Syncros FP1.0 Floor Pump - Reviewed

Sep 3, 2013 at 22:15
Sep 3, 2013
by Richard Cunningham  
 
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Syncros has expanded its range from wheelsets and cockpit accessories to include some impressive-looking tools. The FP1.0 floor pump is the best of three such items in the Syncros lineup and it is one of the better-made pumps we have come across in a long spell. The shaft is polished stainless steel, while the handle, cylinder and base are aluminum. The handle is a rounded, triangular shape that fits the hands well. A large, three-inch-diameter dial-gauge dominates the base, and it reads both in BAR and PSI. The gauge reads to 14 atmospheres (about 200 pounds per square inch). I did not take it up to the redline, but if you forget your shock pump, it is good to know that your Syncros FP1 could stand in for it. The dual-sided valve head threads onto either Presta or Schrader stems, and the head rotates inside its carrier so that the user can easily thread it onto the valve stem by spinning the free end of the pump head. The head seals similar to a shock pump, in such a way that allows the user to unthread it from the valve stem without losing air pressure. Syncros FP1.0 floor pumps come in anthracite silver and cost around $130 in better bike shops.
Syncros

The Syncros FP1.0 pump is built tough, with all metal construction, a comfortable handle and a large, easy to read gauge. The base is cast aluminum, which also helps it to remain upright.



Syncros FP1.0 Floor Pump Features

• Purpose: Home and shop use
• 1.25-inch (31.8mm) cylinder moves a lot of air
• 50-inch (127cm) hose allows easy access while bike is in work-stand
• Thread-on, double valve-head fits Schrader and Presta stems
• High-pressure sealing head can double as suspension pump
• Large, easy-to read gauge indicates both BAR and PSI
• Shop-quality all-metal construction
• MSRP: $130 USD

Performance

I am not the suicidal type, nor would I normally entertain the slightest thought of taking another’s life, but I experienced moments, using the Syncros FP1 pump, when both actions, however unspeakable, seemed reasonable and just. By all respects, the Syncros pump seems like a perfect tool. It is beautiful to look at, comfortable in the hands, intelligently designed, sturdily manufactured, and it incorporates the contemporary favorite, thread-on valve head. To its credit, I used it for nearly a month with great satisfaction on both Schrader and Presta-type valve stems.

During that brief honeymoon, I successfully inflated various tubeless and tube-type tires, filled a couple of shocks and forks, and fixed a flat on my Volvo station wagon. The generous diameter of its piston and cylinder moves a large enough volume of air to get a tubeless tire seated with little effort – or get a car-tire up and running with a reasonably short stint on the pump handle. Before the beauty of this tale swings toward darkness, I will go on record to say that if all the valve stems in your stable are Schrader types, I could recommend the Sycros FP1.0 as your go-to pump.

Internal friction created by the O-ring in the seal, is one contributor that causes the user to accidentally unscrew the replaceable valves from Presta stems when removing the pump-head.



My unicorn died however, and my rainbows faded to black when I showed up at a photo shoot, whipped out my new Syncros FP1.0 uber-pump and proudly offered it to a local hotshot who needed to top off the air on his big bike’s wheels. Each time he unthreaded the pump-head, it unscrewed the removable valve from his Presta stems and released all the air (and a measure of his Stan’s sealant) from the tires. After three unsuccessful and very public attempts, the lad handed me the FP1.0 in silence, walked a considerable distance back to his car, produced a beater hand-pump and finished the job. Shamed? Oh yeah.

From that moment, I too was cursed by the FP1.0 floor pump, which managed to remove two out of five Presta valves that I came across – regardless of the fact that I had tightened most of the little buggers in anticipation of future trouble. I finally snapped while I was racing darkness to get a ride in on a test bike. I had forgotten my hydration pack, which contained my backup hand-pump and the tools required to tighten a valve stem. Standing in darkness beside my bike at the trailhead, with two nearly flat tubeless tires that could not be inflated with the magnificent looking floor-pump that had once shown so much promise, I vowed to take the life of the person at Syncros who decided that thread-on Presta pump heads were a great idea.


Pinkbike's take:
bigquotesImitation, they tell me, is the sincerest form of flattery, but when Lezyne first introduced the contemporary thread-on Presta pump head, Presta stems with removable valves were quite rare and the merits of tubeless tires were still being debated. The copycats, Crankbrothers and now Syncros, cannot claim such ignorance on that issue. Lever-head or Silca style push-on Presta heads have proven to be very reliable and, with one exception, thread-on heads are not an improvement over either of the old standbys. The one situation is when the valve stem is too short to get enough purchase for a flip-type or push-on head to seal. Beyond that, thread-on pump heads can only be defended as a vain fashion exercise.
Now that that is off my chest, I very much like the all-metal, no-nonsense construction of the Syncros FP1.0 pump, and it gets high marks for its shop-length hose. The action of the pump is smooth and it has never felt sticky over time. Ergonomically, the pump also earns our respect - for the handle's shape and for its ratio of height to pump-stroke. (Some pumps can feel like back breakers.) I probably will purchase a lever-type pump-head to replace the stock thread-on item and call it good. For Schrader valves, the Syncros' FP1.0 pump gets two thumbs up. Presta users, however, should shop for an alternative design. - RC
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128 Comments

  • + 51
 When did PB start reviewing such stupid products? A shitty $130 pump that unscrews valves? No thanks. A $20 pump works exactly the same(and in this case, better) Never understood the point of stupid expensive pumps.
  • + 12
 My CCM pump is doing fine at 12$
  • + 54
 I got a pump from Walmart to help me learn bar spins
  • - 4
 They started producing reviews like this when they started to get paid to promote products my friend, cash rules all.
  • + 109
 Wouldn't you rather hear them review about it, then you by chance wasting your hard earned money on this floor pump which obviously isn't the one to go out and get? I'm sorry, and I'm sure this may make the internet gangster in you come out, but you need to quit your bitching.

Thanks for letting us know this pump is not as good as it looks.
  • + 7
 What are you guys talking about? This is a work of art! You can't compare your shitty Walmart pump to this simply because of the effort and craftsmanship that went into this product.

With that said, I'll go use my 12 dollar pump and cry in the basement.
  • + 4
 Totally agree with Fuze .. This is a work of art..no matter if my €25 JoeBlow works great..it's sometimes nice to see where engineering and construction art is applied, in a world full of china bargains and wheel size debate ..
  • + 4
 www.evanscycles.com/product_image/image/754/b37/349/43757/product_page/specialized-air-tool-sport-2010-floor-pump.jpg this one always treated me well, cheap enough, it's not broken but does anyone know if the new specialized pumps are any good? and if they still have that head where you could pop it onto schrader valves or presta without changing anything or unscrewing any bits?
  • + 17
 R916, but you wouldent know it's shifty and unscrews valve cores unless they reviewed it. So quit bitching, or go out and build your own website and wide loyal fanbase to review the products you chose....
  • + 5
 Well I've been through half a dozen cheap floor pumps and when my current one dies, I'll be looking to shell out some decent cash on one that will last me a few years. At least this review was honest in the pumps faults. And for that I thank you, Pinkbike.
  • + 19
 I don't understand how people always try to find something to complain about. At first it was about how nothing bad is ever said about the products reviewed. Now there is an honest one highlighting the cons, so people complain that it's a pump?! you don't realize that pinkbike just saved somebody from dropping $130 on a pump, right? I thought that was the point.

You know, if you want a review on something specific, you can just google it...
  • + 10
 redridesrule is spot on, I thought the same thing myself. I read the article, and headed to the comments thinking "finally the PB'ers will be happy that there is a non sugar coated review"

Nope. Pinkbike commenters are as ignorant as youtube commenters, just with better grammar.
  • + 8
 Rule #1: You can never please the PB crowd. First they don't give an 'honest' review, next they don't want to know about the product reviewed... smh
  • + 4
 You can't please everybody, with that said, good or bad who the hell would drop 130 on a PUMP?
  • + 6
 130 dollars is good enough for a pump and 2 tires...
  • + 6
 r916 - That's exactly why pinkbike should review this pump, so that people know it has flaws and can properly consider everything before spending a hundred bucks ($130 is the MSRP so it won't actually sell for that much)

For once, pinkbike has offered up a good review. Instead of just saying positive things, they provided useful information to us. You should be praising pinkbike for this review, not bitching about it.
  • + 1
 I find it refreshing that they reviewed it honestly. There are probably a lot of people out there who would have bought this solely on syncros' reputation (coupled with the build quality and cost) who were looking for a decent pump that would last them years.
  • + 2
 Who Needs a pump when you can buy a compressor for 100 bucks Big Grin
  • + 1
 I don't know about filling up a fork with a compressor, but I must admit that having a do it all pump (shock/road/mtb) at your house or shop might make everything much easier. On the other hand, when it breaks it means you ran out of all pumps. Still a shock pump today comes free with high end forks or shocks (i got 2), and a high pressure road pump that also works for mtb tires cost anywhere from 40 to 60 dollars for a good one (presta friendly). So in the end it is up to the consumer to decide whether he/she needs it or not. I personally don't, but it's good to know they are available...
  • - 6
 I don't know why I'm
getting negative propped for telling the truth, you guys are a little in denial. Pinkbikes home page is designed to cover local events and shit yet these reviews show up on every single users home page atleast once a week, how do you bigots think pinkbike has afforded to upgrade it's website format and video players etc... Shit all costs money man. Neg prop all you want...
  • + 2
 AMEN to that r916. You have to be really bored with your money to go buy a $130 pump. Go spend 130 bucks on a couple of lift tickets and a case of beer...
  • + 5
 As soon as I read $130 for a pump, I scrolled straight to the rage comments.
  • + 2
 @finnrambo I have the Specialized pump and it is really good, used it for about a season and it still looks and works like brand new. It does have the head that you just pop onto any valve type, so easy. And it came with lifetime warranty so if it does end up breaking Specialized will send you a new one. I think it was like $40-50 but I can't remember, worth it though.
  • + 2
 good review, without this type of review, how many people would have bought this pump before reading this?
  • - 3
 To those that are saying its a "worm of art" NO, its a pump. Its overpriced and do we really need a review of a pump? This is the new dumb.
  • + 3
 @ keyboardkilla - if they got paid by the manufacturer to review this pump then PB would have said it was the best pump on the planet ?
  • + 3
 we use the Specialized Air Tool HP pumps in our workshop

ancillary.edinburghbicycle.com/image-cache/00015500/00016611/extra-large/specialized-airtool-hp-floor-pump.jpg

each pump lasts about 1 year which in a workshop environment is seriously impressive

Topeak Joe Blow lasted about 3-4 weeks in comparison

we are super busy in the workshop, no time to be f*cking around "screwing" the valve head to the valve core on that Syncros pump featured, especially if it starts unscrewing presta valve cores and leaking Stan's all over the workshop!

Every time on a workshop pump, I want to use a press-fit (and lock lever) design head which takes less than 1 second to connect or disconnect and never messes up the valve core
  • + 1
 Bought a Portland Design Works Magic Flute a few years back. Thinking to myself, “perfect, a nice little handy pump.” But then came to realize that it's only great for flats when I'm out and about.
So I got me a Lezyne CNC Floor Drive. Let me tell you, nicest, smoothest floor pump I have ever owned. Compared to the Canadian Tire & Walmart sports pumps for the $45.00 price range, I will always choose my Lezyne Floor Drive.
In my opinion the others are manufactured poorly and lack strength. It seems the plastic always breaks, or seals leak after very little use. The length of hose always seem to be short as well.
Put good money forward and purchase a product that has a multiuse (shock pump), and will last with the option for rebuilding.
Some times It’s worth the money upfront. If I can assume, no one rides a SuperCycle. Same can be said with bike pumps and the sort.
  • + 1
 I made the mistake of taking my Lyzene road pump on the trail with me last weekend. Unaware of this issue, I thought the screw on head would be fine for my presta valves. I get a slow leak on my sidewall. After applying a temporary patch to the outside, I pump it up, and sure enough - out comes the valve core 3 times before I give up and put a tube in. Hopefully articles like this will make people more aware of this issue and people won't face the frustration i did. I encourage more negative reviews, we don't know enough about the products to avoid.
  • - 3
 OKAY, kudos to PB for reviewing a pump..a pump that myself I know a lot of us WOULD NOT EVEN BUY. Who the f*ck spends over $100 for a PUMP?? Max I would spend is $50 (MAX with tax/shipping/whatever)
For $130 I could buy a couple things or at least an upgrade for my bike(well maybe, $130 doesn't buy shit anymore).
  • + 3
 Presta friendly doesn't make it a good pump, presta valves stink, the stupid metal piece always breaks
  • + 1
 1) you only break presta if you don't know what you're doing 2)for the people tgat also do road and cross or have presta drilled rims only it's a pain in the ass to get adapters
  • + 2
 I don't like to spend a lot of money on a pump either (thank you chainlove ect) but having a nice pump you will notice the difference. Maybe you only pump your tires up every so often on your one bike, then fine skimp on the pump, but if your one to pump up your tires before every ride and have a few bikes to maintain air on then a nice pump is key. I like the specialized pumps, they work amazing and used them in the shop every day and they never failed.
  • + 1
 @finn pretty sure i know what I'm doing, the presta valves are very weak.
  • + 1
 And there's no advantage to it except that letting air out is a little faster. The cons outweigh the pro imo
  • + 3
 I own an XC, a trail bike, and a track fixed gear bike (all tubeless) with presta valves, and I most say that presta besides making it easy on you to put stan in the tires, is the worst invention ever made. The valve gets stuck, completely unscrews (letting air and Stan out) when trying to open it to check pressure, and it's a pain in the ass trying to use it even with a presta friendly pump, specially when you cross the 100psi line, a total nightmare!
  • + 2
 I grew up with road and track so presta is just natural for me, trust me they're awesome once you get used to them, I can't stand schraders but personal preference
  • + 2
 the expression "expensive pump" means something completely different here......
  • + 4
 I don't how long it takes to "get used to them" but I ran them for almost 2 years before I realized that the simplicity and ruggedness of schraders work a lot better for me
[Reply]
  • + 20
 I don't know you, RC, but you seem like the kind of guy that would have a Volvo station wagon.
  • + 8
 at least it's not a prius
  • + 2
 What's wrong with prius? Qualify this oh typical pink biker guy
  • + 1
 for a dude named satan (I think you meant that by satn anyway) you sure don't seem to understand exactly what's wrong with small "cute" eco friendly cars that have a top speed of what 80 maybe?
  • + 4
 @ satn, The problem with the Prius is that its only environmentally friendly after it leaves the dealership, the parts travel around the world so much during assembly that the Prius only betters the average internal combustion engined vehicle after approx. 90,000 miles of use in terms of carbon monoxide emissions.
  • + 1
 Mega turtle has done his research.. all the eco friendly stuff is really just being marketed as such.
  • + 1
 Odd place to be discussing this mega-turtle, but I'm interested in your views.
Aren't all cars made from parts sourced all over the world? Even if their locally made?
  • + 3
 They are, but the prius will travel a lot more due to different stages of its assembly being carried out in different factories. Such as the batteries being fitted, before sending the complete vehicle somewhere else for final fitting etc. And all this before you factor in the rare earth metals used in the batteries etc. Not the rock solid link I was looking for but it's all I could find at one in the morning haha. They say after 160,000km it's more efficient but other reports say the break even point is around 80-90,000km. Also the part about health and safety in China is interesting as well.
  • + 2
 I love that website.. awesome.
  • + 1
 The Prius is, however, the ultimate drive-by car: as it rolls past your rival gang in silence you wind down a window and light them up, then you silently roll away. No one expects it.
  • + 1
 if clint eastwood is your grandpa he's a better bet
[Reply]
  • + 18
 Why the hell a bike pump will pump to 200psi?.. why not a MTB pump with a better way to read psi between 20 and 50 !!!
  • + 7
 Because shocks and forks need to be at pressures that high.
  • + 6
 And some people like more than 50 psi in their tires?
  • + 5
 that is what shock pumps are for... buy an air shock and you get the extra cost as a bonus.
  • + 6
 50 psi+ in a mtb tire? that's insane! makes sense for road though I guess, and bullitproof some people do track cycling albeit not very many and they might want a pump that can do it all, and I've heard some track riders run like 180psi or so (I don't get it but whatever) anyway.... my point is idc about the pressure, this pump is too expensive, it's a pump not artwork, it's for people with carbon fiber bottle cages costing $300+
  • + 12
 It's called dirt jumping... You don't want some sluggish, 40 psi tire. I personally run 70 at the moment
  • + 4
 This pump won't easily or accurately be able to pump up a shock due to the high pressure & low volume of air they take. Pumps go to 200psi as there are such things as 'road bikes'!!! Look em up!
  • + 2
 @adamlaycock good point, I'm stupid today
  • + 1
 The most psi one would put in a road bike tire would be 150, and that's about 55 more psi than I would ever put in my personal road bikes. I suppose that if a person lives in a place that has absolutely perfectly flat roads, 150 psi might be all right.
  • + 2
 lets start with this.. there is NO way this pump can be attached to a shock and most forks.. with that huge connector.. aswell as that shock valves are mostly recessed and do not stick out like tire valves..
  • + 2
 Actually on rear shocks the air valve is almost always exposed.
  • + 1
 20 ish psi in dh bike, 80-90 in dj bike, had 120-140 in my bmx... But its still way too expensive... my £30 park tool pump easily does all that, admittedly it gets harder but i imagine even this one would. I also agree cyberhawk to an extent, many shocks are starting to hide the valves away and it also depends on your frame/mounting. And a fair few riders put more than 200psi in the rear shock anyway so this would be useless for that application
  • + 0
 i forgot air shocks btw.. those are mostly exposed.. but indeed also with most frame concepts.. its almost impossible to reach the shock or piggy bag due to design..
  • + 1
 Some track tyres run at pretty high pressures. If you ride MTB, road and/or track 1 pump that can do everything well is better than 2 different pumps
  • + 0
 I run 65 to 70 psi in my tires and it works just fine
  • + 2
 First off good luck pumping your shock up with a floor pump as the volume is so small, and pumps like this go up to 200psi for road bikes, many TT road tires mainly sew up tubular tires are run OVER 200 psi for time trial races
  • + 3
 Some people may need the high PSI, but a pump that reads up to say 60psi more accurately... I'd buy that right now
  • + 1
 Not really. I run 60psi on my dirt jumper.
  • + 2
 @ Enduro 27

Completely agree! this will not accurately pump up a shock, it is for TT tires that run very high pressure
  • + 1
 my pump doesn't read once you go under 20psi, gets a bit annoying when you're light and running tubeless or you're on your cross bike
[Reply]
  • + 10
 Do I need a different attachment for 26, 27.5 and 29ers. This will pump a 26er tire right, or should I be stocking up just in case they stop making 26 inch pumps?
  • + 10
 It will work for front 26" tires only, for rear tires you need the RP1.0 not the FP1.0 (for "front pump")
  • + 12
 they will not make different attachments, its a whole new pump....Don't worry, the 29er pump will be out soon. it's 3" taller and 3" wider for more stability and ease of use. The gauge has a clown face on it and the needle reads from "bad psi" to "good psi".
  • - 1
 what if I want to run tubes, is there an attachment that doesn't work for that procedure. I think I'll take my chances and wait until the carbon fiber titanium with 853 Reynolds valving computer controlled Geoff Kabush limited edition. Blue-tooth and Wi-Fi capable comes out. Saw at Euro bike in the Scott booth. Right beside the great customer service from a Cannondale dealer, WTF, why would you stock, SI crank spacers or left SI hub dust covers, ohhh had no room cus of the limited edition pumps. right. but I got a bunch of headshock dampers, rant over.
[Reply]
  • + 8
 Has a handle and gauge. 5 stars.
Won't take presta properly? It's sucking the big one.
[Reply]
  • + 4
 Just when I think pink bikers can't over-analyze anything else along comes all this. I thought buying a pump with a pressure gauge was fancy.. I still sqeeze the tire with my hand before i disconnect the pump.. People complaining about PSI accuracy and durability and blah blah. What do you clowns do when you pump up your tires in your Airconditioned house and then go outside in 90 degree weather and your psi gets out of whack? I don't use a pump I just ask the first over thinking bike geek I see what psi he runs then shove the valve in his face while he spews hot air and inflates my tire.. I usually have to let some air out after.
[Reply]
  • + 3
 I have a $15 floor pump with a dual head and analog pressure gauge that has been working just fine since forever... which idiot thought to take an excellent pre-existing concept, ruin it, then charge $130 for it!? I lol in their general direction
  • + 4
 how long will that $15 pump last? you ever stop to consider that bike shops also use hand pumps. or bike rental places. business or people that pump up dozens of tires a day, every single day? you think a $15 pump will last more than one month there? just because you have no need for a high end/metal construction pump does not mean that nobody else in the entire world does not have that need.
  • + 0
 err, its lasted me years, and the bike shop I bought it from has been using one for ages too... basically there's just nothing that can go wrong with it, but even so you can buy a metal one with a lever type engagement for $50 if you really wanted
  • + 2
 At the shop I work at we inflate literally hundreds of tires a day and a budget pump does not cut it. We have tried many cheaper pumps all failing quickly, now we settled on a spesh air tool pro $100 legit pump and have used it for years, i even bought one for my house because it is nice to know that my home pump will outlast my bike
[Reply]
  • + 2
 the o-rings in the valve head need to be lubricated from time to time as well ... not just the pump air piston. my old shock pump used to do the same thing with pretty much every shock that had a threaded schrader valve (even ones secured with threadlock), untill i said it's a conspiracy and added generous amounts of ptfe grease.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Lets review something interesting. We have all used a bike pump since Christ was a cowboy. If a pump can't pump then it's not a pump, it's a paper weight. $15-20 will buy a nice pump to put air in your "bike tires" don't give a shit if it can blow air in your Swedish sled. Review what we can afford - Show us useful parts, bikes, equipment. If I invest in a baller bike I probably don't have $130 left over for a pump. Think about it.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I owned a crankbrothers and shimano pumps, both expensive, poor air volume, poor quality and on the durability side. So I stick to our classic pump of $3 value!, no complaints, and even if it get lost is not a worry for $3.
At least a real mountain biker knows how to survive without a credit card on his camelback.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Bought a Portland Design Works Magic Flute a few years back. Thinking to myself, “perfect, a nice little handy pump.” But then came to realize that it's only great for flats when I'm out and about.
So I got me a Lezyne CNC Floor Drive. Let me tell you, nicest, smoothest floor pump I have ever owned. Compared to the Canadian Tire & Walmart sports pumps for the $45.00 price range, I will always choose my Lezyne Floor Drive.
In my opinion the others are manufactured poorly and lack strength. It seems the plastic always breaks, or seals leak after very little use. The length of hose always seem to be short as well.
Put good money forward and purchase a product that has a multiuse (shock pump), and will last with the option for rebuilding.
Some times It’s worth the money upfront. If I can assume, no one rides a SuperCycle. Same can be said with bike pumps and the sort.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Yes, it's just a floor pump but:

1) If you think the review is a waste of time, isn't posting about it too?

2) Any info about avoiding a frusting, overpriced piece of equipment is welcome news.

3) If Richard Cunningham wants to review a floor pump then that's the way it is, show some respect.

Personally I have a CT pump that's mediocre at best but $130 would buy a hell of a lot of CO2 that I can use on the trail. What you need if you're serious is a compressor, not a toy!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I don't get this man... the floor pump has essentially been the same since day one.

If you're going to make one... why not improve on it? Do something different. Making a sub par knock off of someone else's stuff is a pointless waste of resources. I have a bump in my garage right now that's been through a lot of moves, a lot of trips to the trails, dirty, abandoned, etc. It works every time like clock work and guess what... it looks a lot like this one.

Do something new. Do something better. Or don't do it at all.
[Reply]
  • + 4
 No mention of gauge accuracy or ability to be read at low psi? Its the 1st thing I'm interested in.
  • + 3
 No need to review that far when its obviously a failure...
[Reply]
  • + 2
 Never had any problems with the thread-on design of the lezyne pump; Which I must say, feels superior to any lever head pump, as the oring deteriorates quickly after a fair amount of use !
[Reply]
  • + 5
 Looks like a trek session.
  • + 2
 wkwkwkwkwkw
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Why...why would you ever spend more than what it takes to get a Nashbar L'Orange floor pump. $130 for a pump is absurd and the pump head on the Nashbar is better to boot. The L'Orange is by far the best floor pump for the dollar.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I don't understand why I would want to pay premium prices for tools that don't directly improve my actual riding experience. A cheap pump performs much the same, meaning I have money left over to spend on my actual bike.
  • + 5
 But if you need to deflate a presta tire you need this.
  • + 1
 Why? I must be missing something. What does this pump do that mine can't? Mine pumps up presta.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I use a joe blow and when the head died, i replaced with with their replacement head kit. The head is the best i've used and the pump has been going strong for about 5 years now, my only gripe is a flexible handle.
[Reply]
  • + 3
 I live in the town where Lezyne is based and the locals call it "Lezyning your valve core".

Pretty good products otherwise.
  • + 2
 Yup. My lezyne does the same dang thing.
  • + 2
 Get a floor pump with lever-actuated dual head compatibility and leave the overpriced models on the showroom floor.
  • + 1
 I agree for floor pumps the lever is superior. But the lezyne trail pump with the hose and thread on head is a god send when your fixing a flat on the trail. So much better than dealing with a pump where you have to stand and pump in awkward positions and I have seen noobs break off presta valves from getting too rowdy with those frame style pumps.
  • + 1
 Agreed, the Lezyne frame pump is awesome.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 Actually I'm using a ¥20 (about $4) supermarket pump and still feeling pretty good!
[Reply]
  • + 2
 Thanks PB for this honest and unbiased review .... saved a lot of people from buying a total lemon by the sound of it !!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 All my cheap pumps fail for want of a thread on head. I would like to buy just the head adtermaket to make my bell functional.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 In case of weak sales they will "invent" new standard of valve.
"Faster and lighter" than the previous... and World will never be the same.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 This seems like the most tedious waffle of a forced article. Concisely it could be put as 'It puts air in your tyres, and money out your wallet'
  • + 3
 And prevents us all from wasting money on it. Not a single person who reads the review will purchase it now. Job done...
[Reply]
  • + 3
 I dont have anymore kidneys to sell...
[Reply]
  • + 1
 When will a company bring out a pump with a gauge that doesn't go up to 4 million psi?

I need an accurate gauge up to 90 psi.
  • + 2
 1) buy a pump without gauge
2)buy a gauge with the range you need
3) add some pipes between pump, gauge and the valve head
4) you have the pump you need!
  • + 2
 That's the thing tho. After dropping good coin on a nice pump you should not have to change bits. I have a lovely floor drive leyzene pump with a silly gauge. Looked at every floor drive available before I bought it too. Just saying, I ride DH, DJ and BMX like most peeps on here. I don't need a roadie gauge.
  • + 4
 I don't need gauge. Because whatever the pressure in my tire, I never know if i'ts the good one or not... so I adjust with a 5-fingers-manual-gauge, and after I don't care anymore. (I'm not a good rider so if the pressure is perfect I can't see the change)
[Reply]
  • + 2
 Kashima coating price hahaha
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I use a U.S.S.R. pump which is 30 years old and it can beat that peace of "art".
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Ive had the same norco bike pump since I was born, not planning on upgrading anytime soon.
  • + 2
 the hand one? i had the same, until i left it on my truck bumper one time
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I got my pump from pound world, no surprises it was £1, it works, the end.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 so when do special 29er and 650b pumps come out!ha!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Joe blow works just fine thanks .
[Reply]
  • + 1
 $130 USD just for a pomp? are you kidding me
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Think I'll stick to my £7.99 halfords track pump Smile
[Reply]
  • + 1
 130 bucks....... life time waranty?
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I dont have a pump
[Reply]
  • + 1
 My shaft is polished
  • + 1
 Hand polished?
[Reply]
  • - 1
 For that money it better accept Stans milk.
[Reply]

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