60-65. They sell more trucks (mostly to farmers and businesses) and therefore can afford to sell them at cheaper rates. I would imagine the same vehicle in Toronto would be even more expensive because the number of truck owners per capita would be lower...

@ Alexisfire: I appreciate all the added technology its just amazing to see how far things have come in so few years.
  • - 4
 Protour: We carry Specialized and their OSBB; all S-WORKS bikes ship with 2 part epoxy now. The combo of carbon and plastic is just stupid. Praxis have a BB that seems to minimize the problem, but not mute the error. Metal frames with metal-housed bearings seem to be just fine though.
PB: drop the stupid 800mm bar/8mm stem crap.
  • + 0
 Doesn't Devinci make all of their carbon frames in house in Quebec? If so, buy one of them and avoid the import duty Smile
  • + 1
 @ScandiumRider - I've already sent a personal note of protest to BTAC re: tariffs.
And the diff between USD and CAD pricing for this bike isn't covered at all by the spread of tariffs between the two countries, it's only 2-3.5% diff.
We're just getting hosed.
  • + 2
 @VPS13, local production costs more than outsourcing with tariffs. The equivalent bike from Devinci is a couple hundred bucks more at list price than the Norco.

I swear there is heavy price collusion and fixing going on between Manu's and Distributors in the Canadian market. There's just no way to prove it without inside info.
  • + 1
 protour. I have had a few bikes with the press fit BB. I have not had any issues. and if there are no issues, why should I care? please tell me? I doubt you even have a bike. trolling can't be as fun as biking.
  • + 2
 Makripper: I'm with Protour on this one, and it's not hard to find magazine bike testers that will agree. Press fit BB's lower the cost of manufacturing at the expense of the end user. You've had a good run but I've had constant issues with them.
  • - 3
 of course you are. you're another one of protours accounts...
  • + 1
 I have a deposit on the Range LE carbon frameset, those carbon lines are damn sexy, nice job Norco!
  • + 2
 lucky @socalmx!
  • + 1
 Robwhynot consider yourself lucky it's another 850gbp for us or 1400usd ffs
  • + 0
 Nobody really defended the plastic crap bottom bracket this bike is supplied with. This sport is losing integrity when consumers don't even care about the long term durability of anything, and let the corporations screw them in the ass to lower the price a little bit while sucker punching them in the gut with false marketing claims. They eventually creak, if you want reliability you have to replace it with something heavy. No advantages.
  • + 5
 Look at the rest of the spec against the cash outlay, if the bb is all you've got to complain about then in my book it's doing well
  • + 3
 @robwhynot , sewer-rat

Look again at the norco spec against the Devinci Troy SL build: okay, it's 200$ more but you get:
- lifetime warranty on local-built frame (Quebec), so you can break your shitty pressfit without second thought
- easton haven 27.5 full UST wheelset (mrp 1000$) instead of norco's built sun inferno + dt 350 rear and FORMULA FRONT HUB (checked on Norco site)
- full kashi(t)ma teatment for who cares with 34 float fork instead of performance fox shock + rockshox revelation 32mm stanchions fork
- avid's elixir x9 trail instead of x7
- easton carbon handlebar
- full X0 2x10 with carbon crank instead of x0 x1 x11 assembly and alloy crank...

So based on specs it seems that devinci's troy is still a bargain against a non-canada built frame... Okay, we.re only talking about spec...
  • - 8
 Hard to beat Devinci, that's why i ride one. The local made frame alone is worth the extra 200, not to mention the warranty. Also Devinci doesn't have the outdated fsr wannabe suspension design.
  • + 2
 The devinci just looks terrible. The linkage looks cheap, the lines of the "gloss" (yuk) carbon frame don't flow at all. The Wilson looks good though. Norco makes a solid bike, I wouldn't worry about QC at all.
  • + 6
 Protour you really are a muppet. What design does the Troy have again? A linkage actuated single pivot which predates any horst link design. You're anti-Specialized rants are so predictable and boring. You're still gutted the E29 won all the awards this year eh? Oh and you want to talk BB's. Press fit 30 are cheaper to manufacture and allow a larger spindle/crank arm interface. Sure the Sram bearing seals suck but they'll sort them eventually and if you can't handle the wait get a King PF30 BB with it's 10 year bearing warranty. Done.

Now get back to riding that overweight Quebec crapper.
  • + 3
 @VPS13 Devinci carbon is manufactured overseas as well. Only the high-end frames (which are now carbon frames) were made in Quebec. Maybe the alloy Wilson, Dixon, Troys are still made there. I on't know about that

Only issue I have with this bike is the pressfit bb, although I haven't had or noticed any creaking on my road bike

@Protour, why no more ISCG tabs? I hope Im not in the minority here, but I still will run a guide or even a bash with 1x, it'll be something like a Blackspire TrailX or a Bruiser for ring protection
  • + 1
 In the uk the troy costs another 1000 gbp, so no it's not a bargain to us in the uk
  • + 2
 The excuse for all the other brands charging so much more for less is simple. They're a bunch of greedy pigs that need to be boycotted.
  • - 2
 Ok, figures someone from SoCal would only care about looks and the "flow" of the lines, a moto dude no less. MTB is thankfully not like moto where all the bikes look the same and all the riders have the same stupid opinions. At some point the weight of all the vehicles and too many people might be what snaps that San Andreas fault.
  • + 4
 Protour which locally made Devinci do you currently own?
  • - 5
 Well, jclv sorta started to attempt to defend the crappy PressFit BB's...but then gave up as quickly as he started. PF allows for a larger interface but nobody really does it because they want their cranks to still be adaptable to regular frames with proper, reliable bottom bracket designs. You stated with nothing and you still have nothing.
  • + 1
 Norco has been putting crapp headsets and bottom brackets and hubs in their bikes for quite a while! My dad and brother have 04 and 03 shores and theyve both had to replace hubs and headsets repeatedly. I dont know why they do it! Sweet bike tho!
  • + 1
 My 04 Aline came with a Cane Creek which is still in there. The BB however is another story....
  • + 5
 40 million Canadians? I have 10 million people in a 75 mile radius of me. Crazy.

Our imported products are cheaper because of NAFTA. There is no duty on a bike frame. There are more things that are dutyless than are dutied. Canada must still have a tax, the US dropped theres on almost everything. I haven't been taxed on anything shipped from England, including bike frames. We are also "VAT-less".

That's one of the reasons 20 million people in the US that are un-employed come from the manufacturing sector. Companies just sent everything overseas. There is no tax to import the same goods they made here. They make them for pennies on the dollar, don't pay benefits or high salaries. There is something more interesting, I researched my idea of building my own bikes the last time I lost my job 3 years ago due to this. If we (100 random Pink Bikers) pooled our money together, we could have our own carbon fs frames made for around $650. Our own design or a very close knock off, as long as we don't sell them. $600 for the frame with a basic Fox shock and $2250 for a sea freight shipping container. As long as you make the minimum order. It's that easy. Hardtails built to YOUR spec for $150. OX, Scandium, Reynolds, $350. If you research it, you can find it. It's pretty sad, but that's how easy it's done these days. I do feel sorry for the Canadians paying more, but you have actual beer up there. 4% alcohol in our domestics. I might remember the night I met Molson XXX, I have pics of me dancing with an inflatable childrens swimming pool.

The bike is a bit of a bargain, anyway you look at it.
  • + 0
 Linkage quality on devinci's is just outstanding !!!
Pivots are thicks, threads are longs, bearings are overbuilt. Shock mount is perfect too, with a real axis that match the mounting hardware diameter instead of a simple screw like many companies...
The frame is particularly rigid and strong, thanks to the rectangular chainstays.
I rode a troy alloy since october (one of the very first to goes out from production), I did several trips during autumn and winter (french alps, Pyreneans, plus lift from day one (Mont Saint-Anne, Bromont), each time I disassemble the linkage, all the parts are perfectly straight, with no tear, assemblies are perfectly smooth. Even the bearings doesn't grip...
I'm really surprised of the build quality, I didn't expect that from this price tag in comparison of mainstream brands like spesh or trek I already owned.
  • + 1
 I've never heard a noisy bronson. ..threaded bb.
  • + 0
 Threaded BBs are proven, that's not deniable. The Bronson however, a fast machine but the dated geo had me hanging over the front end. Im happy for SC on working on its replacement, the Nomad 27.5!
  • + 4
 Protour, 30mm IS a bigger spindle. Press-fit, you know, like your headset.. It means that money can be spent elsewhere on the frame.

Press-fit BB's have been just fine for years in those 20" bikes being hucked to concrete with 70psi in the tires and no suspension don't they?
  • + 1
 Bearings pressed into metal are different than bearings pressed into carbon. I will not generalize beyond my experience, but I do not think my claim is anecdotal. I personally submitted 5 claims to Specialized. All with the signs indicated by attached photo and with identical symptoms; creaking, loose BB, clicking, poor shifting, sporadic SRM readings, etc.

www.pinkbike.com/photo/10552790
  • + 0
 PressFit usually means the rider has to inevitably change out the light cheap plastic BB and shell out more money and add weight to their bike if they want something reliable. The companies using PressFit BBs are essentially taking a short cut just to make their bikes cheaper and lighter for the sales floor, while making the customer pay the price in reliability and later upgrade costs. That's all it is, right there, and the it bothers me that they think they can get away with it. In the same way Specialized got called out for suing too much, these companies making poor engineering decisions need to be called out and either defend their decisions in public or we have to make them change their ways by not buying their product. That is the way the bicycle industry should work and it is up to us consumers to make it happen. Just like in the real world, except it sometimes doesn't happen there either. But it should. PressFits works fine for BMX, in large part because they have a stronger shell and they use metal cups instead of plastic. Another disadvantage of the plastic cups is that they are often destroyed when removed so you can't switch parts to another bike. I think most bmx racing bikes still use threaded BBs, for a reason.
  • - 1
 Dude move to America. You sound like them.
  • + 12
 No thanks, were already trying to get Justin Bieber sent back...
  • + 8
 At this point I think Protour just gets negative props because he's Protour
  • + 4
 @SoCalMX - who's this Justin Bieber you speak of. We've never heard of him. Smile
  • - 2
 I don't care much about people giving me neg props, I'm more interested in valid points.
  • + 4
 Protour, you wouldn't get a valid point if it sat on you. "I think most bmx racing bikes still use threaded BBs, for a reason." Yeah compatibility with lighter non-BMX chainsets. That's it Mr conspiracy.

b1k35c13nt15t, What's going on there? Is the CF delaminating?
  • + 2
 Well, we carry BH, Cannondale and Niner that also do the pressfit thing, but only the SWORKS bikes have that issue. It is kind of funny actually because it is usually only people that ride once per week on those… or an employee. Anyway, it wallows out the shell; I can seriously push the casings in with two fingers and blow them out using the compressor. Now, the Big S sends their nicest bikes with a "finishing kit"- (read sand paper and super glue). C-Dales tend to creak- but no BBs falling out.
Perhaps my argument should be confined to the parameters of S-works bikes.
  • + 1
 Right so there is a carbon insert that un-bonds from the rest of the frame? Or do the PF30 BB cups wear the surface away?

You think it's tolerance or that they need a aluminum insert?
  • + 2
 I would say a metal surface. The actually shell diameter increased; the epoxy fills in the gap and secures it. We started carrying the Praxis expanding BB30 shell BB. It has the added benefit of aligning the bearings.
Personally, I ride a bike with an aluminum insert- the "lower end model."
  • - 4
 You shouldn't have to use sandpaper and superglue (perhaps epoxy?) to install and maintain a BB, its pathetic and ridiculous what these companies are making bike shop employees go through, and its a huge frustrating waste of time that eats into bike shop profits, and alot of time they are not compensated for the wasted labor hassles by the frame manufacturers.

Considering the probably hundreds of Specialized frames that have been warrantied because of the wallowing they definitely have lost money on PF30 compared to the labor savings of not threading the BB. Lose-lose situation for everyone involved, the customers, the shops, and hurts Specialized bottom line and reputation. They definitely are not the only company that has had issues though. The problem is that these big companies plan their production runs 2 or 3 years out, so if they wanted to quit PF30 we would still have the crap around for awhile. But Specialized is just sitting there on their dead egg, doing nothing, hoping if they stick with it everyone will adopt it.

Jclnv, BMX race bike run threaded BB's because they have always run them since the era of modern cranks. Their is no advantage or reason for them to go back to pressfit, since threaded is superior. I never presented a conspiracy about why just as you have yet to present a valid point defending PF30.

Pressfit attempts to solve a problem that doesn't exist., it just created more problems.
  • + 0
 "I would say a metal surface. The actually shell diameter increased; the epoxy fills in the gap and secures it. We started carrying the Praxis expanding BB30 shell BB. It has the added benefit of aligning the bearings.
Personally, I ride a bike with an aluminum insert- the "lower end model."

Interesting stuff. Fingers crossed my Fact 9 E29 frame (same as the S-Works) doesn't have the issue.

Protour, You're nuts. Seriously, have a lie down dude.
  • + 1
 Oldschool43, you set up that frame order, count me in on the random 100. I'll get you plenty 'o tripleX, and some other, much more tasty quality brews for your troubles.
  • + 0
 Jclnv, you started with nothing andyou still have nothing to offer in this debate.... and now you publically stated you are you have your fingers crossed that your multi-thousand d ollar dream frame won't fail due to the engineering failure of PressFit 30. I never remember anyone ever crossing their fingers over whether or not their threaded BB would hold up. Thank you, I rest my case.
  • + 2
 Protour, you'll be pleased to know the PF30 BB on my aluminum SJ Evo has been perfect and no doubt my stunning Enduro (bike of the year BTW) will be the same. Still if I do have a problem Specialized have fantastic warranty so I'll be just fine.

Oh and BTW it isn't an engineering failure, it's a manufacturing failure.

Keep taking the pills dude.
  • + 1
 When Giant switched from threaded BBs to pressfit, I noticed the increase in stiffness the second I pedalled up the first incline I came to (from one aluminum Trance to another). The marketing said it was stiffer and I never really thought I'd feel much of a difference, but it was huge. I know Giant made other changes to the BB area that year so I can't say it was totally down to the press-fit, but all I know is it was stiffer.

I've gone through one side of a press-fit since they switched, and I still have the spare that came in the box. Based on my experience, that's no less reliable than what I found with threaded BBs.

As a racer, consumer, and home mechanic, I'm all for press-fit.
  • + 3
 @oldschool43 - NAFTA only applies to goods traded between Canada, the US and Mexico. It has nothing to do with pricing differences in the two countries based on tariffs since the frames and bikes are generally produced in Asia.
  • + 1
 I had a chuckle this morning when I was reading the new Hope post about product for 2014 "The star of the show being the press fit BB's", it made me think of all this back and fourth banter.
BUY WHATEVER YOU WANT TO BUY!!!!
  • + 1
 I would, except I want a purple-anodized, long-travel amp linkage fork to mount to my dual-shock Kestrel Rubicon that I have converted to 28" wheels thanks to low-cost overseas carbon. Don't laugh, it has a press-fit BB, albeit square taper.
When I think of the stuff I used to call high-end, man...
  • + 5
 This is why Santa Cruz doesn't use PF30:

It is true that there are some slight weight savings available with the various pressfit bb designs (exact weight savings obviously vary depending on system, frame manufacturing techniques, and crank model), but we don't feel this small savings make up for the inconveniences. We are still able to make a frame that is lighter than most of our competitors (5.1 lbs), while still using a heavier bb system. There are a number of disadvantages that exist with press fit systems:1) Special installation and removal tools are required for these parts, including a headset press. This is not convenient for most home mechanics, and they are quite expensive. Traditional external BB's can be installed or removed with a simple $10 hand tool.2) "Permanently installed cups". Shimano doesn't recommend removing and re-installing their press in bb cups (as they may become damaged), so moving parts from bike to bike is no longer an option. http://techdocs.shimano.com/media/te...9830625426.pdf3) Creaking or shifting bb's can be common with these systems. Since the bearing is pressed into a cup, which is then pressed into the frame- it can be hard to get all of the press fits snug- without being too tight on the bearing or too loose in the frame.4) Reasonable tube sizes. One of the most commonly claimed advantages of a larger bb shell is the larger diameter downtube that goes with it. This may be an advantage on road bikes, where tubes can be increadibly thin and large for optimal stiffness. On a mountain bike, this area of the frame sees a lot of abuse from rocks and crashing, and needs to have a certain amount of wall thickness to survive actual use. Using what we consider a "safe" wall thickness and carbon layup, and a fairly typical tube diameter, we get an exceedingly stiff, light, durable product.
  • + 4
 If we used a larger downtube, we would either have a heavier frame (same wall thickness but larger diameter), or a less durable product (thinner walls and larger diameter).5) Chain clearance. Take a look at some of our competitors frames with press in bb shells. The down tube comes so close to the chainrings that many frames have chainsuck guards on the downtube! In our mind, the chain should be able to fall off on a mountain bike and not get jammed between your crank and thin-walled carbon downtube.6) Backwards compatibility: Many of our customers purchase a frame and build it up with their choice of parts, or parts from an old bike. By using a standard bb, we are compatible with everything without requiring confusing adaptors.7) Chainguide compatibility: While it may seem strange to talk about putting chainguides on a 100mm bike, it is becoming more common now with 10 speed drivetrains. Thread in bb's mean the frame is compatible with bb mount chainguides. We like versatility....Why did Shimano go with their current system (over say a BB30)?When Shimano originally released the external bearing two piece crankset back in '02 they determined that a 24mm diameter axle was the optimal for strength to weight ratio, stiffness and also minimising friction from the rotating BB bearings. It also allows them to use steel as an axle material without a weight penalty. A BB30 system requires an oversize axle to give stiffness but axle made of steel would be bring a weight penalty as it wouldn't be possible to make the steel thin enough to keep the weight down for this application. Shimano feels aluminium is an inferior BB axle material compared to steel. Shimano chooses to use steel on all its high end axles for durability and peace of mind.
  • + 3
 Jclnv, look forward to your response on all 7 of those valid points. But considering you have yet to make a valid point, I won't keep my fingers crossed like you do regarding the reliability of your plastic Specialized frame with the inferior BB design. Or you can just stick your nose back up Sinyards dirty little corporate methane hole. Your choice.
  • + 1
 prartoar I can say the same to you about your mouth full of shimano wank. the BB is larger for increased SA just like the reason for 1.5 HT. when was the last time anyone broke a demo 8 frame or cracked a frame around a bb junction that has the PF 30 or the 1.5 HT? This makes bikes safer, and the manufacturing easier and cheaper to get right so people can enjoy riding bikes instead of sittting on warranty claims.

you're the poorest excuse for a troll i've ever seen.
  • + 3
 I've seen two Trek thin wall aluminum PF30 shells destroyed from impacts in 2013. This, and other issues, is why Trek is actually going bsck to threaded BB's on many of their mtbs.

I've never seen or heard of a frame warrantied because it had a threaded bb, but hundreds, of "defective" frames have been warrantied by Specialized alone because of PF30 issues, and they certainly aren't the only company.

Try again Mark.
  • + 0
 because trek has always made alu frames that are too thin. and to the last "statement" i'm not even going to reply. you're pathetic. Your arguments are substandard at best.
  • + 5
 Is either protour is not on his medication anymore or somebody gave him a bag of that potent bc hydro.......what a stubburn ass!!!!
  • + 2
 @Protour, looks like the Sight uses a Pressfit BB 92. As well as the new Devinci Troy.

Also both King and Hope now are making PFBBs
  • + 1
 Stubborn, yes. This debate starts and ends with the 7 reasons made by Santa Cruz justifying why they don't use PF30, along with the and wallowing issues in carbon frames, and all the creaking issues that are a pain for shops to deal with. Mark has nothing but personal insults to offer here I guess, anybody with a brain can observe that it is possible to make a frame adequately strong with a threaded BB.
  • + 0
 who is mark? that's proof enough that you aren't on your meds. Enough people have shot you down with different reasons and answers. If you can't see that you aren't always right then i really do pity you.
  • - 1
 Pffft, as expected you got nothin. Except a grudge against me maybe.
  • + 1
 You are comedy gold Protour.
  • - 6
 Jclnv, must be difficult to type with your fingers crossed over the fear of your PF BB wallowing out. How many hours did you spend with your nose up in Sinyards stinkhole today?
  • - 1
 Just put the Camber Evo order in. I can't get enough of that PF30 magic. How's that single pivot running LOL!
  • + 1
 I want that bike! probably so facking fast! whats the ha again?
  • + 0
 The thing is.........I dont even get mad at your comments anymore, I jst feel sorry for someone your age acting like a 5 year old taking a tempertemptrum. Not one of the bike manufacturers give a shit about your insight of why to do a bike like you say, start making your own and we will see the results.
  • + 1
 This party is still going? I have opinions from what I have experienced that will lead me to make decisions concerning said products or technologies. I will share my experiences, but that is it. I like camaraderie with PBers, not contention and pointless debate. If thing gets any bigger- Specialized will put a hit out on me, or worse, not allow me to EP!
[Reply]
  • + 27
 "Sight would have wider rims and tires, along with a reservoir style shock in the rear, slight changes that would bring it more in line with the way that the geometry and frame stiffness allow it to be ridden. Of course, for many riders the stock build will be just fine, but we'd love to see some kind of 'Sight on steroids' kit offered."

You mean the Range?
  • + 7
 i have the range killer b 1 (fox ctd shock) and the aurum (ccdb). i have the same issues like they had with the sight in the high speed rough stuff...i think i am gonna buy the ccdb air cs and throw that overrated fox stuff out...also the fox 34 talas could be better. but the range ist such a fun bike to ride...so i think the sight is very similar. keep it up norco, the prices are very fair compared to other brands...cheers
  • + 7
 But the Range has slightly too slack geo for tight trail riding, I have been working on my own "Sight on Steroids" Flow EX rims, pike 150's, I'm thinking Vivid R2c for the rear? PS, this bike is sick.
  • + 2
 well with the talas you can make the HA steeper if the climbs get nasty, but of course the range wont be a better climber than the sight..but its the perfect bike for me because my focus is decending.
  • + 3
 Absolutely, for riding in England I feel the Sight is a more sensible choice than the Range. 140mm travel is more than enough for trail centre riding etc. However if I lived somewhere more mountainous or planned to race the Mega etc. then I would go for the Range too.
  • + 12
 "Granted, this would slightly blur the line between the Sight and its big brother, the Range, but we're not looking for more travel, just more control and a better feel from the travel that's already there."
  • + 3
 Part of the problem is mixing Fox with Rock Shox. The high speed rebound rates are too different. I had this issue on Ibis HDR. I was riding for a while last fall. Not matter what I did I couldn't get the suspension balanced. So I called a friend a Rock Shox. He basically said, "we tried for amost a full day to get an HDR with a Pike on the front a Fox shock in the rear to play nice and it just doesn't work". He said they keep telling manufactures to not mix suspension, but many do.
I'd say put a Monarch Plus on the rear and see what your missing.
Manufactures please learn from this. Don't mix Suspension Brands.
  • + 0
 thanks! i forgot to say that i want to replace the talas with a pike, too...that combination works well on my aurum.
  • + 3
 Seems like the range doesn't climb as well as the sight, and the sight could climb just as well with wider tires and rims and a better shock. Just because it is a shorter travel rig doesn't mean it should have a bad stem, rims and tire choice, let alone the shock choice! Funny thing is, this is another example of a fox suspension fail. I'd take this bike if it had a threaded bb, a 35mm stanchioned fork, short stem, and a better shock. Basically, a short travel range would be nice.
  • + 1
 I rode an aluminium Sight 650b all last season, averaging 100km/week riding, and 'plush' definitely does NOT describe the suspension of the Sight, but it definitely is 'efficient'. I completely agree with everything Mike found on the bike. While the suspension would get a bit overwhelmed on fast, chundery stuff, the bike still handled amazingly well.

I think what Mike was getting at, and something I found with it as well is that the Sight definitely needs better control of the suspension it does have. I would have loved to have tried a DBAir CS on this bike, because I think it would have changed it into a completely different ride.

I routinely outrode the float CTD on this bike, and while I don't think many riders will ride it that hard, there are a few who will find the same, and become slightly disappointed in the bike, as I did.

Overall though, it's a well designed frame, and overall, rode really really well and efficiently.
  • + 2
 So what would the ideal rear shock be if you had a Pike on the front? Would a Vivid R2C match well or would the Canecreek DB Air be a better choice? I like the idea of having Rockshox front and rear but you have to specify the base tune for the vivid which would be an educated guess at best, VS the double barrel which has no base tune therefore better chance of getting a good tune? Anythoughts? Also is the CS switch worth it?
  • + 2
 I have an aluminum sight and this review is pretty damn accurate. I have been meaning to beef up the bike a little just so that it can hold a candle to what the bike can really do. I was thinking about a beefier fork and reservoir shock, along with rims. But really every time I ride it I'm so impressed with it that I can't justify the money
  • + 1
 also, Mike what size stem did you review the bike with?
  • + 1
 @Chad - most of our time on the Sight was spent on a 50mm stem. It's a matter of personal preference, but I'd recommend trying it with a stem between 40-60mm.
  • + 1
 PUSH the shock and be done with it.
  • + 1
 Dave- I would get the db air cs. Great customer service that may be able to help you with the tune. They work great with 4 bar suspension designs as well. The CS switch would be worth it for a setup like yours. Much as I like the vivid, the db air is just a step above it.
  • + 3
 One of the reasons I want this bike as a frame only, is Im no longer interested in purchasing an entire bike then striping it of its shock, fork, wheels, tires, and cockpit just to suit my riding style and personal tastes
  • + 1
 thanks mike, i have a 60mm on right now but I was just wondering what you used. Thats really the next thing I want to try on it. What length did you like the best for more DH purposes?
  • + 1
 I think you definitely want something that you can firm up the low-speed compression on the fly (as with the DBAir CS). While the bike still climbs reasonably well with a "fully open" platform, on anything even remotely smooth you are really going to want a platform as the bike, like any FSR style design, is prone to pedal bob.

I rode mine with the stock 70mm stem it came with for a bit, but switched a 40mm stem and it was a lot better. The reach and ETT on the sight is slightly longer than average (although, not Yeti long).
  • + 1
 Thanks guys, CCDB CS it is then Smile
  • + 2
 Good luck mounting it! Not that the CCDB-CS wouldn't be an amazing addition to this bike. But the reviewer and you guys should try opening your eyes when you're looking at this frame. There is no way in hell any shock with an external reservoir will fit that frame. I guarantee there isn't enough room for the DB to be mounted cylinder head down and mounted the other way the external reservoir will slam into the down tube about 3/4 of the way to bottom.
  • + 1
 Thanks for the thoughts Satans.... It does look like it won't fit, only one way to find out!(and yes I mean mount it with no pressure and check clearance). Pay day on friday.
  • + 1
 I'd shoot Norco an email or phone call, I bet they know for sure. That way you aren't stuck with a shock you can't use!
  • + 0
 My 2013 Range Killer B was completely changed by using a bigger volume spacer in the Fox CTD shock. With the stock build it was too stiff when set for sag, and blew through the travel when set for plushness. I weigh ~ 145# and moving to the next larger spacer made a huge difference in the bike handling. Now it moves smoothly through chunder that rattled it before, and has better control while bouncing down big rocky sections.That $40 spent on the spacer kit has saved me $$$ vs a new shock. Maybe next season I'll upgrade, but this quick tuning change was very cost effective.
  • + 1
 I've seen Sight 650b frames with DHX Airs on them, so I know that fits. DBAir though, I am not sure.
  • + 1
 Just got an email from Cane Creek confirming the CCDBA will not fit Frown I guess that means most other piggybacks will have the same issue. Maybe a pushed kashima'd float ctd is the best option available?
  • + 1
 @ bigmike9699 You've seen DHX airs on the new carbon sight or the alloy? Because the two have a very different shape to the down tube and the alloy has about twice the clearance for the shock.
  • + 2
 are you sure that of that about the ccdb air ? i was planning of changing the ctd for a x-fusion vector air but if it not fit it a big problem for me and did canecreek said why because the 2013 was compatible .
  • + 1
 Piggy back shocks will fit on the alloy version as the down tube bends to give space in the front triangle. The carbon versions down tube comes straight up from the lower shock mount and doesn't allow room for a piggy back at full compression.
  • + 1
 a smaller piggy back should fit, so most except for the vivid air and CCDB air. Those shocks are a lot bigger compared to a monarch plus, vector air, or float x which could fit
[Reply]
  • + 13
 looks, competitive price, performance, finally someone got it right. and who gives a shit about the wheel size
  • + 1
 if you get on a bike without looking at the wheels or name first you probably won't notice, I jumped on a Remedy 29 without looking and the only thing I noticed was the cornering feeling different and the different linkage (rollover probably contributed to that) but I just assumed it was me not being used to the bike, not the wheel size...
  • + 5
 Pick a wheel size, be a dick about it?
I'm Ron Burgundy?
  • + 9
 I'm shocked they didn't complain about riding a bike with a 32mm fork! Also, I expected a comment about the "narrow" 760mm bars!
[Reply]
  • + 8
 We should add, you don't have the GA1 Evo grip installed correctly on this NORCO bike. The top of the grip.....which is the softest part of the grip and designed to fit the voids in the hand when grabbing the grip.....you have rotated too far forward. This also puts your hand in a very unfavorable position on the clamp. As seen in your images you are putting all your hand pressure onto what should be the bottom/under-part of the grip....and onto the bolt/nut part of the clamp. We value any comments.....+ or -......as long as the product is being used and installed correctly.
[Reply]
  • + 6
 So, apart from the rear shock, the grips, the rims, the stem and the tires, this $5,000+ bike is ready to roll?

I really like the design of the bike, and I love upgrading my own bike as much as the next person, but not every bike store is cool about swapping out parts before delivery (after all, why would they want an inventory of parts no-one wanted on their bike?) and I wouldn't like to spend $6,500 Cdn after tax thinking, "with a few upgrades, this bike will be good..."

Reading between the lines, maybe this is more of a trail bike, a bit out-gunned in Sedona compared to the burlier and longer-travel bikes reviewed so far? I expect this bike would rock my local trails as-is.
  • + 5
 Might want to upgrade brakes too...
  • + 1
 keep going..SRAM..
  • + 4
 it's sort of funny. a lot of the complaints around this bike seem to be that it's slightly undergunned for how people want to ride it. if you want something a little burlier, I guess Norco wants you to buy the Range... seems ok to me - also an epic deal...
  • + 3
 the sight really handles gnarly trails well, even with the stock build. I have the 2013 and the only difference is it comes with a 60mm stem. The upgrades that mike are talking about would make this bike more insane on the DH, but even without these upgrades it still hauls ass down any trail i throw it at. The big difference between this and the range is the range is more forgiving and easier to ride fast gnarly trails. Both awesome bikes but i went with sight so i would progress faster as a rider
  • + 2
 Yep. Might be better to buy the bike that fits most of your riding or else your $5,000 deal of a bike might become quite a bit more expensive after you're finished making it something the designers didn't have in mind.

This bike has some all-mountain characteristics with the 27.5 and 67.5 head angle, but people who actually ride it note it's efficiency (apart from PB climbing in descend mode). Who knows, maybe it's closer to a burly xc bike than whatever all-mountain / enduro is. Slap a CCDB, Pike, wider (and possibly heavier) rims and Minions on it if you like, but in the end maybe you really just wanted a different bike.

It would be perfect for 90% of my riding in Southwestern Ontario, and it's one of the best-looking bikes on the market, and with the somewhat reasonable asking price new, I have a hope of picking up a used one in a couple of years for around $3,000, so I'm liking it as is.
  • + 2
 For me I think the devinci troy rc is a better deal. has all the things they complain about sorted with a all shimano kit and is around $500 cheaper at my LBS. I will take shimano brakes and 1X10 over SRAM brakes and 1X11 any day.
  • + 2
 But the overall ride is most important. Have you read the troy reviews? No thanks...
  • + 1
 I demo'd the Norco so far and gonna try the Troy next week. Don't really care about reviews as much as hands on.
  • + 1
 To be fair to Devinci, most review I have read so far are for the XC oriented SL model, that comes with narrow 720mm bars, long stem and ridiculous Schwalbe racing ralf tires. I would shit myself trying to push hard on a technical downhill with these tires, do of course the bike feels sketchy and uncomfortable. I hope Pinkbike reviews the RR model that cost 100$ more but come with beefy tires, a 780mm chromag cockpit, XX1 and all the goods. I'm sure it runs great and it's resonably priced at 6800$. Canadian MSRP for this Sight is 6300$.
  • + 2
 I've been running the sight carbon 7.2 for the last few months, went to it from the SB66 as well and I've been thoroughly impressed by the little beast, a super aggressive descender with pinpoint accuracy and super efficient climber, i'll admit I've upgraded bars stem wheels and tires through sponsor obligations but factory ones were ok(except the tires, hate the skinny ardents) so far the only small let down has been the formula c1 brakes on my model, no contact adjust otherwise work fine just not where i like them too
[Reply]
  • + 6
 Worth a chime in here, I've been riding the '13 Sight Killer B-2 for the past year. Incredible bike, i fluctuate riding weight when I shoot vs when I ride for me, and the bike preforms incredibly in all conditions. I'm chasing exercise freaks, and scary fast riders on all mountain bikes too, and the bike shreds. I raced the Whistler Enduro this year too, a rugged course to say the least, and the bike kept on top of it all. www.norco.com/archives/2013/?id=sight-killer-b2
Also, shout out to Norco for stocking proper XL sizing, as a 6'4 freak it means a lot too!
[Reply]
  • + 4
 What difference would a Float x really make? I get that after sustained runs my float ctd feels a tad hot and no doubt loses a bit of performance, but reviews of the Float x I have read say its not massively different to the float? Just asking.
  • + 1
 I switched from a standard CTD to the Float-X and it is a huge difference, the damping is far superior in addition to staying cooler and not fading/packing on longer runs.
  • + 2
 I went from a CTD shock and now have the Float X. YOu can't compare the two. I almost gave up on Fox (I did on their forks), but the Float X is amazing. Also, it plays very nice with a Pike on a Mach6.
  • + 2
 I guess you are probably not 230-235lbs geared up. Any non-reservoir shock feels harsh when pushed hard down along run.
  • + 1
 I am around 200lbs kitted up and our dh runs are probably a lot shorter than many in Europe and North America. That said, it would be good to try an X to see what difference it would make...
[Reply]
  • + 3
 Nice bike but I refuse to change my Mojo HD160 26" for any 650b bike equipped with less than 160mm even when they say that the feeling is the same, I will stick to 26 many years more.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 "We did find the rear suspension to be a little more active on the climbs than we would have liked, but switching the Fox Float's CTD lever to Trail mode helped to calm things down" - Was it in climb mode when you flicked it over? just interested thats all
  • + 2
 I thought the same. They must have had it in descend mode & switched it to trail, why not try climb while climbing!
  • + 3
 Trail mode works best for most climbing on the Sight. On the 2014 FOX CTD, Climb mode is closer to a full lockout, and works best for smooth hardpack sections - it would be a harsh ride on the techy stuff. As far as climbing in Descend mode, there are a number of bikes out there that have enough of an initial platform that this is possible - the Sight doesn't fall into this category. I know it's easy to get hung up on the names of each mode, which causes comments like "Why would you climb in Descend mode - you're not supposed to do that," but imagine if the lever had three numbers instead: 1,2,3, with 1 being fully open and 3 nearly locked out. It wouldn't seem like nearly as big of a deal - after all, they're just low speed compression settings.
  • + 3
 Thanks for comin back Mike! It was just interest from me that's all, wandered if it was tried in climb that's all dude
  • + 0
 I know what he is saying. The climb mode is simply left to be used on smooth sustained climbs like fire roads, would be too harsh while tech climbing plus lose traction. The carbon Range I will have comes with the DBAir that has the climb switch which I have read still maintains traction well when the switch is on.
  • + 1
 No problem guys - thanks for your questions.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 "We did find the rear suspension to be a little more active on the climbs than we would have liked, but switching the Fox Float's CTD lever to Trail" - What? So you're complaining that the suspension doesn't climb well in the descend mode? Funny that - that a bike brand should spec an adjustable shock, but not design it to work perfectly in all situations in just one setting...
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I picked up the Sight 7.1 and laced up the WTB KOM hoops and XO Trail brakes. This bike is one of the best handling rigs I've ridden, perfect for trails in the Pacific Northwest. Still waiting for the 650b (27.5)x2.4 Trail Kings to come available.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Iscg tabs. Break away bolt for hanger and a replacement. These details make this bike an exelent choice. The bad action from the rear suspention? I think the very active four bar suspention shows the faults with the fox shock.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I don't understand why so many people insist on super short stems now. My Giant Trance 27.5 came with a 70 mm stem and it was very difficult to do tight turns even with my seat all the way back. The bars would hit my legs in no time. When I switched to a longer stem, it felt much more natural and also more stable. My weight was then properly loading the front fork and my rear would start to slide out instead of my front and rear sliding out at the same time. Of course, this was a medium frame and I'm 5'11" so I'm sure a shorter stem on a large frame would be good but overall I think the medium frame and longer stem combo on this bike is better for me.
  • + 4
 I think you answered your own question. I'm also 5'11" bare foot and used to ride medium frames, but now much prefer a large with a 75mm stem. and a slightly offset seatpost. wider bars and shorter stems keep me tracking better and cornering with more confidence. BUT DAMN THE TREE GATES!
  • + 2
 There's a good interview with kona/bike mag regarding modern (mtb)bike design that may answer your questions. Longer front centers, short stems, wider bars, tight rears...
But ultimately, run whatever helps you get more gnar in a controlled manner.

This bike is on my short list along with kona, gt, and maybe new carbon intense out soon.
  • + 1
 Hahahahaha sure sign of your pfeffered riding style i guess, I'm 6'2 have a large sight carbon 7.2 and run a 35mm stem with 777 bars. each to their own tho
  • + 1
 Yeah I would also get the large with a 50mm stem.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 I've gone from a 70mm stem on my Carbine to a 90mm stem, it feels much better. 710mm bars are plenty enough too, wider wouldn't get through the trees.
  • + 1
 Agreed generally recommending mega wide bars is plain foolish. I can just get through some of my local single track on 680mm. Fine for desert rides in UT and AZ etc and obviously mountain and park. Fit the kit!
  • + 0
 width of your bars should depend on your body build not your trail if you want the best out of your bike, most bikes, the sight included come with tiny narrow bars due to retail laws( the sight has a wider bar in the box) but it is very easy to run too wide and put yourself into a weaker position, if you primarily enjoy big grunts techy climbs then the longer stem would be better but if you like to descend more then you'd be better off with a larger frame and shorter stem as it will be far more stable.
  • + 0
 Agreed. One of the dirty secrets of mtb riding is that narrow bars coupled to a properly fit stem (as opposed to "as short as possible") is measurably faster and more comfortable than ultra-wide with a stub stem.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 I want a direct comparison of this and the Troy. Similar bike similar price range. Eric
  • + 1
 +1 Would also like to see a head to head comparo. I've ridden both but only alloy Sight vs Carbon Troy. They do seem very comparable both in price and performance to me. Both high on my list for shorter travel trail assasin.
  • + 2
 Here's my take of Troy vs Sight c, granted I was on a alu Troy XP (frame is only 1/2 lb heavier than carbon) and overall build was still below 30lbs. I had four days with Troy on my local trails and on 1hr with Sight on urban assault (but found some steep inclines,declines and stairs, square hits to rally). Troy feels more like a aggro trail/AM bike to me and really sturdy, somewhat sluggish (mostly due to heavier XP kit with heavy wheels), great when up to speed, slower when changing speed quickly, not nimble, but very playful in the air and wants to jump and spring off everything. Quite supple small bump and nice trail compliancy and never could hit bottom due to increased progression at end stroke. So, in a way felt more than 140 rear travel (used the 150 front much easier), but at the same time felt kind of tall and not as plush while hauling at speed due to increased shock progression. This makes great for jumping and hits due to innate bottom out protection, so a bit of a trade-off I suppose. This was also on Monarch RL shock, so maybe better with more volume, more adjustable shock? Also, wasn't super stoked doing steep trail grinds on it, had to work harder than on my Banshee Rune and felt like I needed a dropper fork up front to tame the front end some with seated climbing. Out of saddle grinder, not as big of deal, but was quite bobby/active unless I used lockout, then it became a hardtail for better or for use (ok for road, not so much for rough trail). Overall, this was a fun bike to ride on different terrain, but didn't climb as well on trail as I was hoping for.
  • + 2
 Onto the Sight C, no real trail testing, but was able to get a good feel for suspension action, fit and feel of frame. First off, I think Norco totally dialed the up/down trail bike geometry on this. Ride position while pedalling feels pretty much spot on for trail bike riding (seated pedalling mostly). It pedalled quite well up steeps and on flats and felt like not much energy is lost with eveyr pedal stroke, even though you can see the suspension working while pedalling (my Rune does this as well and is good pedaller too). The Sight felt farily light and very snappy and responsive to what I wanted to do as well. Rallied up square hits, steep stairs and rippled down long stairs with no body impact or chop, just rippled down with ease. The con to the Sight s that I used all the travel fairly easily with anything more than 1-2 feet and even hit bottom with anything bigger than that, once quite harshly (didn't sound good on frame). This is with 30% sag, whereas on the Troy I was running at least 30% and didn't come close to bottom (1/3" from max with many big hits where my Rune would of had the "O" ring knocked off). So for me, the Sight c felt like it would be a good, snappy, yet active and fun XC/trail bike that is very well balanced for climbing to descending with 140 front to back (I wouldn't necessarily want to run it at my local AM trail center for some reason though). The Troy felt like it could handle more to me while descending, kind of like a "freight train" coming down when up to speed with the bigger wheels working for you nicely. Sight C the better climber and snappier trailbike, yet supple if not using all the travel, which isn't really hard to do if riding the bike a little aggressively. Just my take here on the two, given the two builds and time/terrain I rode them on. Maybe would be different with Troy C build, but still think Sight c has the edge for climbs and Troy for the rougher and rowdier trail descents.
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  • + 2
 Canadian bike, $1050 cheaper state side. Then Norco have the nerve, talking about buy local. Whatever.
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  • + 1
 I hated my RP23 on my enduro, until I got it serviced and revalved for me and the bike. Now it blows my mind. Its all about the mid-stroke support.
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  • + 1
 I saw the price then the X1 cranks/bb and thought X1 was below X5 and freaked out, nope it's alloy cranks for X01, nice looking bike!
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  • + 1
 Because quotes usually have a distinctive typeface
Also, your name is "Enduro27" so your comment isn't valid
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  • - 1
 I stopped reading this article when I ran across the word "horrowshows". I know learning can be frowned upon but I had to look it up. That is not a word in the English Language. Please stop making up words Pinkbike.
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  • + 1
 I never saw that "compare to other [category] bikes" bit before. Is it new or did I miss it? Anyway, great feature!
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  • + 1
 now i would like to see a review of a carbon version of the norco range. please pinkbike, make it happen!
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  • + 1
 The bike is fuckin sexy theres no doubt about it, pretty much point on with everything
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  • - 1
 What does a remote resi have to do with plushness? The purpose is to allow for a larger oil volume to prevent fading, not add "Plushness". Retards........
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  • + 1
 Lets have a review on the Norco carbon Range!
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  • + 1
 It's insanely awesome looking
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  • + 1
 140mm of travel...5250 dollars? Light , performance and...coffe?
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  • + 1
 i am so impressed with Norco this year I might buy one and diss my Ibis
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  • + 1
 NORCO IS BACK!!!
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  • - 1
 Looks like a better alternative than Specialized at the moment. It's not a 27.5, it is how ever a 650b.
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  • + 0
 much 650b. So carbon. wow
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 Why are all the comments in italics now?? it looks terrible
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  • - 3
 If you look past the 650b, thats one good lookin bike.
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