Pinkbike Best of 2012 - Tech Editor Picks

Dec 31, 2012 at 12:01
Dec 31, 2012
by Richard Cunningham  
 
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Favorite New Product:
e*13 LG1+ pedal

- Mike Levy

We ride a lot of different types of platform pedals here at Pinkbike and it isn't uncommon for us to argue openly about what each of us thinks works best. Show up at the Pinkbike office and you'll likely find us rattling on ad nauseam about pin layout, platform size, concave, and just how important (or not) a thin body actually is, with the finer points of pedal design never being universally agreed upon by any of us. e*13's LG1+ pedal managed to pretty much shut us all up, though, except for when we were going on and on about how good they are. You want traction? It has the most.
Looking for a massive platform size? Here it is. Want to adjust the amount of bite? Go right ahead. They aren't perfect: I'd like them to spin with less resistance than they do (an updated seal kit is said to greatly improve this aspect), and they look downright chubby compared to some of the ultra-thin models on the market, but the LG1+ pedal simply offers so much traction and support - exactly what most platform users are looking for - that it makes the majority of the competition look silly.
e*13 Components


Favorite New Product:
Trail Boss collapsible trail tool

- Brad Walton


This time of year, more of my time goes into building new trail than riding existing trail. I love building remotely, but sometimes it's a real struggle to get way out there and carry all the tools with me. I met a guy last year on a local trail work
day who had a prototype of a tool that he built in his garage. Since then, Bill has turned the Trail Boss into a production unit that's ready to cut, chop, dig, and rake, and it all fits into my hydration backpack. It's a trail builder's dream tool. Made from machined aluminum and fiberglass, the lightweight Trail Boss handle is available in four, 24-inch segments or three, 16-inch segments with a variety of attachments. So far, a Corona razor saw, McLeod head, Mattock/pick, and Mattock/axe are available, with a shovel and rogue hoe attachment in the works. And this isn't just a cute show tool. Aside from prying boulders, the Trail Boss is just as strong, if not stronger than conventional fiberglass handled tools, and features a 3-year warranty. The aluminum couplings are finely machined to provide quick, sturdy assembly/disassembly. Made in USA by an avid mountain biker and passionate trail builder. For an innovative approach for showing love to the trail, I give the Trail Boss the Best New Product award.
Trail Insight


Favorite New Product:
SRAM XXI

- RC


The fact that SRAM’s new single-chainring drivetrain has eleven speeds is its least important benefit. What XXI brings to the table are simple solutions to real-life dilemmas that modern bike designers and riders have been wrestling with for years. Eliminating all but one chainring up front makes more room for larger volume tires on all bikes and offers the possibility of perfect chain alignment, but the advantages for 29ers are far more substantial. Ridding the bottom bracket area of two chainrings and the front derailleur clears enough real estate to allow frame designers to dramatically
shorten the chain stays and to use all-mountain width rubber. XX1 moves the largest sprocket to the cassette, where it is well protected, and then shrinks the vulnerable chainring to the point where its size and strength are robust enough to survive all but the harshest conditions without a bash guard. All this would not be possible without introducing a new (read: incompatible) freehub design in order to accommodate XXI’s small, ten-tooth cog on the outboard and the 42-tooth cog on the inboard end of the cassette. While haters may complain about SRAM’s non-standard cassette and freehub body, it is the most essential aspect of XXI. Its gearing spread nearly matches that of today's three-by-ten drivetrains. SRAM’s wide-ratio cassette makes the one-by drivetrain a better solution for any mountain bike rider, from top pro to Joe Blow.


Favorite New Product:
SRAM XXI

- Mike Levy


SRAM took a lot of heat for their 11 speed XX1 drivetrain from riders who harken back to the "good 'ol days of seven cogs," but for better or worse, modernization and ingenuity push on regardless of what gets said on the forums and message boards. After riding the system I have to say that SRAM's XX1 is clearly for the better: a large gear range that can be adjusted by swapping out chain rings, clever 'X-Sync' tooth profiles that will allow some riders to run simpler, chain guide-free drivetrains, and bike designers no longer having to compromise frame layout because of those pesky front derailleurs. XX1 doesn't get the nod solely because it functions so well in its current (and admittedly very expensive) form, though, but also because of what the accumulated developments mean for drivetrains down the road. You can pretty much guarantee that the technology used in XX1 will trickle down to far more economical drivetrain components in the near future, not to mention being utilized in other disciplines of our sport such as downhilling. What about the unicorn of drivetrains, the gearbox? Given the performance of XX1, as well as the knock-on effect it will have for less expensive counterparts down the road, I don't see the need for any such thing as 'gears in a can'.
SRAM


Favorite New Product:
Roval SL 29 Carbon Wheels

- Matt Wragg

Carbon wheels ain't cheap. There is no escaping from that fact, to the point that they are out of reach for most people, and we can't discuss a set of them without putting that up-front. With 26-inch carbon wheels, the bike feels faster and more responsive. With 29-inch wheels, like these Rovals, however, they go further - and may prove to be game-changers. Bigger wheels have always meant more weight and the end result has been trail wheelsets with DH-comparable weights. Nothing kills the feeling of a bike like overly heavy wheels, but with carbon, you can dramatically cut
that weight while retaining strength, and this brings the bike to life - and it opens up a new world of what is possible with big-wheeled bikes. But yes, it is progress with a price tag.
Specialized/Roval




Best Drivetrain Innovation:
Clutch Derailleurs

- Mike Kazimer


The introduction of the clutch derailleur has brought a new level of quiet to the trails. There's no longer any excuse for bombing down your favorite track on a bike that sounds like a string of aluminum cans is dragging behind it. Chain slap, the culprit responsible for sending home mechanics to their garages armed with old tubes and
electrical tape in an attempt to silence the sound of a chain smacking bare aluminum, is minimized with the new style derailleurs. Spend some time on a bike equipped with a clutch derailleur and then ride one without and the noise difference is immediately apparent. And dropped chains? While still possible, they're much less likely, allowing many riders to get away with running a 1x10 setup and a simple chain guide like MRP's 1x or E13's XCX. Shimano has dubbed their clutch technology Shadow Plus, while SRAM calls theirs Type Two, but both have proven to be reliable and worthy upgrades to any drivetrain. A quiet bike is a fast bike, and clutch derailleurs are an easy way to add some speed to your steed.
Shimano, SRAM




Favorite Trailbike:
Santa Cruz Tallboy LTc

- RC


The 29er had matured into a thriving institution among the trail riding and XC segment of the sport by the time Pinkbike picked it up on the radar screen. The realization, however tardy, couldn’t have come at a better time, because at that very moment, wide tires, capable geometry and (relatively) longer-travel suspension designs were coming on line for big wheel bikes. The Mucky Mucks at Santa Cruz were equally adamant against big wheels – until internal pressure from 29er employees and financial incentives from
29er-hungry dealers forced them to reconsider. Getting a late start may also have been a good thing for Santa Cruz, because all the pieces they needed to keep their house full of hard-core trail riders happy were readily obtainable. The original Tallboy was born a winner. It was lightweight, it had head-of-class handling, and under power, it steamed down the trail like a runaway locomotive. All it needed was more wheel travel. My first ride on the carbon fiber Tallboy LTc was the clincher. With 135-millimeters in the rear and 140 up front, 29er-adjusted fork geometry, and exquisitely balanced frame metrics, the bike melted away after a few hundred yards and I was flying. The reason the Tallboy LTc is my choice is that it breaks the mythology of the 29er vs the 26er. There is little or no perception of wheel size, no compensation for steering angle, no monkey motion required to properly weight the bike. It's just a great ride. Santa Cruz found the nexus point between big wheels and proper bike handling.
Santa Cruz




Best Product Under $50: Topeak Mountain Morph pump
- Brad Walton

There are a few products out there that endure the test of time. The Mountain Morph pump has been a staple of my gear bag for nearly 10 years, but its reliability isn't what sold me on the pump. A flip-out foot pad and T-handle combine with a flexible swivel hose to create a portable floor pump, and with a large-diameter aluminum barrel, filling even DH tires is a super quick process. Whenever someone in my riding group gets a flat, I pull out the Mountain Morph and after they've used it, the response
is almost always, "I gotta get one of these." Sure, Co2's are faster, lighter and smaller, but for longer rides, nothing beats the reliability of a good pump, and it's a one-time cost. The Morph converts for Presta or Schrader use. I never leave home without it. Weight: 250 grams, MSRP: $30 USD.
Topeak


Best Product Under $50: $49 Donation to Trail Advocacy
- RC

Dirt is cheap - until you have to go to court to buy it. Breakfast at a roadhouse and fuel for a half-day of shuttling costs more than fifty bucks. Not all of us are the skip-a-day-of-riding-and-shovel-dirt-for-somebody-else’s-trail type, but most of us can afford to write a check once or twice a year to fund our local trail advocacy organization. If you don’t have one, send a check to IMBA and they will see that your money gets to the right place. Bike parks are cool, but there is nothing better than trail riding, and it takes a lot of time and money to keep
trails buffed and bike friendly. Don’t like advocacy nerds? Most unauthorized diggers and riders secretly hope that their trails will survive for others to enjoy. Advocacy nerds have legitimized many miles of secret hope. Send ‘em fifty bucks.
IMBA


Best Product Under $50: Marsh Guard
- Alasdair MacLennan

There are several iterations of these fenders out there, but the one I’ve spent the most time using is the Marsh Guard. Massively effective at preventing spray from reaching your eyes, they’re cheap, simple and virtually indestructible - and there aren’t many things in the MTB industry you can say that about. Usually, cheaper products are bettered by those costing exponentially more. However, in the case of the Marsh Guard, it works so superbly that there’s no need to spend any more. In fact, to do so, you’d lose the inherent simple and indestructible nature that makes it such a winner.
Marsh Guard



Best Product Under $50:
ODI Lock-On Bumpers

- Mike Kazimer

Mountain biking can be an expensive sport, especially in the world of downhill bikes, where even the smallest accessories seem to empty the wallet. For that reason, ODI's Lock-On fork bumpers earn my vote for the best product under $50. For less than the price of a cheeseburger in Whistler, you get a set of bumpers that can easily be installed in under 5 minutes with only a
3mm Allen key, protecting your frame from potentially costly damage. Designed to fit forks with 40mm (Fox) or 35mm stanchions (RockShox BoXXer), the bumpers can even be installed without removing the fork crown. Plus, they're made in the USA, available in black, blue, white, and red, and feature eyelets for securing a race number plate.
ODI Grips




Most Anticipated Product:
Thomson Elite dropper post

- Mike Levy


Dropper posts... a product category that I constantly label as a game changer for anyone who adds one to their bike, while at the same time I often harp on about how unreliable most are. I've had great luck with a few, most notably RockShox's Reverb (which I labeled Best Product of '11), but the general consensus among consumers seems to be a widespread lack of faith in the long term reliability of most designs. It's for this reason that many readers sat up and took notice of the yet-to-be released dropper post from Thomson, a name that is synonymous with trustworthy components. Yes, I am fully aware that a dropper post requires more engineering and prudence than a traditional post, but if any company is going to crack the code I expect it to be the crew from Macon, Georgia.

The Elite Dropper offers 5"/127mm of infinitely adjustable travel, meaning that it can be positioned anywhere between full extension and fully lowered. The travel is controlled with a sealed cartridge (it can be worked on by a service center, though) that separates the post's hydraulic oil from the non-adjustable nitrogen return spring that is set at 135psi. Thomson has employed a clever second check valve within the cartridge that keeps the post from pulling up through its travel when lifting the bike by the saddle, thereby remedying a somewhat annoying trait of some other hydraulically controlled posts. An interesting sixteen-point shaft fits inside of a matching sixteen-point profile within the outer tube to keep everything inline and rattle-free.

Will it outlast everything else on the market? I've gone out on a limb here to say that it will, so we sure it hope it does. The Elite Dropper will be available in early April of 2013 in both 30.9 and 31.6mm sizes, with a 27.2mm option ready in the coming summer. MSRP is set at $389.95 USD.

Most Anticipated Product:
Thomson Elite dropper post

- Brad Walton


I'm rarely an early-adopter of new trends, and that certainly was no exception when it came to the dropper post. But, after Mike Levy told me he'd "rather go back to V-brakes than give up my dropper post," I figured I'd better check one out. Is it necessary? No. Just like disc brakes aren't necessary. If you like to rest at the top of a long climb, don't worry about it. But I'll meet you at the bottom, because this modern day Hite-Rite pulls out all the stops. After my adaptation stage, I've decided to put one on all my bikes. I've been through a few from various companies, and the 2012 gold standard has proven to be the Reverb. As reliable as the RockShox dropper is, however, I for one would like to eliminate the fragility of its exposed hydraulic fittings. I've seen them torn clean off and one blowout experience led to spilled Reverb fluid all over a rear brake rotor. The good news is that 2013 promises a mechanical dropper offering from one of the most consistently great component manufacturers of our time - Thomson. Thomson's five-inch-stroke dropper will feature infinitely adjustable travel with lever-adjusted return speed, hydraulic internals with a nitrogen return spring, a weight of very close to one pound, and a projected MSRP of $380. The seatpost's return speed is variable, based on how far the lever is pressed, and the post has an internal mechanism to prevent it from extending when the bike is lifted by its saddle. Thomson's focus is simple, clean, and reliable, so I expect this post to outperform the rest.
Thomson


Most Anticipated Product: Specialized Demo 8 Carbon
- Mike Levy

Thanks to it popping up under Team Monster Energy - Specialized riders throughout the season, as well as making an appearance at Crankworx while it was still in the development phase, Specialized's Demo 8 Carbon had people clamoring for information long before it was ever an official model from the Big Red S. We worked directly with Specialized, as well as Sam Hill himself, to bring you every last bit of information for the Pinkbike exclusive release in early
June, an article that now sits at well over 100,000 reads! With its exclusive 9-26 tooth, 7-speed gear range and BlackGold treated BoXXer World Cup stanchions, the ultra high-end S-Works Demo 8 Team Replica model has raised the bar for other so-called "team replica" bikes, although with just 250 S-Works Demo 8's being produced, the trick might be to actually track one of them down. And if you do, you best be winning some races if you're aboard this super-bike.
Specialized


Most Anticipated Product:
Mass-Produced Gearbox

- Brad Walton

Our phones are tiny computers, gateways to infinite knowledge. Cars have buttons on them for automatic parallel parking. And yet we're still refining that age old Achilles heel, the derailleur. It's time already. Time for the gearbox revolution. I for one am sick of derailleurs. They're light, relatively cheap, and... I'm at a loss for what else. They work well until they receive an impact. And this sport is all about impact. Even if you're not crashing on a regular basis, that mechanical complexity we rely on for consistent cadence is just hanging on for dear life by mere threads of alloy, exposed to everything within inches of the trail. Not to mention, exposure to the elements. Rohloff's Speedhub has been around for years and some people love them, but it still requires a chain tensioner of some type. Pinion is on the verge of something with the P1.18, but there is currently only one frame manufacturer embracing the design. These are a start, but instead of 18-speeds, lets get an 8, 9, or 10-speed model with a comparable weight to a derailleur system. And let's get one thing clear- twisting is for throttles. Put a real shifter on it. It won't happen in 2013. Probably not even in '14. But what I'm looking forward to most in the future of mountain biking is not another evolution of the derailleur, it's the revolution of the bike.
Pinion Gearbox



Most Anticipated Product:
Syntace’s W35 MX Wheel Set

- RC

Ride a DH bike with 35-millimeter-wide rims and 2.35-inch tires, and it corners with authority. Put those same tires on skinny rims and the bike starts to hunt when you push it hard in a turn. Stronger aluminum alloys and carbon fiber manufacturing have made it possible to produce wider rims for XC, trail and AM use without suffering a substantial weight penalty. Syntace’s W35 MX wheel set offers the precise feel and wide footprint of a downhill wheel for trail and all-mountain use. At only 1680 grams a pair, and laced to
welded-aluminum rims that measure a full 28 millimeters, inside to inside, Syntace’s W35 MX wheels are game changers. Because the wider rims add significant volume and width, riders can often scale down one tire size without suffering a loss in cornering or climbing traction. The wider stance also helps to laterally stabilize tubeless tires. Syntace offers 40 and 25 millimeter-wide versions as well. I am hoping many more wheel makers will follow suit. I think a wider rim standard will boost the performance of bikes with any wheel diameter, and especially so for 29ers, where the extra tire volume and directional stability would be a welcome benefit.
Syntace


Most Anticipated Product:
Specialized P.Slope

- RC

By a large margin, the bike that pops up the most in my correspondence with PB readers is the P.Slope. Specialized pulled the P.Slope prototype from its bag of tricks at the Whistler Crankworx festival and from that moment, the unanswered question has been, ‘When?’ The short-travel dual-suspension jumper employs a swingarm pivot that is concentric to the bottom bracket shell to eliminate chain growth in order to facilitate single-speed drivetrains, and its shock runs through a seat tube tunnel to keep the bike slim for stunts. Bottom line is that the P.Slope appears to have all the makings of a next-generation slopestyle winner and it couldn't have come at a better time. The magnitude of the stunts in pro competition, as the 2012 Redbull Joyride
aptly demonstrated, has pushed traditional hardtail slopestyle bikes beyond their physical limits. The stage is set for a slopestyle competition to progress to a new level - for both man and machine. The P.Slope was slated to arrive just in time for Christmas 2012. If it lives up to its looks, the P.Slope could help to write one of the first pages in the new chapter of the sport.
Specialized


Most Anticipated Product:
DVO Suspension

- Alasdair MacLennan

Staffed and run by the same guys who were behind Marzocchi USA, DVO Suspension is headed up by Bryson Martin. There has been lots of hype, news releases, and teaser images of the prototype gravity racing products - the Emerald fork and Jade shock. Although there are only a handful of people who have ridden them, the ingredients are all there to offer stellar performance to the race and gravity crowd. After that, who knows? The team has plenty of experience in all the key development areas and have spent a lot of time developing the top end Marzocchi products,
so they know how to create a winning product. With several experienced World Cup techs on hand, they should be an easy to tune product too. No mechanic likes to spend more time than is necessary stripping and rebuilding parts. Like others the world over, I’m keen to get my hands on these as soon as possible to see if they can live up to the hype, but for now I’ll have to live my life in suspense.
DVO Suspension



Must Read This Week









139 Comments

  • + 124
 lol now most anticipated is a carbon pulse for you newly converted nukeproof sam hill fans Wink
  • - 37
 I've never liked sam either, but the crc nukeproof team I've liked for a while to, miss the old british squad and matti tho
  • + 89
 I never changed my opinion of someone just because they are riding on a different bike......
  • + 39
 I've never really understood why so much interest in what team riders are riding for. There are tons of good bikes out there which will be good regardless of what pro are riding them, and there are tons of great riders who will be great regardless of what bike they are riding.
  • + 7
 I have always liked Sam Hill and also team Crc nukeproof but now they are together I am super excited to se what they can do together.
  • + 7
 I love it when a pro I follow goes to a frame I think is crap and just kills it ; a good reminder that many times this sport is more man than machine.
  • + 1
 am I seriously the only guy who will miss lewis buchanan, al bond, matti lehikoinen and the mechuras?
  • + 5
 Amen to pinion gearboxes. The future hopefully will get them right.
  • + 1
 i love it how this article has absolutely nothing to do with sam hill or nukeproof....so stop talking about it
  • + 2
 The carbon demo 8 has quite a bit to do with sam actually.
  • + 6
 Sam Hill could ride for Supercycle for all I care, my demo is still the best bike I've ever rode.
  • + 1
 Anybody got a Sunday for Sam to ride so he can start winning races again?
[Reply]
  • + 79
 Sooo many things I cant afford Frown
  • + 23
 not only youFrown
  • + 40
 buy a MarshGuard
  • + 14
 drooling on p-slope.. and thomson dropper... and spec demo carbon.. and xx1.. but at least before that, a $49 donation would be great to get awesome trails to be shred.
  • + 3
 WTF??!! "less than the price of a cheeseburger in Whistler"???!! I guess I'll be fattening up before I go, because I'd rather buy a lift ticket than eat.
  • + 3
 It's hard finding a cheap place to eat in the Whistler Village. Tried both times that I went and I couldn't seem to find one
  • + 7
 Misty Mountain pizza (right by Summit Sports)! 2 large slices and a pop for $8, best value in Whistler IMO
  • + 2
 make a marsh guard ..its free
  • + 2
 Gotta hit up Roland's whenever you go to whistler. Best pulled pork in the world!
  • + 1
 DIY fender bender or marsh guard:

30 minutes, $1.99 "flexible binder" (or other lightweight plastic material), 7 zip ties

picasaweb.google.com/102192623223167170241/January32013?authuser=0&authkey=Gv1sRgCJCA4cmitYOVnQE&feat=directlink
  • + 1
 El Furniture Warehouse is a good place for you cheap pricks to eat when in Whistler. Wink Everything's $4.95.
[Reply]
  • + 31
 love this. that trail boss toll looks too sick!
  • + 4
 stupidly expense though, its so much cheaper to buy all the tools separably!
  • + 11
 well your missing the point of the tool lol. and its hand made so you get what you pay for
  • + 2
 i see what the tool does and it looks great but it would be cheaper just to carry the tools in the get your bike and do separate trips!
  • + 2
 How many miles would you walk with an even 2 tools in hand? 2, 5, 10 ? Then walk back out and get your bike?
  • + 22
 I've always hiked in my tools and left them under a tarp, moving them up along the trail as it's built, but the purpose of this tool is different. Existing trails need maintenance, and this tool makes it easy to get there and work for a bit as part of the ride. Some sections of trail never get any love because they are too far out to justify hiking in a tool, and riding with a typical long-handled tool can be dangerous, or even deadly in the case of a local guy here a few years ago. Funny how the bicycle has evolved from transportation to recreation, and now with a portable trail tool the bike is used for transportation to build recreational bike trails.
  • + 1
 If it was 100$ I would buy it. I've strapped a shovel to my backpack, and watched my head, but this tool is a dream come true. That said, I would rather buy a wheelset or some brakes than spend the money on an overexpensive tool.
  • + 2
 It's expensive, but consider: www.amazon.com/Glock-Entrenching-Tool-w-Pouch/dp/B002PQCMI0/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1356994088&sr=8-2&keywords=glock+shovel

It's mass-produced, actually the first product Glock ever made, and it's still 50 Bucks. So the cost for so much more flexibility and handle length doesn't seem all that far off to me, especially with it being small business produced.
  • + 1
 I see a shovel on the site but they are for some reason not avail? And what about a Pulaski???
Brad, I asume you have used this tool, how does it hold up? Those are aluminum threads right? Do they get gunked up or try to cross thread?
  • + 4
 This tool is great. I'm a professional builder and use it for trail maintenance more than for building new trails and stunts. Like Brad is saying, I'm also leaving my tools out at the building site and only carry my chainsaw and supplies in on a daily basis. The trail boss is really well build and has a solid feel. It's a treat to be able to go for a ride and still have a variety of useful and lightweight tools in your backpack.
  • + 1
 I don't have quite enough use to comment on the threads, but so far so good. Thread pitch is pretty broad, so I doubt it could be cross-threaded. Regarding gunk, that is a possibility, and as the tool's care instructions suggest wiping threads clean before assembly. It does have a Pulaski attachment (called the axe/mattock on the site) and there is also a Rogue Hoe head available, which IMO is about the only tool needed around here. Shovel will be available any day now. I'm sure if you inquired with them, they could send you one. Everyone that has one of these raves about it.
  • + 4
 I NEED a Trail Boss!! That is the greatest thing I have seen since the first real boob I got to touch.
[Reply]
  • + 15
 i don't think that the p slope is a revolution in the slope style world. i mean it's a super dope bike and all, but they pretty much took the doberman lepink, and made it "specialized". like nothing against the bike and im sure that it is going to be better then the lepink, but if doberman didn't make a revolution with their bike, what will the p slope change?

www.pinkbike.com/news/dobermann-sea-otter-2010.html
  • + 6
 Because it has a SPECIALIZED sticker on it!
  • + 2
 Exactly. Specialized seems to be considered the best. And don't get me wrong, pretty much every bike they have is fantastic, but you do pay a premium price for them. As well, a concentric bottom bracket really is far from impressive on the new p. slope. I was much more impressed by rocky mountains new slayer ss.
  • + 1
 simple answer: BANSHEE RAMPANT

gp1.pinkbike.org/p4pb5899445/p4pb5899445.jpg

#1 short travel suspension bike on the market

perfect strength to weight (6.95lb including Fox RP2 shock) ratio, great geometry, very low standover height, high quality of frame manufacturing (hydroformed tubes and cold forged frame components)

gp1.pinkbike.org/p4pb5383931/p4pb5383931.jpg

an awesome pedalling bike (unlike the BB mounted single pivots) but also has active braking and will actually accelerate when pumping the suspension and not pedalling, so perfect for dirt jumps and pump tracks

been around for years too Wink
[Reply]
  • + 19
 Agree on the Gearbox system, its about damn time we evolve.
  • + 6
 Zeroed bikes man!!!
  • + 3
 Zerode Cavalerie Nicolai Allutech All making functional gearbox bikes. And Grip shift is fine if done right. Beneficial even on a gearbox bike that can change multiple gears in one hit. Keep your regurgitated ill informed hype opinions to yourself pinkbike. Say sh!t that's factual, not just stuff people will agree with because they know no better. A Grip shifter with good stiff indexing placed inboard so your hand only just touches it will never miss shift. I've done it with Rohloff, and Nuvinci, without ever a miss shift. Will try it on my Zerodes Alfine one day when I can be bothered. You'd be doing yourself a disservice not buying a gearbox bike because it had grip shift.
  • + 2
 go pinion! I want a good bb sized gear box to end the discussion. Mount the tensioner right behind the gear box too.
  • + 2
 I like Pinion's design, but I wish they'd rotate the gearbox out of an impact zone. just align it with the seattube instead of the downtube.
[Reply]
  • + 7
 ODI FORK BUMPERS DESTROYED MY FRAME! They are way to hard... I really can't recommed them...
  • + 3
 I have them on my forks as well and now i have a dented top tube...
  • + 0
 thanks for the heads up! I was looking at them for if I got a 40
  • + 2
 Yea thanks for the heads up I almost bought some!
  • + 4
 The bumpers work well, but you do need to pay attention to their orientation when installing them. Ideally, they should contact a reinforced portion of the frame - on a weld, gusset, etc...Any bumper can dent a frame if it contacts a thin section of the frame.
  • - 2
 They look like absolute garbage anyways.
  • + 1
 I bought these, and can say that the standard 40 bumpers that spin causing the stantion to hit the frame and cables caused a lot more damage. So far the odi ones haven't caused any noticeable damage and I ride a session 88.
  • + 1
 Just buy a session 9.9 you never will have anymore bumper issues ever!
  • + 2
 yea, you'll have the normal trek issues...
  • + 1
 @seanlegan - I wish I could! One day...
  • - 1
 lol @seanlegan you must live in a cave to not know about their breakage issues, I've seen session 88's and remedy 9.9's break first hand and heard about others having the same problem
  • + 1
 Not going to lie, i cracked/split mine twice this year :S but it was 3 y/o and Trek replaced the parts both times under warranty.
  • + 1
 Finnrambo- you obviously have no clue of what that bike can take. Stop trolling comments because you have no life. That bike has handled more abuse than my aluminum demo that is dented to hell. After a season of beating the cramp out of mine all is has is a few scratches and rock gouges. And that's all hard bike park riding. That bike broke my pelvis into 5 places and the bike is perfect. I have never seen any of these break problems you speak of. Show me your proof!
  • - 1
 look anywhere, even nsmba has a review of a trek with chainstays that kept snapping, I've never bought a trek for this reason if yours still works then I guess your lucky, hell I have a commencal which I've had no issues with despite their reputation, doesn't mean they break less
  • + 3
 All bikes break dude.
[Reply]
  • + 8
 That trail tool looks handy!!!!!
  • + 3
 Yeah I'm intrigued to hear some user reviews...how durable is it in the real world?
  • + 2
 Its absolutely amazing. A friend of mine has the prototype from his friend (the owner of Trail Boss) they use for testing and its indestructible. Yeah its a lot of money but it will out live any other tool...and its portable
  • + 3
 Love it! Now if I rob a bank and hit the lottery maybe I can fix up some trails...
[Reply]
  • + 3
 I'm very curious to see this Thomson dropper post to hit the market. The wide ranging assumption is that this thing will set the new bar for dropper posts because of Thomson's reputation for making a quality product. I tend to think this way too but I am still curious because this seems a little out of the comfort zone for them. While they make great stuff, their existing product lines of bars, stems, posts etc. are much different than a dropper post. Everything else they make is just solid components. Mostly just static machined parts, nothing mechanical like a dropper post. With a dropper post you now introduce all kinds of things like cables, hydraulics, internal mechanisms, seals, oils, etc.

So while I expect it to be good, I don't know we should so easily assume that the Thomson dropper will be able to out perform companies like Rockshox and Fox (who's engineers have more of a suspension background) on its first try.
  • + 3
 I see where you are coming from, but LH Thomson does a lot more than just the seatposts and stems that we know. www.lhthomson.com They have plenty of experience in the moving parts side of engineering to pull off this seatpost.
  • + 1
 If thats the case then that might go a long way. Hopefully they are able to tap into that.
  • + 4
 Thomson is also a bit late to the game, and it shows in their design. In my opinion, for a new dropper post to compete in today's market, it cannot have a seat clamp mounted actuation mechanism. It needs to be down by the seatpost collar (ie KS LEV). One of the biggest design flaws of the current generation posts is that darn cable loop that sticks out and hits you in the leg when you drop the post!. Thomson have missed the boat on this one in my opinion.
  • + 4
 I totally agree with your apprehension, and shoreboy1866 is right on the money. The KS LEV is an awesome adjustable seatpost, and I anticipate it will get even better because Kind Shock will most likely improve on their nearly flawless design, while the others will have to play catch up because their posts are already outdated.
  • + 1
 Eee... I have no idea whats the problem with cable attached on top near the seat mount? Main flaaaaw? I could not care less about hanging cable that I tried on two different frames. Construction wise it is just easier to do to either mount it up there or from the bottom - what requires internal routing and good luck to remove tour seatpost whenever you want to put the bike inside the car. It is just super hard to design a cable going into the post in the middle of its height. Therefore I doubt it to be as reliable as "top/down solition. Dunno about KS Lev but I prefer hanging cable than this crap from Crank Bros
  • + 3
 I am surprised we are not seeing a wireless electronic dropper that works on a bluetooth signal from your smartphone. Pre-programmable to drop the post at designated locations per a gps app. Could be manually overridden by a chip installed in your ass.
  • + 0
 Toddonbike: I have some disturbing news about that! Wireless revolution is coming. Press Follow me on my profile. In few days I will publish some protype pics from Shmox suspension and She-Man-oh. Waki-leaks is coming...
[Reply]
  • + 6
 it's ironic that Redbull Joyride was won on a hardtail this year then. I'm with you though, the p-slope looks boss.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 IMO, XX1 needs a bash guard... I will destroy that expensive chain. Thompson rules, but that dropper is 4 years old, floating cable fail. The carbon Demo is one sexy beast, if you're into DH racing. Best innovation for 2012, Saint clutch rear mech! thank you Shimano for stepping it up far far beyond any crappy Sram product. Happy new year peeps.
  • - 1
 Good observation on lack of xx1 bash guard, the system as a whole seems vulnerable to damage: no bashguard, thinner chain, longer derailleur, and larger cassette which makes derailleur hanger alignment more crucial.

In the future when gearboxes are dialed and derailleurs thankfully gone, we will look back and laugh at that ridiculous 42 tooth cassette.
  • + 4
 Im waiting for X91... Pricing of XX1 is worse than ENVE rims
  • + 1
 It's going to trickle down as soon as enough people switched to x10 cassettes, of course haha! Kinda hoping gearboxes become more popular before that though. By the time I need to change my current frame, there will probably be proven AM gearbox frame alternatives by then so I'm keeping my eyes peeled for that.
  • + 1
 As good as XX1 maybe, it's going to be irrelevant to me because of the cost. Until they come down to XT/X9 pricing. Also, having to buy a new rear hub/add on is going to increase the price by 100-300 depending if you are getting a new hub or cassette body for it. I do like the idea of it though.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 How's the reverb a gold standard? Am I the only one that after 6 months decided to never use it again? It brakes on top of what is already broken. I am going Gravity Dropper until reliable technology is PROVEN by riders, not media megaphones
[Reply]
  • + 2
 One question I have about the clutch and type two derailleurs is WTF too so long here? The concept and design here really isn't all that technical.

How long have people been trying to figure out how to keep their chain on and keep it from slamming into the chainstays. I mean how many internet threads are out there talking about this or that kind of tape, or old tubes, or the soft side of velcro, or whatever other kind of home remedy, all in the name of shutting up the damn chain noise.

WHat the heck too these companies so long to say hey, lets put a little tension on this thing so it doesnt flop around.
[Reply]
  • + 4
 Not that Pinkbike would cover this product, but the Carbon Fibre brakes from the kickstarter the other month ago look like something to get into.
  • + 5
 I have a set coming for testing. Very excited about these.
  • + 1
 Khehe, those new Maguras look like some engineer, Sigfried or something, was cleaning his bike with Muc-off spray, and got a revelation that he can take that plastic sprayer and make a disc brake lever out of it. In car-tuning world they make sure that if you pay for carbon fibre it looks like made from carbon fibre. Bicycle industry needs to understand that their CF products should not look like cheap plastic. And things used to look good like first Scott Ransom CF
[Reply]
  • + 1
 The e.13 pedals are definitely pretty awesome, fully customizable to you, and they never slip. my only complaint has been when I'm hiking or unloading and those things get a hold of a shin they do not let go! I've gotten more pedal bite walking around with them than I ever have slipping off pedals. They are viscous!
  • + 9
 Vicious* (stupid auto spell)
  • + 2
 Just turn it off... Its retarded anyway.
[Reply]
  • + 3
 I'd just like to wish the Pinkbike crew and the mountain bike community a happy new year! May we all have many more years of shredding!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I love RC. First he goes all old man XC on us telling how great the tall boy is and how you can't even tell its a 29er! All us pinkbike kids are so late on 29ers. Then a few lines down he throws us radical kids a bone by talking about a super gnar slopestyle bike. On a serious note, thank you for not regurgitating the same talking points about how great 650b is that every other magazine and website is reporting as news.
  • + 0
 I was hoping his safety wire idea would make the list.
  • + 1
 Nice.... Huge respect for jump/slopestyle riders here. Posing the question about the progression of the sport...? the PB community weighed in heavily on that this year. This season will be interesting to watch.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 That was cool. Definitely has potential.
[Reply]
  • + 4
 Why does a dropper post cost so friggen much?!?!? Can't they just use the technology from my office chair and condense it?
  • + 2
 I've though the same thing. A cheap office chair has somehow reliably achieved this, but these major companies cant get it right?
  • + 4
 The posts are basically the same as the office chairs, but people want something they can use for 2+ years without cleaning or maintaining (use your office chair in a muddy forest for a while and see how long it works) or they call it junk. I have three brands of droppers, and none have failed but they do require upkeep.
  • + 3
 I would think that an office chair would maintain it's effectiveness pretty well in a muddy forest, as long as it remained upright. Except the little plastic wheels, those would get trashed.
  • + 1
 I would say size and weight. The same reason most bike parts cost so much.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Brad you're dead on about the gearbox. I ride a bike with a pinion p18 (29 hard tail) and its great but not being able to shift under load is a bigger downside than the twist shifter for sure.

So mr. Pinion please (or whoever else) make a 10/11 speed gearbox that shifts under load that is a bit lighter. That would be perfect for enduro: no chain guide, super reliable and a big range

Thanks!!
[Reply]
  • + 2
 Good notes on the need for only 10-12 gears on a IGH bike. I think the xx1 has shown that to some degree. I'd be way into a gearbox frame with a smaller range but much more competitive weight.
  • + 1
 Honestly, I don't mind taking a weight penalty hit for a gearbox. Correct me if I'm wrong but if you can take off the bashguard/chainguide/front derailleur/front der. shifter/chain ring and replace all that for a gearbox, I doubt the weight penalty is a deal breaker at that point, especially if you're not even racing.
  • + 1
 weeelll. there was a company showing a gearbox hub that weighed 10lbs at interbike this year. but yes, others seem to be getting close.
  • + 1
 Yeah I should have said gearbox, not IGH. IGH are great for somethings, but aggressive mountain biking is not it. Huge amounts of unsprung weight, and the trail chatter on the internals would kill any idea of that. But the BB located gearing seems like a good idea. Zerode is also a neat way to make it a reality etc
[Reply]
  • + 1
 All he weight saved by going 2x10 is now back with the 42 T rear cog. Seems like a lot of 'marketing' going on, Probably good for 9er's to have a wide range, but I wouldn't know.
  • + 2
 Actually the 42t cog is for 1x11 only, which will save weight by only having one front ring and no front shifter/cable/der.
  • + 1
 Lets go mad and run tripple chainset up front! 22t granny and 42t rear would be priceless. 48t up front, 42t back and you need two meter chain Smile
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns : and a very very long cage rd, till it rubbed the trail...Smile
  • + 1
 @fajar - you are SO missing the point. The world fastest forumers want NU School stuff, and that means short cages. They ride so hard in such gnarly terrain that even medium cage would be destroyed after one run. So the future is super short cage, no lower jockey - just a slider. GNAEEER!
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns : Actually I get your point crystal clear Smile . The fact is my single speed get ridden the most, that’s why for future shake I prefer gearbox over any derailleur system.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I have to admit, I was tempted by the e13s even though I run burgtec mk3s. So saved the penny's and bought some, they do exactly what is said above, it just......I'm still using my burgtecs, nuff said.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Pinion gearbox looks promising, its about time someone put this into proper development, sick of getting my derailleur smacked against everything.
[Reply]
  • + 0
 I don't doubt the e.13 pedals do what you say they do, but those are very plain looking pedals. The Spank platforms or the new Saint platforms look good, and get really decent reviews.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 the idea of donating to trail builders is fantastic, putting shovel to the ground is better, but a donation towards tools, and time is great.
[Reply]
  • - 1
 Can't wait to get my hands on a type II derailleur this year. On the other hand I'm can't really see a motorcycle type gearbox taking over the bicycle. Type II derailleur managed 1x drivetrains are finally sending the front derailleur into the history books. The elegance and efficiency of chain driven drivetrain has been reestablished.
[Reply]
  • + 3
 GEARBOX !!!! about time!!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Syntace W35 Wheels are in stock at Radsport USA!

26", 650b and 29'er
32h
15mm/20mm front
142mm/135mm rear
www.radsportusa.com
[Reply]
  • + 1
 What the sport needs is an AM-Enduro that is top quality and durability made in America for $2400 so the sport can gtow even faster.
  • + 2
 I want a Porsche 911 for the price of a Camry. Greedy car companies robbing me for my money!!!!!!! Why can't someone build a cheap supercar. There isn't $200k in carbon and metal in a supercar. They are ripping us off.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 i have been racing on 35 ml wide rims and they are amazing and are from spank i cant wait to get my 40 ml wide rims
  • + 2
 I bought one of those rims to check it out, 40mm is really kinda nuts. I haven't had a chance to lace it up yet, but it just looks so MASSIVE. Plus, it comes in lime, and that doesn't make me sad.
  • + 1
 yah i am getting the black one
[Reply]
  • + 2
 love the the trail building tool such a handy tool to have but very pricey
[Reply]
  • + 3
 DVO !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Thomson Dropper post available in 27.2 in the coming summer!?

Shut up and take my money!!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 WTF the reverb is shit because of exposed hydraulic lines... isn't it just as exposed as your brakes?
  • + 2
 No, it is more exposed because the cable itself moves, making it susceptible to catching on things.
  • + 1
 I guess your right, would be good if they made the cable/hose exit from the base around the seat collar.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 topeak mountain pump got one of them get you back on the trail in no time. clutch derailleur is on the list for an upgrade .
[Reply]
  • + 2
 derailerurs are dumb. I WANT MY GEARS IN A CAN!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Claymore. Gonna change the landscape of the Enduro season...and I'm a Jekyll fan,
[Reply]
  • + 1
 +1 on the Mountain Morph. Topeak really nailed that one. Mine's at least 8 years old.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 My Most Anticipated Product: pinion gear box and DVO suspensions!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Le pink? YeH I know if I can grab one doepe. If not, SPECIALIZED
[Reply]
  • + 1
 will Pinion make cranks generic? that would be better
[Reply]
  • + 0
 Does anybody know when the P. slope will be released?
[Reply]
  • - 1
 Specalized P.Slope RMB Slayer SS
[Reply]
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