Tested: Scott Genius LT 27.5 Review

Sep 16, 2013
by Jordan Carr  
 
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TESTED
Scott
Genius LT 27.5

WORDS Jordan Carr
PHOTOS Tal Roberts

As one of the first brands to publicly announce the exclusion of 26” wheel options from their trail and cross-country line ups, Scott has indicated just how much they believe in the larger 27.5" and 29" wheel formats. Their popular big travel trail bike, the Genius LT, is the longest travel 27.5" option from Scott and its redesigned platform is claimed to make it a quiver-killing bike that can do it all. But with its 170mm of travel and a 28 pound weight, how does this bike perform as a versatile go-to bike?


Genius LT 27.5 Details

• Intended use: all-mountain
• Revised suspension platform with dual-travel FOX Nude shock
• 170mm travel front/rear, rear reduces to 135mm in 'Traction Control' mode
• 66.3° head angle (in open setting)
• SRAM X01 drivetrain
• 27.5" wheels
• Weight: 27.33lb (claimed), 28.2lb (actual)
• MSRP: $7599.99 USD


Genius LT Construction Details

The clean looking Genius LT, with its full carbon HMX frame and red and orange colour matched components, is definitely an eye catcher out on the trail. The frame itself is constructed using 200 individual pieces, a molding process that differs from traditional carbon monocoque frames. This technique allows Scott to build a more consistent frame even while utilizing the mass production process, but the technology doesn’t come cheap or easy.



As the self proclaimed "carbon experts" of the bike industry, Scott set out to create a revolutionary trail bike with the 2013 Genius LT. It combines some interesting engineering points in both the frame’s construction and its suspension design, with hundreds of hours of design and build time spent to give this bike its versatility. At first glance, substantial tube junctions give the LT a capable look while simple aesthetics complement the bike’s clean lines. Sealed bearings keep the main pivots moving smoothly, while lightweight bushings are utilized in the seat and chain stay pivots. An easily adjustable suspension link allows a rider to swap geometry between a low and high position, allowing for a simple on trail adjustment to the head angle and the bottom bracket height, although it obviously isn't an on-the-fly sort of change. Up front, internally routed cables hide within the frame's top tube, cleaning up the would be rats-nest of cables and housing that come from the many levers and remotes perched atop the LT’s 35mm Syncros handlebar. "Industry standard" features like the 12 x 142mm DT Swiss axle, PressFit 30 bottom bracket shell, and an internally routed RockShox Reverb Stealth keep it compatible with most current market components.




Climbing

Probably one of the LT's best attributes is its readiness to ascend, and whether it's short punchy climbs or hour-long dirt road slogs, the Genius makes it happen, climbing remarkably well with some help from the bike's remote actuated FOX CTD system. The proprietary, FOX manufactured, Scott developed NUDE rear shock features a mix of Scott specific technology and stock components, making the shock easily serviceable at any FOX repair depot. The 3-stage CTD system features all the benefits of FOX's CTD system but with a few important distinctions - there is an additional, internally housed second air chamber that allows the shock to adjust travel on the fly. Up front, a custom FOX 34 Float Factory CTD has been lengthened to 170mm from the fork's standard 160mm platform.


These significant tweaks allow for a versatile suspension platform with easy travel adjustment between the bike's plush 170mm descend mode and its two more efficient 130mm travel traction and climbing modes. The 34 Float features all the same characteristics of the CTD FIT damper, while the rear shock includes some beneficial changes in its two middle modes. In 'Descend' mode, the shock's two air chambers are set wide open. But a flip of the easily actuated Twin-loc remote adjusts the shock first into 'Traction-Control' mode, which kept the shock supple though ramping up the compression a bit and reducing its travel to 130mm by closing the additional air chamber. A further push of the thumb-actuated remote adjusts the shock and fork in to its 'Climb' mode, where travel remains at 130mm but adds the stiffer low-speed compression of FOX's CTD 'Climb' option. These three distinct suspension options made the 170mm Genius LT more of a pleasure on almost any type of climb than many other 150-170mm travel bikes.

Traction and Climb modes offered noticeable benefits when climbing while being quickly and easily accessible on the fly. Traction-Control mode made rolling, rocky climbs manageable by allowing just enough damping and travel to keep the rear wheel planted while still offering enough of a platform for efficient power transfer when needed. Climb mode offered an even more efficient feel while still offering just enough damping to keep the bike on track over rough and loose terrain. The ability to switch modes on the fly was a welcome perk that we came to truly appreciate when putting the bike through a 30 mile cross-country race with 3,000ft of climbing. We found the long and low geometry offered a comfortable, proficient feel on long gravel road climbs, while still offering a good amount of maneuverability on slow technical climbs. If climbing efficiency is important for your trail bike, the Genius LT offered one of the more efficient platforms we have tested, especially for a bike with up to 170mm of travel.



Descending

During the first few rides on the Genius, its downhill capabilities were less than satisfying, and seemed to lay hidden beneath the bike's low and long geometry, but we eventually found the sweet spot with the bike's setup after an initial getting to know each other period. At first, we figured the bike's low setting would offer the most benefit for our riding style, although extensive time in both high and low settings proved that the high mode, with its slightly taller, steeper geometry, offered the versatility and predictability that we were looking for.


In the high mode, the LT features a 1175.4mm wheelbase, which was noticeably longer than similar trail bikes we have ridden lately. This added length provided nice stability at high speeds, but also created a much slower steering and less flickable feel through tight terrain. The low mode offered an even longer feel, and while only adding a millimeter to the bike's wheelbase it slackens out the head tube angle to 66.3-degrees and lowers the bottom bracket another 5.8mm, adding to the bike's already sluggish feeling steering characteristics. Though some riders may prefer this long, slack feel in a trail bike, we found it lacked a certain personality we craved from a long wheel based 170mm travel trail bike. We also found that the Nude shock, which was an amazing asset on uphill or rolling terrain, lacked both the plushness and the linear spring rate we lusted after in a 170mm travel bike. All told, the Genius LT isn't a terrible descender by any stretch of the imagination, but we would have to say that it doesn't tear up the downhills like most 170mm travel bikes.


Technical Terrain

After finding ourselves struggling through rolling terrain on other 160mm+ trail bikes, the Genius was a breath of fresh air; pairing its efficient suspension platform with the larger diameter 27.5” wheels, the bike was a great pedaller. On trails that were constantly changing from ascending to descending the bike's great efficiency and quick on-the-fly adjustments made such sections much more enjoyable, even when trying to keep up with buddies on pure cross-country rigs. Although the Genius LT is not quite a rocket ship on rolling terrain, it did give us a new level of appreciation of the bike's overall capabilities as a do it all machine.

With the Twin-loc remote set in its mid, Traction Mode setting, and the Reverb Stealth set comfortably in the middle of its travel, the Genius came to life, bobbing and weaving through progressively more difficult terrain without skipping a beat. Stomping on the pedals it was efficient, relatively maneuverable, and surprisingly capable, even in 130mm travel mode. We found the stiffer platform of Traction mode made the LT feel lively and efficient, unlike the 170mm beast it really is. Pairing the in-between 27.5" wheel size with high volume front and rear specific tires kept momentum and traction nicely through transitions and ledgey moves at low speeds, while the relatively low bottom bracket and longer chain stays kept the riders weight centered nicely over the both wheels, but also made pedal strikes more of a concern.


Component Check

Our Genius LT Test bike was outfitted with SRAM’s XX1 eleven speed drivetrain, which has quickly become the go-to group for many high-end trail bikes. For production, the Genius LT Tuned 700 will see a full X01 spec package to keep price as reasonable as possible. Up front, the cockpit features colour matched 35mm bar and stem from Scott's house brand, Syncros, that offered a super stiff, point-and-shoot feel that is a welcome addition when the trail gets rough. Like the spec on most high-end trail bikes, a Reverb Stealth makes on the fly seat adjustment simple while still providing a clean look without any extra cable that could rub on the rear tire or your leg. Stopping power comes in the form of Shimano's XTR Trail brakes, which have quickly become the most popular and most reliable high-end trail brake on the market. For the wheels, Syncros partnered up with DT Swiss and plenty of DT's newest technologies show through in the colour matched hoops. A new nipple and washer technology is said to create a stronger interface between spoke and rim, while the new Spline One hub design paired with DT’s durable star-ratchet freehub system make for a lightweight, durable trail wheel. Overall, the build on the Tuned 700 model Genius LT is exactly how many trail riders would build a bike from the frame up, making it a great choice for riders looking for out-of-the-box performance, but it doesn’t come cheap.


• Schwalbe tires: Top-dollar Schwalbe tires mate the Genius with the dirt like a cold beer after a bike ride. Up front the tried and true 2.3'' Hans Dampf offers enough volume to give the confidence needed to tackle uber technical terrain, and the rounded tread pattern isn’t too slow rolling for all day epics with sustained climbing. In the rear, the new Rock Razor tire in a 2.2'' width offers a minimalist center tread paired with aggressive side knobs, creating a perfect balance between climbing traction and downhill cornering. We did find the 2.2'' tire in the rear to be a little lower volume than we would prefer when it was set up on the softer side, though.

• Reverb Stealth: Hard to really call it a trail bike without a dropper post, and the Reverb Stealth rounds out this sleek build nicely.

• e-Thirteen chain guide: Probably overkill with the SRAM XX1’s chain management system, but when ridden at the level the Genius LT was designed, extra peace of mind is always welcome, especially in any type of race situation. As expected, we never dropped a chain, and there were no rubbing or setup issues to report.

• XTR Trail brakes: Immensely powerful, predictable, and always reliable, Shimano's XTR Trail brakes were the icing on the cake. Their consistent power and comfortable lever feel made going fast on the LT the obvious option.



Pinkbike's take:
bigquotesIf a you are looking for a do-it-all trail bike and are coming from a cross-country background, the Genius LT is a solid big travel option. Its balanced feel, long wheelbase and remote actuated suspension adjustment make it a winner for riders looking to ride a long travel machine and still keep up with their buddies who may be on lighter, shorter travel bikes. And although there are options with similar travel that can descend quicker and with a more confident feel, the Genius LT makes up any lost ground when the terrain starts to include rapid elevation changes that allow its clever Nude shock to work to its potential. - Jordan Carr


www.scott-sports.com
Must Read This Week

111 Comments

  • + 82
 I was expecting more from this bike. Basically, what's the point in lugging 170mm uphill, no matter how good it climbs, if in the end its going to be outclassed on the descend by more aggressive shorter travel bikes?
And without the carbon errythang + xx1 + xtr it is gonna suck on the uphill as well.
From what I read in this review the bike is a miss, looks sexy but not remotely worth the money.
  • + 11
 Every review I read of Scott trail bikes is always the same. They just dont ever seem to cut it on the descents.
  • + 4
 I had the 2012 Genius LT 40 with 180mm travel. I pedaled really well and descended awesome. But it wasnt worth the dough and the extra travel didnt make a difference. Now i have a 2013 Tracer 26 with 160 and it rides better than any bike i've ever had.
  • + 12
 Id rather get a jekyll. 90 and 150 seems way more realistic and practical than 135 and 170.
  • + 11
 "its downhill capabilities were less than satisfying" stopped reading after this. a 170x170 bike should go better down than up. wrong emphasis was used here. you can keep your fancy gimmicks and custom shocks and forks and on the fly travel adjust levers...

its a shame - i was really looking forward to reviews on this bike
  • + 3
 "As one of the first brands to publicly announce the exclusion of 26” wheel options from their trail and cross-country line ups." Jesus f*cking Christ we just do right off with it then huh?.....whats happening here?
  • + 1
 It's good to see they've reduced the travel slightly from the previous incarnation. Only 2 weeks ago I almost bought a new 2012 LT40 (old stock) with 185mm travel, and then realised that I really didn't need 185mm travel. When I ride DH, I use a DH bike. I ended up buying a 2013 Reign 1 which I think was the right decision. This new Genius LT does look pretty slick though, I'll give them that.
  • + 3
 There is nothing wrong with the old Genius LT being at 185 travel. The bike pedals great, it does have great enduro geometry and it can take any obstacles it does met. If you are looking for one bike for everything, and most of the people are looking just for that, the old Genius LT is pretty close to the goal.
I can understand why the left the Equalizer shock despite shock was working great, but leaving the 26" wheel size at that travel range was a really stupid move for me.
  • + 7
 idk, I'd rather have an SB66, given what I've read about both these bikes
  • + 5
 mnorris122: Sir I agree with you 100%. For what I´ve read about the SB66, it´s really a super bike, going up, and down. It´s not a coincidence that Jared Graves got third place on the DH Worlds using the SB66c.
  • + 1
 Joey Schusler came first in US collegiate dual slalom, DH, AND XC using it
  • + 1
 Bummer about this bike, I was stoked on it. 180mm plus is great if there is no weight penalty, unfortunately they apparently failed to make it descend like it has that much travel so big fail there for Scott. I will continue on my air-shocked 2010 Bighit with ProPedal and Talas 180 until I can afford a Liteville.
  • + 2
 Please go ride a SB66 before you believe anything online or what pro rides it......the sb66 rides terrible downhill.
  • + 1
 .....did you even see anything about the world champs, or have you been under a rock for 3 weeks....
  • + 4
 Like I said. Go ride one yourself. Don't worry about Jared graves or what he can do on it!
  • + 2
 Well, the fact that he can podium at a DH race on it says something about it. It's not about the bike, but at the same time, it kinda is about the bike...
  • + 4
 SB75 > SB66
  • + 2
 @SileTzar: You will have to ride it it think...it schould be in the Bikeshops by now, so try it out. You will realize, that it aint so bad after all..except for the price of course...but that's the state of the market...it will go even higher as long as we are willing to pay so much money for the product.:-)

Ako nemozes poskusit biciklu kod vas, dodzi do nas. Kod nas ga vec mozes poskusit. :-)
  • + 1
 I would love to try a sb75. I love seeing Yeti getting credits on a Scott review. 1 "3" Yeti
  • + 1
 Curtiso. The sb66 rides great up and downhill, but it's not a bike for everyone. The geometry is really designed for an aggressive dh rider and not for your everyday rider. I have numerous friends who ride them as ie personally ridden one and it felt great; however, I've heard casual riders talk about how they don't like them because of the low bb and slack head tube
  • + 1
 C'mon guys this review is only an opinion of a few if not one test rider not from a general mountain bike populace who owns this bike...give it a year on production and we'll see the feedbacks of those have ridden this bike on the trails for a longer time then we can judge on how this bike really performs.
  • + 2
 My Covert got a bad review here, but I freaking love it! You can trust someone, or you can ride it and see for yourself..
  • + 2
 They never said it descended poorly. They noted it descended more like a DH bike.,it wants to go straight and fast. The geo is almost the same as my DH bike, and that is how it rides. Slacker and lower = less agility.
[Reply]
  • + 61
 Engineered for climbing...single pivot. Engineered for downhill...harsh suspension. Engineered with best carbon and components money can buy...still 28lbs. Mediocrity for every discipline can be yours, for the low price of $7600. Call today!
  • + 5
 Yeah seems like a joke and the Scott engineers think they can throw any bike together and people will go gaga over it.
  • + 5
 Common misbelief that carbon is made only to be lighter. granted it can be but the greater advantage is that it is stiffer than an aluminum bike.
  • + 6
 You don't see 170mm weighing in at 28 lbs...No one else does this except for Scott; they've engineered a bike w/ a definite competitive advantage.
  • + 4
 170 mm that descends like shit is a competitive advantage?
  • + 3
 My Ibis Mojo HD W/170 Float up front weighs 28.2 pounds. It's carbon, has a normal shock, and I use it on 30 mile XC rides & downhill runs. I am also in the process of converting it to 650b. It goes up and down with confidence. No fancy gimmicks, endless set-up options. It makes an average rider like me descend like a champ.
[Reply]
  • + 8
 Although the reviews reading lately are all precise and explanatory i would like to see a list with every pinkbike's rider pick for enduro /xc /downhill etc as far as performance and as far as value or low budget bikes .So every rider sould pick one or two bikes and explain why in 2 or three lines.I think that would be interesting (although i already feel that bad advertisment is something always happening).

*I know that terrain plays a huge role but remember that a lot of people (like me riding a 90's steel rigid singlespeed)can't spend thousands of dollars on new bikes and are looking for smart and economic choices . All these reviews for guys like me always leave asking myself if the tester had that money what would he buy this or the one from yesterday's test
* excuse my english
[Reply]
  • + 7
 i feel the same way as some people has commented expected more from it, but t I remeber on an interview with the scott guys they said the bike was thought for the swiss alps. riding them myself and from what i read in this review, the bike does seems like the perfect trans alp bike.
  • + 5
 This..I'm not saying it was not tested in it's proper environment, cause i don't know where it was tested, but this bike is euro-trenduro race machine, with that slack HA it needs mountains!
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  • + 8
 I really like this bike. If only it was cheaper... but then again, it is top of the game, so probably meant to be expensive. Still would love to ride one.
[Reply]
  • + 6
 Kind of surprising that they are using the Fox 34 platform at 170, surely you would want the 36? For a bike meant for such burly terrain, although I guess it would just add to the heft!
  • + 1
 Less than 200g...
  • + 3
 No Fox 36 for 650B Wheels.
  • + 1
 That certainly explains it...lol
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  • + 5
 Has anyone actualy ridden this Bike? I have and i can say that the guy that Tested this bike didn't do it on a track that this bike is built for. Thats proper, Alpine style single track and steep rocky downhill. Ive ridden one (Genius LT 710 2014), and i am inpresed by the plushnes of the suspension and the stability in technical terain. I own a Specialized Enduro 2009 with 170 mm fork and i think that this bike is way more nible than my bike. I probably don't have to mention that it climbs a lot faster...so please...ride it, and than make a comment about it...:-)
[Reply]
  • + 5
 "And although there are options with similar travel that can descend quicker and with a more confident feel, the Genius LT makes up any lost ground when the terrain starts to include rapid elevation changes that allow its clever Nude shock to work to its potential"

What's the point of a 170mm travel bike if it's a shit descender? IMO 170mm for 27.5 wheels is overkill Scott should have made the genius 140 and the LT 160mm. At least that way you are not stuck with fox and you put a ccdb air and some pikes or xfusion suspension on it so it actually rides better! I can see the attraction of all the adjustability in suspension but id simply rather have something that just works all the time.

170mm travel, 66deg HA and 27.5" wheels no wonder it feels "sluggish". 170mm, 66deg HA and 26" wheel with all the shock travel options on the other hand???!!! This bike is designed with the wrong wheel size if you ask me.....

The bike is sexy as f*ck but just missed a trick it seems.
  • + 2
 Steep fast trails - alps. yo. But most people don't got that kind of terrain. haven't ridden one self though, just my guess.
[Reply]
  • + 7
 Just waiting for the "looks like a Stumpjumper" comments
  • - 12
 No bro, it looks like a session.
  • - 14
 Actually looks like a Foes Shaver with two extra puny bearings and a vietnamese made plastic sweat shop frame at double the price and two years late. Scott hardly cutting edge and its a crime to be boring, nowadays.
  • + 4
 No it doesn't.
  • + 1
 Yes it does. Squeeze your eyes ;-)
  • + 3
 Squeeze my eyes shut? ^_^
  • + 1
 If it helps?
  • + 2
 Doesn't look like a Stumpy at all. Looks like a Camber.
  • - 1
 Soapbardesign - boring and so 2009.
  • + 4
 @wakaba, you clearly have a disdain for anything made in Asia... Have you seen their factory? Have you seen any Asian bike factories? I have, and many are cleaner and more worker friendly than things found in Europe, especially eastern Europe and even Italy. The carbon technology is there, which is a major reason for their location there.
  • - 6
 No, I have a disdain for overpriced and underdeveloped and underperforming products that do not show iterative design development and are made of a material that is environmentally very problematic. I ride an alu US-made dh-bike with most parts not made in Asia - its a blast. Best dh-bike ever, and I had a couple of top notch bikes.I ride a road race bike, brand new 1985 old stock, 100% percent italian lugged handmade Columbus frame with full Campy - even hubs and rims. This rides way better than my latest carbon supper dupper road racer. The carbon racer sucks.

Infrastructure for carbon might be situated in Vietnam and Taiwan - who cares - they churn out inferior products. Your argument is very shortsighted.
  • + 1
 making a blanket statement that says all Asian products are inferior is probably the most shortsighted argument I have ever heard. My Taiwanese frame has outlasted and out performed my previous USA-made bike. But I know that there are some amazing USA-made bikes, and also some not so good Taiwanese builds. Ride quality and performance doesn't depend on where the bike is made, just how it is made.
  • + 1
 @wakaba

would like to see your roadie.
[Reply]
  • + 3
 I'm disappointed with the Scott offerings...The bikes somehow just don't have the "omg" factor they used to have. The brand is getting kinda boring IMHO.
For this kind of buck I expect something completely amazing.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 It's always interesting to read so many different comments from experts who never rode this bike.
There are so many setup options on todays full suspension bikes that can make a big difference in how the bike performs to your riding style, even the tire setup (tires, air pressure, rim width) can make a big difference in how a bike feels on the trail. I rode a 2012 Genius LT 10 for two years and i loved it, especially downhill, i even used it in bike parks riding with my friends an it never was an issue to follow ore escape different downhill bikes, and even on 2-3 m drops the bike gave a lot of confidence.
I hat the chance to try the LT tuned 2014 for half a day. I tested it with more SAG on the rear suspension, as i do on most on my bikes and i liked the performance downhill very much. I also tried a Specialized S-Works Enduro, a Liteville 601, a Liteville 301 and a Rotwild E1. The Liteville bikes are promotet like crazy in european magazins but for me they felt not very nice, the S-Works had a great rear suspension but the whole geometry of the bike did not fit for me, the E1 was great on downhill but very heavy and for all round use to slow uphill. the new Genius LT turned out to be my favorite, it felt great in every situation, playful, light, perfect geometry fit and so on i really loved it from the start.

Reviews are good but only a short cut, in this case of only one person.

So i think the only way to find out if a bike fits for you and especially for your body geometry and riding style is testing it, if possible on different terrain and not only on the parking lot!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 So....this is a playful bike if you keep it in the 130 mode, otherwise, it's sluggish. I appreciate the honesty. I test rode one of the aluminum versions of the same bike and also thought the word sluggish came to mind - and unnecessarily complicated...and limited...and heavy (the aluminum version). pass...
[Reply]
  • + 2
 I see a lot of haters about this bike. I actually like it. The only problem is price. I'm not gonna spend close to $8k when I can get that new Trek fuel 29er that was reviewed for about half the price!
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  • + 2
 With so many Scott dealers almost over taking Trek and Specialized. I don't see any reason in purchasing this bike. The 2014 Trek 27.5 Remedy and Slash seem to be much better bikes on cost and engineering.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Idk about the FOX 34 fork at 170mm, seems like having that much leverage on a 34 chassis may cause the "Wet noodle feel"
Reminds me of my old fox 32 150mm, that thing was the flexiest fork I'd ever ridden, and because of that the handling characteristics were very inconsistent
time will tell
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I believe they chose 170mm because of the 27.5" wheel size. Last years Genius LT was 180mm. It's nice to have 170mm for what it's main purpose is and it does cost less in weight.

I think most people are hating due to the very high price.

I want this bike so bad but it's something I'll never be able to afford...unless I start selling shit.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 Solid review! Sounds like the rear isn't too plush..similar reviews for the 150mm 700 genius. I want a similar review on the gt force please.
[Reply]
  • + 0
 Float X and a 180 Talas seem like they could be a better fit, less cables and knobs and work better.
And I DO MEAN RUN 26's in THERE!!!!!
What are you looking at funny?...... I LOVE LOW LOW Bottom Brackets.
Bring your hate. Im headed to the Garage!
  • + 0
 Im serious! this is a 26 wheeled bike!!!! with the wrong fork and shock on it!
[Reply]
  • + 4
 This test is one man's opinion.
[Reply]
  • + 4
 Don't worry Scott we don't love you either. - Tall People
[Reply]
  • + 4
 was hoping for more "wow factor" in the review...
  • + 2
 so you'd rather read something written by marketing department, not something by the actual test person?
  • + 8
 I think it's implied that he wishes the bike offered the excitement rather than people fabricating the excitement.
  • + 2
 I totally agree and was expecting more from this bike. Trek 27.5 Slash and Remedy look like much better bikes for less of a cost.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I still want it, infact mine will be here next month, so says the dealer. Should fit in great next to the 2013 Gambler 10 and Voltage TMO in the garage.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 No, but stated in a way that if Fox could get a 34/170 platform going, they may ditch the 36...much in the same way that the Lyrik 35mm/170 will replace the 180 Totem.
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  • + 1
 As to article details... i would like to know what size was tested and of the claimed/actual weight, was the based without pedals and the actual included pedals ?
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  • + 2
 wow... my 2012 specialized stumpjumper fsr comp weighs 27 pounds, all stock parts.. and its $2700! haha
[Reply]
  • + 3
 Pinkbike needs to clearly indicate the size of the tested bikes.
  • + 1
 Bike tested and weighed was a Medium.
  • + 1
 Was it on a low or high BB Setting?
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  • + 1
 When are people going to finally start saying that when you can buy a new car for the same price as a push bike its too expensive?
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  • + 2
 28LBS and 170mm. I question the durability of this bike. I would never spend $7500 on a bike with durability concerns.
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  • + 1
 I ve tried it and i love it I could change my Spe for this versatile bike!!!! Ben if you listenin to me !!!!!! Ahaha
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  • + 2
 Love these bikes, I have the 2012 genius lt and absolutely love it!
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  • + 2
 this frame is screaming "Float X i'm here for you!"
  • + 3
 Just a shame it wont fit
  • + 2
 yeah...has the nude shock a particular lenght? if it's standard,then you can put the float x upside down...
  • + 1
 good point, I always thought the nude shocks were something odd, so you could swap it but it would adjust the geo somewhat
  • + 1
 ah that's good, but then you don't have the travel adjust function, and once you have lost that, then you might as well look at any other 170mm travel beastie...
  • + 2
 170mm trail bikes are a rare breed, hence the ability to be able to swap out the shock for something with more guts is appealing...
  • + 3
 Have a look at alutech fanes. Less money, more gnar, more travel. Big Grin 175 ftw. Big Grin

Oh, and many german brands have something that's called Super Enduro bikes (170-190) mm travel bikes (Radon Swoop, Liteville 601, Nicolai Helius AM, Alutech Fannes Enduro, Votex SX etc etc...)
  • + 1
 My 2008 Intense has 170 mm travel and is a trail bike, rest of the bike world is just catching up.
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  • + 1
 Sheep in Wolf's clothing!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
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  • + 1
 Now i dont know if i want this bike............
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  • + 1
 I think it's time for Carbon nanotube bikes. Scott - I'm looking at you !
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  • + 1
 Its funny how all reviews of this bike say that it is an awful descender.
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  • + 1
 Adjustable travel seems a little gimmicky
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  • + 1
 looks gorgeous. too bad about the poor performance and rediculous price.
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  • + 1
 Compared to 2012 or 2013 Scott Genius LT, which one you'd say is better?
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Sorry still 26 all day.
  • + 21
 "Blah blah blah I'm completed biased and came here just to comment that I'm completely biased"
  • - 12
 26 inch bikes are the only bikes
  • + 9
 So 16 inched wheel cars are the only cars amiright? BMX bikes aren't bikes, road bikes aren't bikes, not even Jackson Goldstone rides a bike then; great logic there!
  • + 2
 This ^^^
  • - 1
 Actually highwall 16 inch truck wheels work extremely well. Sort of a good ratio.
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  • + 0
 170mm Fox 34? Fox 180 36 fans be afraid...be very afraid.
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  • + 1
 White Balance.
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  • - 2
 Oh sweet, I was wondering when Specialized was going to get into the 650b game...oh wait...
  • + 0
 At least FSR has the rear pivot in the right place to make the rear suspension plush and active. Why do so many feel compelled to say "looks like a _____ ?" Seems this bike looks as much like a Santa Cruz or a Yeti ASR as it does a Specialized if you are going to ignore pivot locations. Looks like a bike to me.
  • + 2
 Look man, all I'm talking about is how the bike looks. If that's unclear then I'm sorry. Don't read too far into it.
[Reply]

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