SRAM's X01 Drivetrain Explained

Aug 2, 2013 at 15:20
Aug 2, 2013
by Mike Levy  
 
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While we had some early concerns about gearing range and chain retention, SRAM's single-ring XX1 drivetrain has proved to be a game-changer. The group's 10 - 42 spread cassette provides an ample gearing range - so long as you've chosen the correct X-Sync chainring size to use with it - and the 11 speed setup has shown itself to be far from finicky despite the countless miles that we've put on it, much of them in nasty conditions. Given the group's success under both racers and weekend warriors, it didn't take a psychic to predict that SRAM would look to utilize the technology found in XX1 to create lower priced component group, and that much was made official yesterday with SRAM's X01 press release making the rounds on pretty much every mountain bike website out there. Although the specs for the long awaited 11 speed X01 group have finally been made public, there were still some unanswered questions that needed to be addressed.

SRAM X01
SRAM's X01 group left some people scratching their heads due to its cost and weight that compare closely to XX1, but the real story is that it will save the consumer money at the OEM level when they buy a complete bike



How much money do you save by going with X01 instead of XX1?

Somewhat surprisingly, not as much as you might think. Depending on what type of bottom bracket your bike requires, whether you choose trigger or Gripshift, as well as the chainring size you go with, XX1 carries an MSRP of between $1,449 - $1,573 USD, which is only a few hundred more than the $1,273 starting price for the just released X01 group. While you can hear the collective groans of those riders who were hoping for a much less expensive 11 speed group, if you listen carefully, the fact of the matter is that the costly manufacturing methods required by XX1 are also used to create X01, meaning that the new group's retail price is more or less where we expected it to be. Take the cassette, for example, which is essentially the same 11 speed X-Dome unit utilized by XX1, with all but its largest 42 tooth cog machined from a single steel ingot. The result is a $399 USD cassette that is just $25 less expensive and 15 grams heavier than the XX1 version, distinctions that are essentially down to the different finishing processes used. That means that we don't expect a much cheaper 11 speed group from SRAM until a less expensive method of cassette manufacturing is employed, although SRAM does plan to offer aluminum arms as an aftermarket option at some point in the future, a move that should bring the group's MSRP down considerably. Regardless, a pinned 11 speed cassette is key to lowering the group's cost to X9 price levels.



Does it feature the same gearing range?

As of right now X01 does not offer quite as easy of a low gear as XX1, with the issue coming down to the 94mm bolt circle diameter (BCD) that the X01 crank spider utilizes. That means that the smallest ring that can be fitted is a 30 tooth, unlike the 76mm BCD spider on the XX1 crank that allows a smaller 28 tooth ring to be used.



Those carbon fiber cranks sure look like the arms used by XX1...

That's because they are the same. The exact same, actually, which is surely another factor that contributes to the group's near-XX1 asking price. While the arms themselves are identical, there are machining differences in the spider and rings, as well as in the crank's finish, which set it apart. A ceramic bottom bracket also comes stock with XX1, while X01 gets a stainless steel unit, and a narrower Q-factor is possible with the XX1 arms as well. As mentioned above, expect an aluminum X01 crankset option in the future, with it being initially offered only as original equipment on complete bikes.


SRAM X01 group
An aluminum X01 crank will come as stock equipment on some bikes, with it being ready for the aftermarket down the road.


Do the cranks still use that funky sized 76mm BCD spider?

No, the X01 crank uses a 94mm BCD and corresponding chainrings. While SRAM's offset 76mm BCD design used on the XX1 spider does allow riders to easily swap out chainrings without removing the cranks from their bike, it also locks them into using SRAM's relatively expensive rings, a fact that consumers weren't fond of despite how effective the narrow/wide X-Sync design is at keeping the chain in place. SRAM will offer both 94mm BCD rings and their own 104mm BCD rings that will cost between $105 and $127 USD depending on the size.



How much heavier is X01 compared to XX1?

From what we can tell by using claimed weight figures, the answer is not much. The largest weight difference when comparing the groups side by side is found in the cassettes, with the XX1 version weighing a claimed 260 grams compared to the X01 unit at 275 grams. This is actually down to the different finish treatment used on the X01 unit, although most riders will scoff at the 15 gram difference. If you think that is a small margin, there is just 5 grams separating the claimed weights of the XX1 and X01 cranks: 650 grams with a bottom bracket for the XX1 compared to 655 grams for X01. With the same carbon arms, the difference can be traced to the spiders. Just 10 grams separates the derailleurs, and it is essentially a wash between XX1 and X01 trigger shifters. That means, depending on whose numbers you are looking at, there is only a 30 - 40 gram difference between the two groups.



Are the two groups compatible with each other?

With the exception of the differing crank spider BCD patterns, they are cross-compatible. That means that the shifters, cassettes, chain, and the XD driver body from each groupset can be used with components from the other, and that we surely see complete bikes spec'd with an XX1 derailleur and carbon crank, but with a less expensive X01 cassette and shifter.


SRAM X01 Rear derailleur
The X01 rear derailleur will be offered in both carbon and aluminum (shown above) cage options, with the carbon version retailing for $269 USD.


XX1 and X01 seem to be priced similarly and weigh close to the same...

Going with SRAM's recommended prices, which are likely higher than the street price that most people would pay if they walked into their local shop, as well as comparing claimed weight figures for the two groups, we discover that there really isn't too much separating the two single-ring drivetrains. In fact, there is only $176 USD between the two at the retail level, and just 30 - 40 grams (when both groups use carbon cranks) when it comes to weight. Why are the two groups so close? The answer comes down to costs at the OEM level, with the relatively small price difference between the two actually converting to a truly reasonable amount of savings on the retail price of complete bikes. How much savings isn't clear, and that is also something that will obviously vary from brand to brand, but it does mean that an X01-equipped bike could be substantially less expensive than the same model spec'd with XX1. While it may seem odd that the two groups are so close in weight and aftermarket price, spec'ing X01 at the OEM end will allow SRAM to deliver their excellent single-ring drivetrain technology to riders who would otherwise not be able to afford a bike with a full XX1 group.



Pinkbike's Take:
bigquotes
While there were quite a few comments related to the group's price and weight relative to XX1 in yesterday's initial press release, X01's real advantage will be its ability to deliver SRAM's single-ring technology on complete bikes that retail for appreciably less money than what the same machine spec'd with XX1 would cost. That's a good thing in our books because that savings, which might conceivably add up to hundreds of dollars for the consumer, could translate to upgrades like dropper seat posts on lower priced bikes, or just straight up more money left in your wallet. - Mike Levy


www.sram.com
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190 Comments

  • + 206
 SRAM X01 explanation resumed: cost too much
  • + 16
 i love how their "lower cost" XX1 uses the same carbon cranks and carbon derailleur cage for the X01 - just use aluminum and you would sell a lot more groupos due to a lower price!
  • + 48
 #notworthit
  • + 29
 So stupid. Its basically a very slightly worse XX1 system, for about the same amount of money
  • - 74
 It's called XO, If you're pour, Wait for it to trickle down to X-7. Stop bitching about the price. There is a market for it, it has been proven.
  • - 2
 Seriously. Why??
  • - 3
 ^ it does not use an aluminum crank. X01 uses the exact same crankarms as XX1. the photo of the group on the bike is the OEM version. read the article
  • + 13
 this is similar to the difference between XO and XX, it was not going to be an X91
  • + 9
 There is no chance this will trickle down to X7... maybe X9, but doubtful. Either buck up and buy it go, or stop reading and crying about it.
  • + 1
 How they do dat!
  • - 1
 Are you mad? Or rich? Rich people are rich because the dont waste money...the invest....or won the lottery.this sram xo1 is a company investment....hope to get more money and change the industry, but for any one else that dont have any stock on sram ...it is a waste of money.
  • + 6
 Just wait 2 years until obsolete.
  • + 11
 Can't wait until the new XXXXXXX01 with a small price tag of $2k.
  • + 1
 Jajajajaja (means hahahahahah)
$2k unboxed!
  • + 3
 Typical SRAM bs, same group as xx1 but marketed as X0. Looks nice though.
  • - 15
 I have xx1 and x9 on two different trailbikes. I flip a coin every day before I ride uphillin chillin in spandex downhill my balls flex. These bikes are floppy like old guy with no viagra. Save $1900 and run shimano tiagra.
  • + 13
 is Sram PAYING pinkbike to shove X01 down our pockets ??? seriously enuf with this, WE KNOW !
  • + 11
 Every product on here is corporate favors and ass grabbing money dips. Buy what you want and trust your own instincts.
  • + 8
 marketing stupidity is thriving!!!

give me a reason why should one give such a vast amount, and just not buy another quality groupset (eg.sram x9) and save...

Smile
  • + 4
 X9 is the best shiz in the biz. They should work more on making the deraileur smaller and less geeky mtb looking. Tuck that bad boy in there, better clearance, last longer, less material/weight. They like to overcomplicate then over charge the rich spandexers. They going to have ipad docking station next year on xxipad edition.
  • + 9
 Thanks for convincing me it's not worth dumping a shitload of money into the 1x11 drivetrain. The new "price point" isn't even worth it if you're going to spend over $1,000 on a drivetrain anyways. I'm more confused than anything... if you aren't going to make it noticeably cheaper, and then explain that it's actually almost the same thing as XX1, where is my incentive to upgrade??
  • + 8
 After re-reading this, I realized that the initial press release about this, showing the aluminum version of the set on the Lappiere is what I was expecting to be able to buy. Why the hell give us the impression that's what we could expect to be able to buy and then say that "it's only available OEM". What bullshit. Obviously, they can produce it, they just want all of us that are anxious to upgrade to get suckered into paying for the carbon shit out of impatience, and only release the aluminum version after there is enough of a clamor for it. I hope Shimano is watching this, and working on a new Mega-Range 10-speed cassette I can run with my current setup, or maybe I can just upgrade to full XTR for much less than this stuff.
  • + 27
 Hashtags DONOT belong on pinkbike. Get that crap outta here
  • + 6
 300$ for a carbon crank isn't so bad, (I'm running xx1 crank with 12-36 tooth rear and x9 derailleur, love it). Can Sram just give us an 11-40 tooth 10 speed rear that will fit a standard hub? Maybe a X91 derailleur? That whole kit could cost 650$ - and you wouldn't need a new hub!
  • + 5
 their argument for being cheap when buying a new bike having the xx1 or 1 group pre installed is nonsense in my opinion. If this is supposed to reach a higher point of availability for rider with a tighter budget then why should my bike have an 11 speed setup in the future? No argument about the technological advantages there BUT as a true low budget rider it still wont make sense to buy 11speed setup on a bike in the future because there is always a cost factor in REPLACING BROKEN STUFF. now imagine breaking a tooth out of the casette or breaking a rear deraileur. thats wher the cost is even higher...i mean i dont buy a new setup every 2 years for an outrageous amount of cash. 399 for a casette what a joke. And the discussion about hubs for such systems aren't even starting.
  • + 1
 We already know what works. Don't believe the double tongues. They just want your money. Dah here I spend 18k every season on "upgrades".
  • + 2
 SRAM just needs some competition in the 1x11 drive train market. Then maybe they will maybe speed up their trickle down to the lower component specs.
  • + 1
 I don't know why people are all surprised this X01 stuff being expensive. Yes the pricing is probably a little silly and yes I'm always the first to go "AHMAGAWD2XPENSIV!" but X0 has never been known to be a budget friendly category.

So now I guess we either wait patiently for it to trickle down to x9 or we get the general lee cassette with a raceface chainring for 1 bazillionth of the price.
  • + 3
 I don't think it's about being cheaper. It's basically the same group, branded as XO, slightly cheaper. It's a way to add "XO" to the lineup, which is fine, but the truth is this is a super versatile but expensive set up. And truthfully, I don't want a heavy ass basketball sized cassette so if Im going to do this Im buying XX1.
  • + 1
 Sram patatic game. Wait for another shimano patatic game. Thats called marketing
  • + 1
 "XX1 carries an MSRP of between $1,449 - $1,573 USD, which is only a few hundred more than the $1,273 starting price for the just released X01 group."

What's more important, on eBay you can find a complete brand new boxed unused XX1 groupset for $999, which is less than the price of X01. So unless someone decides to sell it for a sub $1000 price, they will have serious problems to sell it even if it was better than XX1.
  • - 9
 Fuck this group.
  • + 2
 why neg prop him? most are probably thinking the same..
[Reply]
  • + 34
 is this article just damage control from SRAM or something?
  • + 25
 yea good question - is PB just an industry mouthpiece or do you have actual journalists working there - i.e. independent, fact checking, no bullshit representatives of the MTB community....all i see lately is PR and marketing surveys. i like the videos, but will soon be leaving the community if things dont smarten up around here lads
  • + 13
 The article on the Dirt mag site is a bit more frank - dirt.mpora.com/news/sram-officially-launch-their-1x11-x01-groupset.html
  • - 1
 SRAM could give a crap about damage control... SRAM dominates in every XC race with their XX1
  • + 3
 Thanks dingus, that article hits the nail on the head. Where is my incentive to buy this?
  • - 2
 Sram does not dominate.
Nino rides a 650b and not a 29er.... it is all about the size baby.
Wait until nino changes to this new size.... 26" lol
  • - 1
 For your brikes, ya dingus
  • + 0
 Nino runs XX1 it has nothing to do with tire size
  • + 4
 @ccolagio and haljohnson - There is no damage control in the article, just facts. Unlike some other sources (but not all, Dirt did the same), we actually compared both the prices and weights and made it very clear in the piece that both X01 and XX1 are quite close... that's all. We haven't ridden the group yet so we can't be critical of it, although we do note that the cassette is a major contributor to the group's price and that it won't come way down until a pinned version is manufactured.

We explain why the prices are so close at the retail level, and unlike other sources, we also mention that it is actually going to save money at the OE level, likely hundreds of dollars, which is a big aim of X01.
[Reply]
  • + 20
 Shimano has been awfully quite about 11 speed, wonder what they have up the sleeve. Quite frankly, all I want is an 11-40 ten speed cassette to run with a 30t single up front.
  • + 2
 Im running 36t with 11-36ten speed and even thats a bit a bit low for me when i want that dh power. How are you planning to pedal at speed with a 30 t?
  • + 1
 If they came out with wider range 10 speed cassettes say 11-38, 11-40 or 11-42, they wouldn't make any money selling you a whole new drive train.

I am going give the General Lee 11-40 adapter a try on my 1x10 Sram X9 setup (32 front 11-36 back). Will be switching from a 32 to a 34 up front and this should give me the gearing I am looking for, a little on both ends.
  • + 3
 I've seen a few different people saying that they work for shimano or know people at shimano been claiming that shimano has an "ace card up their sleeve" product coming. They couldn't disclose anything due to obvious reasons.

Not sure how much weight there is to that claim but since I'm not going to fork out that much money for a groupset... Shimano: "You had my curiosity. But now you have my attention."
  • + 2
 Oh an Shimano is actually going to be giving it away for free
  • + 1
 Quesadilla34, XX1 is meant for XC/Trail/All Mountain use, not just DH. The idea of 11-40 is being able to pedal uphill, it has nothing to do with downhill bike gearing.
  • + 1
 I understand completely, however even in am applications it wcpuld prove to be a hastle
  • + 0
 Probs to shimano for not being a bragging mouth like sram with their 11 speed stuff....http://www.vitalmtb.com/forums/The-Hub,2/Shimano-14-Speed-Cassette,6574 quite interesting... Big Grin mhh i bet shimano will bring a matured solution at half the price.
  • + 1
 that patent was filed in 1996 and the design failed.
  • + 1
 thats what i'm getting at....at failing. same for 11 speed i think. Somehow i cant imagine a wide range of ppl having this setup Big Grin D
  • + 1
 Do you live under a rock... 11 speed is taking over enduro and XC
  • + 1
 i do not. i ride a 11-27 setup with 34 and 36 chainrings up front on my enduro. i don't think that it makes sense it just compensates a lack of strength. tell me who would ride 60 km enduro races on a single chainring and that cassette. keep the 42 toothed ring and give me 10 or nine teeth at the bottom. makes the 30 teeth more acceptable.
[Reply]
  • + 15
 This is seriously ridiculous, I love innovation (I'm an engineer myself) but I upgraded my Nomad to 10 speed with Zee shifter and FR derailleur, chain and cassette for 200 bucks. I could waste a half dozen of this whole set-up before I came close to 11 speed pricing.
  • - 13
 Haha, theres your problem, the only amazing zee component are the cranks. The rest is just ok
  • + 14
 No way. Zee is the bees knees man. Especially the rear derailleur and brakes. Just because it's affordable doesn't mean it has no value.
  • + 2
 I've had enough of dealing with the Avid often funky brake behavior and the saint look really attractive but expensive. The Zees are looking more and more interesting especially since that at 150lbs, I'm not too hard to stop so they'll probably be just fine...
  • + 1
 Dude Solem22. If you are an engineer then you know products are designed to make money. The X01 is at the higher price to maintain perceived value while OEM versions will feature compromised technology giving the bikes competitive proicepoints for their perceived value. "I want this one, it costs 500 less and has X01 which everybody says is the same as XX1". This is when lust for the product overwhelms intelligence and regular folks avoid paying attention to the difference between OEM and aftermarket.
[Reply]
  • + 14
 Dear Sram,
To command a price you have to demonstrate performance.
Your top enduro rider uses a top guide still!!

Performance not demonstrated/verified. Thank you.

Dear Shimano,
I have your 10 speed xtr stuff on my enduro bike.
Your 9 speed shifter was better,
Your 9 speed cassette shifted better,
Your 9 speed system ghost shifted less
Your 9 speed system was less prone to rock strikes effecting performance

Just give use a light 11 to 36t in 9 speed, xt price and we will be happy....
  • + 10
 I just want a 9-speed shadow-PLUS deraileur.
  • + 4
 Use a shimano 10-speed mech with a sram 9-speed shifter and you have one
  • + 3
 Yep. I'm running a zee rd and x9 9 speed shifter. Spaced the actuation a little bit, maybe 5mm and it's close to perfect.
  • + 1
 Add a 40T chainring bolted onto your 34 and you're golden. Takes like 20 minutes, tops.

forums.mtbr.com/drivetrain-shifters-derailleurs-cranks/cheapish-9-speed-11-39t-cassette-865962.html#post10547269
  • + 2
 Or you find someone who does it the professional way.

fotos.mtb-news.de/p/1371765
  • + 1
 A real cog doesn't work as well. The cog is too large and can bend under higher torques. The large cog can also cut into the freehub (not catastrophically, but it will cut grooves and make the cassette near impossible to remove). The large cog or chainring needs to be bolted to the cassette close to the teeth to share the kind of load it generates. Thats part of the reason why large cog cassettes are on spiders of sorts.
[Reply]
  • + 12
 When you are cutting 10-15g off a component (e.g. xx1 vs x01), you haven't designed a new group, you have just revised a manufacturing process.

So much more goodwill if there was only a single high end 1x11 group, and it came down in price $200 from '13 to '14, instead of two nearly identical groups pretending to be different. Then release the budget/value (x7/x9) version a year or two later for much, much less, should that ever be feasible.

Seems like x01 is part empty marketing exercise bumping the 1x11 hype, part xx1 revision, part OEM group trying not to look cheap, and so riding the x0 group's established gravity/AM following. The whole thing is confused and stupid. And I like SRAM.
[Reply]
  • + 10
 I guess it is great for the OEM, too bad people wear parts out. I guess you could just buy another new bike to get the OEM price before the drive train wears out or you rip a derailler off.
  • + 4
 It's kinda funny that I've been using the exact same drive drain, except my chain (can thank a log for that), for over 5 years now. Broke 2 deraileur hangers on some rocks, but that's it. I ride year round too, 4-5 days a week for 3 hours each outing. I guess I'm lucky I don't get this "wearing out" people speak of. My drive train shifts crisp and clean year round. Rain, mud, dust, 15 degree temps with snow 7 inches deep.
  • + 1
 Depends on the company I can get 2500 kms on a XTR cassette with frequent chain changes, however the Sram XX was known for wearing out fast I have also heard the same for XX1
  • + 5
 I agree about the wear issues with SRAM cassettes. The alloy cog on my cassette wore incredibly quickly, well before any noticeable wear on the steel cogs. I suspect Shimano is coming out with 11 speed XTR soon as some online retailers are starting to clear out XTR cassettes cheap. Saw the same thing happen with xx1 cassettes before 11 speed came out. Given my experience with SRAM cassettes, I will be waiting for Shimano.
[Reply]
  • + 9
 Only dentists and former CEOs in Lycra will be able to MTB soon if it goes like this. Those companies that start targeting middle of the road customers like you and me will win this game. Thank you, Kona!!! For real.
  • + 1
 Amen... Carbon operator, nuff said.
[Reply]
  • + 8
 Having spent a lot of time in the fabrication and manufacturing industries, I don't see justification for a 400 dollar cassette. Assuming 100 percent markup, manufacturing costs would be 200$. No way. I see a cassette that costs 30 to 80$ to produce. Complex machining process? Nope. Even if they do get a blank stamped into a cone, then machine that, nothing unusual here, move along folks, you're getting hosed.
  • + 2
 I agree that it's probably way more expensive that it costs to make even after the mark up but you seem to assume only sram makes a mark up. Sram probably makes good money on those, then the distributors mark up and then the shops marks up. Apparently shop mark ups are often a joke compared the distributor mark up though.
[Reply]
  • + 9
 Sure it will save money on a complete bike, but as soon as the cassette wears out your going to be spending $399 to replace it. Im sorry but i got my deore cassette for £15.
  • + 8
 I got a chance to ride my neighbors xx1 equipped Carbine and I must say, You get what you pay for. that being said I'm not some dickpumping fan-boy but I really really enjoyed the single ring up front. I think when ever possible it is a 100 times better to have a single chainring. Comparing deore to xx1 just doesn't seem fair in this circumstance.
  • + 14
 "dick pumping fanboy"...excellent choice of words.
  • - 5
 Screw your Deore Cassette its crap
  • + 11
 Deore stuff isn't crap. For the money you can't go wrong and assuming Massini's prices are accurate, you'll be getting 17 cassettes for the price of 1. Yeah the Sram stuff will be better but i'm not entirely convinced it's 17 times better
  • - 4
 If you are complaining about the cost of a cassette, this groupset isn't for you.
[Reply]
  • + 6
 explanation of xx1/xo1's use: a way to repackage what's basically been done before with 10 cogs rather than 11 in this case, in order to hike up the price and thus increase profit margins for the coming financial year. I won't buy it as i'm just not impressed by it.
how is a rear mech worth $269, i'd rather spend the time it took to earn that much riding.
  • + 5
 also the idea of making a chain with skinnier side plates is a shit idea. anyone that knows the basics of engineering will tell you that it will stretch faster. any person that has a higher than average amount of power knows how easy it is to snap a chain and thats not going to get any better either.
  • + 4
 A $269 rear mech is plain stupid considering they are one of the most commonly broken mtb parts...I run a cheapo road mech because of the simple fact that it will most likely be violently ripped off my bike at some point when it comes into contact with rocks at high speeds tup
  • - 13
 you should try not hitting rocks... kinda the object no?
  • + 12
 No rocks on side walks. The rest of us ride on trails....Where there is rocks.
  • - 1
 Where there (are) rocks.
  • + 4
 I have had my grammar corrected by an Amurican. I think rear "mechs" are retarded. Ten years from now we will all laugh at the time we used to have to endure the misgivings of rear derailleurs.
im constantly amused by alphabitches.
  • + 1
 derailleurs are not going anywhere. You think this stuff is expensive wait till you find a price for a gearbox.
  • + 1
 alphabitches get stitches...
  • + 0
 In response to mat, i understand completely. Ive torqued my $50 10 speed chain rigjt in half multiple times while mid geared and abruptly taking off for wheelies and such. With less mayerialto hold those pins in the chain it would be easier
[Reply]
  • + 10
 Yeah $1500 is a great price...for a bike!
[Reply]
  • + 8
 With these prices i might go back to my front deraileur!
[Reply]
  • + 8
 Shimano Research American Marketing
[Reply]
  • + 3
 Just an overpriced workaround to a pre existing derailleur . The research and development should be focusing on an internal shifter to eliminate dérailleurs and chain guides. An all in on cassette with gears built internally . I would pay 1500$ for that.
  • + 3
 This is shitty old tech.. who the fuck wants a conventional drivetrain at this price. This is like buying a massive CRT monitor, days before LCD screens come out.
[Reply]
  • + 5
 Or I could get a zee or similar, you know a good drivetrain that isn't overpriced to hell, lasts longer and is basically better in every way.
[Reply]
  • + 6
 Looks awesome. Although I would rather hold out until Shimano releases their version. Which hopefully won't be far off.
  • + 2
 I don't care if it's Shimano or SRAM, as long as it's close to current XT or X9 price. Which is about 500-600 non-retail prices. Until then, it's just nice.
[Reply]
  • + 3
 Does it install easily, like with some double sided tape and windex?

Seriously... a $400 cassette? Marketing for bicycles is out of control, they're turning over like digital cameras did in the early 2000's.

I'll stay with 1x10, which actually works out be 1x9 by the I've adjusted everything.
[Reply]
  • + 5
 Your amp goes up to 10? Ours goes up to 11.

Thought of that not sure why.
  • + 1
 YES. I was waiting for that!
[Reply]
  • + 2
 With such a small difference, I suspect X0-1 was never intended for retail. At this point of the products development, SRAM probably can't maintain a significant weight loss over a 2x10 drivetrain with a $100 cassette. My guess is they might be having trouble figuring out how to manufacture an alloy spider light and narrow enough to fit behind a 42t cog. If they come in too heavy, my thought is the average XC rider would realize they don't really need the chain retention benefits and would invest their cash elsewhere on the bike or simply make the common sense conclusion that a 1x10 setup would suit them just fine. While XC was never the intended use for XX1 or X01, my bet is it makes up a sizeable portions of the groups surprisingly healthy sales. Since weight is less of an issue for OEM spec,as the increase in weight is contextualized across the whole bike, I suspect SRAM is a bit more willing to let XO1 go out the door with a considerably heavier crank.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 I swear. The MTB industry is its own worst enemy. Instead of coming out with parts that work well and are affordable they constantly try to invent new standards that really aren't needed at prices that no one should have to pay..f.u.SRAM.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 It's still WAY too much. I had a SRAM 990 cassette that bent the largest 34 cog about a month after I bought it and popped the chain off, even after it was mostly straightened. Though these things happen, it cost $100 to replace and I was on the road. $400 is just not realistic when a 10 speed cassette is still $100 or less. The gearing isn't great for me, so it's not for me anyway. But the price of replacement parts is even less desirable.
  • + 2
 "Though these things happen". I have a SRAM 990 and it's great.

Your n=1 versus my n=1
[Reply]
  • + 2
 Duh. Xx xo visa versa Traditionally more $$$. Parts are higher than normal across the board... But a $400 cassette (let's grow up and round here). Is there an option to buy the largest ring for the cassette and throw a SRAM 10 speed in front of it? Seems cheaper. lets say... $300 cheaper. How about a solid cassette that hasn't been machined. That would be oodles cheaper.
  • + 4
 I don't understand that either. When I first saw the SRAM Red cassette I was amazed, as were the experienced machinists around me. Certainly a trick and light way to do something, but I thought for sure it would be thus limited to the very high end. What's wrong with a conventional set of cogs, slid onto a freehub, or grouped in twos and threes in carriers, in order to save a few hundo?
  • + 3
 Action Tec sells individual 39tooth, Ti cassette cogs. There are a few riders who have thrown those behind a 36tooth cassette cluster. Gets you prettttty close to the range of SRAM's for multiple hundreds of dollars less.

www.actiontec.us/prices.htm
[Reply]
  • + 2
 Bit of a waste of time, it's pretty much the same groupset just with a less price tag, even as a racer why would you pay $300 more for something identical. People might say but the crank spider... Really who needs any less than 30-42!
[Reply]
  • + 4
 Bottom line - will not make me a better/faster rider. There are more "fun" parts I'd rather blow my money on.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 everyone just keep on bitching and wasting your time doing it. its a good idea to make things more simple. one shifter and be done with it. i just got into mountain biking last summer and im running a 1x10 sram setup.39 tooth up front and 11-36 in the rear. truvativ chain guide up front and xo grip shift with xo in the rear. i would love to take off the chain guide and not worry about problems of it falling off due to hard riding. ive noticed a difference in riding with a chain guide. you get more friction when pedaling. oh well ill deal with it. thinking about going to a 34 to get a better range for climbing. other than that. i love grip shift. wont go back to anything else. wont go back to 2x10. you dont need a carbon effing crank to run a xx1 ring. xx1 rings will fit on older xo , x9 cranks. do the research. im not paying 400 bucks for a cassette. ill still stick to a hundred bucks for a ten speed.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I'll just stick with a Shadow+ Derailluer running with a 9-speed SRAM system, with a 40T chainring bolted onto my 11-34 cassette. Cost? More than 10x cheaper at around $100. Did someone say better shifting too?

forums.mtbr.com/drivetrain-shifters-derailleurs-cranks/cheapish-9-speed-11-39t-cassette-865962.html#post10547269
[Reply]
  • + 1
 someone said something about a 10 ->40t 11spd cassette, why would you want a larger gap between gears?
Do you think pedaling up hill and doing a gear change from your 36t to your 40t would be comfortable?

sounds like lots of broken chains and bent cogs to me.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 So...XO1 is still not going to make it onto "cheap" bikes. It will likely still be a top-spec component group. Who at that price point of bike wouldn't shell out the extra $176 for XX1 over XO1? Or is this SRAM's way to basically say: "We'll deeply discount the XO1 group to the OE market, and continue to gouge the consumer for the XO1 and XX1 group at retail." Instead of carrying a 2nd sku for all these parts, just make the XX1 group more affordable and sell more of them.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Considering that a chain and cassette are consumables and get replaced often, I often buy the cheapest chain and cassette I can find. I find that the cheaper cassettes and chains actually last longer than fancier ones too. I'm sorry Sram, but no one will pay that much for things that they will have to constantly replace.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 "Regardless, a pinned 11 speed cassette is key to lowering the group's cost to X9 price levels" - This hits the nail on the head. Chain Reaction have the X01 cassette listed for £239.99, the 11-36 10 speed PG1070 is £49.99. I know its not comparing equivalent level group sets, but how many people actually run the X0 ten speed cassette versus one like the PG1070 or an XT cassette?

In addition to that comment in the article, being offered an 11-42 option (Shimano offer there cassettes in 11-n and 12-n options) would make it even more accessible as we can use our existing cassette bodies, currently I would have to spend £63 on a new Hope cassette body to run the X01 cassette, over £300 just for the cassette aspect of the group.

Perhaps the biggest loser in this is SRAM themselves. Had they released a more accessible X9 level groupset there would be a significant number of existing SRAM users upgrading and Shimano users moving over. Now they run the risk that Shimano might answer many of the things we are asking for from a wide range single speed setup and SRAM lose users to Shimano. I'd been hoping to move from my Shimano 9 speed set up to 11 speed this winter, but thats not going to happen now, maybe I'll become one of SRAM's missed customers.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Hell I never got on the 9 speed bandwagon still rocking 8 speeds! Did upgrade to a 10 speed Zee deraileur this season so now have a 8 speed clutch deraileur system silent and at a reasonable price! The idea behind XX1 and X01 is great but never should have been an 11 speed system to begin with...
[Reply]
  • + 1
 you would think SRAM would have a member on this website. being the biggest and one of the most influancal. 1 person to read the comments on their products. then have that guy talk to the company. when you have hundreds of posts saying this isnt what we want. we want a more affordable better x9 system. why dont they listen. companys say they want to please the community but they just hope we pay top dollar. well theres not a snow flakes chance in hell im spending top dollar for a brand new derailuer that can get smashed jsut as easily as my x-9
  • + 1
 You got it the other way around, they get to decide what you want. Who knows, maybe shimano is listening...
[Reply]
  • + 4
 Can somebody cry about how much xtr costs too? If u want the best u gotta throw around the$$$
  • + 1
 Wait till they step into the 1x11 and we can listen to this all over again.
  • + 2
 XTR cassettes can be found for about half the price online.
  • + 1
 so can Sram, just not their 11 speed or Xdome stuff
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Well if they did make the cassette and other stuff cheaper,then it would be very easy to just buy those without cranks and the complete set and run it with shimano or other brands...so for SRAM it´s lost money. There is a reason why they want to hold it at OEM level (complete set only)...
[Reply]
  • + 1
 OK....so even if this does trickle down to the X9 and X7 level....what going to save a couple hundred each time making the X91 $1100 and the X71 $900...don't this your average person with spend that on just a drivetrain!
[Reply]
  • + 3
 $176 dollars for 40 grams? No thanks. Ill just drop a deuce before I go riding.
[Reply]
  • + 4
 But I'm still glad they started towards a cheaper option.
[Reply]
  • + 3
 it's products like this that make me like sram less and less. seems to me that shimano is starting to keep it real-er
[Reply]
  • + 1
 If the cassette is bigger than the rear rotor, there's something clearly wrong here. It's like balls bigger than d..k. Maybe it has hell lot of pottential, but... Sorry, not for me!
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  • + 2
 Man, too many people are suckers. The derailleur and cassette was a game changer when they were invented. Seriously, there is no inovation here. Oh well, not my money.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Tbf this does look rather great but 2 things do concern me:
1. Costs way too much for anybodies liking
2. The Shimano Saint (to me) looks better and feels more comfortable to ride with
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  • + 1
 I think that will be awesome an 11 speed cassete like those X01/.XX1 and 2 chainring on the front! something like 28-38!

LOL !!!!!!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 You know what? Gimme back good old X0 with 9 speeds, short cage & PG970dh cassette. I don't care about super-duper bling-bling XX1 or X01 or whatever X's you can offer Smile
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  • + 1
 I was expecting that the cassette will fit my standard free hub, but its not so forget this. I will stick to my ever reliable shimano 1x10.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I'll wait for X71 and X91 to turn up I think. Or stick with 10 speed if they work out to costly. Not really gonna make me any faster anyway.
[Reply]
  • - 1
 Sram def screwed the pooch on this and pricing, dudes, its a game changer just get a well priced option out they're for the fraking masses already and stop piss asking around and kick Shimano to the curb the way you did with STI...did you guys employ lots of ex Shimano marketeers in the last few years or what! I run XX1 and love it but others not so lucky common real world pricing is overdue! Personally love the offset BCD on my XX1 btw.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I used to come on this forum every day, now maybe once a month, its a load of marketing bs now with little inspiring or interesting articles....totally disappointed in PB.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I'd be happy with 1 x 9 - as long as I choose the teeth on the cassette. Steel so it wears little. then I can ride without TRENDYMANIA!
[Reply]
  • + 3
 will someone bring back the 7 speed for dh
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  • + 3
 Sram just keep digging a bigger hole for themselves
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  • + 4
 yeah, maybe not.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Hah. Somebody deleted my comment. More and more manipulation on pinkbike. It all becomes one big commercial that we all watch daily. Buy, buy buy !
  • + 2
 As I've already told you, your comment wasn't deleted. It is in the ''below threshold'' comment section at the bottom of the article due to it being negative propped by other users.
[Reply]
  • + 3
 Can they explain a $400 CASSETTE?

This isn't road biking.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 It's a good thing no one here rides a road bike, god with Di2 and Campagnolo, and carbon wheels you're talking 10,000 bucks
  • + 2
 2013 Campy electronic group is 5.5k
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Unless Shimano makes any of the drivetrain and braking bits, it is not on my bike.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 IMO XX(+1) has always been a stupid waste of money..... until this crap overtook it's throne
[Reply]
  • + 1
 If I wanted a very light efficient xc bike this would be a great gruppo. Would an all XTR double ring set up be lighter???
[Reply]
  • + 2
 Sram in Bulgaria means SHAME...
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Pretty stoked to be able to run this X01 with my XT cranks and a Raceface ring
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Haha. So much negativity! I personally can't wait to say good bye to my front derailleur!
[Reply]
  • + 3
 Talk about underwhelming
[Reply]
  • + 2
 What can be said that hasn't already?

laaaaame
[Reply]
  • + 1
 dear sram stop creating new/revised product yearly to make our current product worth nothing
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I wonder why they went with a spider instead of a GXP setup
you can get GXP rings as small as 24T for only $78
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Yes, but why not just make 10 louder?
[Reply]
  • + 0
 I still have a 3x9 and that wigs out when I'm in 1x9 how would that make it to 11 and not be all shifty?
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Well now i might be able to afford a 10spd
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  • + 1
 pffft 11 speed? is that all? i'm waiting out for 12 speed
[Reply]
  • + 1
 f*ck You too; Sram! Your stuff doesn't last anyway
[Reply]
  • + 1
 sram sucks and grip shifts are retarded, but good try
[Reply]
  • + 1
 X7, x9 rule. This new sram stuff is spandexcrowd quality and overpriced.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 who´s gonna get robbed??

shimano, just give us a slx ou xt x11
[Reply]
  • + 1
 SRAM... I really want this on my bike, just not at that price...
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Looks great but rather expensive
[Reply]
  • + 0
 XO1, XX1, X91 - What the hell! Just put a single chainring on your crank, put three gears in the back and you're done!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 For that price you mays well buy saint
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  • + 1
 Everything is amazing and no one is happy
[Reply]
  • + 1
 My 1x10 sounds good Wink
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Singlespeed ftw!!
[Reply]
  • + 0
 Now I know why I ride a single-speed 29er...
  • + 9
 Single speed mountain bikes are borderline retarded.
[Reply]
  • - 3
 They seem to be marketing xo1 and xx1 based on the idea that you can run a single chainring. This is not a new thing... 1x9 and 1x10 setups have been around for several years.
[Reply]
  • - 2
 Sram is the shit we test it here in my track and it kick some @ss_____0^0_____
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  • - 3
 looks fucking horrible
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  • - 3
 I ordered this set for my Ibis Ripley that I am receiving next week !! Smile
[Reply]
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