Pinkbike Product Picks

May 24, 2013 at 0:07
May 24, 2013
by Mike Levy  
 
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JayBird BlueBuds X headphones

Anyone who has ever used headphones while doing any sort of activity knows full well that the cord catching and tugging on stuff is one of the most annoying things that can possibly happen, forcing you to constantly tinker with it while on the go. JayBird's wireless bluetooth BlueBuds X headphones look to solve that issue by not only eliminating the attachment to your music device, but also by incorporating clever flexible fins of different sizes that work to hold the earbuds in place while you exercise. The soft rubber fins, which come in three different sizes, work by fitting up into the folds of your ear, while the rubber earbuds themselves push into the canal much like you'd find from standard earbud style headphones. JayBird has designed them to be worn with the cord connecting the left and right earbuds either under the wearer's chin or behind the head (the call function does not work when using the latter setup, though), and the cord can be bundled up to keep its length in check. Battery life sits at an impressive eight hours - they charge via the included micro USB cable - and they are compatible with any Bluetooth capable music device, not just an iPhone or iPod. MSRP $169.95 USD. www.jaybirdgear.com

Jaybird headphones
Like to listen to music on the go? The BlueBud X headphones are not cheap, but they might be just what you're looking for.


Pinkbike's Take:
bigquotesWearing headphones while riding rates pretty high on the anti-social scale, not to mention being downright dangerous on busy trails, but there is a time and place where they do make sense. Many of our rides start with a twenty minute spin to the mountain, followed by a good hour or more of climbing up a steep decommissioned gravel road in order to access the goods, a task that can be made a bit more bearable by pumping our favourite tunes. With this in mind we were pretty stoked to try out the BlueBuds X headphones. With three different sizes of rubber buds (we found the medium size to work best for us), and three different fin sizes (we preferred the smallest), figuring out the best fit and setup is a small effort but it's certainly worth it to achieve the most secure fit possible. After tinkering around for fifteen minutes or so, we ended up with a setup that refused to budge from our ears, regardless of what we were doing. While we admittedly didn't expect the JayBird headphones to work that well, we have more than twenty rides with them now and can't remember having them dislodge once. The cord that connects the left and right earphones can be run either behind the head to keep it out of the way, or in the more traditional position under the chin, with us favouring the prior due it feeling invisible and not rattling on our helmet strap. We don't pretend to know much about sound quality but the BlueBuds Xs sound pretty decent to us, with deep bass that doesn't feel tinny whatsoever. Their range seems to be about four feet or so, more than enough to function fine if you have your music device in a pocket or your bag, and JayBird's claim of an eight hour battery life looks to be true.

While the JayBird headphones may be one of our favourite new pieces of gear, they aren't perfect. The control buttons that allow you to adjust the volume or answer calls while on the go feel a bit vague with gloved hands - it'd be nice if they stood out higher for a more tactile feel - and we kept accidentally dialling the last caller while trying to adjust the volume. We also experienced intermittent cutting out, with the sound being interrupted for for a split second once or twice an hour. Our other complaint is that the JayBirds don't fit as snuggly into the ear as other earbud style headphones, simply because the rubber fin that acts to hold them in place also dictates how deep they sit into the ear canal. The result is that they are a bit more prone to being affected by wind noise than a standard earbud setup that can be pushed further in. This isn't the end of the world - we noticed it more on our commute to the mountain than when we were actually on dirt - but it is worth noting. So, would we recommend picking up a set of the $169.95 USD BlueBuds X headphones, especially given that an inexpensive set of earbud style headphones can be had for around $20 USD? That really depends on how often you listen to music while riding (or running, hiking etc). The wireless Bluetooth technology is a massive plus in our mind as it means not having to fiddle with cords that can get caught on your shirt, jacket, backpack, or bike, and the sound quality is very good to boot. We're big fans of music, and despite the lecture that we are sure to get from some riders, we are also big fans of listening to music during a ride. With that in mind we would happily pony up for the BlueBuds X headphones. - Mike Levy





Prologo Scratch Pro seat

You could be forgiven for not knowing of Prologo if you don't live in Europe or split your saddle time between a mountain and road bike, but they offer a massive range of saddles for everything from skinny tired bikes to full out DH machines. With its carbon fiber rails, the Scratch Pro CPC tested here is intended for cross-country use, and it's for this reason that it uses Prologo's relieved 'ESD' shape to its sides that the company says allows for more efficient leg movement as the rider pedals. Its microfiber cover features what looks like growths of some kind but are actually patches of small upright rubber tubes of different heights and diameters, with the concept being to keep the rider from sliding back and forth on the seat. Prologo calls this design 'CPC', which stands for Connect Power Control. The seat features a slightly rounded profile that looks more forgiving than a flatter shape, and measures in at 134mm wide and 278mm long. MSRP $285.00 USD www.prologotouch.com

Scratch Pro seat
Prologo's Scratch Pro CPC seat had everyone at the trailhead asking about it. It looks weird but it works.


Pinkbike's Take:
bigquotesReviewing a seat is a tough thing to do. Not only are we all shaped differently down there, we all ask very different things of the seats we use: a lot cross-country or all-mountain cats needs something that's comfortable for the long haul, while those who don't often go past the two hour mark might be happy with anything. Then there are the downhillers and freerider types whose main concern is that they aren't going to break the rails or rip the seat's fabric cover the first time their bike goes off on its own. Prologo's unique looking Scratch Pro CPC most definitely falls into the first category, and we would go so far as to say that it likely isn't the ideal choice for an all-mountain type bike that will be leaving the ground on a regular basis, despite the seat's carbon fiber 'NACK' rails holding up just fine to the abuse we doled out. We also found its gently rounded top and 134mm width to work just fine for us, even on rides that went into the six hour mark, and the seat's nose didn't feel like it was going to drill into our nether regions when it came time to slide forward for a steep climb. And what about those rubber patches that look like a cat's tongue is about to lick your underside clean? It turns out that they actually do make a difference when it gets wet and muddy, enough so that we found ourselves noticing how much we moved around on a more traditional seat in similar trail conditions. Having said that, it isn't like anyone is going to be ever held back by using a regular seat, just that Prologo's CPC rubber patches are appreciable. Unfortunately, those same rubber patches tended to make quite the interesting noise sometimes, with them emitting an odd squeak as our baggy shorts rubbed against them as we pedalled. This seemed to happen regardless of what material our shorts are made from (although we admit to not using the Scratch Pro CPC with only lycra shorts), and it was annoying enough that we could see it being a deal breaker for some riders, especially given the seat's $285 USD retail price. Want to try the same shape and CPC rubber bits but without the carbon fiber? The 'TIROX' rail version goes for a full hundred dollars less at $185.00 USD. - Mike Levy





Demon Hyper Knee X D3O pads

As their name suggests, these knee pads from Demon utilize D3O to protect the wearer's knees. The density changing material remains malleable until it is struck, when it then near instantly firms up to provide protection. The advantage is that while a hard plastic knee cup is just that, hard and inflexible, D3O can both contort to better fit you, and also allow for better range of motion as you pedal. Demon also goes one step further by adding a thin layer of memory foam on the underside of the D3O, with the idea being to keep your knees from being right up against the material when it hardens during a crash. A panel of rip resistant kevlar fabric is used overtop the D3O, and burly triple stitched seams are used to keep everything together. Internally, a terrycloth liner is employed for comfort, and an opening behind the knee helps to keep temps down and any excess fabric from bunching up. Two elastic Velcro straps work to hold the pads in place, although their mostly closed back means that they still have to be slid up or down the leg to put them on or take them off. MSRP $89.95 USD. www.demonsnow.com

Demon Dirt pads
Demon's Hyper Knee X D3O pads get top marks thanks to offering both a lot comfort and a lot of protection.


Pinkbike's Take:
bigquotesThe Hyper Knee X D3O pads aren't slim fitting numbers that would go unnoticed under your your favorite pair of jeans, and we'd even go so far as to call them bulky, which is why we were so surprised by how invisible they feel during riding. The soft material that Demon uses as the pad's inner liner feels very comfortable, even after a few hours of wearing them, and there are also no internal seams that might cause irritation in the longrun. One problem that we sometimes see with pads that utilize adjustable straps to hold them in place is that the straps can often shift off of the pad itself and chafe, but Demon threads both their upper and lower straps through loops to prevent this from happening, and we didn't ever feel like they needed to be snugged up overly tight in order to hold the pads from sliding down - they stayed put even when a lot of pedalling was required. The D3O knee protection allows them to conform to your leg better than if they used a hard plastic shell, likely contributing to how comfortable we found the Hyper knee pads, and the inner and outer side knee protection was appreciated as well. While not inexpensive, their $89.95 USD price is very reasonable considering Demon's use of the pricey D3O padding, but it is their ability to stay put and feel close to invisible that makes them winners in our books. - Mike Levy


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88 Comments

  • + 159
 It will be a cold day in hell before I ever spend $285 on a saddle.
  • + 68
 For real. if I'm spending 285 on a seat it better come with a pair of tires, new brake pads, a fork rebuild, and a pair of chips.
  • + 54
 carbon rails for a trail ride.... how about you don't need them and if your seat rails weigh you down you suck?
  • + 13
 Carbon rails are more fore comfort than for weight. Otherwise I agree, the price of this saddle is freakin' ridiculous. I wouldn't pay that much for a saddle even if I were really wealthy, I would just feel like a moron doing that.
  • + 6
 You guys should check my buy & sell add if you want an expensive seat hehe
  • + 4
 that my sir is the coolest saddle ever!!!
  • + 6
 Literally everyone I know uses £25 Charge Spoons. Don't see why you'd want to spend more unless you're a weight weenie and chromoly rails are 'too heavy'.
  • + 2
 Tough crowd. Carbon rail saddle = $$. Not my cup of tea but I still like looking at that one it's pretty cool.
  • + 0
 use titan rails. they are flexible enough to give an impressive comfort.
  • + 1
 Mostly the price I paid for my Lev + Ti Flite
  • + 1
 Ti rails, in my personal experience bend and deform over time. Ill bet the carbon doesnt do that.
  • + 1
 then get steel rails?
  • + 1
 That's what I have. I run chromo rail WTB Silverado on all my bikes and one of those can be had for under $100. Pretty light too. But this is what trick saddles cost. Ever browse parts for road bikes?
  • + 0
 CRC has the weight @ 165 grams. That's really impressive weight wise.
  • + 4
 road bikes are expensive yes, but they have been more expensive then mtb for a while, this is kinda changing topic but the road market figured out they could charge 9 grand for a "california edition" cervelo and some poor losers would still pay that, dont want that happwning to mtb, but idk road saddles also last far longer as you don't have nearly as many crashes, I could never put carbon rails on my slayer, I crash it too often
  • + 3
 Yeah the road market is different for sure. It mostly comes down to the market, which is loaded with income. Also, like you point out, it's one thing to drop 10-11k on a road bike and it last for years without even a scratch. Quite another to plunk down on a 10k DH sled and go beat the snot out of it. Unless 10k is just a drop in the bucket that is. Specifically relating to this sadlle. It's for road guys, who have mountain bikes that they want to decorate too. Doesnt mean the saddle is a rip off. I mean a full carbon Selle Itailia is $500 bucks! That has me scratching my head lol
  • + 6
 And the market is expanding upward in mtb. No way to avoid it. Guys my age, 29yrs and a bit older, (im not rich if I was Id have my Carbon 9.9 by now) are starting to reach a point where they can spend money on mtn bikes like they always wanted to when they were young. The good news is the tech is trickling down. Bikes are just so damn good these days at every price point.
  • + 5
 look...this site is a microscopic segment of the biker population. It represents a tenth of one percent of the world cycling market. What people say and complain about here, really has no bearing on the cycling industry as a whole, especially what companies charge for things. Companies sell $300 saddles because people buy them. Who buys them? People with money to spend.
  • + 1
 Very to the point, lol.
  • + 4
 Right, so why not cater to the people who visit your site? Why not review $100 saddles? Like someone said, I would never pay this much for an MTB saddle, or even a road saddle even if I had the money, it could be spent better elsewhere and I think the majority of people on this site would feel the same way. The downgraded seat is $185 so why not reiview that model?
  • + 3
 You really shouldnt assume that you know the tastes and desires of everybody who visits the site. Honestly.
  • + 7
 Also when they review the $185 seats...people still complain. Practically EVERY product reviewed, people complain about the price. Its never priced low enough. Face facts...the people who complain are cheap skates. The companies submitting stuff (for FREE) to be tested/reviewed are not the least bit interested in those sorts of people, because they'll never be one of their customers. The people who don't complain about prices, don't bother to post about it either, they just go out and buy it. And then use it. Enjoy it. Really people complaining about prices of things are complaining that someone else will be enjoying whatever is, but not them.
  • + 1
 very true deeeight. complaining that something costs too much for product that has to do with choice makes no sense to me. sounds like material for s#%* mountainbikers say pt.2
  • + 5
 In all fairness, I don't complain about expensive forks, or shocks, or drive train, because the engineering that is required to manufacture said parts is fairly complex. If you compare the cost of a derailleur (Hundreds of times more complex than a saddle to create) to the saddle here, it then becomes blatantly obvious that the saddle isn't worth that much. To each his own I guess, but for me, I'd rather cheap out on the saddle, and get quality parts elsewhere (which I have no problem spending lots of money on)
  • + 2
 And that's your choice. For other's who want all the best stuff they don't stop at the saddle and that's theirs. Have you actually held and checked out a really nice saddle? They are pretty sweet, super light, hand made out of top quality materials. Im not a saddle snob lol, I am with you I don't nuts on them, they are too disposable. But I do other things that might not make sense to people like fitting Thompson post's to everything because I like how they look (and function) when a "reg" seatpost would be fine. Does it make sense to spend $300 on a saddle and $200 on brakes? No, it doesn't. But I don't believe anyone is really doing that, and if they are ... who cares?
  • + 3
 They make a few hundred or thousand of the saddles... they make a million derailleurs... gee... unit costs might come down a bit when they spread the R&D and tooling costs over a much larger production run.

Put in more newsworthy terms and bigger numbers... the unit cost, of the B-2 bombers the US Air force bought, amounted to about 2.2 BILLION each, when the R&D costs were included in the program, after the air force abruptly cancelled more orders after 21 bombers. Had they produced the planned 121 bombers, the unit cost would have been in the hundreds of millions each. The same thing is happening today with the F-35 program. What was originally planned to be a unit price plane around 70 million, is currently rolling off the assembly line in low rate initial production versions at around 150-200 million each once. Why? Because rather than with the B-2 where they did all the R&D and then built a prototype to do the flight testing and work the bugs out with, AND then produce planes ready to deploy, with the F-35s they've doing the R&D/Testing concurrently with the production of aircraft. Problem is, as problems arise, and they are (hundreds), the planes being assembled at the factory are being built with the already identified problems still present. Money will need to be spent to go back and fix these planes later once they solve all of them.

Now how does this relate to this saddle or the bicycle industry ? Well some brands do all the work to get it right up front, then base the unit price on how many units they'll be producing and how quickly they want to get out of the red on the balance sheet, and some companies develop and produce concurrently and its the end users who suffer by having to pay for the product, and then later pay again to keep the product working / fix it. Tony Ellsworth operated on the concurrent strategy for YEARS much to the annoyance of many customers and dealers.
  • + 2
 I can agree on the futility of pointing out the high price of obvious novelty/top end products. The guy who doesn't mind spending 300$ on a saddle for an already fully decked out bike is not going to care about what people think of the pricing. All he wants to know is how well it compares to other 300$ saddles.

For some products though I believe it's highly warranted, like when people smashed sram for those rims who were heavier than most competitors but sold for more than 2x the price. If you're in the market for rims, that's valuable information.

People come here to get information about products, so most of the time I don't find it out of place when people call bs on price/quality/features/whatever.

And people do mention it when the product is well priced and works great.
  • + 1
 Yeah except the people calling bs often don't know what they are talking about. So everything should be taken with a grain of salt, especially in the comments section.
  • + 2
 That rule applies to any subjective opinion and pretty much anything found on the internet though.
[Reply]
  • + 7
 I purchased demon knee and elbow protection at the beggining of this season and could not be happier with it. Hardly notice it there. Haven't had a bail of massive consequence yet to really put it to the test, but i'm sure it is soon to come.
  • + 1
 should be really good knee pads! almost every d3o protection is the same mold for a lot of manufacturers... on the pic they look just like RF ambush, have you had a chance to compare them?
  • + 1
 almost all the knee pads on the market are the same imo, rf dig, 661 evo, oneal sinner, all felt the same to me
[Reply]
  • + 6
 I own the Jaybird earbuds. They are pretty awesome. I initially purchased them for the gym, but have been using them for trail rides. The wings on them are great. You can use them without, but I wouldn't recommend it. With wings, they stay in for running, lifting, cardio, and lots of gym stuff. I have only used them riding singletrack trails with a normal helmet as they do not fit under my full-face helmet, they stick out a little bit from your ears.
As far as sound goes, they are amazing. I use my Blackberry and ipod nano to connect to them via bluetooth. At the gym, I leave my Blackberry in a cubby and can listen to music easily 30-40 ft away. While biking, I don't both with the "over the ear" as the normal mode is just fine. Would recommend to anyone.
  • + 3
 I fit them in my kali avatar helmet with no problems at all. you just have to flex the cheeks guard out a tiny bit.
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  • + 5
 I rather pay $ 10,00 for a Rubber Dildo and use it as a seat, than spend $185,00 on a saddle.
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  • + 1
 I've been rocking Headrush Bluetooth headphones for the trail....work great! and I only paid $30 CAD for them.....I use them for my daily commute, trails...anything really. And $170 for those Jaybird Bluebuds I'll stick with what I got.....my headphones,I don't even feel them while riding.
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  • + 1
 no thanks --- l'm not a big fan of ear pieces period ---- those are for tecky geeks to begin with. ---- even less of a fan when it comes to riding and blocking out noises you might want to hear --- e.g. a stick stuck in the rear d or some other important place on the bike where you'd want to stop ASAP so it doesn't cause damage to the bike.
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  • + 1
 Those knees just like tbone troy lee which I already own. $285-185 for a seat and I cant even find weight on it. I dont care what it weighs thats some roadie shiz right there. Give me a plastic seat weight-150g for $40 beat those numbers??? What????
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  • + 1
 Riding with headphones is rad. I only ride downhill cause I can & use cheap moto style headphones that fit right in the TLDs ear slots with the wire running out the helmet strap and into the front pocket (from China-Ebay like $10-15). Just turn it down enough to still hear the tire leaving & hitting the ground and all's good.
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  • + 1
 My first thoughts on the headphones were: What if they DO fall out? I know they shouldn't, but if your Bluetooth headphones fall out when you're riding, chances are they're gone forever. If a normal (wired) headphone falls out, it just flaps about for a bit until you can sort it out. No way would I risk $170 worth of headphones getting lost so easily.
[Reply]
  • + 5
 i think rideing with ear phones works well if your on a bizzy trail or not
  • + 4
 Exactly, I always ride with earphones, even at Whistler, every day in the park I rode with earphones. Oh, and I never had any issues with the cord tugging either.
  • + 1
 there only unsafe if your walking up the track and then you asking too get sat on some ones bars but other then that its mint rideing with earphones
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  • + 2
 outdoor tech makes a bluetooth earbuds for 80 bucks and if you are lucky enough to have access to Promotive.com they are only 40. I have had them for a year now and they are awesome.
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  • + 3
 Personally I just ride my bike, no headphones, no kneepads and certainly no 'Connect Power Control Seat', comon guys lets get back to the real reason for biking, enjoyment.
  • + 8
 First of all, who here isn't doing a standing sprint the whole time they're riding? I think pads and other protection is great for product reviews.
  • + 4
 kneepads: yes, headphones: if you're fast enough to not be in the way, saddle: isn't that a road saddle?
  • + 10
 I don't know if you're trying to do this but it sounds like you're seeing product reviews as something which doesn't add any value to mountain biking.
I love riding and I also enjoy the occasional product review to keep me some-what in the loop of what new product is out there and how it is generally rated. These sort of things often come hand-in-hand and it shouldn't change a riders passion of riding for fun!

We can appreciate product reviews and still ride for enjoyment Smile
  • + 3
 finnrambo: TT saddles are very popular among people going for sub 32lbs DH bikes.
earphones? - read about that thing inside your ear, responsible for balance
knee pads - Kyle Strait nr 5024a with different material of padding inside = hindered pedalling? Yes those opened the whole new world for all of us, but let's put that to museum. I want 661 TOMCATS back in production!...or Dainese Oak Pro at lower price!
  • + 0
 @JamesNorco....Ill wait and see when you say no to knee pads after you have eaten shit in a rockgarden at a fairly decent speed and slice your knee open while breaking your patella.....couch surfing for the recovery time sounds like a ton of fun....
  • + 0
 @immacaroni its funny you say that because 2 months ago I dislocated my knee and chipped some bone off my patella, causing me to have immediate knee surgery, I havent ridden my bike since, and wont be able to for another 4 months, so please dont insult me with your toughness, I have experienced allot worse than you care to desire.
  • + 0
 Im not saying im tough, im saying those injuries suck nuts, they happen and knee pads can either prevent or lessen that type of injury. healing vibes your way.
  • + 1
 So JamesNorco - you have basicaly not learned anything?
  • + 1
 Thanks immacaroni ill be needing all the heeling I can get, @WAKIdesigns i dont understand how I havent learnt anything?
[Reply]
  • + 2
 It looks like the "fin" on the JayBird headphones can just be removed? Depth problem solved then..

I'll give them a try. Looks like they are just what I've been looking for, for they gym!
  • + 0
 Headphones and biking is a no go :-)
  • + 5
 1. 1980's headband $5
2. place over ears holding in existing earphones
3. money saved, choice of whatever earphones you prefer, problem solved
  • + 3
 I wasn't aware this was a problem anyway. I always ride with earphones and never had any issues with the cord tugging. If it did happen a tiny bit of duck tape to hole the cable to my shirt would do. Also, why is it a no go? I've never had a problem, used earphones every day at Whistler for over a year. Unless you're the slowest bastard on the trail it's not a problem. And unless you have them up really loud you can still hear someone yell at you!
  • + 1
 One word = Bluetooth.
  • - 5
 bluetooth causes cancer bro. Smile As far as headphones, yeah if you wear a pack/camelbak they tug, open face helmet straps can tug them too. I don't really care for headphones while riding and would never even consider it for DH. I like my focus. But to each their own.
  • + 1
 I find wearing headphones helps me loosen up. Focus is over rated I think. Focusing on certain elements of the trail has shagged things up for me more than it has helped me.
  • + 2
 I don't exactly follow. But again, everybody has their preference. When Im on putt putt rides I like to just enjoy nature.
  • + 7
 You saying BRO to me is giving me cancer. Wink

Trials or street riding w/ ears on? Never, unless it's wireless. Then sure.
TRAIL riding? maybe. Used to do it, but honestly, I like the sound of nature...
  • + 2
 I do too. I also like how my tires sound across the trail. Maybe Im weird but I really enjoy that. And when the sound falls away when you jump the bike into the air... That's the soundtrack.
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  • + 4
 "[...] Not only are we all shaped differently down there [...]" (chuckle)
[Reply]
  • + 0
 Price is price, it's like a BMW z4 to a Mazda Miata, both have 4 tires,brakes,seats, convertible tops etc., but it's what you can afford and how you use it along with comfort, I 'm old and been around a while so I own a Z4 and a couple descent bikes with descent components. It's good to see options even if the price tag is HEAVY
[Reply]
  • + 0
 I understand that the pinkbike team is probably not qualified to review sound (this isn't an audiophile blog after all) and I'm probably more fancy than the average PB user when it comes to sound but for 170$ headphones I would have liked a better sound review. I understand that a trail is a very suboptimal place to appreciate sound quality but as far as I am concerned, sound is quite a critical feature when it comes to headphones.
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  • + 1
 Voted for the seat purely on aesthetics and the fact that I want t a new seat, went back and read the review...

Saw the $285 price tag and went right back and changed my answer to "None of the above".
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I found these on Amazon (for less) and was going to give them a try:
www.arriva.com/leo/index.html

like in the article, would be great for the hour+ forest road climbs then peel em for the down...
[Reply]
  • + 3
 Where are the marks of impacts on those knee guards?? I loved my 661s until I ate a rock garden salad....
  • + 5
 i am wondering when is he gonna finish that tattoo .. ?
  • + 1
 if you're not into d3o get a set of raceface digs, they're plastic shell but feel very similar to 661 evos, but then again soft k nee pads are almost all the same
  • + 1
 same here with the 661s, the slipped at the first impact and the rest is imaginable. now i've got the scott grenade pro II kneepads, had one crash so far, but not really a bad one, but they performed quite well. they sit better than the 661s, but are a bit less comfortable when wearing the whole day.
  • + 1
 Looks like Mike's more recent impacts were taken on the shin.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Seat price is a joke, wouldn't trade my $75.00 WTB for it. 3D0 rocks - love that sh$t!. Headphones in nature... are you kidding?

www.sweetsingletrack.ca
[Reply]
  • + 1
 My WTB Silverado Team saddle was $55. Riding headphones for $170? And my 661 kneepads were $30 and work great.

Everything there seems a bit overpriced.
[Reply]
  • - 1
 I have the ear buds and they are great. Not sure why you only have a 4' range? I use my Blackberry with them and get closer to 40'. They are pricey but its great not having a chord and good sound quality.
Also if you want music without earphones try there boombotix.com I clip it on my camelbak.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I wish they'd compare the knee pads to other minimalist knee pads like the TLD KG5400 in terms of long ride comfort and how warm they get
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  • + 1
 $285 for a seat? I can get a dropper post for that... I'm sure some people would pay extra to have no seat at all so they can claim the weight benefit!
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  • + 2
 Don't care about any of these, WHERE CAN I GET PINKBIKE SOCKS!?
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  • + 1
 Sweet sadle!!!! Get in what you fit in
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  • + 1
 dude needs to get that ink finished
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  • - 2
 Gimme dat tattoo please!
  • + 4
 ooooh a flame tat.. so original! go ahead and get a koi fish too while your at it.

generic (non original tats) bother me more than they should.. lol
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