Riding Trek's Remedy 29er

Jun 6, 2013
by Mike Levy  
 
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trek remedy 29 2014

Rethinking the Remedy

Trek's Remedy platform has been a favorite of ours since its inception more than five years ago. We've spent a considerable amount of time on every variation of the 150mm travel, 26''-wheeled bike over that time, from the original aluminum model to the carbon fiber, DRCV version of more recent times, with all of them performing well. We aren't the only ones that feel that way, though, with the Remedy receiving critical acclaim over the years from other media outlets as well. It is for this reason that we have to admit that we were taken by surprise to learn that Trek was planning to introduce a 140mm travel, 29''-wheeled version of the bike, a move that seems odd given how many other companies are shifting their efforts to 650B wheels. All sorts of questions immediately came to mind: what will happen to the 26'' Remedy? Why not 650B? Would Trek be able to make the 29'' version perform up to the expectations of riders who might be really throwing down aboard the bike? Would it handle like an 8ft long tandem bike when on slow, technical trails? We got the answer to all of those questions and more during our time in Sedona, Arizona, as well as enough time on the bike to come away with some well-founded riding impressions.

Trek Remedy 29

Big Wheels, Less Travel

As of right now the Remedy 29 will not be replacing the 26'' version, with the two platforms being offered concurrently in Trek's 'technical trail' lineup. This point needs to be stressed as it often seems as if wheel size debates stir up feelings that range from religious zeal to all out fury - those riders devoted to the 'original' wheel size shouldn't feel like Trek is forcing them to cast aside their beliefs or be burnt at the stake in the town square. Wheel size isn't the only difference, though...rear wheel travel has been bumped down slightly from 150mm to 140mm, although some riders may find that the bigger wheel's ability to take the edge off of a lot of terrain will act as an equalizer, making the 10mm difference only noticeable on paper. Interestingly, Jose Gonzalez, a suspension engineer at Trek, told us that the travel decrease wasn't down to the packaging challenges that are often associated with fitting 29'' wheels in longer travel frames, but a conscious decision on their part to create an overall package that rides the way they want it to. In fact, 150mm travel versions of the Remedy 29 were tested extensively, with Gonzalez and the rest of the design team favouring the suspension performance of the 140mm platform and its slightly shorter stroke FOX DRCV shock.

Remedy 29 Details

• Intended use: all-mountain/enduro
• Wheel size: 29''
• Rear wheel travel: 140mm
• Aluminum frame
• ABP and Full Floater suspension
• FOX DRCV CTD shock
• ISCG 05 chain guide tabs
• Internal dropper post, derailleur routing
• E2 tapered head tube
• 'Mino Link' adjustable geometry

The $4,729.99 USD Remedy 9 29 (claimed weight: 29.6lb) we rode in Sedona sits, for now at least, at the top of the Remedy 29 hierarchy, with all three of the new bikes assembled around the same aluminum frame. The other two models slot in below price-wise, at $3,459.99 USD for the Remedy 8 29 (claimed weight: 30.5lb) and $2,839.99 USD for the Remedy 7 29 (claimed weight: 30.2lb). Where do the carbon fiber Remedy 29s fit into the picture? No where right now, but we fully expect that to change in the near future. Trek didn't deny this, only saying that it is pretty easy to figure out given their history of first introducing an aluminum model followed by a carbon version, but they did politely dismiss our probing about when we might see this happen.


Why Not 650B?

There is no doubt in our minds that the new Remedy would be readily accepted by more riders had Trek decided to design the bike around 650B wheels. This fact isn't lost on the Wisconsin brand, and they conceded that they have been testing numerous different 29'' and 650B-wheeled platforms for some time, including the 29er DH mule from a few years ago that is pictured at right (no, Trek is not pursuing the bike shown). When it came time to make the call as to what wheel size to go with for the new Remedy, Trek felt that the 29er version was simply a better bike, knowing full well that there would be more consumer resistance than if they had gone with the 'tweener wheels. That isn't to say that there won't ever be any 650B bikes in Trek's lineup - we suspect that we'll see Trek World Racing riders competing on 650B Session 9.9s at some point this season, although Trek declined to comment on the subject - but that they believe that 29'' wheels offer more advantages for how a bike like the Remedy is intended to be ridden. Regardless of how one feels about the Remedy platform using 29'' wheels, Trek gets full marks for not yielding to the 650B-wheeled steamroller that is changing the face of the mid-travel bike market. Not into the big wheels? Trek is still be offering the current Remedy with 26'' wheels as well.






















bigquotesWe're still moving the ball forward for 29ers, and we're not going to rush a 650B bike to the market for the sake of having one. Wheel size is one variable in the package, with the bike a sum of all its parts. The suspension has to be dialed, the geometry has to be dialled - it's all part of it. We're going to deliver the best overall package, whatever that wheel size might be. - Travis Ott, Mountain Bike Brand Manager

Trek Remedy 29

The Tech

• ABP Convert: Trek has been using their Active Braking Pivot on the Remedy for many seasons now, and the 2014 Remedy 29 employs their latest ABP Convert system. The design allows the dropout pivot to rotate concentrically around the rear axle, limiting the amount of rotation between the caliper and rotor, which in turn helps to keep the suspension working better regardless of if the rider is on the brakes. The 'Convert' signifies that the pivot hardware is easily interchangeable to allow for both 12 x 142mm axles and standard 135mm quick release rear wheels.

• Full Floater: Attaching the bike's FOX DRCV CTD shock to an extension off the front of the chainstays rather than a fixed position on the front triangle isn't a new concept, but it is one that Trek has employed for a number of years on everything from their Session downhill race machine to the shorter travel Fuel trail bike. Trek says that doing so allows the shock to ''better respond to bumps across a wide variety of terrain,'' which is a simple way of saying that the arrangement gives them more opportunity to tune how the shock performs throughout its stroke by altering the leverage from both ends.

• DRCV: Trek's proprietary rear shock technology developed with the help of FOX. The 'DR' stands for Dual Rate, with the shock's two different air chambers providing two different rates depending on where the shock is at in its stroke. Connecting the two chambers is a plunger, or valve, that opens the airway between the two at a predetermined point in the travel. The plunger is referred to as the control valve, or the 'CV' in DRCV. The goal is to be able to have your cake and eat it too, meaning to have a lively but firm spring to push against that is provided by the main chamber, but benefit from the secondary chamber's ability to add a more linear and forgiving end to the stroke.


Trek Remedy 29

Riding Impressions

The current 26'' wheeled Remedy is the kind of bike that, when spec'd correctly, we would travel to nearly any destination with and be happy to head out for a long ride with the locals. It has enough travel to pull you through some truly hairy situations, can be built light enough to not feel like a boat anchor on long climbs, and its handling rates among the best in its class of mid-travel bikes. In other words, the Remedy 29 has a lot to live up to regardless of its wheel size. The time that we spent on the bike showed us that it might be able to do just that and then some.

Our main concern centered around how 'big' the bike would feel on Sedona's sometimes tight and technical trails. We're not talking about sizing, but whether or not the Remedy 29 would feel ponderous in slow-speed situations due to its travel and big wheels, a feeling that we've experienced with other relatively long travel 29ers. It didn't take long to see that the bike felt very much unlike the lumbering beast that some riders might expect it to be, and it had a very lively feel that was in contrast to its somewhat portly weight and longer wheelbase (46.42'' compared to 44.84'' on the 26'' Remedy). Our feelings were backed up by the thoughts of the other editors in our group, most of us sharing similar concerns, and we actually had an easier time scaling some of the tricky climbs on the bike than we ever had on the multiple 26''-wheeled Remedys that we've ridden on the very same trail.

The longer wheelbase and bigger wheels felt like just the ticket for Sedona's rocky and marbly downhills, and the bike felt less skittery and on edge. While the handling did feel a touch quicker than the 26'' version, the bike was far from feeling pointy on steep downhills or when the speeds picked
up. How did the 10mm travel reduction effect the ride? Very little, we'd say. In fact, the bike actually felt more forgiving in the first third of its travel than the 26'', 150mm travel Remedy, no doubt a by-product of the larger wheels and supple DRCV shock. Did the Remedy 29 do anything bad during the first date? While its trail manners were very un-29er like, the bike's heft was noticeable when accelerating from a standstill, as you'd expect from a 30lb bike. A set of relatively light wheels would be on our parts list if we were to build a Remedy 29 up for ourselves.

at 2013 Trek Launch in Sedona Arizona USA
  Trek's Andrew Shandro getting on well with the Remedy 29.

Pinkbike's Take:
bigquotesNo matter how great the Remedy 29 turns out to be, and our initial impressions have us believing that Trek has hit this one out of the park, the bike is bound to garner criticism simply due to its wheel size. That is a shame because much of the unwillingness to accept 29'' wheels is born from either their appearance or a rider's previous experience on a sub-par big-wheeler. Then there is the 'get to know each other' period that, akin to cosying up to a new lover, can feel a bit awkward for awhile before you start leaving the washroom door open. Get yourself on a proper 29er, though, for more than just a single ride or two, and you'll be leaving that door open without a second thought. At this early stage of the relationship with the Remedy 29 it feels every bit as capable as its long standing 26''- wheeled brother, but we are only days away from receiving our personal test bike that we plan to thrash on more familiar terrain. Will the Remedy 29 be one of those 'proper' 29ers? We'll know within the next few weeks, and you'll be able to read our thoughts shortly after. - Mike Levy

www.trekbikes.com
Photos by Sterling Lorence and Dan Milner

151 Comments

  • + 45
 "We're still moving the ball forward for 29ers, and we're not going to rush a 650B bike to the market for the sake of having one." Nicely put Travis/Trek...now someone go and tell that to Santa Cruz who seem to be putting 650s on whatever frame they can find
  • + 32
 Isn't that the advantage of a smaller company though?Santa Cruz has been testing those bikes for a couple of years, the big guys have a lot more invested in their bike designs, it's hard to turn that big ol' ship!
  • - 13
 I wish there were companies that "stayed true" throughout all period of the hype and never jumped on some fashion wagon with paper wheels. I respected Rock Shox for being resilient to 15mm axles for a long time. Unfortunately they joined the team for good with the new Pike. I hoped they would be the 3% that refuses to be a trend whore. I'd love Spesh to have balls and stay out of 650B disco club.
  • + 11
 Put it another way that's closer to reality....

"we were already developing this and it was cheaper to finish and implement production of the 29er design we were working on than to start from scratch on an entirely new 650B design"
  • + 7
 Uh...no. If you knew the trek development guys in any way, you would know that they build, test, build, test, build, test, any and every bike design they can come up with, before spouting off about what's "the best." Learn yourself before you spout about what's "the best."
  • + 3
 Believe what you like... but Trek's not behaving any different than any other brand who got on the 650B bandwagon late, other than they're not going as Anti-tweener as Specialized is still. They can "say" all they want about what they think is best, but it'll be the sales that really determines what's what. They were far enough along with these models that they decided to take a risk and go ahead with production. It may work out, or it may not. Trek often gives models a shot and then drops them after a couple years if they don't sell very well.

As to rockshox adopting 15mm axles... again its a question of what actually sells and what doesn't. RS claimed repeatedly that their 20mm Maxle LITE QR axles were the same weight as a 15mm QR, and were still stiffer.... which is all fine and dandy, except there isn't a whole lot in light weight 20mm hubs at a reasonably cheap price but lots in 15mm already... and the material weight for forks are better used in the crown and stanchion tubes than in the sliders and dropouts.
  • + 10
 Forks stiffness is about: crown, axle clamp type and clamp length/surface, then arch, then bushing offset, then axle diameter. Recent 15mm RS forks have: thread on one side, only proper clamp on the other, small clamping surface. 150mm Sektor RLC with 15mm axle is a wobbly pish compared to 120mm Reba with 20mm axle and to Lyrik. Sketchy in corners and hard to keep on line on the straight line, not inspiring confidence in an average rider like me.
Fabien Barel said what he thinks of it in Fox, but he can talk all he wants, his reputation can be undisputable, one DirtTV with him VS 3 press release vids and it's gone. Dirt made a check once, how much DH bikes of pros weigh, they talked in it that this and that must weigh this and that for purely practical reasons - it never stopped people for spending thousands on shaving off weight to reach the magic 32lbs, making tons of compromises, doing more harm than good. The dogma is: lighter is better, and you better don't argue with it, as otherwise makes no sense. Marketing and sales dictate everything, and can convince almost anyone. Dominating human factor in MTB creates room for bullshit as a guy like Fabien can win on almost anything, so you can tell anyone that his latest stuff is what makes him fast, and there are hundred of ways of keeping eyes of a potential buyer off the reality.
  • + 3
 Seems like a "big ole ship" can afford to have a couple extra test products in the works. If trek and specialized aren't going for 650b enduro rigs then isn't because they can't start research because of money, it is a question of broad appeal. Trek thinks 650b isn't going to last with the AM crowd. Maybe with DH, but they think 29 is going to get a grip on the enduro circuit.
I'm not saying they are right, but it is the big companies that have the power to do what they want. The small guys have to pray that every experiment pays off.
  • + 0
 The other possibility is that they already started the development on the 29er models a year earlier than the other manufacturers, and it takes more testing to get the big wheels working with the correct wheel path, leverage ratio etc. 650b has a shorter develpment cycle, with just slight modification to 26" geometry. By starting early, they ended up a year behind. In the end, most Trek models and Spesh models work very well, and are released when they are adequately refined.
  • + 6
 Their customers have been putting 650b wheels on SC bikes for years. SC is just finally responding to that demand.
  • + 1
 Then why wouldn't they have a tweener out too? If it is so easy and as the article says, they've tested them, they could have released two sizes together. They must not think it is worth the expense of contracting it to taiwan.
  • + 3
 Because they had other bikes to be released first... Santa Cruz actually came out against 650B only a year ago, but then customers started demanding them from them and now they're racing to catch up to other brands that are already supporting them, like Intense. When Trek customers start demanding 650B models, they'll start offering them also.
  • - 7
 650B is not a fad, its faster period...
  • + 3
 Specialized had 650b proto Stumpys over a year ago. They know what they're doing and they know what is faster. 29".
  • + 1
 My knee jerk reaction is to hate on 29ers, but i have never tried a new one and if the big companies that are the best at making money are avoiding 650b, then maybe it is a fad. I am sad to say this. I want a Norco range killer b so bad, but if 29ers can be made as good as they say the Spesh Enduro and this Trek are, then maybe 650 or 26 is not going to last.
  • + 1
 Specialized? Nah.. more like individual owners converting their existing bikes... Specialized wouldn't have done the whine fest tantrum that they did last year at Interbike over 650Bs had they been testing them in-house already. They simply would have said they're developing something but it won't be ready till next year. Instead they did everything they could to discredit the concept. You only do that if you've completely missed the emerging of the trend and you need to do anything and everything to justify your continued focus on 29ers.
  • + 2
 So either they are reading the tea leaves or wagging the dog. Time will tell.
  • + 6
 you have to be naif to think that 26 is the best size wheel... don't you think it would have to be amazing luck for that to be the case? 26 became the default wheel size cause it was the only one available 25 years ago... now real research is being done and we are realizing that 26 might not be optimal...
  • + 1
 I will take a SC over a Trek any day.
  • + 4
 Who give a FF! Just ride and have fun - sick of this stupid debate, wheels are wheels, they turn and make biking fun. End.
  • + 2
 would you run into a chess club and point out that no matter who wins they are still nerds? We don't care! We are here to argue and discuss bike parts. if you don't like it then kindly go read better homes and living or something.
  • + 1
 I'd love to run into the middle of the field during the football match, grab a mic and shout: "you're all f*gs!"
  • + 2
 Headline: footballers kill cyclist in failed attempt to prove heterosexuality.
  • + 0
 I'd say Spectators kill a cyclists during a football match in failed attempt to prove their manhood
  • + 1
 Except what happened as they sated their blood lust, and in the excitement gave air to their true feelings for one another infront of a gaping world audience, who proceded to riot but swiftly fell to their own passions. The ensuing love fest was rebranded woodstock. I have no problem gay people, just homophobes who act violently to repress their feelings.
[Reply]
  • + 24
 As a guy that's 6'4'' I think 29ers are built for people like me. I have 26er right now, but I've tested out a couple of 29ers and they seem more comfortable to me. People talk about the feeling of being "on the bike" vs "in the bike" and I think I get that now. I sit on my current bike and I fight it to get it to do what I want, but when I was testing out that 29er I wasn't fighting it as much. Anyway, I'm excited for some more "proper" 29ers to come out Smile
  • + 4
 Agreed. I am a tall guy too. I tried an xc 29er a while back it did well for what it was intended. Now Id like to try out one of these enduro 29ers. Seems promising. If only I could get my hands on a demo bike or lots of cash. Preferably the cash...
  • + 2
 This is all about how well the bike is designed at each size point though - as a smaller guy, at around 5'9" (depending on what bar I'm walking out of), I found old Marins were very sit 'on' rather than sit 'in'. I'm sure you'd find a 26er that fits you well too with some test riding. I imagine that wheel clearance limitations in 29ers will restrict how well a designer can make a small 29er fit smaller people. Actually - are there any small 29ers for women?
  • + 2
 Yes there are some brands offering small 29ers for women, but not really in long travel formats like this bike. Typically for the really long travels you won't find frames smaller than a "medium" size, and even for XC models you have to make some ridiculous compromises to get a small or extra small size 29er for short folks. Look at Emily Batty's bikes for example, Trek's smallest 29er hardtail frame size is 15", and for Emily who's a whopping 5'3" tall to fit on one, she runs no spacers between the stem and headset, a 25 NEGATIVE degree stem angle, a flat bar, and a seatpost that's offset forwards (time trial bike style) to put herself in a position on the bike to attack on climbs which is where XC races are won/lost. She's also sacrificing descending stability (as could be scene during the Olympics last year when she crashed during a training ride days before the race, cracking several ribs).
  • + 3
 For sure, 6'8" here and 26" bikes simply do not work for me. At all. I mean, just look at the geometry of my current (i.imgur.com/7ORjNud.jpg) and previous (i.imgur.com/hfbPwrC.jpg and that's with the seat slammed) 26" bikes.

My current bike fits so much better. i.imgur.com/Q9I1FoU.jpg
  • + 2
 Finally! No one ever seems to mention wheel size matching body size. With my Bandit 29, I've never noticed any of the pros and cons typically associated with 29ers but for the first time, I feel like I'm on a bike that really fits me (I'm 6' 3"). It's so silly to think that the only thing that should change with body size is the length of the bike and the height of the seattube. To me, fit and feel should be the #1 consideration for going with bigger wheels.
[Reply]
  • + 23
 Geez, when will we be able to read bike reviews again that aren't 50%+ about wheel size?
  • + 36
 When we have comments that aren't 50%+ about wheel size.
  • + 1
 Welcome to 29rReview...
  • + 2
 You could always start up Retrobike Review to keep discussing 26ers. Smile
[Reply]
  • + 14
 they need to release their slope bike..
[Reply]
  • + 7
 But In a head to head with the Specialized Enduro 29er who would win? My bets are on the Specialized.
  • + 11
 Would like to see that test... maybe MBA will do one Smile
  • + 9
 Scrolled down to write this. I think a larger comparison or "shoot out" between the longer travel 29er would be fun too. Wink
  • + 9
 My bets on the better rider. Who cares what company makes the bike, just because it's made by a certain company doesn't mean it will make you better. Sure it may help to a certain degree, but it's about the rider and their ability to ride.
  • + 1
 Isn't the enduro 165 mm on the rear wheel?
  • + 1
 @wobbem - the only problem with your logic is you are comparing two bikes that are in different classifications. The Enduro 29er sports 150+mm (most often 160) of travel and is a solid AM bike while the remedy maxes out at 140mm and is geared towards the technical/xc types. The Slash is Trek's bike that is more comparable with the Enduro's specs.

also @feardabeast is right on ^
  • + 1
 Wouldn't they be two different bikes? I believe the spesh is a 160mm enduro bike compared to trek's 140mm trail bike. Plus Trek hasn't even rolled out a carbon remedy 29 so they'd feel quite different as far as weight and dampening go. I'd like to see a comparison too, but I think it's too early for Trek to have a fair fight in that battle.
  • + 3
 Really? Trek's ad campaign seems to differ... Trek will always be trying to one up the big S and vice versa. At the end of the day "shut up and pedal" seems the best choice.
  • + 2
 I believe the Remedy 29er is intended to compete against the likes of the Stumpjumper Evo, Kona Satori, Transition Bandit 29, etc. The Enduro 29 is a whole other beast all together.
  • + 3
 Specialized Enduro Evo 29er is 155mm rear travel.
  • - 5
 dbodoggle Your head is up your ass
  • + 5
 wobbem haha thanks for being so polite its just a conversation
  • - 3
 Lol, at least you have a sense of humor....... tit : )
  • + 3
 feardabeast -Haven't you ever gotten on a new bike felt more or less confident or faster/slower. I know I have. Its BS to say that a bike will make your skills better but a bike is the machine that translates your skills into rolling power. If you have a better conversion of skill into speed (aka your bike) it definitely makes a difference. Sometimes even a world of difference. Ask super market biker kid how he feels on his brand new Giant Glory. Still having said that, we all know super market biker could rip that Walmart bike. Until it broke...
  • + 2
 A bike won't make your skills better but it can help you make your skills better.
  • + 1
 Man wobbem you really know a lot about about the Enduro and the Remedy. The only problem is that they are two completely different bikes with different levels of travel. The Enduro is All Mountain/the Remedy is heavy duty xc trail. Congratulations !!!
[Reply]
  • + 4
 That's a badass story haha. He seems like a cool dude
  • + 3
 Kinda. He is the guy who sent them to iraq. He always struck me as a naive rich guy who has rose colored glasses on and thinks war is a tool, not a last resort. Kind of fitting to represent the USA i guess. He has always been big on mtb, and he is super healthy. I get the idea that most people who meet him are surprised to find they like him. Sounds like a trek rider to me.
[Reply]
  • + 3
 I think all three wheel sizes have there place and utility. It is up to the rider to decide what he/she needs and/or want in a bike. If you want something to roll fast over little bumps, ride that 29'er (more pure XC style). If you like quick and nimble, that 26'er (DH mainly). if you like anywhere in between, ride that 27.5 (trail/all mountain).
I believe they all have there place, attributes and downsides.YOU CHOOSE.

Look at the ski industry, you have different style and sizes of ski's for each discipline, why would bikes be any different?
  • - 4
 >Look at the ski industry, you have different style and sizes of ski's for each discipline, why would bikes be any different?

BECAUSE 29ERS AND 650B SUCK DURRR 26 FOR LYF!!!!11
  • + 0
 The ski industry has WAY to much range right now that its insane just like the biking industry. Do we really need these options or just 1-2 tools to do the job of most of our needs.

For example: armadaskis.com/product/skis
  • + 2
 Not sure if 26 has anything going for it besides tradition. If 650 is only marginally better, then isn't that still better? DJ rigs need smaller wheels so they won't be moving up, but even DH can benefit from a better axle to bb height ratio. If lower profile pedal are worth it then so is 650b as far as racing is concerned.
[Reply]
  • + 3
 Nice anecdote (to me at least), I took my 29er to the local skatepark to meet up with some bmx buddies. All of them loved riding it, one even aired a big vert quarter (West Blaak for those in the know, at least 20ft) . Granted, 26 (or bmx) is the way to go when focusing purely on jumping but considering how much fun a good 29er can be on rough terrain the slight trade off in poppiness is more than worth it.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 It's crazy people have such strong opinions about wheelsize. Who gives a crap? Just ride what you like. It's not like there aren't options for all wheels sizes. And for the 26er folk, if the time came there were no more 26er bikes, I'm pretty sure you'd need a new bike by then anyway, and your new bike will effing rock. Till then, just take advantage of all the cheap ass 26er stuff on craigslist. BTW, I ride a 26" hardtail!
  • + 1
 You use craigslist? Geez... kijiji is so much better...
[Reply]
  • + 2
 I think the 29er has evolved in geometry into other categories besides XC.. I have a Banshee Prime. I ride both size wheels. Both bikes have advantages and disadvantages.I love the flickability, maneuverability of the 26 wheel bike and I love the speed I can get on the 29er wheel I notice it when I pedal next to the 26 wheels how much further and faster they cover terrain, rolling over stuff is easier also.

My 29er is not for the weak or faint and it gives me a good workout picking the front end up and turning tight spots. Its a really different ride that you have to get used to. I find the 29er a challenging ride at times but the geometry or wheelsize feel doesnt bother or faze me and im only 5 foot 9 not a gargantuan I feel I get a better ride on my 29er when I push the hell out of it.

At NO TIME do I ever feel like I ride an XC bike on a 29er!

I find brapping around corners and berms is funner on my 29er done by hammering at corner full speed picking up the front wheel turning it and slamming the rear brake sliding the bike rear end out and around and keeping it low. Its not as natural as a 26er and much more of a process for sure.

Its a personal choice.

I have yet to try the 650 but hear they are amazing and a happy medium of wheel choice. I recently did the 1x10 setup with 32 ring and 11/36 cassette on the 29er and like it.

Thats enough blab time to Shut up and ride! BTW I dont think 26ers are on their way out! TREK LOOKS LIKE THEY NAILED IT!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 It looks like a promising rig. I like the polished look - it's pretty unique to my eye. I look forward to some insight on the spec, particularly if the 2x10 gearing works well with the 30 pound mass. Not that 30# is a boat anchor to me, but I rode a 30ish pound 29er last summer and thought the gearing was too tall, making sustained alpine climbs a challenge.
  • + 2
 I ride a ~30lb 29er with 2x10 and I don't have any problems, although it's geared a little lower than normal (22/33), I'm a bit heaver than most, so it all balances out.
  • + 1
 What do you ride, @joeofloath?
  • + 1
 A Trek Cobia. It's technically an XC bike, but it's pretty slack and playful. I break things a lot, so I've gone for strength rather than lightness with many of the components.
[Reply]
  • + 3
 Now there's a tagline, Mike. The 2014 Trek Remedy 29. Go ahead and take a shit in front of your girlfriend. You'll be hired in no time!
  • + 3
 Come on! These are the jokes, people.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Trek is about greed! Like all other big companies.

Who or what type of management do you think big companies have; sociopath/ performance!

Managers must make money!

Marketers are about money; they lead the company in a direction That will create a product pocket of uniqueness. Remember, all these frames are being built by a few big factories. Bikes these days a similar/close versions of the same bike in any direction; nothing is new under the sun! These people making and selling bikes need to feed there families, they do not want to go out of business; this is the primary motivation! They must come up with something different! What could be more different then bucking the trends... Specialize has been capitalizing on this with the 29 Enduro!, and the fierce resistance to 650B!

Big companies do not want to start over with 650B at present, they want to milk the system for awhile! They will push the 29 for a few more seasons then suddenly change! and all will be 650B heaven! and no one will remember the other wheel sizes..
--------------------------------------------------------

Most important point made:
When the engineering is spot-on , the rider must spend more time on the trails/bike to appreciate its performance. one ride is not enough to get used to something different; something new!.

Something different is going from 26 to 29r!

I think a good 29r would be a good experience! I think a good 650B would be a good experience! I think a good 26 wheel size would be a good experience!, If one spends a few weeks on each bike!

Just my opinion!
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  • + 1
 Trek made a good move supporting the 29er platform. The 26" version of the Remedy is 100% 650B compatible....I recently upgraded my Remedy to 650b plenty of clearance front and rear with knobby 650b Hutchinson Cougars. I like the fact that I can swap out my wheelset for 26" or 27.5" on any given day. If Trek ever plans to go 650b they would only have to increase the spacing in the rear of the frame. The Remedy 650b is now livelier, climbs better than before and has been lifted with more clearance over rocks which is another added benefit of switching to 650b. I will be posting photos on my page soon of my build so far I am thouroughly impressed. Go Trek!

P.S. Don't give up on 26/27.5 compatible bikes.....

Here are the specs:

2012 Trek Remedy 9.8 Carbon 650b
2013 Reynolds 650b Carbon Wheelset 29mm (Total AWESOMENESS!)
Fox 32 DRCV Kashima 150mm
Fox RP3 DRCV Kashima 150mm
Bontrager Rhtyhm Carbon Wide Bar
Bontrager Rhtyhm Stem
ODI Rogue Grips
Full XT Drivetrain
RS Reverb Stealth Dropper
Hutchinson 650b Cougars 2.2s Fr & Rear (Feel more like 2.3s)
Stans Notubes (Tubeless)
CB Candy 3s
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  • + 1
 Instead of positing all these comments about wheels, go ride your bikes! They are all good, they make you fitter, stronger and happier. 29ers with a slack (67-6Cool headtube angle are here to stay. They only not as good as a 26 bike at very tight awkward corners. In everything else they are....superior!
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  • + 1
 6.5 foot tal?l...29er trail bike...5.7 tall, I'm hoping Trek offers up a 27er. For now I'm sticking to my Trek Fuel 9.9 26er until Trek offer a Fuel or Remedy in the mid wheel range or its off to Santa Cruz I go.
  • + 1
 A 650b bike is coming. I promise.
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  • + 0
 First Spec, then Trek not picking up the 650B trend... things get interesting... shall the hype cycle go into the through?

Then... I thought we were over the 29ers gay thing, and they are no longer weird, I thought they are widely accepted, quite surprised with your words Mike. That Trek looks ace, though they could have left the downtube straight as on Fuel EX, which is one of sexiest bikes I've seen.

For me personaly the relationship with Wheeletta Bigs lasted half of a year just after we started leaving the bathroom door open and she accepted my midnight farts. It's time for her to pack her stuff and find someone who likes roomy body more. No it wasn't the sloppy ride, slower handling or being less playful and not jumping as well - It was the clock that killed our relationship ultimately. If my 6" Nomad on Minions can beat a 3kg lighter Niner EMD on Nobby nics on a 2h ride, then sorry... you got to go baby! Runkeeper app stole the last thing I thought you are good at.

They don't fit all trails and all people. Go to nomoresingle.com to find your perfect match
  • + 4
 You shouldn't be comparing an AM FS bike to an XC HT. If you're riding rough woods and trails the nomad will feel better because that is what it is designed for. the EMD will be the preferable ride if you are dealing with more of an XC/socal trail ride, the climbs are long and the descents are wide open. Its kinda like going off-roading in a land rover defender vs a mazda miata.
  • + 1
 Edit Miata was a bad choice, lets try a suby or EVO, a rally car can go fast on dirt and gravel, but it cant drive well off of an actual road (DAKAR cars and trucks dont count for this analogy).
  • - 3
 Depends on how you look at it: if you look for a best weapon for your trails, the bike that suits best the ridign you do for most of the time, or you look at which trails would suit a particular weapon. Showing up with Suby Evo on Silverstone, or with Porsche on gravel road, isn't going to make you perform well isn't it? If you live in Scotland a Murcielago won't do the trick, even if you look good on Nurburgring or in Monte Carlo once or twice a year.
  • + 3
 @WAKIdesigns: Making your personal "wheel size" comparison/decision based on the inaccurate information provided to you by an iPhone app and a comparison between a 6" travel, 26" All-Mountain Shredding Nomad and a budget buster, XC, 29" Hardtail has disqualified you from having any future opinions on anything...ever again.

You sir...are a moron.
  • + 3
 Subies FTW!
  • - 5
 Inaccurate information?! - oh for f*cks sake... like the watch right? leaving home 8:05, coming home 10:10 - Look I use a watch on I-phone, and on my pulse meter - I will do another test for you one especially for you with the use of Breitling chronograph - you imbecile. For your information - if you had any idea about running tests and experiments with scientificaly apporved methods - you would know that - because human factor is so dominant in any cycling - nearly any test is useless, because if you had or didn't had shit before the ride is going to affect the time.

How hard is it to grasp, that a bloke gets two bikes runs them on the same trail and he measures the only thing that can be measured because 99% of the stuff on bikes is subjective, because a human is not a measurable object, especialy his brain and way of experiencing the surrounding world. Because you are yet another square-headed geeko with no experience in science what so ever and no perspective - you are fkng welcome!

Inacurate information... f*ck - go find a laser-meter to measure your dick, but it won't be any much longer comparing to an innacurate measurement done with tape. Honeeeey! I used that cream, I made quite accurate measurements and the thickness of my penis increased by 1,5mm that is 12%! - feeling anything? Fkng wannabe-scientist all over the place in recent years - go take acid, smoke pot, drink alcohol, run naked, sing karaoke, pierce your penis, do whatever it takes to get those numbers out of your system!
  • + 7
 @WAKIdesigns....holy shit!!! You really are a moron!!

Timing yourself with Strava/Runkeeper/TrailBuddy/CycleTracker, etc. is about as accurate as measuring your dick with your thumb. (An anology right up your alley since you appear to be insecure about the topic.)

You literally said that you based your decision on wheelsize on a comparison of two bikes, from opposite ends of the mountain biking spectrum, using a timing app on your phone.

If you can't see how that makes you a jackass...I, nor anyone else can help you.
  • + 2
 Also...if 99% of biking (or any experience for that matter) is subjective, as you claim, what would you call someone who makes a decision based on 1% of the overall result/feedback?

I would probably call them a moron...oh wait...I already did.
  • - 2
 Why people want 29ers over 26ers? Two reasons, first most important: being faster than 26ers (by rolling faster) and inspiring more confidence due to stability. The trail I rode on, an XC ride consisted of hills of max 50m differnce and is theoreticaly suited for a 29er hardtail, eventualy 29er FS with little travel. And as for measuring method that is completely irrelevant, because I looked at watch when leaving home, and then after arrival, both in front of the same door - so whether it was a runkeeper or Garmin or fkng NASA Niner tracker, it is utterly irrelevant. So a 6" Nomad which is synonymous with big mountains and shredding super gnarr, has beaten a bike suited (in theory) to XC, on a XC ride. And a small detail makes the difference - whole shit is infested with rocks, between many you need to negotiate and accelerate quickly - and 29er looses purely because of that!

In that specific terrain a bigger wheel got beaten, while most people think of wheel sizes and components as whether they are best all over the planet for everyone - this is the point I am making from the beginning mr Harvard professor. People should check if the bike suits their trails before jumping on: that wheel-size is better. And there will be a thousand of places in which that EMD will be faster than Nomad, but for me, for 90% of riding I do, it is slower, because the wheels are f*cking too big and too slow in accelerating, and I am too short. and unlike me going for a 29er because "there must be something in it". I did not bitch on 29ers, I just sad they don't work in my area as good as 26ers.

Please continue focusing on irrelevant details and make blatant insults. I used nomad to exaggerate the difference. Two weeks before I rode the same trail on a 26" hardtail filled with the parts I took from 29er, nearly identical setup, 120 RS fork as well, same tyres but in 26" - and for your info I kicked the ass of that 29er, not by 15 minutes but by half of an hour.
  • + 3
 @WAKIdesigns: When you get to the bottom of the hole....stop digging.
  • + 7
 This little dialogue between you two is hilarious Smile
  • + 2
 @arna86: Messing w/ this moron is pretty comical.

Sometimes you've just got to let these internet tough guy/mensa members know that in the real world, they're still a just a jackass.
  • - 2
 jackass - who gets insulted with that?
  • + 0
 Maybe your English isn't the best...but "jackass" is a word commonly used in the English language as an insult.

There you go...lesson #2 for the day.
  • - 3
 Yes I managed to learn that before - now as my English (American) is not so limited I am wondering who the hell can get insulted with that? - You have to agree with me that it is a lame insult, that cannot have any effect on anyone else than a particularly dumb 12yr old - Try harder, impress me, you are so smart, you'll figure out a better one. Did you know there is no aluminum in nucular reactors yall?
  • + 1
 Hahaha...dude, all I can say is congratulations on the obvious enormity of your success. You're clearly a huge deal in your own mind. Be careful out there when you're performing your very scientific wheel size comparisons. They don't make many idiots like you...It would be a huge loss to humanity if you weren't around.
  • - 2
 It wasn't meant to be too scientific in the first place, it is you who were on about accurate measures. Look, I am sitting here making draft renders for a stupid project for a company who is a bunch of world-fkng assholes - when rendering this computer is not useful for anything else than arguing about meaningless shit on Pinkbike, I can't even Google properly due to the fact how CPU is occupied with calculating stuff. Peace...
  • + 2
 Holy shit...I think I broke WAKIdesigns!
  • + 0
 when did you two get married? hahah f*cking hilarious although i agree with WAKIdesigns... f*ck 29ers or 650 b!!!
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  • + 1
 I'm wondering which Sedona trails are shown in this review? In particular the picture just above the Riding Impressions title.
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  • + 1
 is there any guarantee that after I sell my beloved 26" for a new 29er there wont be any 30something inch wheel bikes coming up in a couple of years?
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  • + 2
 I don't see why there is so much hate over the 650B, Santa Cruz has worked hard on achieving where they want to be.
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  • + 0
 Weekend is near, shit is finally dry, warm weather. Champery, Wiriehorn, Bellwald, Gurten, Metabief? Alps, Jura? Big Bikes are ready. Can`t be bothered with a cartwheel report on 300 feet of elevation.
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  • + 1
 I'm getting one in 2-4 weeks. Rode the Fuel 9.7 today and loved it. Can't wait to try the full floater with 20mm more travel.
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  • + 0
 The people who will make this and other 29ers with longer travel successful in the market don't know what pinkbike is, and will buy based on criteria not mentioned so far in this thread. Just sayin...
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  • - 1
 I bet Trek won't have a single 26'er by 2015. It'll all be 650/29. Same with most other brands except Specialized, who are falling to the wayside with their "No 650" stand point. inb4crybabies

This isn't about what is better, it's called marketing.
  • + 1
 Oh they'll have them.... sessions and the entry level "sport" trail bikes and kids models and so forth. Same as Rocky Mountain is now. Other than full suspension and slopestyle hardtails, they have no 26er models above the $1000 price level of the Fusion model. No carbon hardtails at all that are not 29ers currently. Trek themselves for 2013 already ended production of their OCLV hardtail and full suspension 26er XC models and in fact they have no XC 26er models at all above the 4900 disc aluminium for $1200.
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  • + 1
 Ohhh snap... Trek led us on with BS, they just announced a remedy 650b platfrom today....
www.pinkbike.com/news/Trek-650B-wheeled-Remedy-and-Slash-Models.html
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  • + 3
 See they have dropped the DRCV CTD Fork then!!!!
  • + 0
 I actually like those DRCV forks. Pity then.
  • + 1
 Yeah there' ok for the lighter guys but I can't get mine to stay up in the mid-stroke, I've been waiting for the volume reducer spacers but will probably just try a normal float air shaft.
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  • + 1
 I've never tried a 29er before, is there any difference while jumping a 29er or a 26er? I mean is it more difficult to jump on a 29er?
  • + 6
 smaller wheels follow the radius of a jump better. Bigger wheels make the jump have an effective tighter radius. I can jump mine, but it took some getting used to.
  • + 5
 The 29er is a bit harder to maneuver in the air and jumping requires a different technique, but it all requires practice, just like jumping on a 26.
  • - 2
 If you want to jump don't ride 29....they're good for staying on the ground.
  • - 1
 If you can't jump a 29er, you suck on 26er as well. You can get used to the difference. If we talk true jumps or bunny hops, then it isn't much more difficult, takes a bit more effort. But if we talk rock gardens, poping from one root/stone to go over others, especialy if you must do it spontaneously and you have no time to prepare yourself, then 29ers are evidently worse with that (at the same time they don't need to pop that often) While trail riding in rough they feel much more stuck to the ground. But I'm 178cm tall. Taller guy might make a better use out of it.
  • + 6
 thanks for the responses, they really help

Waki your comment was spot on, but starting with a somehow derogative sentence "If you can't jump a 29er, you suck on 26er as well" it wasn’t really necessary, come on amigo most of your comments seem to have an objective to create conflict or something of that type.
  • + 4
 I just tested the Endruo 29er in the Whistler Bike Park on Monday. I regularly ride a Demo 8 Carbon which is amazing in WBP. It took me about half a lap of Crank it Up (an intermediate jump trail) to get used to it, after that I was at the same point of progression in my riding as I was on my Demo hitting new lines and jumps that I hadn't yet hit on my Demo. It is different, it feels like you're floating with the 29er, but it's super fun, and you're one of the only guys riding a 29er out there haha!
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  • - 1
 I think that one of the main reasons why they went with a 29er is so that they could force the G2 "standard" on consumers even more than they do already. Lest we all forget, every Trek 29er has a proprietary 51mm offset crown equipped fork that is specific to the geometry of the Trek 29er frames. Putting a regular-offset fork on a G2 frame will mess up the geometry and handling of the bike.
  • + 1
 And quite rightly so, it's a great idea. When it was announced, all the other 29er manufacturers had stupid low offsets copied from 26" bikes, and handled like crap. Offsets have been creeping up for the last few years until G2 and standard forks are only a few mm apart.
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  • + 0
 I eat big wheeled bikes for dinner..... chomp chomp. I love the big wheeled fad..... 26" bikes n parts getting cheaper everyday.... love it!!!! keep it up wagon wheelers!
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  • + 1
 Am I the obly one that thinks that 29" dh proto actually looks pretty good? I for one, am a fan.
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  • + 1
 Of course they'd put a 34 on the 29'er, but not on the 26's cooooooooooooooooool
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  • + 2
 i love this place to ride
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  • + 0
 "At this early stage of the relationship with the Remedy 29 it feels every bit as capable as its long standing 26''-wheeled brother, "

then WHY? i'm confused.
  • + 9
 To sell a bunch of product.
  • + 0
 26ers are going obsolete in this category. In 2 years it will be hard to find a 26" AM or long travel trailbike. Its the same progression that happened in XC a few years back. No one makes a high end 26" XC bike anymore. They are all 650b or 29". Being "as capable" only refers to not having deficits. It doesn't refer to the benefits.
  • + 2
 Well companies still make high end XC FULL SUSPENSION 26ers... but yes for hardtails they're an extinct thing with many mid/large size brands. But folks will still custom build from frame up with 26ers also just because its cheaper to do it now (the market flooding with discounted 26er parts is helping things).
  • + 1
 @Willie1, that is simply not true:

The Scott Scale 600 is a carbon hardtail with 26" wheels and xtr /xx.
  • + 2
 Yes but that's Scott...the company that markets mainly in Europe where 29ers were resisted for as long as possible. And where 650Bs are exploding in popularity instead. But how long will Scott keep offering high end 26er hardtail models... that's the question. They're already dropping the 26er model full suspension bikes from the lineup to focus on JUST 650B and 29er versions. Its highly likely the 26er hardtail models will go the same way shortly. Put another way... if mountain biking had started as a sport in Europe... say france... and NOT in California.... we'd never have been riding 26ers in the first place.... it would have been 650B or 700C tires from the start.
  • + 1
 Cannondale F26 carbon 2
Another carbon high end 26" hardtail.
  • + 1
 Yes... but for how long... its all fine and good that a few brands are still offering them NOW... but two years from now... unlikely. Trek like Rocky Mountain and Specialized and Giant are all abandoning 26ers for higher end XC. Point to what's available currently all you want, but the writing is on the wall... the wheelsize is going away for most all brands other than cheap models, gravity models and things for really short folks.
  • + 1
 Maybe my statement was a bit of an overgeneralization, but there is really no current development in 26" XC racing. As the development cycles move on, the last remnants will disappear.

I sold my 26" XC hardtail to a frien last fall for a song. My Ibis Mojo SL with 650b is within 1 gear (1 gear lower on long climbs compared to the hardtail) as efficient as the hardtail, and much more versatile. It was redundant, and gathering dust.
  • + 1
 ditto..my girlfriend is short...I built her a 26er hardtail before I built her a 29er hardtail and the niner was originally picked as a cheap route to a snow bike so she could winter trail ride with me (as I own a salsa mukluk, which was the LAST 26er wheelsize mountain bike I decided to build for myself). But had the second 26er frame she switched to been able to fit 650B wheels... i'd have built it for her that way instead of a 26er again. And the only reason I'm looking at building another 26er for her is she wants to try full suspension out and its a cheaper route to go right now given her small size frame needs and the market shift leading to model dumping sales online (but ideally she has asked for a 650B full suspension, but that's in the long term goals plan for bike ownership right now).
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  • + 2
 the only remedy I want to try is a 650b version
  • + 1
 I'd try a 26er remedy now... just so I'll have a comparison point when they release the 650B version to replace it.
  • + 1
 Mnah in 5 years they will all be full of it - it took them less than 3 years of extreme 29erism to set the course on something new like 650b. By 2015-17 we will hear that 26ers got redesigned, someone found he hole in geometry that no one ever saw before, and their lower mass and acceleration is a great thing. I've heard it numerous times: release of a carbon XC/trail frame: "the light weight is the key to build a fast bike" - same company, a new 29er released few months later: "wheels might be heavier but the momentum is riders friend..."

What goes around comes around
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  • + 2
 Should have made it 27.5" 29ers are so gay
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  • + 2
 Enough talk. Shut up and take my money Trek...
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  • + 1
 Lets face it, bigger wheels are faster in a downhill scenario. This IS the direction the market will be going.
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  • + 1
 This one or Santa Cruz Tallboy LT? Trek looks just as good Smile )
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  • - 3
 In 2010, I beat a guy on a brand new remedy at a SuperD race at northstar. He was more fit than I was, and out pedaled me on a fire road section, I blitzed a pass on him dropping into sticks and stones, my '06 Heckler blasted the remedy, I left him behind in the gnar, and won the race.
  • + 4
 Cool story bro.
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  • + 0
 Not a Trek fan but must admit that lower-front frame guard looks stunning Smile
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  • + 1
 I like big bikes and I cannot lie! -run dmc damn I just made that up!
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  • + 0
 Not enough travel. I'd rather have the 29er enduro or a Lenz PBJ.
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  • + 1
 looks like a session! Big Grin
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