Spank Spike Pedals Review

Jun 14, 2011 at 0:06
Jun 14, 2011
by Mike Levy  
 
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What is it: Spank has gone out of their way to design a pedal that is thin, at just 12mm (not including pin height), but still uses a large and reliable, inboard, full compliment, sealed bearing that is paired up with an outboard Igus bushing. Each pedal features 20 menacing looking pins to keep your feet firmly in place. A set of the new Spike pedals weighs in at 398 grams, a respectable weight that is lighter than some other options out there. The Spikes retail for $125 USD and are available right now.


The Spike pedals use a slim 12mm thick body and chamfered leading and side edges to give more clearance and lessen the chance of damage from pedal strikes.</span><br><br><span style='font-size:19px'>Spank Spike pedal details:</span><br><br>- Thin 12mm pedal body<br>- Large 90 sqcm platform<br>- 20 pins per pedal<br>- Cold forged and CNC optimized body<br>- Chamfered leading and side edges for improved impact deflection and more clearance<br>- Full compliment sealed inboard bearing<br>- Reduced diameter Igus outboard bushing<br>- Scandium enriched steel pedal axle<br>- Proprietary 'Spank Friction Seal' for durability and maintenance<br>- Reduced Q-factor<br>- Weight: 398 grams with cromo axle and alloy platform<br>- MSRP $125 USD
The Spike pedals use a slim 12mm thick body and chamfered leading and side edges to give more clearance and lessen the chance of damage from pedal strikes.

Spank Spike pedal details:

- Thin 12mm pedal body
- Large 90 sqcm platform
- 20 pins per pedal
- Cold forged and CNC optimized body
- Chamfered leading and side edges for improved impact deflection and more clearance
- Full compliment sealed inboard bearing
- Reduced diameter Igus outboard bushing
- Scandium enriched steel pedal axle
- Proprietary 'Spank Friction Seal' for durability and maintenance
- Reduced Q-factor
- Weight: 398 grams with cromo axle and alloy platform
- MSRP $125 USD


The details: The Spike pedals have a number of interesting features, but the most obvious would be their slim body shape. Spank is able to use such a thin profile by designing the Spike pedals to rotate on an Igus bushing at the end of the pedal axle, while using a much larger than usual full compliment, inboard, sealed bearing. The 12mm body flares out close to the crank arm in order to accept the larger than standard bearing. The pedal body also sports chamfered leading and side edges for a touch more ground clearance, as well as to limit the amount of damage when that inevitable pedal strike does occur. They also have a slightly longer than average profile, 90 sqcm in total, to help reduce that chance of "pedal flip" on rough ground or when your feet are not in the ideal position. The body isn't extruded like the majority of other pedals, but instead cold forged. Spank claims that this allows them to achieve a smaller and more consistent grain size in the alloy and better grain orientation than extruding, thus a better strength to weight ratio. The trick tapered and hollow scandium enriched, alloy steel axle itself goes through a complex heat treatment process that Spank says increases strength and stiffness.

The Spike's sport 20 pins per pedal (16 hex head pins, 4 grub screw pins) and each one's position has been chosen carefully in an effort to provide a high amount of grip between the pedals and your shoes. Sixteen of these pins use sturdy full size hex heads that thread in from the opposite side, which should stand up to hits better, resist stripping, and make them easier to replace when the time does come. The four center pins are "grub screws" which thread all the way through the pedal body. These are optional to the rider depending on the intended discipline and required level of grip and adjustability on the fly.


The Spike's large inboard sealed bearing is fitting directly into the pedal body where it flares out close to the crankarm.
The Spike's large inboard sealed bearing is fitting directly into the pedal body where it flares out close to the crankarm.


Performance: The Spike pedals got put through the ringer on multiple bikes during the review process, as well as ridden in some absurdly muddy conditions, only to be followed up with cleanings from the jet washer. We've come away quite impressed with how they have handled it all, but it is also the amount of grip that they provide that has us not looking to take them off our test bike anytime soon. Modern tacky soled shoes have managed to make even the worst pedals more acceptable, which is why we also spent time using the Spike pedals with standard flat soled shoes as well, and were pleasantly surprised to find that we never once found ourselves wishing for more secure feeling. Our feet felt firmly planted, even in the roughest and muddiest conditions. There was some initial concern about being able to feel where the body flares out to accept the inboard sealed bearings, but that isn't the case - the bulge was invisible to our feet, probably because it is not nearly as pronounced as it may look in photos, but also due to it being in the same same location as the wrench flats would be on a standard pedal (right up against the crank arm and out of the way).

There are quite a few pedal options out there that offer a lot of grip, but producing a pedal that can shrug off being dragged through rocks on a downhill rig or do long miles on an all-mountain sled without being any worse for wear is a whole different ball of wax. The Spike's sturdy hex head screws took a beating without a single one bending or breaking off to this day - impressive considering that most pedals with this much purchase use fragile set screws that can be easily damaged. Besides a few cosmetic marks, the body is also easily handling the abuse, as are the unique, hollow scandium enriched, alloy steel axles.


Spank's Spike pedals proved to be not only quite grippy, but also very sturdy, which is impressive considering their competitive sub-400 gram weight.
Spank's Spike pedals proved to be not only quite grippy, but also very sturdy, which is impressive considering their competitive sub-400 gram weight.


What's not to like? Honestly, not much. They proved to be a well thought out and rugged pedal that provides an impressive amount of traction. Those who rock flat pedals on their all-mountain or trail bike may want to look for a set of pedals that spin a bit easier - the Spike's don't turn as well as a dual bearing design and tended to get a bit stiff if left to sit for awhile - although most downhillers or dirt jumpers won't be bothered by this. I also found that the finish tended to mar fairly easy, but cosmetic concerns should be low on your list when looking for a new set of pedals.


Pinkbike's take: It seems like there are endless choices when it comes to deciding on what to run, but given their competitive weight, high level of grip and durable design, the Spike pedals are among our favorite options.


Visit the Spank website to see their entire lineup.


Have you used the Spike pedals? Do you like the slim design and sturdy pins? Let's hear what you think of them - put those thoughts below!
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81 Comments

  • + 5
 Reduced Q factor and super thin platform sounds very promising for those "weird" XC trail riders using flats. I just switched from pretty fat NS pancakes to sub-20mm thin Wellgos and difference in pedalling is big. I guess with these it must be huge! can't wait to do my current pedals and buy ones like these!

Not bad looking either
  • + 9
 are you calling XC'ers who use platforms weird?
  • + 13
 I think so Smile After a long time on Spds, I run flats on XC as well, even on HT, but I get lots of shit for it, there's still this clips-are-the-best stuff all over... it's like arguing whether AUDI is better than BMW or if Canon is better than Nikon, penis or vagina...
  • + 2
 spank has been stepping there game up lately and it's workin
  • + 8
 running flats for xc is where its at!!
  • + 1
 especially on the hardtail!!
  • + 1
 It is goood vagine' , does noth hang like sleeves of a wizard *Borat Voice*
[Reply]
  • + 2
 Honestly I was expecting to read some comments about the quality of these pedals, and of course on hands (feet in this case) experience, quality, durability, security feeling, and grip about these pedals.... And I found not a single useful comment to this extent... =/
  • + 1
 seriously, id like to know what people who own these pedals think about them...
[Reply]
  • + 2
 The shit part about this design of pedals is that they don't fit on the "crank-slot" style bike racks at the races. I'm not sure if that is just an Australian designed bike rack but is at all the races I've ever been to! Looks so sick though
  • + 2
 same thing with Saints, but the racks will adapt to them soon hopefully.
  • + 2
 picture of this rack?
  • + 18
 Yeah... lets see ya' rack.
  • + 1
 I would also like to see the picture. The only difference i can see, if yu wish to hang your bike by its pedal on a thin edge, is that with these pedals, the bike will be lik 0,5cm higher. Its not like the pedal body runs 1mm from the crank.
  • + 1
 Ten minutes with an angle grinder will sort this out.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 www.gripsport.com.au/bike_main.php?part=bike_products&prodID=52

This is the rack that the pedals don’t fit in. There are variations on the rack and the crank slots are sometimes welded to a trailer so that up to 20 bikes can fit on.
I personally have on and they are quick and easy to load on and off and they are great for shuttles.
[Reply]
  • + 5
 My shins are gonna hate these!
  • + 1
 Twice the price tho, c'mon really?
[Reply]
  • + 5
 superstar nano thru (mint!!!)
  • + 2
 yer nano techs all the way. Havent tried the thru pin ones yet but as soon as ive gone through my current ones I'l have to give them a try
  • + 2
 for sure mate they are quality ! specially if your like me with a bike wi a low bb hieght ! the value / quality / and customer service is a1 from those guys , bought my wheelset off them over 12 month ago and they hvent skipped a beat!
[Reply]
  • + 5
 I'll Stick to Point 1 pedals
  • + 1
 Point 1 Pedals are the Bees Knees.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I think that Wellgo B-38 are the best platform pedals ever - they are almost undestructible (my friend use them since 2001 and they are still in quite good condition) and very comfortable. But the Wellgo is, of course, not as stylish as the Spank Smile
  • + 3
 B-38s?! I bet they installed those on strategic bombers "back in the days" Big Grin strong reliable but huh... the name is a clue Big Grin
  • + 3
 I have MG-1s on almost all of my bikes. Unbeatable for the price, never broke or had any issues with them over many years. Tempted to try a really thin pedal but its hard to justify shelling out twice the price for 1/2 the pedal lol..
  • + 2
 I agree MG1s are great! Even if they do break once a year, you could probably afford to replace them that often opposed to other pedals. Only issue I have with MG1s is that the pins rip out extremely easy. These spike pedals look great though and secretly if I had the dough I would probably buy these over MG1.
  • + 1
 @timmy - those b-38s have amazing grip but in by experience the bearings die really quickly, especially the sealed bearing versions and they are far from slim.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 SO what are the exact measurements of the pedal? How long and How wide, or is it a perfect 90 sq cm
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Spank sent me a pair, and they are just amazing.. Use them on my hardtail and they feel like spd pedals with the freedom of flats!! And they look dope too!!!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 2 years on, mine are still in one piece and working as well as ever.

www.ridemorebikes.com/spank-spike-pedals-long-term-review
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Bigger and more spikes means bigger/deeper and more gashes in your shins. But i still like them, might just be on the wishlist.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 Thanks Mike! If these came out earlier these would have been my set for sure. Salute
[Reply]
  • - 2
 So they spin stiff? That might turn me off of them. That mean the bearings will wear down quick or what? I like the idea that they still use an axle but what's the point if it doesn't make them spin better and last longer.
And one guy here says his buddy broke one. I'd wait to see if that happens a lot. I still got wear down the welgo wam d10's for another year before I can buy another set anyway.
  • + 1
 Indeed, because most freely spinning pedals dont have axles? The f*ck?
  • + 1
 More or less. A lot of new flats are so flat they don't have room for a real axle.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 thinkin' i'm going on chain reaction right now and buy a pair of these !
[Reply]
  • + 1
 nice price.. i prefer superstar or wellgo.. more cheaper..more ligtest.. 310 grams
  • + 1
 Way cheaper in fact...
[Reply]
  • - 1
 My mate broke the axle on his. Caused him to have a pretty nasty accident! I really liked the look of them until this happened and now won't be buying them. Shame really as they look really good!
  • + 0
 shit breaks...these pedals are still awesome!
  • + 8
 Right, you probably didn't mean any offence but I think you need to get your facts straight before you start spouting accusations all over the internet. These pedals have NEVER caused a crash. The rider you are talking about is me. The pedals you are talking about were pre-production prototypes given to me by Spank for testing. I managed to have a huge crash in practice at the Welsh MIJ race at Taffs Buggy. This crash was caused by me going far too fast round a corner and crashing off a drop and not by any mechanical fault with my bike. Upon impact with the floor, I broke my mech, my mech hanger, my gear cable, my metal bar end plug, the pedal and my thumb. The ground was strewn with large boulders and I was going at a serious pace. That's not what I call any kind of mechanical fault, that's called me abusing my bike and body using the floor as a brake. The reason that companies like Spank give out prototypes is so that they can use information from riders to make the finished product better and stronger.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Can't seem to find any info on replacement pins or rebuild kits...
[Reply]
  • - 1
 A previous Pink Bike artical said 19 pins, now it's 20 ??

www.pinkbike.com/news/Spank-spike-pedals-sea-otter-2011.html

I'm just saying......
  • + 3
 yeah, i read that too. so how many pins are there in real life on these pedals?
  • + 3
 Counting the pins on the second photo, it's 20.
  • + 31
 Generally, the consumer does...
  • + 10
 its simple there is two models a 19pin and a 20pin, next year they are upgrading to a 21 pin set up should be gnarly.
  • - 2
 The 19 vs 18 vs 20 pin debate went on FOREVER. Sorry Brule, you lose.
  • + 1
 The earlier pedals had one pin in the center but now theres 2 on the production model. After filing down the center pins to give a better platform they are deffinately my favorite flat pedals!
  • + 2
 They looks awesome. Perhaps I will be drawn away from Wah Wahs.
  • - 1
 A pedal having 19 pins, does that not mean there will be more pins on one side than the other? i.e. 10 on one side and 9 on the other. Surely it should be symmetrical on each side giving an even number of pins. If it was not even you would always be looking for the side with more :/

Also don't really see the point in the two pins on the top right of the second picture being so close together. I would have thought that it would have been better to have it halfway down the far side arm. If it has been tested to be better then fair doos
  • + 2
 The center pin(s) is/are like an 'allthread' type pin, similar to my canfield pedals. It's one pin technically, acting like two.
  • + 3
 Oh man, pins are a hot topic! The production pedals will have 20 pins, period. There are 16 hex head pins and 2 pins per pedal that thread completely through the body, making for 4 pins.
  • + 1
 Carlos - but conical heads have compatibility issues with shins... Yes 19 pins... I think it's a great marketing magnet, especially if they wouldn't make a hole for this missing pin. Give'em to Sam Hill and ppl will start wondering whether this missing pin is not making him slower this season... yea Sam falls only to the right side, he has 9 pins there! but if he wins... Dear lord man!!! Pits won't be full only with cut off Wet Scream knobbs - people will be screwing out pins to tune the bike for the track conditions!
  • + 1
 Sorry to bring this up but thinking about getting some. Either these, Burgtec MK3s or Superstars. Anyway surely if you were you slightly bend one of the allthread pins on both sides of the pedal you would have to get it cut off?
Advice on which pedal to get out of the 3 would be great too
[Reply]
  • + 1
 i love mine plenty of grip and insanely thin and light Big Grin
[Reply]
  • + 1
 90sqcm ~ roughly 9cm x10cm. Wish spank would list the platform dimensions.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 wat colors will these come out in
  • + 2
 black, silver, red, blue and orange. all very shiny!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Available now? Not via QBP or BTI. whack.
  • + 1
 There's a distinct possibility that neither distributor will end up carrying the Spike pedals. Although BTI seems to carry the rest of their stuff, so who knows.
  • + 1
 According to Lance at Entrada imports the two american distributors will be BTI and Seattle Bicycle Supply. Both disributors only purchased a very small amount and as a result the first production run will be very small. They should apparently be in stock by July via BTI.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 very nice pedals!
[Reply]
  • - 1
 Nice looking pedals indeed. But the area lacking any pins, Will there still be sufficient grip ???.
  • + 1
 enough for me Big Grin
  • + 2
 less pins mean that the ones there will dig deeper into your shoe... So more grip Wink
[Reply]
  • + 1
 "- MSRP $125 USD"
  • + 2
 did you just look at the pictures aero? for f*cks sake...
[Reply]
  • - 1
 to be fair i prefer the new DMR pedals Smile
[Reply]
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