Pinkbike Product Picks

Nov 16, 2012 at 0:07
Nov 16, 2012
by Mike Levy  
 
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MRP Bling Ring

MRP's Bling Rings are designed to replace the chain ring and spider assembly of your SRAM or Truvativ crankset, providing a simple and clean way to run a single ring setup. They utilize a spider-less design that mates directly to the splines used to mount the stock spider, making for a very BMX-esque setup that shaves weight compared to a more traditional single ring layout that still requires four chain ring bolts. The arrangement also allows riders to fit ring sizes that aren't available from SRAM as stock equipment, with MRP manufacturing 28, 30 (60 grams, tested), 32, 34, and 36 tooth options in their US facility. Weight ranges from 53 to 94 grams depending on size, and they are compatible with GXP versions of SRAM X9, X0, and Truvativ AKA arms, as well as some OEM models, including the S2200 and S1400 cranks. MSRP $69.95 USD. www.mountainracingproducts.com


MRP Bling Ring
Thinking about making the switch to a single ring? MRP's Bling Ring offers a light and clean-looking way to do it. The only downside is that it only fits on specific SRAM and Truvativ cranksets.



Pinkbike's Take:
bigquotesIs a single chain ring setup going to be suitable for everyone and every kind of terrain? Certainly not, but the simplified drivetrain not only creates a stronger rider over time, it also changes the way you approach a trail, making many rides new again in the same way that riding a single-speed bike can. Our 30-tooth Bling Ring was fitted to the X0 crankset on our 29er because it comes close to matching the gear development of a 32 tooth ring on a 26-inch wheeled bike, a ratio that makes for a good workout on our steep local climbs. Installation is a simple job that required only a Torx key to remove the single screw holding the stock spider onto the aluminum splines, with the Bling Ring then pushing on snugly in its place. Since we would no longer be shifting up to the now-replaced big ring, we also took a few minutes to shorten the bike's chain by a few links (always make sure to double check that your chain is long enough to prevent damage at bottom-out). With the crankset reinstalled on the bike, we found that no amount of playing with the bottom bracket spacers would allow us to align the ring perfectly with the MRP 1X guide that was mounted in place of the bike's front derailleur, resulting in a touch of chain rub at the far end of the cassette. This was remedied by spacing the guide's slider out slightly from its mounting arm - MRP includes two 1mm Nylon spacers with the 1X guides for this purpose - but it took a few tries to get it just right. MRP has designed the ring to sit at a 51mm chainline, but keep in mind that slight differences from bike to bike mean that some tinkering with spacers may be required to set it up drag free. The Bling Ring does its job just as you'd hope once the proper guide spacing is set, though, with absolutely zero issues arising during our many months using it. The fit is still snug on the X0 crank's splines, and not a single creak or groan as popped up from the junction. The ring's wear rate is par for the course as well, with ours certainly showing some, but nothing more than we'd expect given the amount of use it sees compared to a dual ring setup that spreads chain ring wear over two rings. All told, the Bling Ring makes a lot of sense for those who use a SRAM/Truvativ crankset and want to ditch their bike's front derailleur - it's simple, trouble-free, and the lightest way to run a single ring. - Mike Levy




Bontrager Rhythm short

Bontrager's Rhythm short is constructed with two-way stretch fabric, and features six pockets, belt loops, and adjustable waist straps that allow you to dial-in the fit. A sturdy zippered and dual button enclosure should present no problems in the long run, and they come stock with a detachable mesh liner that is fitted with Bontrager's own inForm Solstice chamois. The 14-inch inseam puts them firmly on the casual side of the fence compared to shorter, racier offerings. The Rhythm short is available in small through double-extra large, and in either grey or the black shown here. MSRP $89.99 USD. www.bontrager.com


Bontrager Rhythm short
The mid-weight Rhythm short is a touch baggy, but it will be perfect for those who ride in knee pads.



Pinkbike's Take:
bigquotesWe liked the soft, two-way stretch material that Bontrager has used for the Rhythm short because it sits right between a burlier, heavier fabric and something that would be too lightweight for use throughout the fall. We found the fit to be pleasant, and the casual cut meant that we often wore them while not on the bike without looking like a cycling oddball who escaped out into the real world. The 'Easy-adjust' hook and loop waist straps make fine tuning the fit simple, a nice feature that we took advantage of as we rode off our Winter pudge. We are also fans of the zippered pockets (both of the rear and one of the cargo pockets) that never left us guessing as to how far back their contents fell out, although, just as with any other short, we were reluctant to put anything more substantial in them than a small multi-tool or gel due the contents swinging around during pedalling. We like our shorts to have a bit of a long and baggy cut to them, enough so that we don't end up with our creamy white inner thighs exposed to the world, but we sometimes found the Rhythm short to be just a touch too loose at the leg openings. The upside is that they will play nice with bulky knee pads, though. We also weren't big fans of the inner liner that comes with them, but that is easily removed to allow riders to use their own chamois. No, the Bontrager name isn't as fashion-conscious as some other brands out there, but they proved to function just as well as offerings from other brands. Looking for some under the radar clothing? The Rhythm short is a good choice, especially if you wear knee pads on a regular basis. - Mike Levy




Osprey Momentum 26 backpack

Osprey has a full lineup of bags that includes models for hiking, travel bags, and even child-specific offerings, but the Momentum 26 tested here has been designed with bike commuting in mind. The bag's name refers to its 26 liters of storage capacity, although that figure increases to 31 liters when the zippered expansion panel is utilized, providing enough room for a change of clothes, your lunch, and whatever else you'd like to bring to work with you. A dedicated sleeve provides a protected place for a laptop, and a zippered pocket on the shoulder strap is ideal for a phone, camera, or wallet (although not large enough for all three at the same time, obviously), with the opposite strap being home to a key pocket that incorporates a clever retractable clip - no need to remove the bag to unlock the front door, and it also keeps you from dropping your keys. Your helmet can be clipped onto the bag via a plastic section that is attached to stretch cords, allowing you to slip it through one of the helmet's vents and snug it down. The entire package becomes easy to deal with thanks to tuck-away shoulder straps that turn the Momentum 26 from a backpack into a handbag, complete with a side handle. Color options are bamboo (tested) and carbide. MSRP $129.00 USD. www.ospreypacks.com


Osprey Momentum 26 pack
Commuters take note: the Momentum 26 makes more sense than your silly, fashion-friendly fixie bag.



Pinkbike's Take:
bigquotesWe used the Momentum 26 strictly for commuting, choosing to go with a smaller and more trail-specific pack for off-road use, although we could see a trail guide or first aid rider making use of the bag's cavernous hauling capacity. We liked the sectioned storage area that splits the bag into three sections: the laptop sleeve, a big area for clothing and gear, and a smaller, zippered section for any tools or odds and ends. This let us keep things separate from each other that shouldn't be mingling, such as our lunch and our laptop. There is also plenty of room for clothing, enough so that we never found ourselves having to do the 'ol squeeze-and-zip routine in order to close the bag up, but we did take note of the awkward rounded bottom to the inside of the large section. This isn't really a big deal, but it meant that we often ended up just stuffing clothes in rather than folding and stacking them; good luck keeping your lunch containers upright as well. The bag's shoulder strap pockets are a massive plus in our mind - why more bags don't employ something similar is a mystery to us. The cell phone pocket allowed quick access to our phone if we needed to answer a call or take a quick photo, and the retractable key clip on the opposite pocket simply makes a ton of sense. Because we're based in B.C., we had ample opportunity to try out the bag's rain cover, deploying it from its zippered pocket at the bottom of the bag countless times. A small clip at the top allows you to access the bag's upper reaches without having to completely remove the cover as you might if it simply stretched over the entire bag, and it proved to be able to keep out all of the moisture. The bag is well thought out, with plenty of clever details that make sense in the real world, but we also liked the fact that it actually looks like a backpack rather than a funky commuter bag that bows to the fixie scene and puts fashion over function. We recommend the Momentum 26 to any rider who commutes to work and needs enough room for a change of clothes. - Mike Levy



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86 Comments

  • + 17
 The bling rings are so rad. right when they became available i bought two and a set of aka cranks . price to weight is awesome.
  • + 3
 it's funny that mrp (somehow sram) makes chainrings for truvativ (so more or less sram) and sram (obviously sram) Big Grin
looks clean though!
  • + 10
 MRP is not related to SRAM.
  • + 3
 They have been partners before so it's not surprising that they would work together like that.
  • + 3
 @NoahColorado: then why is there for example a X0 chainguide from mrp?
i know it says truvativ x0 on it, but they're built by mrp...
  • + 1
 ^ I think you just answered your own question
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  • + 10
 surprised that you guys didn't mention fit on the Osprey: only brand I've run across that makes bike packs in different sizes for different size people, and the fit and comfort of the straps has been second to none for me. you definitely pay a premium for them, though.
  • + 5
 They have lifetime warranty on their items though. I busted a couple straps during a crash I had and they replaced them with no questions asked.
  • + 1
 good to know, though I got it from REI so I've got their return policy as well should it have problems. Funnily enough, as a replacement for a newer camelbak that had a broken sternum strap (not a fan of the sliding adjusters for sternum straps that ride on a round piece: not exactly strong)
  • + 3
 FYI, Ofsprey has a lifetime guarantee, NO QUESTIONS ASKED!!! I own two right now and couldn't be happier!
  • + 3
 I absolutely destroyed an Osprey pack from one year of guiding. I actually melted part of the frame from leaving it too close to a wood stove, wore a hole in the bottom, broke the zipper, crushed the waist buckle and ripped off a few straps here and there. I sent it to Osprey and they just sent me a new pack, no problem. On top of that it fits much more comfortably than previous camelbacks or others. The only gripe I ever have is wishing the magnet holding the bite valve to chest strap were stronger (pretty minor). I own two now and will probably pick up a full backpacking pack from them too.
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  • + 11
 Having ridden bmx cranks and chainrings for a while, switching to the silly spider system frustrated me. This bling ring looks like a perfect idea, and it matches my cranks!
  • - 7
 The guy at Homebrewed Components have been making custom rings and direct-mount sprockets for specific cranksets for a long time, a way before MRP. I would think that this sprocket is made from aluminium, but I know there are people that want something better like titanium or maybe even steel! HBC delivers!
  • + 12
 Yes, HBC delivers...sometimes, maybe, or never. That guy might make nice stuff when he actually decides to make it but his delays are beyond ridiculous. Order a bling ring today and get it next week, order a HBC ring and get it before the next presidential elelction.
  • + 7
 Actually HBC doesn't deliver. 8 months for them to get my spiderless chainrings to me, and it's not offset so it won't work with a chainguide. Ebayed them and got MRP rings which worked perfectly.
  • - 2
 Well, when he DOES deliver... he delivers! I received mine after 6 weeks, but went through 2 or 3 delays.
  • + 1
 $70, plus you have to use SRAM/Truvativ cranks, I'm a little skeptical. The weight savings is nice.
  • + 6
 Waiting months for a hand made frame is one thing, but for a friggin chain ring? That is pointless. It's a chain ring!
  • + 1
 Well I got it as a fun-upgrade and wasn't in a position where I couldn't ride.. So I didn't really care that it was that late. $45 for an aluminium DM sprocket in any anodized color.... not bad in my eyes. And regardless of which sprocket you get, the weight savings are quite substantial! I lost ~55 grams (0.12lbs) going from an E13 guide ring with aluminium ring bolts to an aluminium sprocket setup.
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  • + 7
 I HATE squeaky chainring bolts. MRP bling ring looks like the ticket for me.
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  • + 3
 Clever idea that bling ring. Haven't been able to go below a 32t chainring on a similar Shimano conversion. If only they made it out of steel, I'd consider buying into the SRAM/Truvativ crankset.
  • + 4
 I agree it should be steel - any 1x ring should be steel otherwise they wear too fast. Steel won't add that much weight for such a small component.
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  • + 2
 I was told by my local outdoor store that my Osprey pack had a lifetime warranty and if anything went wrong bring it back, including zippers and wearing it out. Its been a great pack, been all over Italy, Poland, States, trail building days...it keeps on truckin.
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  • + 1
 Just replaced the 3-piece Profiles on my dirtjumper w/ the 28T Bling Ring and a set of AKA's, such a nice upgrade. Looks pretty good too, considering I paired the set w/ a pewter colored Chris King bb. Can we expect to see some more colors in the future?
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  • + 1
 Chian ring would be cool if i had cranks for it. Not that cool if you have to buy a crank for it..... I dont understand mountain biking shorts... basket ball shorts seem to get the job done. If i was gonna spend the money id buy some mma board shorts they have way cooler designs. That back pack is awesome. Just need to justify the cost in my head. Should only take a few weeks to brainwash myself into beliving its really a good deal. Cant wait!
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  • + 2
 i rode with the rhythm shorts a bit this season and they are very comfortable although i agree they are a bit baggy but like they said, they go well with knee pads
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  • + 4
 Like the bling ring. Good product...Want.
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  • + 4
 I've used an Osprey pack for a while, they're great!
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  • + 3
 $70 for a chainring??? BLOW!
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  • + 0
 Certainly do not understand how someone can ride a single ring upfront without a chainguide. bling ring is cool but Is it available with bash guard mounting capabilities for ss use?
  • + 2
 Yeah, I remember a while ago MRP introduced micro chain guides, for running a chainring that is smaller than a 32. I think I saw it here:

www.pinkbike.com/news/MRP-Responds-to-SRAM-XX1-With-Three-New-Chainguides-2012.html
  • + 1
 Hmm, I don't know but I've never had a chain guide or a bash guard on any of my "BMX-esque" bikes.
  • + 1
 A ICSG or BB mounted bash guard can be used with a bling ring. Another option is to run a 28T up front and a smaller cog in back. This has made a bash guard no longer necessary on my SS. There is so much more ground clearance that rock and log strikes aren't a problem. For geared riders, a clutch based rear derailer makes a chain guide up front optional for some riders and terrain.
  • + 2
 We used our Bling Ring with an MRP 1X guide that bolted to the direct mount front derailleur position (there are also seat tube clamp models). The ring works with this setup or with a ISCG-mounted guide.
  • + 1
 I own the mrp 2x chain guide and it's been so much trouble to deal with that I'm not sure I want to buy a mrp product ever again. So much that I'm considering a clutch derailleur/chainstay tension device and a rock ring instead of a chainguide.
  • + 1
 I've run and recommended MRP products for years, including the 1X, 2X and various G2 variants, and always swore by them. But this year, after replacing yet another cracked 1X cage, and yet another seized G2 roller, I suddenly stopped and thought 'You know what, this isn't good enough'. I think MRP are realistically 1 or 2 steps behind the main competition in terms of performance and durability, and also a good way behind the budget brands in terms of value.
  • + 4
 Fair enough brit-100,

For 2013 we've changed both the design and materials of all of our upper guides. They are now made of nylon which should be a fair bit tougher and more chemical resistant than our previous polycarbonate. The new upper guides will first be featured on the G3, AMg, and Micro guides slated to arrive sometime next month. New versions of the 1x and Lopes guides will follow shortly there after.

Additionally, on the G3 we will include both a pulley and a slider block - perhaps the slider is better for your conditions?

Cheers, hope to win back your business!
  • + 1
 I wished I had a slider on my 2x. Maybe there are downsides compared to pulleys but in my case if I put pretty much ANY tension on the bolt that fastens the pulleys to the backplate, the pulleys stopped turning and the chain just grinded the teeth. It was a constant struggle to put just enough pressure so you didn't lose the bolt but not too much to stop the pulleys rolling. I tried to keep things clean so it could run as smooth as I could get it to but needless to say, I ended up losing the bolt, the pulleys and the roller cap.

Even with a short enough chain and a well adjusted front derailleur, I ended up losing my chain outside the big ring a bunch of time and it makes quite a mess when it enters the roller. Usually the roller cap gets torn off and the chain falls out of the pulleys.

I know that 2x setups are bound to be more tricky than 1x but I've had e-13/gamut chain guides on DH rigs that took a LOT more punishment and I've never had any issue with them. The gamut is still going strong even after eating more than it's fair share of rocks and having the backplate straightened homemade style I don't know how many times. I've been extremely disappointed with the 2x, can't say I will recommend it to anybody.
  • + 2
 Sounds like you had an installation error - perhaps a washer was lost on your pulley assembly? If by tightening the bolt the pulleys stopped moving - you had something incorrect in setup.

Secondly, if you are losing you chain to the outside, that is a front derailleur setup issue. Possibly a positioning issue or improperly setup limits causing overshifting? Or it could a incompatible front derailleur - perhaps a triple being used in a dual ring setup?

The 2x is never going to be as tough as a singlering guide, but we have another dual ring guide that is - the LRP. People have been using the LRP (and imitations) for over a decade successfully. Having a crank-mounted, traditional bash guard helps mask a poorly setup front derailleur too - the bash guard prevents the chain from ever overshifting. The 2x was designed to be a lightweight trail/all-mountain guide specifically for the new breed of 2x10 cranksets that cannot accept a crank-mounted, traditional bashguard. You can use it on 9-speed systems and on triple-ring conversions (where you would normally use an LRP), but it should be understood you are sacrificing some durability in exchange for weight savings.

We have recently made some changes to the 2x guide, you are welcome to contact the warranty department if you'd like to try it again.

Cheers
  • + 1
 I'm interested in what changes have been made to the 2x guide. My problem with it is the weakness of the plastic thread that the mounting screw uses. If over tightened the lower guide plate cracks. This is very easy to do it seems from other forums. I strongly suspect it was cracked when i bought the new bike as the chain slipped off and jammed several times in the carpark test ride. I could bend the plate easily to put the chain back on which i thought odd but now think it was cracked. Otherwise it's been great.
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  • + 2
 Bontrager Rhythm perfect understatement...rode mine these year without any problems..also looking good off the bike
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  • + 2
 The rhythms have been changed substantially for 2013, which addresses the concern of being too baggy.
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  • + 1
 If I went to single ring on my xc bike, would I need a chain guide? My friend said I would, but then seeing the MRP ring made me kinda confused
  • + 1
 Yes i would like to know this to please. But i only think the new xx drive chain offers this without a chain device i maybe wrong ?
  • + 0
 With a clutch equipped rear mech you probably could skip the CG with that ring, but mnehemneh, I would rather not try it - the upper guide like E13 XCX is rather a must. Eventually the XX1 chain ring and spider that rumours say to be compatible with X0 cranks
  • + 1
 Yeah thats what i thought . I run a 38 single ring and to be honest i like haveing a CG becouse it has a bash at the bottom . I run a srame typ 2 clutch rear mech i find it makes a clunking sound when you push the travel down becouse the chain gets pulled abit pulling the clutch . Anyone els get this noise ? Or is my chain maybe to short ? Sorry off topic iknow
  • + 1
 Chain too short is easy to check, take the shock out with chain on the biggest cog. Dont have SRAM but Shimano SLX with clutch and run front mech for XC on 29er - so far no dropped chain. I hate lower roller for XC riding, had MRP, blackspire gamur and all have so much drag - fine for gravity but for XC it's just a power robbery
  • + 1
 Thanks ill check that
  • + 1
 @cwkrause thats a slick bike man. Im planning on a 32T chainring mated to a 9 speed xt, but Im hoping to go 1x10 after christmas hits. Ill have to ask around, thanks guys
  • + 2
 @shredalways: if you can uphill any desired stuff on 32t x 11-34 cassette then you don't need 10 speed for anything else but clutch rear mech.

@cwkrause: awesome bike, but while it being a 29er aren't you frustrated of not using the added speed? I rode on 32t front on 26, then changed to niner with the same setup and just couldn't stand that there's so much more speed to be gained while I spin 200RPM. Changed to 36t and yea stuff became quite even, at 36t I got a nice ratio for asphalt, gravel roads on the way to the singletrack and could use it better on downhills. It is also an issue of diminished wear on Cring and cassette on 30k + rides. But then I noticed that on 36 I can't uphill some stuff, or at least I really have have to be on my toes mashing it up - no probs on 1h ride but on 3h there's some energy conservation needed. I ended up with the front mech 26-38t 11-32 cassette.
  • + 1
 Listen to WAKI: you never need a chainguide for XC.
  • + 1
 @groghunter - where did I say it?
  • + 1
 "fine for gravity but for XC it's just a power robbery"
  • + 1
 yea... I said it about the lower roller not the whole CG
  • + 1
 Just removed the bottom roller that has stoped the clunking noise i was geting when the travel was push down . No need for bottom roller with the clutch mech then. Job done
  • + 1
 Thanks @shredalways and @wakidesigns. For me and where I ride (hilly!!!) the 28 bling ring with a 11-36 cassette with 29" wheels works perfectly. I can just get up the steepest trails and don't top out often on the downhills or flats. If I want to go fast downhill I use my other bike colin.smugmug.com/Sports/Mountain-Biking/hd
  • + 2
 @cwkrause - how dare you steal the one that belongs to heavens... you have some nice aesthetical taste Smile
  • + 1
 Meh, if you're not going to run the bottom roller, why not just run a chain catcher? and if you're going single ring, even that seems overkill, especially with a clutch der.
  • + 1
 We used the Bling Ring with MRP's 1X guide, although it wasn't on the bike when we shot it. We recommend always using a guide with a single ring setup, even if it is just tame cross-country riding... a simple bolt-on upper unit like the 1X works very well. The only exception would be the XX1 rings from SRAM.
  • + 1
 Do the new clutch derailleurs really eliminate the need for a roller on 2x setups? If there is such a need... I lost my rollers on my CG and I havent really had any problems ever since, hell... it's even smoother...

Thinking about dropping the cguide and getting a new clutch derailleur but I can't seem to find a longer term review (I know they're quite new) on the topic. I currently own a broken mrp 2x that would cost at least 70$ in spare parts to fix so if the clutch derailleurs are a viable option, I might as well make the switch at that point.
  • + 1
 Yes get one they really do work so much better i give it 10/10. It stiffens up the bottom of the chain stoping chain slap keeps things runing smooth.
  • + 1
 PLC07 they do work but I will still put a garage.inc 20g carbon backplate to avoid any chance of chain jumping down off the granny. I have SLX with medium cage - swett stuff.
  • + 1
 hmm, while I get what you're driving at mike: (the chainguide is a replacement for the front der. keeping the chain on) In practice, I just don't seem to hear many people riding single ring setups complaining about the chain coming off, and I live in dirt roadie heaven (Tucson)
  • + 1
 PLC07:

It depends on where and how you ride. I recently purchased a Zee SS derailleur to go 1x10 with the hope that I wouldn't need a bottom roller. While I've waited to have enough cash to buy some kind of chain retention system, I've come to the conclusion that no, clutch-type derailleurs aren't enough to keep my chain under control, on my terrain, and for my riding style (I have a mojo HD, and ride on the east coast of NA - but I just got through a week of riding in Phoenix-Sedona-Flagstaff, and the conclusion certainly holds there too). A G3 mini is in my future when they become available.
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  • + 2
 cant never have enough shorts
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  • + 1
 Bling ring is awesome... too bad its not compatible with Holzfeller cranks.
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  • + 2
 I have the Momentum 34, and its awesome for school and a daypack.
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  • + 1
 I certainly like that backpack and if they have it in blue they have a sure buy with me!
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  • + 1
 I love mrp bling ring, its so simple. kind of using 3 pcs crank without bought them. just my 0.2 cent.
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  • + 1
 Bling Ring looks sweet. I'm guessing not compatible with BB30 X9/X0... ?
  • + 1
 No, unfortunately not. Using a Bling Ring on a BB30 will result in a very inboard chainline - impossible to use with a guide and likely causing contact between the ring and chainstay. I'm lobbying for a BB30 Bling Ring with appropriate offset. Cheers
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  • - 3
 While I appreciate the Bling Ring, I'd rather pay $45 and support a dude that has been making them by hand for a few years now. I have three, and they're all brilliantly machined. Home Brewed Components (just be prepared to wait a few months)...
  • + 13
 It isn't like MRP is some corporate conglomerate such that ordering from home brewed is supporting workers in a more ethical manner. If anything, the ethical thing to do is to hold people accountable for conducting business in an upstanding manner. Home Brewed Components is anything but upstanding. The guy runs his business with complete disregard for customers. He takes your money but doesn't deliver and never responds to attempts at communication. Taking people's money, refusing refunds and all communication for 9 months or more, that's the type of business we should boycott, not support. We should support small manufacturers that conduct business in an ethical manner and refuse to business with shady companies like Home Brewed Components.
  • + 6
 Just to be clear, the Bling Rings are also manufactured in the US.
  • + 2
 I totally agree with dfiler on this. While HBC rings are nice, some of the stuff that his customer went through isn't acceptable on any level. Hopefully he gets his stuff together soon. It would be such a shame to see him go out of business.
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  • + 0
 Lmao mtbers so funny to jump on that sprocket design. Those shorts look nice though.
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  • + 1
 MRP Bling Ring is nothing new, just Google: Middleburn Uno!
  • + 2
 Middleburn only work on one crank. these work on like 5 different price point arms. kinda different.
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  • + 1
 Osprey's are dope packs. I have a raptor 10 and its awesome.
  • + 1
 I have a Talon 44 hiking pack. It's been fantastic, and comfortable enough to ride with. Perfect for over/multiple night trips =]
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