Thomson Dropper Post - Eurobike 2012

Aug 29, 2012 at 6:19
Aug 29, 2012
by Mike Levy  
 
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Thomson Elite Dropper Details

• Telescoping seat post
• 5''/127mm drop (internally adj. to 4'')
• Infinitely adjustable travel
• Hydraulic internals
• Nitrogen return spring (not adjustable)
• Lever-adjustable return speed
• Weight: 450g (prototype)
• Availability: March/April 2013
• Projected MSRP $380

Thomson stirred up a hornet's nest of activity when they teased riders with a few quick photos of their upcoming telescoping seat post on their Facebook page a few months back, but no other information was available at the time. Fast forward to Eurobike and they were showing off the new post, dubbed the 'Elite Dropper', in their booth, which we made our first stop of the show. The post is still in the early prototyping stage, with only a few functioning samples in the wild at this point.

The Elite Dropper offers 5"/127mm of infinitely adjustable travel, meaning that it can be positioned anywhere between and full extension fully lowered . The travel is controlled with a sealed cartridge (it can be worked on by a service center, though) that separates the post's hydraulic oil from the non-adjustable nitrogen return spring that is set at 135psi. Thomson has employed a clever second check valve within the cartridge that keeps the post from pulling up through its travel when lifting the bike by the saddle, thereby remedying a somewhat annoying trait of some other hydraulically controlled posts.

While it looks as if Thomson has refined existing dropper post technology rather than reinventing it, they have done something completely different to eliminate any side to side saddle wiggle from the Elite Dropper. Rather than use multiple keyways to keep the round stanchion from rotating, an interesting sixteen-point shaft - that fits within a matching sixteen-point profile within the outer tube - is attached to the bottom of the stanchion. This requires assembly to involve sliding in the stanchion from above, then threading the sixteen-
point section into place through the bottom of the outer tube, followed by screwing the silver bottom cap onto the bottom. This layout allows Thomson to utilize traditional round bushings from Norglide to keep the post's travel smooth, although the upper, stationary bushing sports a custom finish to further enhance the post's movement.

Thomson is being very clear about one thing: reliability is the focus of the new dropper post. They are aiming to have the Elite Dropper trump everything else on the market when it comes to longevity, a goal that will likely make the Thomson post a favorite among riders if fulfilled given how unreliable most current designs are.


Thomson Elite Dropper post

Head-mounted actuation The Elite Dropper's actuation arm is located on the side of its two-bolt head (that features the very same rail clamp as used on their standard seat posts), with a bolt-on cable stop and arm that is pulled on by a standard shift cable. Hidden from view within the post's head, the actuation arm pushes down on a plunger located at the top of the cartridge, thereby opening the oil port and allowing the post to stroke through its travel. Interestingly, Thomson allows riders to choose from varying rebound speeds despite its shift cable actuation thanks to a cam design on the plunger that determines the amount of oil flow allowed when engaged - pushing the lever completely through its travel will result in a faster return speed than if the rider only depresses it partway. While we didn't get to try the system on a bike, it should allow riders to easily find those partially dropped positions.


Thomson Elite Dropper post

Remote or under seat Two activation options will be available, allowing riders to pick from either a remote or under-the-seat lever. While still likely to receive some minor changes before production begins, the lever employs an ultra-slim footprint that easily fits between the other controls on your bar, as well as being hinged for simple installation and removal. The under-the-seat lever is likely going to be less popular than the remote, but using it will reduce bar clutter, if that is a concern. It is bolted to the same mounting location as the remote actuation arm, and pushes the cartridge's plunger down in the same way when pulled.


Thomson Elite Dropper post

Thomson Elite Dropper post

Hydraulic cartridge Thomson isn't shy about admitting that the Elite Dropper's cartridge is outsourced to another company; they wanted to focus on the machined structure and design of the post and let a team with experience in hydraulics design take care of the internals. The hydraulic oil is held within the upper section of the cartridge (right), with the activation plunger at the very top. At the bottom is the nitrogen chamber that is pressurized to 135psi. This pressure is not adjustable, something that many riders have used in the past to adjust their seat post's return speed, simply because the cam design on the plunger allows the user to select rebound speed by how far the lever is pushed.


Thomson Elite Dropper post

Non-adjustable nitrogen The Elite Dropper's outsourced internals are laser etched at the bottom of the post (left), including the nod to its Norglide bushings and Motul oil. The threaded silver bottom cap (right) allows access to the post's internals, while a specially-shaped plug at its center keeps users from letting the nitrogen gas escape accidentally.


Thomson X4 stem with carbon faceplate

Thomson also had a few other goodies on display, including an X4 stem that was fitted with a carbon fiber faceplate. How much weight does it save? Likely very little, but it sure does look rad.


Thomson prototype QR

They also had a neat seat binder tool that uses a magnetic 4mm hex wrench. The production version (note the very roughly shaped handle - this was just a sample) will likely use a 4mm hex key with a strong magnet placed behind it, allowing the tool to be held securely to the seat clamp but still allow riders to pull it off quickly to use elsewhere on their bike.


bikethomson.com
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138 Comments

  • + 98
 I'll pay that kind of money because I know exactly what I get from Thomson. They're like Chris King of the seatpost world....works of perfection! Like the article said, they're not reinventing the dropper ;just perfecting it! Peace of mind is priceless!
  • + 11
 exactly, never been disapointed by the quality of their product!
  • + 2
 eeeeeexactly !!!
  • + 2
 Could not agree more Jhou! It's awesome to support such guys, good people giving jobs and caring about qualitae before money! Thomson go go go!
  • + 11
 All it needs is for the cable to be placed at the bottom of the post like the KS LEV! Knowing Thomson, I'm sure they'll figure it out.
  • + 4
 Like Chris King (hubs)...meaning you need a special tool kit to rebuild, bearing preload lock rings break, and it gets overhauled 3X more often than any other hub. Then there's the freewheeling drag. Uggh. Headsets and BBs work, but so do everybody elses.
  • + 1
 But CK has a 10 year warranty and the best customer service possible. Although my 110 headset has a 110 year warranty, just to spite CK.
  • + 3
 Anyone got a bad word to say about Thomson seatposts or stems? I certainly haven't.

BTW does anyone know of a seat dropper post that has a cushioning affect (like a height adjustable office chair) that would work to take the sting out of a hardtail?
  • + 1
 Perfecting it?... I don't know I'd say Rock Shox perfected my Reverb pretty darn well. Nothing bad to say about that one plus it has adjustable return speed which the thompson will not. Sorry guys but in my book the Reverb is still on top!
  • + 1
 Lemonade, funny you should mention that. When the hydraulics go on the KS posts it acts a bit like a suspension post too. Sadly it also means the post starts to slip and needs to be rebuilt. But there is a period of time when it works and gives at the same time, and it really worked great on my hard tail! I thought about writing them to try to marry the two options; dropper and suspension post. Of course if you could adjust it that would be ideal.

When post failed further I'd sit on it in the up position and slowly it would work it's way down again. It gave me another idea of a 'weight controlled post, where if you sat hard on it it would go down, then slowly come back up to height. It's essentially how the failure was functioning, Not sure how you'd fine tune that though, but it was kind of neat how the post self returned without pushing the button. Most of the time I use the post it's for a log, sharp corner, or a scary dip, and only on long descents do I want to lock it down.
  • - 6
 @ lemonade, i bent a thomson elite by coming up short on a jump, rode out of it and they wouldn't warranty it!
  • + 22
 @JoeyBatten

over the years, I have destroyed the most hardcore products from Easton, Deity, Race Face Diablous, Azonic, X-Lite, Kore, DMR, etc = anything can be broken in the "right" situation, the most important thing is how that products "fails". Does it injure you? Or does it allow you to stop riding safely?


Thomson designed their Elite seatpost to have a "bending fuse", which means the huge force you placed on your saddle caused it to bend, rather than suddenly snap like many lesser seat posts will in the same situation you faced

you'd be surprised at how large the force of a bad landing from height combined with your body weight applied through your saddle into the seat post can actually be?

of course, Thomson will not "warranty" their product because they know exactly the huge force it takes to bend their seatpost, and I understand that it sucks you then had to buy another seatpost rather than get a free one from Thomson

but this design feature of Thomson, allowed you to ride out of the problem and safely stop - there is nothing worse than a crash caused by a component failure, or by that failure actually injuring your body by having a jagged seatpost stab you in the rectum or thigh muscle Frown


Thomson are known for their superb engineering and design features, your post did its job in keeping you safe when you came up short. I have had the same situation as you, and actually snapped a Race Face seatpost leaving a jagged seat post shaft which thankfully did not injure me Smile
  • + 4
 I second hampsteadbandit. I almost had an Easton post make me more aerodynamic in the rear section when it snapped clean off and nearly impaled me. It did rip my shorts and boxers, though!
  • + 1
 ah that's classic joey Razz was holarious
  • + 0
 I will not be a guinea pig. Until now, they have been doing just a simple, good things in metal.
  • + 2
 this is made of metal and they've outsourced the hydraulics to a competent company .this will be my first dropper post.
  • + 1
 @skierdud89 did you read the whole article? "Thomson allows riders to choose from varying rebound speeds despite its shift cable actuation thanks to a cam design..." You can't make an adjustment to the return speed but you can control it based on how far you depress the lever.
  • + 2
 I've never understood why they can't just use a Fox Talas type of system in a seatpost. Even Fox don't use it in their post. Anyone know?
  • - 6
 @dmacrostie: yes I did read the whole article. Did you read my whole comment? I said that the Reverb has ADJUSTABLE rebound speed which the Thompson post will not, it will have VARYING. Meaning I can push my lever all the way and my seat will only rise as fast as the speed I have set. Let me know if the differences are too confusing for you. Wink
  • + 0
 Reverb is not as reliable as people make it out to be. Less than one season on it and I've already had to bleed it, rebuild it, then after neither worked, send it back for a new one.
  • + 1
 dirtbagluvin - my experience is only good with it (apart from soft poo, easy to break, piston on the lever), but I have to admit that most of the people I know running it, have troubles. However at least two of them are "reported" to run too little pressure, not as recommended in manual where it states clearly: 250PSI or overhaul/possible rebuild. But honestly I find Reverb and KS stuff nicest performing, Crank Bros - no comments, Command post and giants one are, mneh mneh, decent but not as good. In general it is a complicated piece of equipment, more parts more chances that something will go wrong if someone want a reliable stuff stick with normal post
  • + 3
 I owned a RS Reverb post on my Devinci Dixon for about 6 months and thoroughly enjoyed the experience, it hugely changed my riding style and allowed me to attack the terrain much more aggressively.

The only issue was caused by myself, I snagged my baggy Oakley shorts on the remote lever whilst standing to climb and snapped it clean off Frown


I was honest with SRAM about this problem, and they had the seatpost back to me within 4 days, fixed free of charge = very good back up


If Thomson's new post is anywhere near as good (or better) than Reverb then it will be a darn good product.

I always thought the best combination for a dropper post would be "Thomson post with Fox guts" Wink
  • + 1
 only drawback are color options...........................no green
  • + 1
 @madmon

its like Henry Ford with the original Ford Model T (automobile) all over again Wink


"any colour you like...as long as its black!"
  • + 1
 black works but GREEN is allways better. I adore tommy products and over 20 years now i never had one fail or "unhinge"
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  • + 12
 Magnetic allen wrenches? Brilliant.... Absolutely brilliant. I'm super happy I have a bike that compliments a dropper post.. with the wide array of different dropper posts available it will be almost a no brainer on which to choose based on thorough reviews. I will be anticipating some good reviews on Thomsons dropper post, however my standard Elite will do the trick in the mean time. Smile
  • + 1
 Agreed that this magnetic trick is brilliant .. as long as it'll be strong enough to stay on the bike on the roughest DH tracks out there Smile
  • - 20
 Since when did neodynium magnets stick to alu? Or Carbon? Frankly, the idea of a mag hex wrench sounds great on paper, but NFW would I stick them on my frame. I'm not even sure where I would find a piece of steel on my bike. Or is Thomson saying their clamps are now steel ( and not regular stainless steel which of course is not magnetic)? Fail.
  • + 14
 The bolts are steel.
  • + 1
 The clamp isn't steel, the bolt is and the allen head is magnetized so as to stick inside the bolt head.
  • + 4
 The bolt is still Steel.
  • + 1
 Think the'yre referring to the hex bolt...

...Oh, and stainless steel is magnetic, or at least basic stainless steel is; depending on the ferritic structure (i.e. nickel content)...
  • + 2
 Maybe the bolt inside the clamp is steel making it possible for a magnet to stay and still have n aluminum or carbon fiber clamp...
  • - 8
 Good point about the bolt being steel. BUT, take a look at the pics - you either have to leave the hex wrench in the collar socket or you use the bolts under the seat; neither of which seems like an optimal place for a bolt to hang/stick out. In the case of the former, why not just have a normal lever and in the latter, how often do you adjust your seat tilt angle on the trail anyway? Looks like a solution for a problem that does not exist.
  • + 1
 @oldslalomskier: People without dropper post and riding AM/Enduro, ride up full length, shred down fully tucked in.

I'll definitely go for the dropper post if it is actually released on next spring.
  • - 6
 Yes, I know - I ride AM and enduro. But what exactly does changing the tilt have to do with a dropper post? Once the dropper is installed, do you expect to stop and drop the post further? that would be the only reason to have a hex key onboard. My overall point is that a magnetic hex key sounds like a perfect marketing gimmick for a problem that does not really exist. If you are going to ride with a hex key, you might as well carry one that all the hex sizes you need and not worry about a specific one falling off.

That all said, Thompson's dropper does in fact look like a great product.
  • + 3
 First of all I don't see what the problem is with leaving the lever in the clamp socket. It's makes perfect sense. The lever also doesn't go under the seat. The picture of the saddle with the lever under it is the lever actuated version of the dropper post, nothing to do with seat tilt angle it just makes the saddle so up and down without having a switch on the bars.
  • - 8
 Uhhh... i f you are leaving the hex key in the seat tube clamp socket, what is the point of it being magnetic? Makes no sense at all IMO - just use a regular lever clamp if you have any use to drop the actual entire post (which obviates the use of a dropper, eh?). The seat clamp at the top of the drop is a std. 2-bolt fixture which allows the seat angle/tilt to meet the riders needs which is the only reason to have a hex key (assuming it is the same bolt size). I am aware the lever has no effect on tilt. I only mention seat tilt as a reason why one might want a hex key. But I personally have NEVER changed the seat angle during a ride. At least on a MTB.
  • - 6
 And if you upgrade to a Ti bolt kit you are SOL with a magnetic wrench.
  • + 5
 you only need your seat clamp bolt to be steel... god forbid you cant guess your ass up the hill with the extra 1/2 gram of weight
  • + 5
 and if your an idoit ^^^ this product will make you whine like a douche!!!!!!
  • + 1
 you just called me an idoit... retard.
  • + 3
 If you have a hex key on your seat clamp, they you can use it anywhere on your bike. I think it is intended so that you can ues it in place of a lever on your seat clamp, and then you can use it anywhere else on your bike where you need a 4mm hex key
  • + 1
 Just look at the magnetic release this way: if you take if off and throw it in your pack, or pocket, then 1) you won't lose it no matter the harshness of the ride, and 2) if discourages those that might want to make a quick steal of your post/seat if you were using a simple QR binder (since they can't remove without tools). One thing Thompson may want to look at is fabricating the bolt with a special interface (like a design or pin or something) that would only allow the removable lever to interface with it, thereby further discouraging a would-be thief, even if he had a 4mm hex handy.
  • - 1
 I did not think of the theft argument. That is a good thought to consider. I guess for 300 or 400 these things are attractive to scumbags. The special pin (another good thought) might render the wrench unusable elsewhere, but I can think of a couple ways where that would not be the case.
  • + 3
 doh,sorry finnrambo it was aimed @ oldslalomskier.
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  • + 10
 People need to stop whining about the prices of dropper posts. If you want cheap, use a damn QR clamp and any post and get on and off to raise/lower the saddle like the rest of us do. Want to do it in motion, use a damn hite-rite.
  • + 8
 hite-rite, +100 props
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  • + 11
 head-mounted actuation = epic fail.
  • + 3
 Cable driven and head mounted actuation. Fails on 2 counts.
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  • + 5
 Thompson You Need to Move That Actuation Lever To the Bottom of the post. First a big Loop of cable rubbing on you, your frame, and tire is a really annoying. Second Most new frames are routing dropper posts internally. Third it gets the cable out of harms way. Last It just makes more sense and looks better. If your going to go carbon on your stems. Make Sure It's at least as Stiff as your aluminum one. In every direction I've been very disappointed by the flexy nature of some Very Expensive Carbon stems both Mountain and Road and have gone back to aluminum after a couple unnerving rides where the bike did not want to go where I wanted it to. I have yet to use a Carbon stem that rivals the Stiffness of your aluminum stems. I'll gladly accept the weight penalty to have control of where I'm going.
  • + 2
 Internal routing, why not but you'd limit the amount of customers actually buying it (including me). The Reverb comes in "regular" and stealth which is fine, leaves you the choice of going internally or not.

But I'll agree with the lever at the bottom. No moving cable ... That's what I hate on my Reverb Frown
  • - 2
 Just coil the cable around the post. Problem solved. I do it with my Reverb and it works great.
  • + 1
 Ploutre, This is a Prototype and they are looking for feed back. The biggest complaints about dropper posts are Reliability and cable routing. Rockshox, KS, and Crankbrothers have all figured out how to move the actuation away from the head and eliminate that loop of cable. If Thompson wants to bring the best to the table. They need to move that actuation lever. I personally want it internally because every new frame I want to buy routes the cable internally. Am I going to take the Gravity dropper off my current bike and replace it with something new? No! It has worked flawlessly for over 3 years and the previous one has been going strong for over 8 years. Would I consider one for my new bike? Definately, but the KS Lev and RS Reverb are on that list as well. They both offer internal, and lower cable routing. Thompson needs to do the same. The Fox Doss is not on the list because of cable routing. I didnt even consider the specialized and Crankbrothers posts because they both use a crappy single bolt clamp that I have personally seen fail on the trail.

Thompson As far as the under the seat lever post. Don't bother. If the lever isn't on the bar the post won't get used enough to justify its extra weight.
I am really glad to see Thompson bringing a dropper post to the market. If its as good as everything else they make it will be one of the best if not the best.
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  • + 2
 I'm not being funny but i think it was ether PB or MBUK that did a write up on that cheap german foza make one and said how good it was for £90 and it's not hydraulic so easy to clean and maintain, now if they are saying how good it is for £90 delivered why the hell would you pay £380 for one??? sorry but think I will keep £290 in the bank and go for the german cheap one ta I mean after all thye build the best cars.....
  • + 1
 forca sorry Smile
  • + 2
 That "looks" like a clone of the Ice Lift V8 no ? (I don't know who copied the other the first)
  • + 1
 Quick Review for you Andy on the Forca:

I bought one for my winter HT and snapped it in 6 month, they sent me a new one (not snapped it yet) Work Well. Being 27.2mm is a bonus Smile

If you have a sub £500 bike then it’s a good dropper for you.
If you have a more expensive bike I would go for a more expensive post.
  • + 1
 Forca is like El-gallo : www.youtube.com/watch?v=Cop0Lrbtu7E , www.rowerowawaga.pl/index.php?d=artykul&kat=47&art=3762 - works but not for long .This time cheap mean poor Blank Stare
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  • + 2
 Absolutely gorgeous looking piece of kit, i love my Thomson Stem and Lay back seat post. Both 4 and a bit years old and look near new, lets hope the dropper post is as good as the rest of their kit and they will certainly be on to a winner with it...I am in the market for a dropper so lets wait and see what the final product is like??.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 BEAUTIFUL! Thomson engineering is in a league of its own, not surprising when the company's primary business is precision custom aircraft componentry. Was about to pull the trigger on a KS LEV or Reverb, looks like I am waiting til spring! You know, because it would only make sense to replace my Masterpiece with another Thomson!

And to the folks complaining about price, a static (non-dropper) Thomson is $150, so what did you expect for a dynamic post?
.... isn't this the reason you have a Fox fork out front as opposed to a SR Suntour?????
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  • + 5
 One post to rule them all...
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  • + 1
 y carnt they just put one of them ruber covers we used to see on v brakes over the cable under the seat to stop it jaming like the ks ones do i dont want to have to use the under seat lever in the winter just cause of the mud untill they fix this the reverb still rules Smile
[Reply]
  • + 1
 If it was perfect the cable would route from the bottom as others have said like the KS Lev or Gravity Dropper which has been like that for years. Thomson are awesome, I have a 10 yo Elite seat post and Stems and still run an X4 50mm stem, but they missed the mark by not doing it properly first up, real pity.
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  • + 6
 seatpost looks awesome
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  • + 1
 Pleaaaaaaaaaase Thomson, make the stanchion of this beauty black!!!!!
That thing just shouts out "perfection" ...and that magnetic hex wrench surely is a neat idea, although I always have the hex-kit in my rucksack anyways. I don't know how anyone could go riding without.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Looks SUPER! Still a bit wary of the side-mounted pull on the head. Prefer the Specialized CP BlackLite's front mounted position. I'ts been super-reliable since day one, and should it fail, I'll definitely be looking at this- looks like a very sound design and weight is very enticing.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 While I welcome more players in this market I would hope that It might drive the price of these things down not up. I got my first Reverb for €200 now the same thing retails at + €340 ? Don't even get me started on the ridiculous price of the fox one.
So Thompson get a good product at the right price = sell loads. Not quite there yet IMO
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I've been hearing great stuff about the KS posts for the past three years. I ask riders about their experiences with KS and they're always good. The cable interface is fixed (a real plus), the price is one of the most reasonable out there, and they're one of the few manufacturers who make a 27.2...(I'm amazed at how many 27.2s are still out there).
Hey, many of the other posts are well-engineered, and real eye candy to boot! However their cost & durability keep the KS at the top of my list.
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  • + 4
 Waiting for the "Masterpiece Dropper".
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  • + 1
 Would only buy it if they make the cable stationary at the base like the LEV. Maybe KS has a patent on that design and others cant copy it. Ever post where the cable moves is instantly obsolete regardless of the quality.
  • + 2
 crankbros has the kronolog or whatever, shit post tho
  • + 3
 Are any of the stationary cable ones reliable ? No? Nuff said.
  • + 1
 non are reliable, yes the reverb isn't bad but its still not reliable, reliable as in marzocchi 888 reliable not boxxer reliable if you see where I'm coming from
  • + 1
 Based on past experience, the KS lev should be very reliable. I would have been happy if my i950r lasted 2 years, i'm on 2.5 and it still works flawlessly. Also, based on past experience, I can live with the drop mechanism at the head of the post. Which means i will be considering this thomson along with the lev in about a year, or two.
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  • + 1
 Seat post does look good but lets hope they refine it just a little bit more so that I don't rip the arse out of my £80 shorts on the end of that cable !! Get it terminated properly Thomson !
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  • + 1
 Why put the cable actuator so high? NEEDS to be like KS LEV with lever lower so no shitty cable rub on the inside of your thigh.
I think I will wait to buy until they correct that oversight.
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  • + 4
 head mounted actuation? cmon man
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  • + 3
 Leaves just one question unanswered: do the feature a 27.2mm dropper?
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  • + 2
 you can't mention bunch of best seatposts without thomson. can we say it again for dropper post?
[Reply]
  • + 1
 So tere will be a Masterpiece Dropper ? ;> That will be 150mm travel , hydraulic remote and cable that doesnt move with the saddle for me please Big Grin
[Reply]
  • + 2
 KS LEV is much better its the only one that doesn't have the cable movement!!!
  • + 3
 But Kronolog is the trail of fail
  • + 1
 like everything else made by crankbros
  • + 1
 not Everything. Just most stuff...lol
  • + 1
 the new mallet 3's haven't failed me yet... I give them maybe two more neds runs?
[Reply]
  • + 2
 $380?! Shit that's expensive!!! Somebody needs to make a decent dropper post that isn't uber pricey.
  • + 9
 It certainly isn't inexpensive, but it is still less than some other options.
  • + 3
 and it may last more than one season...
  • + 4
 @derpdownthehill Fox DOSS costs nearly 100 more and you don't even get it with Kasheeeema!
  • + 1
 if i had to take a guess, i'd say if everything else they sell has a 3 year warranty, this post will probably have more than 1 year. Also, the reverb is 370 and plenty of people are buying that. I always spend more on thomson just because they are so much better
[Reply]
  • + 2
 I'm confused about the 2nd patent etched there, the first is their clamp design, the 2nd is for a candlestick design!
  • + 1
 Haha! Looks like a typo, change the 7 to a 2 and you get a Thomson patent.
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  • + 3
 27.2mm please.
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  • + 2
 YYYYYYYYYEEEEESSSSSSS!!!!!!!
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  • + 1
 Magnetic allens? What if they were square also. Then you could never strip a bolt
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  • + 1
 This will be a cool thing to sell to people, but I'll be sticking with a rigid Thomson post for now.
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  • + 1
 arriving with perfect timing to be added to my new AM build this winter! Sweet!
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  • + 2
 Arghhh!

Still with the floppy cable?!
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  • + 2
 $380 is much less than the equivalent alternatives...
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  • + 1
 27.2 5in drop please! I can't believe that some brands think that only 100mm is enough drop.
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  • + 1
 380 might sound expensive but it's all about the quality. I'd rather pay 380 than paying 150+ that breaks easily.
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  • + 1
 I wish em luck...always been a fan of their product...but for right now Reverb is king and less expensive.
  • + 2
 The Reverb retail for the same price.......But it's available now and it seems like SRAM mostly got their issues fixed.
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  • + 1
 I've been waiting for Thomson to make this since the Joplin came out. I will probably be selling my Reverb Spring 2013.
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  • + 1
 They added 142g from the prototype. 592 grams including remote lever and cable. Thomson, you lost a sale.
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  • + 1
 I have never had a tommy product fail in 20 years of serious riding. Long Live Thomson
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  • + 1
 Being nitrogen charged, does this mean you have to send it back to Thomson for servicing?
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  • + 1
 Still waiting for their Ti handlebar here in the UK ...
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  • + 1
 3 bikes all thomson posts & two with stems
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  • + 1
 First dropper post I might actually consider!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 MUST HAVE CARBON FACEPLATE!!!!!!!!!!!!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 They need a Masterpiece dropper now!!!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Will there be a master peice version of this?
[Reply]
  • + 1
 all the 3 products are great, and seem worth of buying them. Excellent!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Nice to see Thomson on these shores
[Reply]
  • + 1
 The Magnetic Seat Binder needs a strap hole. Nice idea.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Been waiting a long time for this!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I shall indulge!
[Reply]
  • + 0
 how can they not put the cable actuation on the bottom?? come on Thomson!!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 MADE IN THE U.S.A.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 This or the reverb?
  • + 1
 Thomson quality but the Reverb is pretty darn good. Ugh choices
  • + 2
 Yep, Reverb is great, but the connection point of the hydraulic line is frail.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 KS LEV bitch's!!!
[Reply]
  • - 3
 "MADE IN THE U.S.A." = expensive

We need more I beam options . These posts need to be made lighter
  • + 1
 One pound is pretty light for all of the crap that goes into making one of these work well. When are these going to be for sale I wonder?: www.pinkbike.com/photo/7872369
  • + 1
 fine me one ....
[Reply]
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