Pinkbike Product Picks

Nov 23, 2012 at 0:07
Nov 23, 2012
by Matt Wragg  
 
You must login to Pinkbike.
Don't have an account? Sign up

Join Pinkbike  Login

Park Tool PF4 Track Pump

The PF4 is Park Tool's beefy, professional track pump. It's built a bit bigger and stronger than the rest of their range to stand up to more abuse and to survive longer. Its universal head fits Presta, Schrader and Woods/Dunlop valves. Sturdy steel foot-plates are set into the pump's plastic base and the handles have big, comfortable rubber grips. The pump cylinder is slightly larger in diameter to increase the output volume, and the hose is a little bit longer than most other track pumps to make it easier to inflate tires when the bike is in the work-stand. MSRP $55.00
Park Tool

Park Tool PF4 track pump

It's definitely an impressive-looking pump.


Pinkbike's Take:
bigquotes'Solid' is the only word you need to know about this pump. It's got an engineered feeling to it and you can easily believe that it's going to stand up to a world of abuse. We especially like the larger volume of the cylinder, as this made it better for seating tubeless tires. The only niggle is that it can be a bit of a fiddle sealing the head onto a valve - at least until you're used to the pump, but once you have the knack down it's problem-free. - Matt Wragg



Onza Ibex Tires

Onza is a name that fell off the face of the tire world. They were one of the big brands in the late '90s, but failed to keep up when gravity riders moved on towards larger, more substantial tires like the Tioga DH. Recently, Onza decided to set this right and re-enter the world of high-end tires for aggressive riding. Their flagship of the moment is the Ibex. It is an all-round offering, much in the same vein as Maxxis' ever-popular High Roller (in fact, both tires are made by CST in Taiwan). We tested a pre-production 2.25-inch version (even though the graphics say 2.4) in a soft, 45A compound for the front and a harder, 55A for the rear - both feature a sturdy dual-ply casing. MSRP TBD
Onza Tires

Onza Ibex

The similarity to the High Roller is immediately apparent, but the subtle differences are welcome.



Pinkbike's Take:
bigquotesOnza's new Ibex looks very similar to one of the most popular trail tires out there, so it should be no surprise that it is a good one. The side profile performs slightly more consistently than the High Roller it mimics, which means it breaks sideways in a more pleasant, predictable fashion. The 55A rubber on the rear tire has lasted well and we are struggling to tell the difference between that and the slightly harder, 60A, compound that Maxxis uses. Despite the tire only weighing around 900 grams, the sidewalls were strong. We had no problems with pinch flats and they mounted tubeless with no issues. The problem with the Ibex is the size. Because the casing has been shrunk from it's original 2.4-inch size down to 2.25, the tread blocks are relatively small and hard. This gives the feeling that you're riding on top of the tread, not in it. What this translates to is a nervous feeling, particularly on wet rock. That said; as a return to form, this is a solid showing from Onza. The Ibex still needs some work to be great, but it's closer than much of the competition. - Matt Wragg



Selle San Marco Concor Racing Protek Saddle

Sitting in the middle of the range, the Selle San Marco Concor Racing saddle is rated for "XC and enduro racing." A carbon-reinforced hull sits on titanium-alloy rails and the whole package weighs in at 190 grams. Edges of the saddle that are prone to damage are protected by their proprietary Protek technology, where a silicone coating is sublimated into the material to make it much tougher. MSRP $149USD (£89.99)
Selle San Marco

Selle San Marco Concor Racing Protek saddle

You can immediately see the road heritage in the Concor saddle's design. The rippling effect around the edges is the Protek anti-abrasion technology.



Pinkbike's Take:
bigquotesWe chose the ti-railed option from the Concor's range of options, as we felt this would be the one that enduro riders would go for. The more-expensive carbon version was a bit too XC and the softer trail model was too heavy (a saddle is a great place to save weight without compromising the bike's performance). The first thing we noticed about the saddle was the sharp wings - they dug painfully into our inner thigh when the saddle was dropped down for descending. This meant we spent time trying to move the saddle on the rails to get the wings out of the way. It then committed the cardinal sin for any saddle: it left us with numb balls on a long road climb. Sure, saddles are personal things. Maybe this was a very individual problem, as many road riders swear by Selle San Marco, but yeah... there's no forgiveness from this corner for that one. - Matt Wragg


Which product tested in today's PP would you be most inclined to try?



Must Read This Week









74 Comments

  • + 25
 Having worked in a bike shop for nearly 6 years I have had a lot of experience with Park, and specifically the PF4 pump. In a shop setting they tend to last about a month, perhaps we have just had bad luck but there are currently 4 of this model in our workshop and only 1 of them works. The seals on the head of the pump wear out very quickly, and the internal o-ring where the hose meets the gauge also tends to leak. I would steer clear of this pump if possible.
  • + 6
 thank you! A good quality pump is hard to find especially when it is used and abused in a shop on an everyday basis. We thought that the park pump would be just as good as their great tools but it falls incredibly short.
  • + 4
 I have the same pump at work and it lasted just under a month. I think we must have around 6 or 7 Park pumps and non of them work. SKS pumps last a bit longer. Managed to have a couple last 3-4 months. 15 years as a bike mechanic I think the longest a pump lasted was 6 months, but I also had an air compressor on the go at the same time.
  • + 3
 Does your shop not have an air compressor?
  • + 5
 Silca, a real, professional floor pump, totally rebuildable mine is over 15 years old and never been rebuilt. And yes, every bike shop uses floor pumps in addition to compressors.
  • + 7
 Our 2 Specialized Airtool pumps have been around for a year now, no problems.
  • - 4
 just to say, how can a plastic body for a foot pump be 'sturdy' at all, for this kind of price i would like to see metal all round, or maybe im just asking for too much? And again i can see park making a cheap product and selling for a stupid price. stick to compressor for workshop and the good old hand pump for when out
  • + 3
 Giving my two cents, I have this Park Tools pump and I use it daily in my tool supply. It gets used and abused as I am a pro racer and it has to deal with travel. I have had mine since the beginning of 2010 and it had served life as my personal pump and was used at the team pump for both Team Geronimo (5 Pro riders and 10 juniors) AND Turner Dark Horse Racing (5 Pro riders and 12 development riders), which is quite the challenge to survive when being used in the dirt by juniors who are freaking out about having a flat right before race run. Yes the valve fitting is finicky, but as was well put, once you figure out the trick you got it. I didn't like how it felt like it would break itself when bottomed out so I cut and old bottom out bumper off a 5th element 5way and fitted it under the handle, problem solved and has factory status. Anyhow, no idea how y'all at the shops must be going through these pumps dime a dozen, but it is a quality pump.
  • + 5
 It has to be said that Park pumps are.... well.... just pump.
There are better pumps out on the market.
A Specialized pump works better and has more features, and they are not top of the quality/reliability/function list.
  • + 4
 There is a difference in shop use and having one. When I worked in a shoppe we used joe blows, there nice pumps but the hose assembly would wear out. But they were being used buy every one in the shop. I feel like that pump would last me a long lime. Due that I don't pump my tires up that much.. But I have broke a bell pump such garbage!
  • + 4
 lezyne floor drive is the only pump to use.
  • + 2
 For those who have issue with their piston o-ring wearing out. Remember to service your pump once in a while. A few drops of air-tool oil will keep your pump working like new for a while.
  • + 5
 Be nice if Pinkbike mentioned max pressure too for those of us that ride all kinds of bikes that might need 100psi+, or at least publish a photo where you can actually read the dial.
  • + 4
 i got my bontranger track pump for £20 at my local bike store, solid as a rock, has some nice features on it , great bit of kit. doesn't have the "park tools" poshness about it but why would you bother paying that much for a label, and by reading the comments above, something that doesn't even work that well.
  • + 1
 I love my lezyne because all the parts apart from the hose and the rubber feet to stop the base slipping are metal, oh and the sexy wooden handle. Critics say that it's too heavy, i just call it solid, and around the same price as the park one (I have the classic, not the alloy or cnc) Would definitely recommend!
  • + 2
 Shop pumps take a beating, they get used by every Tom Dick and Harry that comes in looking for air. They get kicked or thrown into the corner when they are in the way, and they pump up more tires in a week than most home pumps do in a year.

If a pump is lasting a month in a shop, there is a good chance it will stand up for 4+ years under normal home use. That is just my personal experience. I have a cheap MEC pump for home use and have had it for 10 years now and all I had to do with it is replace the hose and head because a mouse chewed through it one winter in the garage. The shop I worked at had the same pump and it died two month after getting it.
  • + 2
 We've got a similar story to tell with track pumps in my shop. Park, Pedros, SKS, all have failed quickly, and the Lezyne Dirt Drive CNC is only rated to 80psi, so no good for road tubes.
Interestingly, it's the Giant Control Tower Pro that has lasted us longest. 18 months and still going well. Not bad for RRP £70.
  • + 3
 I work at a shop, we use specialized air tool comp pumps. We just had our first pump give out, lasted 8 years....
  • - 1
 @ everyone who commented - thanks for sharing your experiences!

The common 'track pump' in home use has nothing in common with 'shop use' (retarded customers will quickly kill track pumps...trying to pump their tires without loosening the presta valve) or for 'workshop use' (where the pump literally wears out i.e. start leaking in the pump head / base or valve unit, or just bend or break)


Specialized Air Tool Comp for sure, will easily last 8-12 months of daily 'workshop use' and easy for 'customers' to use on the shop floor as the pump head is simple for both schraeder and presta tubes

found Park's pumps only last 3-4 weeks, along with the feeble Bontrager and Topeak Joe Blow track pumps

not been impressed with Park tools in the past few seasons, their quality is falling in terms of their pedal spanners, wrenches and screwdrivers....

SKS RenoKompressor are bombproof and rebuildable, but don't generate enough air volume per pump to make them any use, and in a shop scenario customers becomes confused with the presta / schraeder fittings and you will find those parts all over the shop
  • + 2
 I have the Specialized air tool pro.
I have gone through 1 head (not my fault) and the o-ring inside is now a little loose, so needs an oil more often (read once or twice a year). The pressure gauge front has a crack in it... but she just keeps on going. Love this pump, bought it many years ago after I used a friends one, his is still original and going strong.
  • + 1
 Strangely I was ready to buy this pump but may just go for one of the Giant Control Tower pumps.
  • + 1
 Perhaps I'll stick with the pump I have downstairs. It must be about 25 years old now, and does 120 psi when asked. It probably is rebuild able, but I've never had to. Buy well, buy once.
  • + 2
 I have a Topeak pump and they seem to be great! Impressed so far and regularly pump tyres up to 100psi with ease!
[Reply]
  • + 9
 Why is the San Marco a "Pinbike product pick" if it stabs your legs and makes your balls go numb?
  • + 13
 because pinkbike pick products that companies send them and test them, it's a review not a recommendation
  • + 1
 Well then, if that's the case, all the other product picks just lost a lot of "credibility", since people will no longer see them as "pinkbike recommendations".
  • + 10
 If people saw them ever as recommendations then they didn't bother to read past the photograph and the price tag...
  • + 2
 The name might be a little confusing but if they only had nice things to say about everything, people would accuse them of being biased toward the people who send them stuff.

I like to read about "lesser quality" products. At least I know what to avoid when I'm not sure what to buy next.
  • - 1
 Lesser quality as in; Anything Avid disc brakes, TREK BIKES, Parktool anything, Specialized tyre toobs, Pedro brand ANYTHING--the list goes on and on. Please, if anyone can add to my list of 'lesser quality' items..please reply to my comment.

HELP OUT THE CYCLING COMMUNITY FAR MORE BY TELLING THEM WHAT TO AVOID. I lost TONS of money, respect and life hours thanks to a bike shop in Lakewood Colorado that COULDN'T ball up and tell me the truth about what to get, and what I actually needed--not what their cash registers were willing to accecpt. Took my own due diligence to find what works, and what people are in HIGH praise of. FEEL THAT
[Reply]
  • + 4
 I rode Onza Ibex FRC 2.4 all season, with amazing grip in all conditions. A bit too much grip uphill though, but rolling resistance is the currency you pay in. Which is fine with me when I get these downhill abilities! Fantastic Enduro tire imho. Don't know about your pre-production issues, I have the feeling that doesn't translate to the market options.
  • + 3
 By the way - you mention the wrong 2.4 print - please note that the DHC casing is neither available for 2.25. So I guess you rode the FRC casing, that would also fit to the mentioned weight.
  • + 2
 It is the DH casing - they just aren't available to the public yet.
  • + 4
 Are they available for sale in the US?
  • + 2
 A tire with my name on it! ( IBEX=Aibek's?) love it ( they have a kickass distributor here), had one frc 2.25 on the back for the last 6 months , no problems with grip, reinforced side walls etc.., one problem i had is its not so good as a "tubeless" tire so i switched to tubes (no flats yet!). and they are cheap here!
[Reply]
  • + 2
 Onza today has no relationship other than brand name to the Onza of twenty years ago. The original Onza folded up shop in the late 90s and then about five years ago some brits bought the rights to the name and started a new bike products company.
  • + 3
 There are in fact two Onzas!

www.onzatires.com/1-1-Home.html
www.onza.com

The Brits in Nottingham still use the original logos so I don't know where 'Onza Tires' came from.

If I was being picky, I'd also say that Onza were one of THE brands of the early 90's not late 90's. White Porcupines FTW! Bar ends, Ti cranks etc.....
  • + 4
 and those crazy pedals with the elastomer springs
  • + 2
 ONZA Tires is a Swiss brand. the relaunched the tires in 2008. ONZA Tires and the other ONZA (trial bikes) have nothing in common with each other, two separate companies.
  • + 1
 Great... even less to do with the original onza... so why the hell compare these tires to Onza tires from back in the day ?

White Porcupines are one of the most sought after tires for vintage mtb restorations. The last NOS ones I saw on ebay went for $200US PER TIRE. They were fast tires on a DH course because the compound was so soft... we're talking like a 20A shore rating. The stuck to the dirt/rock like crazy, and they wore out incredibly fast. i found a pair in a bike store in 1993, gave them to a Dh racer buddy for his birthday, he got TWO practice runs out of them at MSA's World Cup and then they were shot.
  • + 1
 I was running (black) porcs up until this summer when I couldnt find any more to buy for a sensible price. Great tyres and damn light too. Switched to a ralph as its the closest thing I could find with similar characteristics.
The white ones were crazy soft but the black ones although soft do last a decent while.

I did email the guys at onzatires and asked if they are bringing back the porcupine and he said:

"Unfortunately the model as you know it will not be re-produced, because the molds we use to make them are no longer useable. But who knows, maybe a new Porcupine will make its appearance one day... Smile "

Anyone remember the onza octopus tyre? Wink
[Reply]
  • + 2
 We've have nothing but trouble with those Park pumps at our shop, we're on our second one because the first one broke and Park sent us a new one. The second one has a broken gauge only 3 months into use. Look for another option.
[Reply]
  • + 5
 use that pump everyday at work. the gauge fails all the time. total junk and not worth the money
  • + 3
 Agree with you; Those type of heads never work correctly. Plus it's plastic ! Lezyne floor pumps are better IMO. You can screw the head onto the valve, which can be adapted to presta/schraeder valves. They have a high volume floor pump too, and it comes in a very cool red anodized main cylinder !! That's what I use at work, with no problems !
  • + 3
 We use those pumps at our shop down here in Florida, hate them with a passion. Gauges will fail, pump head will seize or break. With the little that we actually use them you think they would hold up better. My go-to pump is still the Nashbar L'Orange. It has a better head, better gauge, large volume, and other than stickers falling off it holds up to some abuse. Plus, its like $15 cheaper. Parktool does have some fantastic warranties though, cause you will have to use it a bit.
  • + 2
 I have actually had the seals in the head of the pf4 melt on me on a really hot day. wouldn't be surprised that the gauges fail, not an impressive pump at all.
  • + 1
 Spend $60 on a specialized comp pump and it will last forever.
  • + 1
 Lenzyne cnc pump ftw!
  • + 1
 Thanks for the tip whoswright91, i'll look into one!
[Reply]
  • + 2
 Just to point out as well that this brand has nothing to do with the brand of the same name many years ago!

I would agree with the review though that there is a large difference in tread depth across the various tyre sizes. I don't think you will find the "skating on the tread" feel in the production tyres but you might want to consider a wider tyre if you like more tread or a narrower tyre if you like a little faster rolling. This difference seems more pronounced than most other brands.

I run an Ibex 2.1 front and Canis 2.1 rear for XC in the drier months. Super fast and very, very grippy even in mud which should be causing a world of issues Smile The compound and suppleness of the tyre account for the large grip.

Onza are well worth a try Smile
[Reply]
  • + 5
 I think Selle San Marco means 'ass will hurt' in Italian...
[Reply]
  • + 1
 in my opinion, the Ibex is simply the best tyre i have used, both the DH and the FR versions are mind blowing. pair the Ibex FR with an Onza Canis on the back and you have a super grippy fast rolling and tough trail setup that i have yet to find an equal to.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Been running the Ibex's for a while now on both my XC rig in the 2.25 version and my DH sled in the 2.4 version. Wear rate is really good, and shed loads of grip! I also run the XC version, the Canis 2.25 on the front of the XC bike and together they make the perfect XC/All Mountain pair!

Still wondering whether to replace the 2.4 Maxxis ADvantage that I have on the front of the DH bike with a bigger Greina, but will probably just buy a pair and keep them for when it gets muddy and horrid!

Yet to go tubeless with them, but new year that will come!

All in all great tyres, and will be running them from now on!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 ..really, a pump? A shite-crap park tool (like the rest of their lineup) at that...shame on you pinkbike. Review honest things..man, remember the AWESOME parktool chain cleaner yall gave praise toward? You influence newbies/XC riders far far FAR too much with you blatantly SLANTED and biased ADVERTISEMENT of a review..this is a complete mockery of keeping it HONEST and FAIR for people spending their paychecks on bike equipment. SHAME ON YOU PINK BIKE..BOO THIS WEB SITE BOOOOOOOOO (look at the VERY FIRST comment of this board if you don't think this review is outright SLANTED)
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Haven't seen any comments about the Topeak Joe Blow dual head pump - been working for me for a long time, and dual head works well for both presta and schrader. Only problem I've had is sometimes it's hard to yank off and I end up knocking my knuckles on the spokes when I pull it off.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I have that Park pump. Love it, only problem is that I've buggered the pressure gauge by knocking the pump over. It's located in a great spot for reading it, but is more susceptible to damage.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 something is wrong here! my friend went to Ligure this year and got one of this IBEX 2.40 tires. on a Deemax rims the tire is bigger than a 2.5 Minnion and you say that the 2.4 is kindof 2.35???? strange
[Reply]
  • + 2
 I really wana try the onza tires but im waiting for the skinwall tires to come out. you can see them used on the Commencal bikes website. they look awesome
  • + 1
 +1 for that. skin walls look sweet
[Reply]
  • + 2
 i had a hire bike with the ibex tyres for a day in morzine this summer after i blew te forks up on my glory, pretty decent hoops in my opinion.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 Hahaha... the Park pumps are a complete joke. Lezyne Alloy Floor Drive. Good stuff...
[Reply]
  • - 1
 The Park Tool PF4 Track Pump can handle up to how many PSI?

Only reason I chose Topeak's track pump over this one is because the PSI info on Park's pumps isn't easy to or I'm just too lazy to use Google..........oh wait, I actually did use Google and came up with nothing.

I need this info because I have a road bike as well.
  • + 1
 there is a pressure gauge on the pump, when you push down on the pump the neddle on the gauge moves and shows you the pressure, sounds a bit crazy but usig this method you can inflate your tyres to the correct pressure.
  • + 1
 LOL! i guess I asked the right question in the wrong forum or vice versa (or maybe im just lost in my translation).
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Have the Concor on both of my bikes for the last year. Love it. Can't complain of any of the things he did.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 "it left us with numb balls on a long road climb", lol!
[Reply]
  • + 2
 "only niggle is that it can be a bit of a fiddle"
[Reply]
  • + 1
 im glad i own a lyzen at my home, but i am also mechanic, and an axiom propell air is awesome, lifetime warranty!!!!!!!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 ONZA IBEX IS NOT COMMERCIAL IS THE BEST TIRES CAN HAVE. :-D
[Reply]
  • + 1
 what the heck is a niggle
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I think a niggle is sort of a pain in the butt. Not literally tho...
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Onza tires rule !!
[Reply]

Post a Comment



Copyright © 2000 - 2014. Pinkbike.com. All rights reserved.
dv15 0.049563
Mobile Version of Website