Pinkbike Product Picks

Oct 26, 2012 at 10:05
Oct 26, 2012
by Mike Kazimer  
 
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NiteRider Lumina 650

NiteRider has been around since the days when bike batteries were the size of water bottles. The advent of LED lighting systems has made big, bulky batteries a thing of the past, with modern lights burning brighter and weighing less than ever before. The NiteRider Lumina 650 fits in the middle of NiteRider's bike light lineup. It is a rechargeable, self-contained (the battery is built in) light which can be run helmet or handlebar mounted (both mounts are included). The light has 5 total settings – high, medium, low, blink, and walk. As the name implies, the Lumina 650 has 650 lumens of light output at its high setting. At this setting, run time is 1.5 hours. At the medium setting, light output is 400 lumens with a 3 hour run time. The low setting drops light output to 200 lumens, but run time is 5.5 hours. When the battery capacity drops to 15-20% the blue indicator light turns red, and when the battery level drops even further, the light will automatically go to the low setting, locking out the high and medium beams. Actual weight for the Lumina 650 is 138 grams without any mounting hardware, and charging time via USB is 5.5 hours. MSRP $139.99 USD. NiteRider.com


NiteRider Lumina 650
The Lumina 650 isn't as powerful as some larger options out there, but it is far lighter and more compact. The helmet mount needs further refinement before we can fully recommend this light.


Pinkbike's Take:
bigquotesThe arrival of shorter days and longer nights in the Northern Hemisphere means that night riding season is upon us. There's no better way to make trails you've ridden hundreds of times in the daylight feel completely foreign than to mount up a light and head out into the darkness. The majority of our rides with the Lumina 650 took place on technical singletrack in a heavily wooded area, riding conditions where the more light, the better. For more open areas, less technical trails or commuting, 650 lumens will provide plenty of illumination, but we preferred to pair the Lumina with another light to eradicate as much darkness as possible. The Lumina's beam pattern is even and wide, providing excellent trail coverage. The handlebar mount was easy to install and remained secure throughout the test. We appreciated the handlebar mount's ability to swivel side to side - it simplified the effort needed to find the right light position. We were less satisfied with the helmet mount. While the mount attaches easily and securely to the helmet, the light was able to move forward and backward on the mount. There was a noticeable (we could hear and feel it) clunk when the light slid back and forth. This would also bounce the beam up and down, creating less than ideal lighting conditions. A zip tie around the light and the mount snugged things up, but we didn't feel we should need to resort to MacGyver fixes on a brand new light. Burn times were close to NiteRider's claims, although we did notice there wasn't much time between the indicator light turning red and the high and medium beams getting locked out. The Lumina 650's reasonable price and small size make it an excellent choice for the rider looking to add another light to their system, or as a backup light, just in case a long ride turns into an epic adventure. - Mike Kazimer




ODI Lock-On fork bumpers

Best known for their extensive lineup of lock-on grips, ODI's product range now includes lock-on fork bumpers. Designed to replace the stock fork bumpers on dual crown forks with 40mm (Fox) or 35mm stanchions (RockShox BoXXer), the bumpers can be installed without removing the fork crown. A single 3mm hex key snugs it into place, keeping total installation time to less than 5 minutes. The elastomer bumpers are available in black, blue, white and red, so you can color coordinate with your bike and race kit. Eyelets are built in to the front of the plastic ring which holds the bumper to provide a spot to secure a race number place. Made in the USA. Weight: 32 grams (pair). MSRP $15.49.ODIGrips.com

ODI Lock On Fork Bumpers
Simple, effective, and inexpensive; the ODI fork bumpers make a lot of sense.

Pinkbike's Take:
bigquotesODI's lock-on fork bumpers fall into the ''Why didn't I think of that?'' category. Anyone who has struggled to move a fork bumper into the proper position has thought ''there must be an easier way.'' ODI thought the same thing, but then they did something about it. The bumpers installed easily and remained in place with no twisting or slipping throughout our testing period. Of course, as with any fork bumper, you'll want to make sure the bumpers contact your frame in a spot that's strong enough to handle some force - you don't want to put a dent in your fancy race machine. Once installed, the bumpers even gave us a little extra turning radius, as they're a few millimeters shorter than the stock bumper on the BoXXer we put them on. For the gram counters out there, the ODI bumpers weigh a miniscule 10 grams more than the stock bumpers on a BoXXer. - Mike Kazimer




Hydrapak E-Lite Vest

Hydrapak's E-Lite Vest is a hydration pack stripped to the bare minimum. The E-Lite Vest has a sleeve in the back designed to hold Hydrapak's one liter, BPA and PVC free reservoir. The E-Lite Vest has two zippered front pockets on the shoulder straps, along with four smaller elasticized pockets intended to hold energy gels or bars. The reservoir's hose has a small magnet attached to it which allows it to stick to another small magnet clipped onto the pack's sternum or shoulder straps. MSRP $59.99 Hydrapak.com


Hydrapak E-Lite Vest
Perhaps too minimalist in its design, the E-Lite Vest would benefit from a pocket or two.


Pinkbike's Take:
bigquotesThe E-Lite Vest's small size and limited water carrying capacity make it best suited for shorter (less than 2 hour) rides. You're not going to be able to load this up with all the tools, parts, pads and food needed for an all day ride (but that's not its intended use). This vest will keep you hydrated for a hotlap on your local trails, but that's about it. At first, we were concerned the lack of a waist belt would make the E-Lite Vest shift around on technical terrain, but the vest's small size helped keep it in place. The vest doesn't sit low enough that a waist belt would work - the vest only extends to about mid-back (depending on the user's height). Given the small size of the vest, we found the the length of the tube on the reservoir to be out of proportion. It's much too long - we were able to keep it out of the way by affixing the magnet to the far side of the sternum strap, but we would have preferred it to be short enough to remain on the right shoulder strap. It's easy enough to trim the hose, but it would be nice if this was already done. When we were loading up the vest to head out on a ride, we realized there wasn't any dedicated gear pocket on the back. The reservoir pocket has a hole on each side of it, eliminating the possibility of tossing a small multi-tool in there. We're not huge fans of using under-the-seat bags for mountain biking, so we did everything we could to make our flat fix kit and multi-tool fit into the E-Lite Vest. We managed to squeeze a tube and a pump into the reservoir pocket, and a multi-tool and tire lever into one of the front shoulder strap pockets. On the trail, the vest's light weight was immediately noticeable - a significant difference from the hydration packs we normally wear. The breathability of the shoulder straps and back panel were much appreciated when the temperature climbed. However, we would like to see some refinements before recommending the E-Lite Vest for mountain biking. The addition of a tool pocket and pump holder on the back panel would let the E-Lite Vest retain its minimalist styling, but it would make us more likely to use it on short rides. Without a place for a tube and pump it's basically a water bottle you wear on your back, at which point we'd rather have a traditional water bottle and not have anything on our back. - Mike Kazimer



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54 Comments

  • + 20
 Already got the ODI bumper on my Boxxer, but soon i found out, then bumper is not tat kind good, even worse then my original one comes from Rockshox. The outer soft shell is very thin, even with finger, can feel the hard of the screw base inside. I have return to Rockshox bumper after i found the ODI bumper already gave my frame a dent......
  • - 44
 better than giving your stanchion a dent.....
  • + 48
 id rather not dent either of them.....
  • + 1
 Someone should do similar but much more thicker for bikes with narrow top tube. For example Antidote

www.pinkbike.com/photo/7162612
  • + 4
 Sorry to hear your frame got dented.. when I first saw these, I thought putting the screw into the contact point wasn't such a hot idea. too bad it got lost in the comments..

www.pinkbike.com/news/What-This-is-and-Why-You-Need-a-Pair-Sea-Otter-Day-3.html
  • + 0
 I didn't used ODI bumpers but i used something very similair,it worked pretty good.
gp1.pinkbike.org/p4pb7975179/p4pb7975179.jpg
  • + 2
 I was really hoping to run these but now I think I'll stick with the stock bumpers. That's a really good point about the screw placement.
  • + 3
 Make your own bumpers... cheap, easy.
  • + 1
 used beach sandals!
  • + 1
 @lorDHenry why wont normal fork bumpers work on the lifeline?
  • + 2
 I'd recommend anyone using fork bumpers or wanting that peace of mind, is to get good quality velcro strips (3M Kind), strips of silicone off of grips, etc, and put it in the exact spot where the fork bumpers hit one the bike frame. It's perfect and seriously never have to worry about hard hits...cause even with the fork bumpers alone, they can cause minor dents over time. With the velcro you can remove them anytime and they stick on/look fine.
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  • + 17
 10 grams more??? f*ck that shit.
[Reply]
  • + 8
 Already have a camelbak, don't do night riding, and my frame has built in bumpers. Although if it didn't I would give the ODI's a try, they look nice... Regardless, nothing here for me. Nice write up though
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  • + 3
 I've got another version of the NiteRider light and had no problems with the helmet mount. It might have something to do with the helmet they're mounted on, mine has a ridge right on the middle and it fastens really tightly over it and never moves.
[Reply]
  • + 4
 650 lumens 1.5 hr burn time at around 150 bucks.... sweeeeeeet. Perfect for commuting or as a second light for serious nite time thrashing. Very nice!
  • + 1
 I have a lumina 650. I love it. Actually, thare hasnt been too many rides ive been on during daylight since I bought it!. Good light output. But the review was right. on the helmet mount ( which I prefer) it does bounce a bit. But I still recommend it to anybody who wants to night ride, without breaking the bank.
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  • + 2
 I've recently started to ride at night (like 10 pm) with a custom made head lamp at 770 lm. Trail riding in the woods in the dark is completley different feeling! I'm mega stoked after each ride...

Ohh yeah, the head lamp is called Bocialarka XM-L. You get the lamp, handlebar mount, battery, charger and a bag for 100$
[Reply]
  • + 1
 650 lumens and $130 and a poor burn time.
You would have to be mad to pay that money.
I just got 3000lumens, £130 and 3 hours burn time, at 1000 lumens, burn time is over 10 hours!

I think the Dh specific riders need to catch up with the XC boys.

We get £10 torches with that many lumens and a slightly better burn time. Then a few pounds for a clip.

www.bikelightsuk.com
  • + 3
 210$ is a lot more than 130$ Betsie. Also, with how big that lamp is, I doubt anyone would want that shit on the front of their bike, or helmet for DH purposes. The whole point in this light is it's light, and even able to mount to your helmet etc, and an all enclosed unit, with no cords or anything else to run to a battery pack.

Remember, xc guys ride on generally smooth trails compared to a lot of gnar dh brings, and having some massive lamp flop around, and have the potential to flip up pointing those 3,000 Lumens right in your eye during a run, seems a little well.. you get the point.
  • + 0
 Language and attitude rffr, there is no need for that, now calm down, if you can't say things nicely, don't say them at all.

I ride for up to 1 hour every night on trails for 6 months a year.
Today being the first day after the clocks change for 6 months! (the joys of commuting in Northern Scotland)
For 3 months it will be dark in the mornings also, so all riding during the week is done in the dark.

$130 for 650lumens is very expensive by UK prices.

I ride Dh in the dark also, I have a Troutie, the light from bikelightsuk and an older L&M ARC Lion. I just don't use the L&M any more. For Dh, I like to be able to see where I am going at speed!

The lamp weight is what goes on your bars, so the lamp is probably lighter than that light, with the battery pack separate.
  • + 0
 Attitude? There wasn't much attitude at all in there.
And Language? The word shit is widely used on even the radio, and isn't even *'d out on here. Not too sure why any adult would cringe at the word "shit" in any way..

And this isn't horsepower, having more lumens doesn't always make things better, in fact, many times it's just the opposite.

Also, the fact is there is an external battery pack in which you have to mount somewhere, and deal with the cable for it, that is the whole point in this light, is it's an "all in one".
  • + 1
 They have done a nice job with the cable, providing an extension cable for if the pack is mounted further away. Might not be bad language where you come from, but where I live it is, and if my son was to use language like that he would be straight to bed and grounded. You would not hear that word used on normal radio over here. I guess you guys are different to us in that respect then. I had 3 riders around last night, all with 1000 lumen lights that are all in 1, after a quick test, they were heading home to purchase some 'horsepower'. You always have the option to run the light at 1000 lumens for around 11 hours, nearly enough for a night time winter enduro.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Im still not sure how they justify THAT much for a light, sure if at 650 lumens I get 4 hours of runtime Ill buy it. But at that price? I can get myself a Fenix Tk60 that runs for 30 mins longer and projects at least 50 lumens more.... And its more compact, for 60$ less.
  • + 1
 The advertised run time is their lowest expected, just like the lumen outputs. A lot of the lights run longer or are brighter, that's the way NiteRider does things. I've got several of their lights (MiNewt 700 Dual and MiNewt 600 Cordless) that run 25-50% longer and are much brighter than some of my friends "brighter" Magicshines. Just because the components say a light should have a certain run time or light output doesn't mean they actually stack up.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I may have to take a closer look at the Hydrapak. It appears to be about what I need for endurance events so I don't have to carry a full pack when I'm just doing a bunch of laps. Just stop to swap out the bladder every lap or so.
  • + 1
 Not a bad idea, Phran. The bladder has a quick release mechanism at the base of the hose, so your downtime when swapping out bladders would be minimal.
[Reply]
  • + 3
 Which size will fit 888's 38mm stanchions? Boxxer 35mm or Fox 40mm? Or should I use fox with 1mm shim under the clamp? I want one particularly designed for 888!
  • + 8
 Why? The 888 are good enough stock. Actually fox and and rock shox should take note.
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  • + 1
 If you have a Demo+Fox40 forget about use the ODi fork bumpers. Using the special bumpers for Fox40 that SPZ send with the frame the ODI bumpers will stay very far from the frame.
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  • + 4
 yea... but will the bumpers work on a shiver?
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  • + 3
 gotta love frames with integrated bumpers! odi has a great product for sure though
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  • + 1
 For the bump stops, I don't understand what was ever wrong with the inner tube/electrical tape setup. It worked great, cost nothing, and gave me something to do with a blown DH tube.
  • + 2
 whats wrong with it? it's tacky and looks like garbage. thats what.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 The ODI bumpers don't budge on my 40, well worth the money I spent...I also own the light and is bright as a mofo on my road bike
[Reply]
  • + 2
 already have the ODI might check that light out though, not bad for the price
  • + 1
 Check out this led, exact same thing magicshine sells but it's $40 here. Works great, very bright, but takes about three weeks coming from china.
us.dinodirect.com/ha-iii-ssc-p7-c-sxo-3-mode-900-lumen-led-headlamp.html?AFFID=123&cur=AUD
  • + 1
 Yeah dog, buy that magicshine knockoff..... Before you do, search "Lipo explosion" on YouTube then tell me if you want to cheap out on a light.... There are different standards with lights produced in China than north America, including proper cases so the battery bodies cannot get pierced... And if by some fluke they are, you are protected...
  • + 1
 I wouldn't be worried about puncturing the anodized aluminium case. But I would be worried about the reliability, and the charger accidentally over charging it.
  • + 2
 i've used it for a year and it's been great. i looked up the charger and it says it has built in IC to cut off power automatically when battery is fully charged. the majority of batteries, lights, electronics, and everything is chinese anyway, why pay someone more for a brand?
  • + 1
 I have 3 of these. One for on the bars and 2 helmet mounted. Reliable bright and cheap for me so far.
  • + 2
 Magic shine lights are great for the money. If you're that worried about the batteries exploding then you're doing the wrong sport.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Got the ODI bumpers on my 40's after stretching two sets of the stock fox ones, been running them for a few months now absolutely no problems, definitely recommend them.
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  • + 1
 ohhh i gotta get me some of those bumpers!! and quit using the stupid innertube wrapped around with tiewraps
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  • + 1
 What a stupid backpack! How about you sack up and carry an extra couple pounds and not waste your money on that thing?!
  • + 1
 I saw these in Whistler, they did not have my size, but for what I look for in a pack (I dont carry the sink like many do), it looked perfect.
www.salomon.com/uk/product/advanced-skin-s-lab-5-set.html
[Reply]
  • + 2
 Didnt brent foes design those bump stops ?
  • + 1
 Foes fork stops are built into the frames now , did they used to have these style ones before then?
  • + 2
 check out the end of this vid mr brent foes did design them alongside odi www.youtube.com/watch?v=EVYHjq2GN-A
  • + 1
 ps copy the vid link then google
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  • + 1
 Night rider has the worst helmet mout ive ever seen. Such garbage
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  • + 1
 got the ODI bumpers & i love them. damn good design & USA made!
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  • + 0
 Can't wait to try those fork bumpers.
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