Specialized Status II Review

Sep 17, 2012
by Mike Levy  
 
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TESTED
Specialized
Status II
WORDS Mike Levy
PHOTOS Fraser Britton

Getting yourself onto a proper downhill bike is an expensive proposal, with many top tier models going for well over $5,000 USD, and let's not forget about the dream machines that can easily double that. Specialized's Status II, at $3,100 USD, is a far more realistic option for many riders who want a bike that can be ridden hard and fast, be it on a race course or just with your buddies, but aren't willing to sell a kidney to do it. The 200mm travel bike comes ready to roll with a dual crown Domain fork from RockShox, a FOX Van RC rear shock out back, and both a chain guide and proper, dual ply DH tires.

Status II Details

• Intended use: downhill
• Rear wheel travel: 7.8''/200mm
• RockShox Domain fork, 200mm
• FOX Van RC rear shock
• 1.5'' head tube
• 10 x 135mm rear axle
• FSR rear suspension
• ISCG chain guide tabs
• Specialized Butcher DH 26 x 2.3"
• MSRP $3,100 USD


The Status is available at two price points - the $3,100 II shown here, or the $2,500 I model - both of which are assembled around the same aluminum frame. While the Status lineup retails for a good chunk less than the race-inspired Demo 8 series, you'd be mistaken for thinking that the platform is low budget - it's far from it. From the flush
aluminum pivot hardware to the very well laid out cable routing, the Status frame looks every bit the part of a high-end DH machine. The details are all there as well, including a full length 1.5" head tube, thereby allowing an angle-adjusting headset to be fitted if the Status owner is looking for more extreme geometry than the stock numbers. The non-tapered head tube also makes for a wide, strong junction for the top and down tubes to come together at. There is plenty of stand over clearance thanks to a top tube that drops down well out of the way as well. Interestingly, Specialized decided to forgo the 150mm rear wheel spacing that is commonly found on the back of most downhill bikes, with 135mm width, open dropouts utilized instead. Why buck the trend, especially in a sport where riders often get caught up in the numbers? The decision lets Status owners fit a standard rear wheel that often retails for quite a bit less than what a 150mm wide, dedicated DH wheel would go for. The choice makes sense to us, but how will the bike's lateral stiffness compare to the competition?

  The 200mm travel Status utilizes Specialized's FSR, four-bar suspension layout.

The FOX shock rotates on two sealed bearings at its rearward mounting point.
Status Suspension

Specialized's two downhill platforms, the Status shown here and the Demo series, use suspension layouts that appear to be very different. There is some truth to that, in that the positioning of the components differ, but they both feature the same FSR genes.

The bike's Horst Link, FSR design is all about keeping the suspension active, regardless of the rider being on the brakes or on the gas. This is accomplished by the rear pivot's location ahead of the dropout, a design that means that the brake caliper is positioned on the seat stay assembly that floats on the chain stays and rocker link rather than pivoting directly off of the front triangle. This allows the braking forces to be decoupled from the suspension's action, thereby letting the bike absorb impacts regardless of if the rider is dragging the rear brake. The FSR design looks very much like many other single pivot, linkage driven bikes, but the key difference boils down to the rear pivot's location ahead of the dropout, compared to the former's location that is usually above the dropout.

By altering a bike's pivot locations, Specialized can tune the amount of rearward axle path they desire, as well as the suspension rate and pedalling characteristics, with certain FSR-equipped models in their lineup requiring more focus on one facet over others depending on the bike's intensions. The Status, for example, puts a high priority on being able to absorb hard, abrupt impacts, while Specialized's XC-focused bikes put more of an emphasis on offering a firm pedalling feel. The bike also does without any suspension rate or geometry adjustments, leaving both of those particulars up to the engineers behind the Status' design.

Specifications
Release Date 2012
Price $3100
Travel 200mm
Rear Shock FOX Van RC
Fork RockShox Domain Dual Crown R, 200mm
Headset Semi-integrated
Cassette SRAM PG-950, 9-speed, 11-28t
Crankarms FSA Gravity Moto-X MegaExo, 165mm
Bottom Bracket FSA MegaExo
Pedals Alloy platform
Chain SRAM 9-speed
Rear Derailleur SRAM X7, 9-speed, short cage
Shifter Pods SRAM X5, 9-speed, trigger
Handlebar Specialized Demo low-rise bar, 750mm
Stem Specialized Direct-Mount stem, 40mm length
Grips Specialized lock-on, S/M: Grappler, Others: Grappler XL
Brakes Avid Elixir 5 hydraulic, 200mm front, 180mm rotors
Hubs Specialized Hi Lo disc, 20mm front, 135mm rear
Spokes Stainless
Rim P-Disc, 32mm, 36h
Tires Specialized Butcher DH, DH casing, wire bead, soft dual-compound, 26x2.3"
Seat Specialized DH, 8mm steel rails
Seatpost Two bolt micro adjust, 30.9mm




Riding the Status II

The popular Demo 8 proves that Specialized knows how to design a downhill bike with racing in mind, a fact that gives them a bit of leeway when it comes to the Status in that it doesn't have to follow the relatively extreme geometry set of a contemporary downhill race bike. This much is obvious when sitting on the red and white Status II; it feels a touch more upright than its more expensive sibling, as well as slightly higher off of the ground. Don't get the wrong picture, though, because the Status is far from feeling 'freeride-ish', but there is certainly more of an all-around character to it when compared to the Demo.

  The Status can can dice it up on both smooth and rough, technical terrain.

Handling

We wish we could narrow down the combined ingredients that create a bike that feels at home right off the bat, because it is always a great thing to jump on an unfamiliar steed and be at ease straight away. This was the case with our medium-sized Status II test bike - it just felt 'right' from the get-go, minus the too-skinny 750mm wide stock handlebar, of course. Tip it into a corner and it does what you ask of it without fuss. While some 200mm travel sleds can feel a bit awkward without a good amount of momentum behind them, the Status still responds well at a slower pace and doesn't require the body english to get around those tight, slow bends. Braking hard into a corner would force the bike's Domain fork deep into its travel, making the handling a touch twitchy when pushing hard, but this can be minimized by tinkering with the fork's spring rate and oil weight, something that heavier Status riders would do well to look into.

And what of the Status' standard, 10 x 135mm rear axle? In all truth, it passed unnoticed during our time on the bike. It felt every bit as rigid as a 150mm wide thru-axle setup, and we wouldn't be able to make the call in a blind test. Specialized did spec the bike with a 10mm bolt-on axle, though, likely upping the rear end's ability to brush off side loads. The 10 x 135mm spacing also means that Status owners aren't restricted to expensive 150mm width hubs, but can fit a more price-conscious rear wheel if the need arrises. While maybe not the Usain Bolt of downhill bikes, the Status motors along nicely when throwing down pedal strokes between corners, and the FOX shock's compression adjustment certainly adds to the bike's 'sprint-ability' if required.

Status vs. Demo

We've spent a bit of time on the more race-focused Demo 8, so how do the two compare? The Demo 8 is a great DH bike, one of our favorites, in fact, but we also acknowledge that it isn't going to be for everyone. Much like a powerful street bike, the low-slung Demo can bite a rider who hasn't yet come to terms with the bike's low bottom bracket and short rear end. Use those two attributes to your advantage and the Demo 8 becomes one of the most formidable cornering machines ever made, but forget and you are asking to get spanked as a reminder. The Status, on the other hand, is a more forgiving steed that can still be ridden extremely fast, and, as a bonus, you're less likely to catch a pedal thanks to the bike's slightly higher ground clearance. As a matter of fact, tight, rocky trails are actually easier to ride fast aboard the Status than the Demo, again proving that a bike's geometry is by far its most important aspect.
Unlike many other downhill bikes, the Status doesn't cater to a specific type of rider or terrain, but is more of a jack of all trades. That means that it doesn't gobble rough ground as well as some, or smash corners as well as others, but it has an easy-to-ride personality that lacks the sometimes polarizing traits of some other designs, and we mean that in a positive way. To put it simply, the Status it is a neutral-handling bike that is plain easy to ride.

  The bike's dialled rear suspension punches far above the bike's $3,100 asking price.

Suspension

The Status' rear suspension may look very different to what is employed on the Demo, but its layout features the same FSR DNA and, not coincidentally, performs similarly. This is a good thing, though, with the rear end of the bike remaining active regardless of what we were doing. This was highlighted when coming into fast and rough corners, with the bike doing well to remain settled and planted in such circumstances, keeping the chattering to a minimum and the traction high. The active and neutral rear end could also be felt on the steeps, where the the rider's weight being pitched forward can often result in the back of the bike locking up and skipping over steps and holes on the trail - not something that we can complain about during our time on the Status. The active and forgiving ride also didn't seem to detract from the bike's ability to be jumped, pumped, and generally thrown about when required, allowing us to not only ride fast, but also have fun. In fact, the Status' rear end felt somewhat invisible after swapping between other DH sleds, with us never wishing for more or less of anything from the bike. The FSR rear end simply goes about dealing with the terrain in a quiet way that left us very satisfied, if a bit bewildered that we couldn't find something to complain about.

The FOX Van RC offers rebound and compression tuning options, but lacks the volume and air pressure adjustments of FOX's pricier rear shock. This means that we couldn't use those features to tune the rear of the Status to either ramp up or be more linear through its travel, but we also never really felt the need to make any such adjustments. Sure, a heavier, pro-level rider might want to squeeze even more performance from the bike's rear end with a higher-end shock, be it a DHX RC4 from FOX or a Cane Creek Double Barrel, but that would also jack the price of the Status up a considerable amount and defeat the purpose of this affordable trail-crusher.

If anything, the quality of the Status' back end exposed the RockShox Domain's shortcomings when pushed past anything above a moderately quick pace. Yes, the steel-stanchioned fork is quite smooth and active, but its damping could be overwhelmed by fast, successive impacts, giving the front of the bike a somewhat unpredictable feel when we least wanted it. It was almost as if the fork forgot its job for a split second, highlighting the internal differences between it and its pricier BoXXer cousins.


Other Ride Notes

• The minimalist chain guide may not be as popular with riders as some other brands, but we didn't suffer a single derailment during the test. Having said that, we would like to see some bash guard-type protection incorporated into the guide - we didn't damage the chain ring or chain, but it only takes one good hit to cause some ride-ending damage.

• Specialized's Butcher DH tires are great all-around performers, and we were also happy to see that they use a burly DH casing that kept us from flatting during our time on the bike.

• The stock, Specialized riser bar, at 750mm, is a bit too skinny for our liking. Bar width is always going to be personal preference, but we would install something wider if the Status II was in our stable.

• The bike's cable routing is bang-on; the lines stay out of trouble and are nearly invisible when viewed from a few meters away.

• Heavy or aggressive riders will want to step up to a 200mm rotor out back instead of the stock 180mm that comes fitted.




2013 Status II

The Status II goes stealth for 2013, but there is one standout component spec change that should make prospective buyers happy: the rebound-only Domain R used in 2012 is replaced with a more adjustable BoXXer RC. The fork's low-speed compression dial means that it is a step up from the Domain, allowing the Status II pilot to tune out the brake dive that we complained about on the '12 model, and it is well over a pound lighter thanks to its aluminum stanchion tubes (steel uppers are used on the Domain). Other changes include Truvativ Descendent cranks, and Specialized's own Bennie pedals as stock equipment.
Pinkbike's take:
bigquotesThe fact that we grabbed with budget-level Status when heading out for shuttle runs instead of a number of other bikes in our stable, some that retail for about twice as much, speaks volumes about the Status' abilities. The bike's neutral handling and dialled rear suspension outshine the less than exciting component spec, not to mention that the Status frame itself could be the crown jewel in another company's lineup, let alone the 'second tier' offering under the Demo. Simply put, the Status II offers the best dollar to performance ratio of any downhill bike we've ridden. - Mike Levy

www.specialized.com

238 Comments

  • + 110
 In what world are 750mm bars too skinny? Such a stupid trend...
  • - 8
 So real, anyone that is not super broad shouldered just looks stupid riding anything over 750 anyways
  • + 24
 rednecks just like the feel of tractor steering wheel I ride 765 and more just pushes my shoulder out of the right place when I am on brakes
  • + 63
 It is funny thoug, to see a 9 year old rippin it with a 790mm.
  • + 35
 i love my wider bars. extra leverage for the climbs and more confidence on the descents. at first i thought i was gonna cut my bars when i bought my bike but after a couple weeks with them i would not go back. Its all preference but man what a difference it can make
  • + 1
 tbh anything over 780 is just plain stupid, I guess being very tall but at 6'3 I still dont need 800mm can even be fine on 740, I love seeing lil groms on 800's tho so funny to watch!
  • + 7
 I used the Yard stick from Superstar 915 far to wide cut them down to 840 you get loads of control but still looked to wide just cut them down again to 770 just right but after using a wider bar its made the 770 feel skinny. But when you can not push your bike through a door way you know your bars are to wide.
  • - 13
 i am riding with 900 bars and that is what suits me the most... i would call 750 skinny.
  • + 16
 I guess theres nothing to Aaron Gwin riding 800mm bars.. haha
  • + 11
 I like 780s tried 800s and cut them down have also tried different sizes al the way down to 690. As they said its all personal preference and riding style.
  • + 35
 I am glad people here are choosing bar width due to how it looks on the bike, after all looks are the most important thing in MTBing, forget about performance or personal preferences.
  • + 1
 I once had 800mm bars. I did cut them down, they were Da Bomb Bazooka 800's, and whilst I'm not very big, they were still sarcastically wide, even one of my friends who is about 6ft 6"ish, he too thought they felt way too wide for him. I ride 760mm Atlas bars atm and still I feel they need to come down!
  • + 2
 I had to cut mine down for functionality as really could not get through the front door and im not leaving my baby out in the cold shed
  • + 1
 Running 680mm, feels odd, but I can get away with getting closer to trees and the like, but it feels strange in the air with a long fork, it feels fine on my small hardtail, not quite sure how much wider I should go, my arm span is nearly 6'5'', I'm shy under 6'2''
  • - 1
 Hey, guys! I'd ride handlebars over 750mm on my freeride rig, but I'm 197cm tall Smile
  • - 5
 i still think 750 is too much...id never run above 735 unless im doing something crazy!
  • + 1
 For FR/DH I'd run about 760ish as a benchmark and work from there, for something smaller though like a DJ bike I probably wouldn't run any more than 700.
  • + 5
 im rocking the Blackspire 808's. First time i rode down my driveway i instantly thought "there's no way i can ride with these" and went to cut them down. before i could bust out the saw i decided to force myself to ride them 1 day before i made up my mind. no i have 808 bars on both of my bikes and love the feel. i do have long arms though (6' tall with a 6'3" span)

my wife is 5'5" and it looks hilarious when she rides my HT around the block
  • + 8
 My SXtrail I '11 came with a 180mm single crown domain. It sucks, but after putting a 66 on, it was like having a totally new bike. Specialized should stop using Domains, they are crap...
  • + 3
 @Caiokv, I agree with you. After owning a SX Trail equiped with Domain 318's and having it leaking oil like crazy getting it repair to have it leak again, I wonder why Spec still put crappy Domain's on their bikes. Even a couple friends of mine had the same experience as me. Since then I ride with my Team Boxxer(on my DH Bike) and Fox Float Kashma 36 (on my Freeride).

In regards of Handlebars, Chromag 760mm is my sweetspot for my 2 bikes.
  • + 1
 I have always said that wide bars are just pants I had run a set of 720mm bars for years, brought a new set but only came in 800mm or 690mm so brought the 800mm fitted them just prove a point didn't cut them down done 2 runs on a DH track and thought HHHMMMmm so cut them to 790mm ended up eating my own words Frown devastated. i had a lot more control over the bike easier to do jump on everything was better, however I do have to say I do have fairly large shoulders but can see the benefits even if i do look a right prat riding the hills Frown haha
  • + 2
 i love my 800 mm bars. i am 2.04m tall, i felt like a hipster fixie rider with my 700 m bars Smile

Love the look of the 2013 status. Hope it fits
  • + 1
 I like wider bars more precise control, but they fit poorly with the terrain I ride. Last ride I went on, my bars were 750mm wide and I clipped the left-hand side on a tree while descending. I remember thinking my bars would clear, boy was I wrong.
  • + 9
 I love how pinkbike can make any topic out of nothing...It's about a bike, not bars. Razz
  • + 1
 i used to ride 740 bars on my bike and felt the need to go wider. got 780 and that was a real pain in the a*s ... way too big. oh yeah ... and expensive. now i'm down to 750 and feels just right. 750 is no way, no how skinny ... not even remotely.
  • + 9
 What a list of comments and about what...!?

Just take the bar that feels good for you. It's not a competition. It's just what's right for YOU. Nobody cares if you ride 800 or 680 bars.

Cheech, Specialized is one of the biggest brands out there... Would be kind of stupid, REALLY, to sell a FR/DH bike with narrow bars if they aim at satisfying as much riders as possible. If 750 is too wide, you just cut it. If it's too narrow, then tell you dealer to take the bar off and add a little cash (or nothing) to get a wider bar. It's as easy as that.
  • - 10
 who the fuck rides bars anything less than 780mm thats as skinny as you can go and not be an asshole
  • + 2
 I do hope you're not serious samtomkins.
  • + 2
 As do I, that's just plain ignorant. I'm only 5ft 5" so even 760mm feels on the wide side for me. Its all well saying that but if you're going on trails where there are tree's everywhere, I would not want to be riding 800's.
  • + 1
 Get yourself what feels natural to you, but saying the wide-bars trend is stupid is pretty ignorant. I'm 180cm tall, riding a 777mm Spank Spikes for over a year and since the very 1st ride on local enduro trail I knew that THOSE ARE THE HANDLEBARS which suit me. Old 685mm Bontragers are left in the corner as I don't want to see them anymore.
  • + 7
 *All you wide handlebar haters* Have you ever gone over the bars in a steep tech section because the front wheel got pointed where you didn't want it to be? Get wider bars. Get wider bars, get more control.
  • + 2
 Just for the record I'm not hating on wide bars, just giving my own 2 cents, I have what would be considered wide bars I suppose, I just think there becomes a point where the impracticalities of a REALLY wide bar are more than the benefits they can provide.
  • + 1
 lmfao sam! youll feel like a tard if you ever get a slopestyle rig
  • + 1
 I ride 745 sunline V1's they feel better to me then 800mm wide bars, i might try some chromags, but for now my sunlines are great, and i'm not a small guy, im 6'4" with a 6'8" wingspan
  • - 9
 calm the f*ck down a*sholes im 5'4" and i ride 795mm so dont bitch about being short and i ride a freeride bike
  • + 6
 But its easier to spec 800mm bars and let small people trim them than to spec 750mm and have people wanting to buy new bars....
  • + 2
 Agreed Andy M, I can see some folks wanting for "wider" bars, but calling 750MM bars "skinny" is just a trend thing with todays bikes (I always chuckle asan "older rider" who's been around this game a ong time cause some folks would flat out tell you that you "couldn't ride that" if they saw or tried to ride DH and bikes in general of the past...OH how far we've come) ... There are certainly merrits for wider bars for some folks, but there are just as many people out there who think that 750MM is penty wide. I think Mike Leavy did a great job of making this review accurate and fair, and the "bar width thing" is just a personal preference thing that may have been stated in a sort of "matter of fact" way. I still think the review was, as a whloe really well done.
  • + 15
 anything less than 3 metres feels a bit narrow for my liking
  • + 3
 Why is there always a debate about how wide someone ELSES bars are? its not your bike, and not your money. Bikes are made to be custom to the rider, hence all the technology. You dont go around laughing at someone who likes their brakes a little touchy.
  • + 4
 nice vid...? not the place to post it bud
  • + 1
 +1 Gouty... the way some folks act, it's like if you ride a sick line but you're not riding "the proper set-up" it doesn't count... This whole thing would be like poo poo-ing someone for riding with flipped brake levers, or NOT using a droper post... Sure there might be an advantage to some things, but if someone's comfortable on their bike why would anyone else CARE??? I just don' get it. If you're happy out o the trail on YOUR bikes, then what else really matters. Bar-Width is just the big "thing in the last few years, but it's not like people weren't ripping it up before super-wide bars so are they stupid for doing that??? What if a guy takes all these people's advice and then ends up being slower out on th track with his new set-up... is he stupid for going back to what works FOR HIM??? {shakes head and slaps forehead furiously}
  • + 3
 Just FYI - Sam Hill rides 745mm, Troy Brosnan around the sam and Brendog around 755mm.
  • + 2
 i want 900mm bars, ha!
  • + 1
 Ritchey made 1000mm bars: linky
  • + 1
 i really hope that this is an april fool.
  • + 5
 F*** this im going to buy a scaffolding pole and an industrial oven im getting 1200mm bars

suckers!!!!!!!
  • + 2
 @alazamanza just get your self one of those "city bike" wrap around bars and straighten it .... that might get you there Wink

I can't wait to see the first guy on vid to get hung on both bar ends between two trees at mach speed and EJECTED (not that I dislike wider bars, just think I would laugh at that a LOT... then cringe... then wonder if the guy was alive...) Smile
[Reply]
  • + 34
 Ride it til you break it then upgrade...I'm just glad to see more gravity bikes hitting the mid you lower financial spectrum of the financial scale
  • + 3
 Word... I shudder to think that $3100 for a mountain bike is "cheap" but its the reality and the times we live in (both economically and a sign of the progression of the tech. of such bikes), but it IS really great to see you can get a GOOD, upgradable COMPLETE bike for the cost of some of the higher-end frames...
  • + 3
 Agreed I like that Giant offers the Glory 0 and Glory 2 to bad that Specialized doesn't do the same. With the Demos that is Smile
  • + 1
 Yeah, there's acertainly a market for ALL kinds of "levels" of bikes aye... Some folks already have parts that they'd like to swap, but not ALL the parts plus you can then sell-on the unused stuff or kee it as spares. For a really money tight "privateer" I think having a good solid frame with parts that'll get you started is a GREAT plan. I wish more companies would do this across the board. Giant has been doing it for years, Specialized USED to do it (more), I mean for a young rider who's say 16, it can be the difference between being able to get a good, DURABLE bike AND a vehicle to get him/her to the hill to race and just for transportation or having to shell out and ride his DH bike EVERYWHERE... not the best commuting ride aye... FUN, and sure "looks" tough, but it's a WEE bit hard on the knees aye.
[Reply]
  • + 17
 "Simply put, the Status II offers the best dollar to performance ratio"
well then please check the Young Talent Industries TuEs 2.0 WC Limited Wink
getting Mavic Deemax Ultimates, a CCDB and a Marzo 888 RC3 Ti etc. for the same Price couldnt be THAT bad
  • + 21
 Just my personal opinion, but I would WAY rather have a Young Talent Tues. Mainly cuz of the spec that comes on it.
  • + 2
 this is exactly my dilemma now, choosing between Status and YT. The only downside of bying Tues directly from YT is lack of extended payment for foreign customers, while my local Specialized retailer offers payment in several steps. On the other hand the spec-list of Tues is simply unbeatable for its price.
  • + 5
 that's why Bank's were invented.
  • + 3
 I've been trying to buy a YT Tues 2.0 and the customer service is shite. They told me the cant sell me al bike cos DHL won't ship to Australia. So I said what if I organized my own pickup and delivery (bike flights)and they basically told me to get fukd. Buy the status at least specialized won't make selling a bike to you near impossible
  • + 11
 Yeah, please can you review the Tues 2.0 or the Noton 2.0, I'd like to see a review of those that I don't have to put through Google Translate, they never make sense after that... Wink
  • - 4
 less than half the price but similar spec: www.airbornebicycles.com/products/96-taka.aspx
  • + 15
 The airborne frame is also a heavy piece of junk.
  • + 4
 Reviews state otherwise and you still could replace it with a scalp frame without paying more than 2500$ in total.
  • + 18
 i dont want this becoming mean, but the 2012 kona operator has a great build, avid code breaks, boxxer fork, same rear shock. same price really
  • + 15
 I ride 1500mm bars. At 5ft6 i find these bars perfect for my style. Just the right amount of leverage for the downhills and not too big for going uphill.
  • + 6
 Or take a look at Canyon's Torque FRX. And cry if you ride a Status
  • + 0
 I think the Status frame would be nicer than the Canyon. Also, I think you'd get a better warranty and customer service with a company like Specialized in comparison to some of these buy direct companies like Canyon, I've read some comments from people who had issues when dealing with them. Just something to bear in mind.
  • + 3
 How would someone in the US get ahold of a YT or a Canyon bike?
  • + 2
 Just the same way as anywhere else, from their website, they don't sell their Bikes through bike shops.
  • + 4
 The base model Glory from Giant comes with a very similar parts spec, with their flagship frame, right at 3 G's. With that you get a proper DH head angle and BB height, a 150mm rear end, and a company who is going to support the product better than Specialized or any of those small company's.
  • + 3
 at least the stories about YT not answering mails and whatever has not proven true, they replied to me instantly about some details. but at the end of the day I still think Status is a great offer too.
  • + 5
 you would think that if pinkbike wanted to review a low cost bike, they'd go get a YT industries - its a bargin for what you get. So you kind of think think down the line of bribery perhaps?
  • - 2
 I think you've been watching too much Sopranos...
  • + 1
 That's how it works in the industry. Mags review companies buy ads. You can't find one article about yt's bikes on pinkbike. If it wasn't for their teamriders you wouldn't even know they exist and that's more than weird considering their popularity in europe.
  • + 1
 Got the 2011 Tues Freeride (same bike, but with a 180mm Totem). Absolutely awesome bike, but indeed, the customer service is virtually non-existing. I had a leaking o-ring after a month on the fork, in the end I had it repaired at my own expense. When I ordered the bike, it arrived at my door in a week though.
  • + 2
 @Pendsocks: I can tell you as an American that I NEVER see YT bikes and I'd really LOVE to try one out but they're not making it "over here" as much as I'd like to see. Euro riders have the advantage of getting to see/ride/buy all the "major brand" bikes AND the lesser-known (to US Americans anyway) brands as well (I'm ure this isn't the case EVERYWHERE, but what would an American be without generalities about other countries right Wink ).

I think YT's bikes look AWESOME and as someone else already pointed out, they have a great spec. as well. That said, to us Americans thy're like Diesel Toyotas, non Bling G-Wagens and Unimogs etc. : they're "foriegn unobtanium" unfortunately. Even worse to hear someone (in fact MULTIPLE people) say they've been trying to get ahold of one but can't get the company to play ball 9even worse to hear KRDIECKX say that he's GOT one and the CS is "non-existant" aye - they're a German co. aren't they??? If you're not getting good CS in GERMANY I shudder to think what it'd be like outside Germany). Makes it seem like it's pretty unlikely that I'l be seeing let alone getting to TRY OUT any of their bikes in the near future... Bummer for us Americans aye Frown
  • + 2
 Rental Bike!
  • + 2
 Are you refering to the Status or to YT industries actually having somepce that uses them as Rentals???

I'm sure that the Status WILL be used heavily in rental fleets for sure, but (and I'm not sure how you meant that statement so I'm not trying to flame you) I can see some upcoimng, young, killer riders who would be stoked to have the 2013 Status and could concievaby take it to an AM or Junior podium. I forsee there being a LOT of these in the younger ranks as their a GREAT suspension system for DH and the price will be attractive.
  • + 2
 Yt can't sell their bikes due to patents overseas and the customer service is actually very good and that's not just my opinion. You will always find someone who isn't satisfied.
  • + 2
 all my post sound like im a preacher for the Kona choir, but i agree with hermit185, and an amazingly balanced bike, +1 kona
[Reply]
  • + 19
 Sweet review. But I, and I'm sure many others, would prefer to see the 2013 reviewed.
  • + 8
 Id say its much the same. Just glad specialized listened and decided to put the boxxers on instead of the domains
  • + 2
 The 2013 would have been announced at Eurobike I would imagine, there wouldn't be time for an in depth review. It sounds like it is the same bike in a nicer colour with a better fork though.
  • + 1
 dude they added in the changes for 2013 at the end of the artical, its pretty safe to assume that the fork upgrade will increase the performance bbut not only that any decent frame design will ride well with decent spec, its more about the price they can bring it to "us" i personally think the kona operator is an amazing sled, having ridden santa cruz v10 v.3 giant glory and giant DH comp previously, ive never felt so comfotable and balanced on a bike, i have also raced a 2012 demo2 and a trek session, the trek wasnt set up properly and felt terrible, and the specialized as stated in the above review is a race sled and you need to be ready for what it does, never hit so many rocks with pedals, kona ftw and i used to be a kona hater cause of how ugly they were and the floating brake but got a killer deal and everything came up Milhouse
  • + 3
 This bike its awesome i have the Status 1 2013 sooo stocked i loved this bike and its 2 400 USD the only thing i thing I should change its the pedals and maybe for future the front suspension for a bigger one I totally recommend this bike !!!!
[Reply]
  • + 20
 Buy whatever you can afford, and ride it like you mean it !
  • + 2
 Best post yet!
  • + 1
 Thanks !
[Reply]
  • + 14
 It's hilarious that $3,100 is now considered affordable...says Specialized.
  • - 7
 That is about 1 months pay. How is that not affordable?
  • + 5
 You get way better specced bikes from other companies for less money. That's why.
  • + 4
 @ blankty:
You try living in the US for two months on one month's pay.
  • + 4
 its called saving money over time... tough but possible... if you really like biking you'll make it happen... get fast. go pro. get connected
[Reply]
  • + 11
 The Status is a rather nice bike, but I find it unfortunate to see the SX Trail discontinued as it is such an amazing trail weapon!
  • + 3
 Wait for the Enduro SX Smile
  • + 2
 Enduro EVO is basically a SXT replacement and is lighter. 180mm front and rear.
  • + 2
 The new 2013 Enduro EVO is over 1 lb lighter than the SX Trail, and maintains the same strength. The linkage is also designed specifically around a coil spring (totally different than the 160 Enduro with air shocks), so the feel and progression is improved. If you liked the SX Trail, you should love the new Enduro EVO.
  • + 2
 The Enduro EVO looks like a long travel trail bike (from the internet pix that are around) and the SX trail has been more of a park bike/freeride bike. I would like to try a new Enduro EVO since I was planning on a new park bike. A Status with adjustable travel from 200-180 travel would really make that a better all around bike.
  • + 1
 Enduro EVO vs. SX Trail - "long travel trail bike" vs. "park bike/freeride bike". Same travel, same strength, same stiffness, lighter and more plush - I think you will find that it meets your expectations as a park/freeride bike.
  • + 2
 @Jason, Thanks for your reply! Keep up the wonderful work!
[Reply]
  • + 11
 that bike isn't afforadable in any way. look at the yt tues 2.0. has the best components out there on it and only costs 2,500 euros! Specialized is just overpriced
  • + 10
 oh and it has a domain for 3,1k are you kidding me?
  • + 6
 It's also heavy like nothing else. I could go on and on
  • + 9
 Specialized capitalizes on Sam Hill's switch to the Demo from the old IH Sunday. Lots of Sam Hill fanbois out there imagine that getting on a Demo would make them as fast as Sam Hill.

Same with Trek, now having a $10k "elite" DH consumer bike thanks to Gwin's winning seasons.

The MTB journalism remains piss-poor, but the average MTB buyer/rider seems unaware that he or she is being played as a fool. I guess having more money than sense is a true First World Problem.

Agree that Specialized is overpriced. Most beginning DH racers would be better served with a used bike and some skills courses.
  • + 3
 Cfoxtrot couldnt agree more!
  • + 2
 couldn't agree more, for 50$ more you can get a glory 2 and at 1900 eur yo can get the yt tues dh it is not affordable and as all low priced specialized bikes that I know they are very underequiped in comparison to other brands
[Reply]
  • + 10
 I think pinkbike should actually compare the 2013 Status II, against the Aurum and Operator in a direct head to head... you know for all us riders on a budget.
  • + 3
 and the glory
[Reply]
  • + 10
 sweet bike!! my mate has one and its pimp amazing price too
  • + 1
 fairplay dude, better kit overall but i find it hard to trust Marzocchi with expensive gear these days :s
[Reply]
  • + 8
 The frame itself I'm sure is a proper rig rig but its a crap spec for 3100. I would much rather buy a year old used bike bike with a much much better spec list.
[Reply]
  • + 5
 3k affordable? try my $1400 Airborne Taka. I ride that heavy DH rig on the local XC trails. I'm keeping up with carbon s series hardtails. spend a few hundred more and upgrade the cranks and cassette and that is a big bang for your buck. it beats the crap out of my $3k Marin. I'm never spending that much money again. Haha this Status comes with the same crap motox cranks as the taka. those suck ass. my BB broke loose within a month.
  • + 9
 You're not "keeping up with hardtails." You're keeping up with riders, who happen to be on hardtails. A fitter rider would spank you silly on a rigid cyclocross bike. The rider is the most important factor, the bike is secondary.

Agree that the $1400 price is more in line with "budget" category, though.
[Reply]
  • + 5
 I got my 2103 Status 2 on the 27th August, I had a 2007 Glory which was great but wanted something a bit more up to date. I narrowed my choice down to YT, Canyon and Specialized. I went for the Status in the end because of the backup, and that Specialized know what they are doing when it comes to DH bikes and have a proven track record. I have done a couple of uplift days and a lot of local stuff. I have had no issues what so ever, every thing works fine and looks like it is going to stay that way. I am not a small bloke either being 6' 2" and 17 stone and the only change I have made is a larger rear spring. If you are looking at one of the above like I was then they are all good bikes but I think I made the right choice. At last it is good to be in position where you are looking at DH bikes between 2-3k rather than 5k plus, especially if you are like me and also ride XC/Trail and road.
  • + 1
 great bike mate I've just bought it
  • + 1
 what size did you went for, i'm 6 foot flat 165 pounds and i'm not sure between Medium or Large, can you help me?
  • + 1
 I got a large I'm 6ft 2 and around 14 and a half stone
[Reply]
  • + 5
 Well I used to think specializeds warranty was the best but since they refused to replace my 03 big hit when I found a crack on the head tube ill go for a yt! Lifetime apparently means nothing to them.
  • + 0
 Lifetime warranties are at best a marketing gimmick to sucker in new customers. To properly build a frame, especially a DH frame, to even last anything close to a "lifetime"of a rider, would require using so much material as to make it an overweight pig of a bike that could not be ever jumped or raced without some seriously steep mountains being involved because you'd be dependant on gravity to get you up to speed. If you want to return to the days of 45 to 50 pound DH bikes... so be it. Others however don't share that view, and will take a logical lifespan of a few years as an acceptable trade-off for a much lighter bike.
[Reply]
  • + 4
 If the sport of DH is going to continue to grow companies need to start making more cost effective bike's that everyone can afford it's a simple equation cost effective bikes + more people getting into DHing * resorts looking to make more $(because of lack of snow) = more DH trails for everyone to ride.... good job specialized I know at winter park they have a whole fleet of status rigs I see people on them all the time. It dosent matter what bike your on just go freaking ride it!!!!!!
  • + 0
 Except the sport isn't ever going to be that big... DH is such a tiny portion of the mountain bike riding world (less than 1%), that there's simply no way to keep prices down, as the products are not produced on sufficient scale to spread the R&D and production costs over a wider number of items made. At best it can only ever hope for technology to trickle down after its been developed and marketted sufficiently for other aspects of the sport. The rise of long travel trail bikes with double-ring drivetrains and the need for chainguides is for example, what led to clutch cage derailleurs from Shimano and SRAM, and shimano brought it out first for XTR, not for Saint. Shimano actually dropped their previous "cheaper" DH/FR group, Hone, because of poor sales. Now they have Zee again doing the same thing, but who knows how long that will last for production.
  • - 5
 Dh is elite sport. Nice to have bikeparks, not really necessary. Dh might be tiny but a huge marketing driver for brands. XC-types might not feel as wimpy all of the sudden if their brand wins...There is not much more gear for XC people just a lot more hype. Gear is getting better slowly and more durable lately. Experienced dh-riders buy though stuff that has been out for a couple of years. There are no double ring dh-bikes. Two chain guides types work others have been binned.Clutch cages are going to fail. Dead on arrival. Changing the rear derrailleur twice a year still applies. Shimano dropped it because Shimanostuff does not work for dh. Sram stuff is slightly better and cheaper. Zee is a renamed Hone and Saint clone. Will fail.
  • - 8
 Please explain why any sport needs to "grow."

Please give examples of a sport that died because it failed to "grow."

Please.
  • + 1
 @wakaba... there is WAY more gear and technology and products for XC now than DH. Perhaps twenty years ago, DH racing drove the progression of technology as far as suspension initally went, but it was XC riding that cemented it into widespread acceptance. Without XC riding, we'd never had disc brakes on almost every bike, nor tubeless tires, or clipless pedals, or anything for any frame materials other than steel alloys. And I'm sorry you feel that XC gear is just more hype... perhaps to someone looking at XC from outside that genre of the sport it might look that way, but what you in the fringe see as hype... I see as companies trying to do things that I already know to work.
  • + 1
 CFOxtrot what I mean by "grow" is that here in colorado ski/snowboard is king, we have tons of resorts that just sit all summer long. I am of the opinon that as Downhill bikes become more afforadible more ski resort will jump at the chance to "grow" there offseason business by developing downhill specific trails. Of course the sport is not going to die because it has failed to grow far from it. Look at snowboarding as an example there were resorts that would not allow snowboarding for the longest time now it accounts for a huge margin of the snowsports industry. If you have a bunch of people that have DH rigs that want to ride them why wouldn't ski resorts look into developing trails it's supply and demand simple as that. Oh yeah and I would be remissed if I didn't mention that the snow absoulty sucked here in colorado last year, The mountains and dirt are not going anywhere however the snow may become harder and harder to come by good by pow hello brown pow. There will always be the high end products but I think that budget bikes like the status are going to only make downhilling more accessable for more people which hopefully will equate to more trails for everyone
  • + 2
 In this area, there is a ski hill / town called Mont Saint-Marie, its about 45 mins drive north of ottawa (the capitol of canada, for those non-canucks reading the thread, population for the region is about a million) and traditionally in the summer, other than cottagers going to cottages with nearby lakes and the sort, the economy of the town/region near the ski hill just DIED during the summer time. Then a bunch of mountain bikers pitched an idea to the town council to build bike trails (most XC/AM type stuff), and the council agreed to it and gave I think it was a $55k grant to get things going.

This is the result...

www.velomsm.com
  • - 1
 Oh my gargamel! Burandt thinks the problem is not enough bike parks.

Do you even know how to pedal a bike, Burandt? You realize bicycles can be pedaled uphill, right?

Here's a little reminder from someone who's watched several sports go through phases of big growth & faddishness, and phases of slow-down. Balloons in growth due to "promotion" and faddish me-too buying are bad for the long-term. MTB has seen several phases of mad, faddish popularity since the late 1980s. The rest of the time it hasn't died, or threatened going away forever. It simply wasn't experiencing a fad of me-too-ism. Fads cannot be sustained.

In alpine lift-served skiing, people panicked that skiing was "dying" during the 1980s. What hurt skiing in that period was not a lack of growth, but instead, the idea that ski hills needed to become "resorts." Ski hills over-spent on real estate "development" and this is what put the kibosh on skiing. Lift tickets got super-expensive. People who weren't from the idle rich segment of humanity couldn't afford skiing. But the sport weathered that downtime just fine.

Being panicked about MTB "dying" is just paranoia. People will continue to ride MTBs even if every single bike park closes down. Even if Whistler stops running a bike park, people will continue to ride bikes.

Whining about not enough bike parks is the attitude of a spoiled child.
  • + 0
 Exactly... if ski hills want another revenue stream during the non-snow months, then simply putting in XC/AM trails is all they need to do, and run the lifts on certain days to offer the folks who just want to ride down the mountain a chance to spend money in order to save time. There's no need to do elaborate "bike parks" with all manner of slopestyle and so forth like Whistler has done. Many ski hills in areas where there are trees which undergo seasonal changes of their leaves already know that running the lifts so tourists can ride up and down looking at pretty colours is a easy way to make some cash.
  • + 1
 CFO.....I was just making the point that I would like more lift access trails near my house to ride my DOWNHILL BIKE you know ummm down a hill(if I wanted to ride up the hill i would probably have bought a XC bike).

And as fait may have it I do know that my bike has pedals..... actually I pedal a bike almost every day it's a single speed cruiser that I roll around downtown denver it's even got a coaster brake just like the some of the first DH bikes yeah check it out I bought it from a buddy in a bar at 2AM for $40 so I can go urban down hilling jumping over bums curbs all kinds of stuff it's even complete with a cup holder to hold my beer or coffee, yep hoopdie has seen more miles than most.

oh yeah and one other thing I snowboard at a basin never herd of it didn't think so well there is no resort there..... But I do also love vail and oh my what a resort do they have. Did you know that I could hike to the top of a mountain and snowboard down it???? yeah no kidding but you see they invented lifts to get me to the top faster and as it turns out those lifts are there in the summer so why not be able to ride down the hills.

buckle up BRO because the "fanboi's" as you call them are coming and it's not going to stop,
lock up your daughters,
hide your spandex,
find your wide bars because it's coming and it's going to be awesome after all once global warming takes away all the snow all we will be left with is ski lifts with dirt under them.

FYI I still like bikes like the status.......ahh I feel better thanks
  • - 3
 So it's the responsibility of everyone else to "grow the sport" and "progress the sport" with MORE BIKE PARKS because you chose to buy a DH bike even though you're not a DH racer?

Burandt, you're satirizing yourself un-knowingly. You bought a DH bike for the image of tough-DH-bike-owning-badass, and now you're worried your image will crumble because you don't have 25 bike parks within 3 hours drive. You know what, Burandt? That's YOUR stupid mistake here, not everyone else's.

Go on and try to hash me because you imagine I'm some kind of roadie or whatever other kind of rider you think is a "wuss" or whatever. I'd spank you silly in a DH race. Wearing lycra. On an XC bike. And then I'd get out a slightly plusher bike that doesn't qualify as "AM" in your world, and spank you even worse. I wouldn't need an "AM" or "slopestyle" or "freeride" bike to beat you, let alone a DH bike.

Most serious lycra-wearing riders could stomp you on their XC bikes too. Why? Because they ride for the sake of riding. They don't buy a bike to maintain an image.

Hoo boy.
[Reply]
  • + 6
 I recall few years back, 3 grand would not be considered "budget". 3 grand would get me something like a demo 7 with a Totem and pretty decent components.
Buy used.
[Reply]
  • + 7
 nice!! i like Status II !so cool!!
[Reply]
  • + 7
 They should compare the Scott Voltage to the Status
  • + 3
 Yeah! Make a comparison between the Status and the Scott Voltage.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 status 2012 is sh*t... I tested it on bikefest and it was the worst bike i have ever riden, domain dual crown has a bad run, and that components! dont kidding me, it is too expensive, dont buy new bike, wait for last years sale and than buy it, I buy my big hit III 2010 which cost in year 2010 2600€ and in year 2011 I buy it just for 1800€ for a new bike, but status 2013 look absolute amazing, but that price...
[Reply]
  • + 2
 Hey Pink Bike how about doing a head to head between the 2013 Specialized Status II and the 2013 Giant Glory 2 so those of us looking to get an entry level DH rig will know which way to look..... Thanks for all the great work you guys do!!!!
[Reply]
  • + 2
 As DH race bikes become more specialized- lower and slacker, bikes like this will pop up more regularly. Few people have the skill to use the current overslack geometry,and bikes like this for the rest of us make a lot more sense.
[Reply]
  • + 5
 What is the Status on getting a fox shock sticker upside down so it will be right side up for this bike?
[Reply]
  • + 2
 $3100 for a beginner bike? Most the parts on there are crap. You can build a far far far better bike for less and you'd get to learn about the parts you're buying let alone how to fix it when it breaks.

But I suppose when the tween-thirty moms go in to the store and the kid tries on a TLD Carbon once thats $400 and says 'Okay pay for it' and the mom just goes 'Okay...' then. The real kicker is, it costs no more to make the Demo than the status. At least that's how it was in 08' with the 7/8 and the BigHit FSR.

Im just getting old and cranky I guess.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 This bike and the Scott Voltage are both bikes competing for the same rider - a budget minded guy who loves performance, without having to pay for all the little extra fluff. The Status is awesome.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I just bought the 2013 status 2 and think its great.. Don't like giant, have a trek xc. Wanted a demo 8 but have a daughter and couldn't justify the extra dollars..

Just a tip for people especially younger riders.. Never ever pay retail price.. I got my bike shop to sell me my status for $2900.. I couldn't get a better bike for that price..
Always ask for lowest price and then say "surely you can do a bit better than that!"..
If you don't ask then you'll get ripped off.. If they won't drop the price then go somewhere else.. Its really that simple. Playing two or more bike shops off for price will get you even more discount..
[Reply]
  • + 3
 why not drop the status and put the alloy demo 8 in its place? then riders could slowly upgrade up and not have to swap frames
  • + 1
 I guess they can get more money for the Demo by having the Status in their range. Also the Demo frame is probably more expensive to manufacture.
  • + 1
 I can think of a couple more reasons too - first to come in at the same price point would make the previous demo builds/frames look overpriced - i.e the response would be Spec have been ripping us off for the last few years!

Plus it would probably hurt carbon demo sales too, I mean you get practically all the performance with a little bit more weight with the alu one so there is less incentive to get the best. Especially if the alu one was at the status price point, noone would buy a demo.
  • + 1
 To finnrambo, the bike has a different geo, a very different one actually. This goes back to preference. The Status feels a little faster and flickable. The demo is an amazing bike as well but it does feel noticeably different, as they put it without speed behind it, it can feel sluggish.
  • + 1
 this is true... I remember hating the first time I got a WC type frame thinking "f*ck this thing is slow"
  • + 1
 Demo-8 & Status has its own criteria and market aim.. Please read "Demo vs Status" writing and I agree with that
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I just bought the 2013 status 2 and think its great.. Don't like giant, have a trek xc. Wanted a demo 8 but have a daughter and couldn't justify the extra dollars..

Just a tip for people especially younger riders.. Never ever pay retail price.. I got my bike shop to sell me my status for $2900.. I couldn't get a better bike for that price..
Always ask for lowest price and then say "surely you can do a bit better than that!"..
If you don't ask then you'll get ripped off.. If they won't drop the price then go somewhere else.. Its really that simple. Playing two or more bike shops off for price will get you even more discount..
[Reply]
  • + 4
 I'm glad they upped the spec for the 2013 model. $3100 seems a bit steep for Gravity cranks and a Domain.
[Reply]
  • + 5
 $3100 - affordable? wow.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 'Simply put, the Status II offers the best dollar to performance ratio of any downhill bike we've ridden' i really would like to see if that stands after testing the yt industries bike.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I have a just bought a status 2 2013. I have not been on any downhills yet but it feels like you need alot more effort to pedal , Is this common and is it the chunky tyres or a fault. The wheels spin freely off the ground but it feels a little slow !!!
  • + 1
 yeah its a DH bike, lol
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I bought a Status frame only online in August in order to upgrade my 2008 bighit frame. Set it up with a cane creek angleset to slacken the headangle and lower the bb height and am super happy with it. €1300 for the frame only is in my opinion a bargain. I'm super happy with my bike. I highly recommend the status for anyone on a budget who wants a good handling bike.

www.pinkbike.com/photo/8612193

As for 750mm being narrow well it all depends on what you use. I switched to 750mm this spring and yeah initially they felt narrow but now I'm totally used to it.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I bought the Status 1 because the specs on both weren't the greatest so I wanted to slowly upgrade the parts and there is a big $ diff between 1 and 2 its my first DH bike and I paid 2350 at my lbs so couldt find much for that price. i dont regret it one bit its just a fun bike to ride had a couple friends on 8+ grand bikes and there where really surprised at how playful it is you can just throw it around and shred any trail and hit any jump line.
and its race worthy entered 2 races (amateur) this year and was a bit embarrassed that everyone was riding sponsored and on pro bikes and full kit...... well I won both races 2 for 2 obviously not world cup worthy but it does what you need it to do looks sweet and rides awesome
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I've just purchased the status 2 2013 only had it a few weeks but as its my first downhill bike iI can't really compare it to anything else. to me it rides great and I know looks aren't everything but it's a nice looking bike. I advise any novice to start off on this bike hopefully it will be a stepping stone to bigger and better bikes in the future. And yes specialized customer service is great and the after care to.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Oh man there should be a heads-up when CFO is gonna comment,because i`m gonna need some popcorn next time i see him on a thread! Dude is mad cranky and i love every single bit of it Big Grin
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I would wait for the 2013 to get the Boxxer over the domain. A lot of other entry level DH bikes are using the Boxxer, glad to see they *finally* stepped it up with this model.
[Reply]
  • + 3
 So it's better to just wait for the 2013 model to come out, with the nice stealthy black paint and the Boxxer.
[Reply]
  • + 3
 What no one is complaining about all the house brand parts on a bike over three grand.
  • + 1
 because Specialized's house brand parts aren't actually that lame. Case in point: my 750mm Demo bars feel way stiffer than my Truvativ Hussefelts ever did at 680mm.
  • + 1
 no kidding, their a lot of their "house brand" saddles are like $80 and up . . .
pedals are not cheap, either.
  • + 1
 I don't think many house brand components are lame, that's my point.
  • + 1
 Oh. Wasn't easy to pick that out. That having been said, I couldn't stand some of the old Bontrager tires I tried (they were free). No bite whatsoever. New lineup does look good, though.
[Reply]
  • + 4
 Canyon and yt piss all over this
[Reply]
  • + 2
 "Simply put, the Status II offers the best dollar to performance ratio"

Funny that considering most bikes reviewed on Pinkbike are all mostly Specialized. :\
  • + 8
 They've also reviewd the Scott Voltage FR20, the Kona Operator and the Norco Aurum which are all similar bikes to the Status. I may be wrong, but none of those are made by Specialized...
  • - 5
 You can't keep your access to free parts and bikes if you don't fluff the hell out of each manufacturer whose parts or bikes are sent to you free of charge.

Once PB decided it wanted to be "the" source for MTB journalist income earned with a captive audience (teenage fanbois and e-riding desk jockeys) whose click counts gain big (ish) bucks for PB, it signed a Deal with the Devil to always say great things about Big Companies.

That's how you "grow the sport," bro-heem. With unquestioning fanboi blather.

Speedy might be confusing PB and VitalMTB. It's Spomer and The Greed Collective at Vital who are busy performing un-natural physical gratification acts toward Specialized. Here at PB the massaging is more non-discriminatory.
  • - 3
 Well but CFPxtrot!
  • + 5
 CFOxtrot. Get real, you are absolutely full of shit and you know it. If you have actually ridden any of the bikes reviewed (which aren't all specialized) you'd realize that most bikes being put out these days are pretty damn good. You can only review what a company sends you. We'd be more than happy to review bikes from any company, they just have to step up and send them over.

Nice troll, though.
  • - 4
 Fraser, you're full of shit. Or you don't know how things work, despite taking pictures for a few years. Seriously. Manufacturers give review bikes on the assumption the review will be positive, and if it's negative, you won't get anything more to review. Advertising revenue dries up. Your'e left writing the same nonsense about nothing.

Your pee-marking of territory is funny though. Maybe ask your team-mate RC why MBA got the reputation MBF. Maybe you'll see some truth there.

And while you're at it? Look up the definition of "troll," buddy. You're wrong on that one. Remind me, Fraser -- when did you meet me? Oh that's right. You never have.

I roll my eyes, and laugh at your sad shilling & cover-up impulses.

"You can only review what a company sends you" is a statement that distracts. HOW does a company decide to send you something? WHY does a company decide to send you something?

You crack me up Fraser. Nice pictures, but really dude, you're clueless about life.
  • + 2
 Keep dreaming, home slice. Also, keep trolling, it's entertaining.
  • - 4
 What's the "dream" here, "home slice"? That you want everyone to believe Mfrs don't expect shilling? Yeah, that's one of those "funny" dreams isn't it?

Being a good photographer and being a DH fanboi isn't the same as knowing how the world works.
  • + 1
 Big manufacturers tend to design their bikes pretty carefully and try to make them good and well specced for the money because then they sell. They take their good bike and send it to journo's to be reviewed. Journo's ride bike and either like it lots or like it a bit - as the bike is good they will never really hate it.

Reviews often have comments like - forks lack a little bit of adjustability, bars are a bit narrow, tyres could be better which is ultimately all you can find to pick on when the bikes being produced are so good - rating one bike another comes down to performance vs price, finish quality and looks as performance vs performance without those other factors becomes irrelevant.

Manufacturers dont send bikes to journalists expecting good reviews because they are supporting the journalists through advertising revenue, they expect good reviews because they know their bike is good. Its not like they are churning out sh*t and getting other people to palm it off as gold.
  • - 1
 Nice fluffing Pablo.

If every bike is so good, why review anything?

"Supporting the journalist through ad revenue"? WTF does that mean? Who is the journalist? I haven't encountered a single MTB journalist. I have read plenty of hack, no-talent writers who regurgitate marketing brochures or Sales Dude Lingo. That's not journalism. That's Sales Conduit Work. Journalists don't care whether their writing raises hackles, reduces "unit movement" or otherwise blackens someone's eye. Hacks fluff the manufacturer, help "move units," and throw fake punches that miss the target but get a loud, sound-effects "CRACK!" that doesn't match the sound of a punch hitting a person.
  • + 1
 Feel free to write three reviews for the last three new bikes you rode highlighting the flaws in their spec. construction, ride quality or whatever you wish. I would love to hear your insight into what makes any three current, large (or even boutique) manufacturer's offerings of the past year flawed.

Hell I'll take one - rip it to pieces, lay its flaws, errors and problems open for us all to see.
  • + 2
 Whoo hooo! CFO's off his meds again! Love reading his posts.
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  • + 1
 i love this bike (2012 version), had it since it came out and rode it lods, upgreded fork and wheels as i broke the others but its really nice!
rode it at fort william, morzing,la bresse.great bike definatley recomend it.
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  • + 1
 I want some bars that are so wide that my nose is almost touching the stem, only then will I feel like I've got the complete and total control of my bike that I've been yearning for.
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  • + 1
 looks like a nice entry level set up. has anyone rode one of those forks?? i wonder how they last under a experienced rider.
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  • + 1
 just wondering how the status compares to the kona operator since they both have models that come in around the same price tag. although, the status does look the business.
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  • + 3
 Bought a Status I and put a world cup on it. The bike shredsssssss!
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  • + 1
 My bashguards are all beat up. A square rock on a g-out ate my mrp g2 and broke my chainring and chain... Selling a DH bike without bashguard is absolutely retarded...
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  • + 3
 If I had 3000+ dollars I would so get a lightly used demo. f*ckkk I wish
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  • + 2
 I JUST GOT MY 2013 STATUS II 2 DAYS AGO AND ITS AMAZING!! Would highly suggest
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  • + 1
 That's my bike! I love it, its survived a summer of Whistler, silverstar, and plenty of other trails in the Pacific northwest and Canada!
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  • + 1
 i dont see a bash guard on there which is weird dont wanna mess up your chain and chainring
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  • + 2
 How much do you get for a kidney?
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  • + 0
 Affordably heavy, you mean.
  • + 1
 The taka weighs 40.8lbs which is exactly the same as the status 2
  • + 1
 pretty nasty looking frame in comparison though...
  • + 1
 The 2012 status 2 weights around 39Ibs and the 2013 model is down to 38lbs.
  • + 1
 depends on the frame size this review states even more: www.bikeradar.com/gear/category/bikes/mountain/product/review-specialized-status-2-12-45229

to say the taka is heavy as f*ck in comparison doesn't do it justice. And I'm not even talking about the fact that you could get three taka's for the price of one status
  • + 1
 It's heavy, sure. But who cares? It gets you on the track with a pretty well equipped rig that is both safe and fun. Once your skills increase you could justify either lightening up the build, or just buying another bike (or just swapping parts to a new frame) or hell, just ripping it up on the stock build! Admittedly the Status is probably the "better" bike, but that all boils down to one's perspective. Personally I rip it up on mine and have an absolute BLAST doing so.
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  • + 1
 I like it better then the demo cuz well I think the rear end of the bike would better fit me then a demo.
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  • + 1
 crazy that all revews from this bike they dont understand why Specialized did not made a top spec bike!!! never knows
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  • + 1
 nice frame ,maybe better than the demo 8 for most
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  • + 1
 bike sucks got broken in two months .....f!&%$k you specialized
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  • + 1
 Why don't they sell these frame only?
  • + 1
 they do in eastern europe but if they did in the rest of the world you would probably get a better specced bike if you built it up for the price of the status 2
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  • + 1
 dig the 2013 paint jobs both the status and demo look nice
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  • + 1
 used this bike to dh crested butte, co. it shreds Smile Smile Smile
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  • + 0
 What about the glory 2? It's basically giants version of a more affordable dh bike. I never see anything about it on here
  • + 1
 the glory 2 isn't considered affordable, and is also a terrible suspension design
  • + 1
 The status 2 is 100 dollars more than the glory 2. Idk what's so bad about the suspension design it works fine for me.
  • + 2
 who knows if you're even using it to its fullest potential. The status 2 comes stock with a better fork, better shock, and a better brand name.
  • + 1
 I don't see what the huge issue is though with the maestro suspension, yea I'm not pushing it to the limits but it feels fine whenever I'm riding, what is so horrible about it? Not trying to get into a huge argument just wanna know
  • + 1
 It feels unbalanced and unpredictable. Try braking over continuous rough stuff at speeds
  • + 1
 It works fine....
  • + 1
 But to each his own I guess
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  • + 1
 Specialized = Best bikes ever
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  • + 1
 Love the look of the Status. Beautiful in it's simplicity
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  • - 2
 "Simply put, the Status II offers the best dollar to performance ratio of any downhill bike we've ridden"

Ummm, the Kona Operator, Norco Aurum... both bikes are much better spec builds and about the same price.
  • + 1
 I have used both the norco aurum and the status 2 and i will take the status 2 when given the option, IMO it rides rock gardens noticeably better
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  • + 1
 thanks for the advice in buying a new bike.
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  • + 1
 Is that a dartmoor blade chainguide on the white status?
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  • + 1
 I'm 6 foot flat and 165 pounds, should i get a medium or large?
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