2013 Trek Bikes In Cortina, Italy - First Look

Aug 13, 2012
by Mike Levy  
 
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Cortina, Italy

A small mountain town nestled in the Southern Dolomites, Cortina d'Ampezzo (Curtain of the Ampezzo Valley ) has an eclectic history that makes it one of the more interesting locations to visit, let alone mountain bike on the rocky, unforgiving mountains that loom over the 4,000ft high Italian hamlet. Cortina has the down-home atmosphere that all European mountain towns seem to exude, but it has also seen its fair share of strife throughout history. Conflict visited the region in both 1420 and 1508 as the Republic of Venice first came knocking, followed by Austria nearly ninety years later. The Habsburg dynasty laid claim to Cortina until 1920 when Italy ultimately took control subsequent to victory in the first World War. History then took a less violent turn, with the 1956 Winter Olympics coming to town, and you can actually still spot the
well-maintained ski jump tower and landing slope on the drive in on the twisting two-lane road. Lifts and gondolas make their way up the surrounding slopes as well, attesting to the area's heavy history in Winter sports. The vertical, rocky walls surrounding Cortina are also home to both many trekking and rock climbing routes as well, with climbing legend Reinhold Messner himself cutting his teeth on the local terrain. The adventurous mountain history has spawned many remote Rifugios, restaurants and hostels nestled high in the surrounding mountains, (shown above ) that provide shelter, food, and atmosphere to those who travel far enough to enjoy them. And even if you will never get the chance to visit Cortina's mountains, you've likely already seen them up close without even knowing it - the Sylvester Stallone movie, Cliffhanger, features many climbing scenes filmed in and around Cortina, as well as the classic Bond flick, For Your Eyes Only. It's fair to say that Cortina has quite a mixed bag of history behind it, not to mention some very challenging terrain for those who are looking for a two-wheeled adventure.

Trek 2013 bikes in Italy. Photos by Sterling Lorence and Dan Milner.
  From the Ferrari 430 Spider parked in the basement of our hotel, to the red, white, and green colours everywhere we looked, Italian pride runs deep in Cortina.

Trek 2013 bikes in Italy. Photos by Sterling Lorence and Dan Milner
  This is the proper way to tour Italy.

Trek 2013 bikes in Italy. Photos by Sterling Lorence and Dan Milner.


Into The Mountains

We spent two days riding in the valleys and up on the peaks of the Dolomites, with the first leg of our journey beginning with a short pedal from the hotel to the cable car that ascends Mount Faloria. Sure, we could have climbed up the mountain's steep lower slopes, but with nasty weather moving in fast, the lift-assisted approach made more sense. As it turned out, the storms caught most of our group regardless. The lift, which begins right in town and gains 3,000ft in total, took us to the mid-way station where we disembarked in order to climb under our own power. As is often the case, the slopes that didn't look that intimidating while overhead in the cable car turned out to quickly put our entire group, barring Trek's Travis Brown, immediately into the red-zone.

What began as a steep gravel road, the bain of most mountain bikers, soon slimmed down to a rocky singletrack that emerged from the tree line, exposing both the views below us and the sheer drop to our left - unforgiving to say the least. Our entire group were on matching, blue Fuel EX 9.8s, likely looking to the congregation of hikers like some sort of wayward tour group that was about to jump in way over their heads. And that was partly true, because while we were all snaking our way along the rocky singletrack, ominous dark clouds were moving in quickly overhead. Most of our group didn't think anything of it at first - we've all been caught out in the rain and cold - but a storm high in the Dolomites is quite different than a storm at sea level, especially for those in our herd hailing from warmer, ocean-side climates.

It took less than ten minutes from hearing the first thunder for the black clouds to open up on us, throwing down hail fast enough to leave red welts on any skin left exposed. We all scattered immediately, leaving the bikes behind as we searched for even the shallowest of overhangs, crouching low and covering our ears from the missile-like onslaught. The first storm lasted only ten minutes at most, but the rain, hail, and wind strong enough to blow a grown man over the edge, left the steep slopes above us in distress, with bowling ball sized rocks zooming past our protected hiding spots from above.


Photo by Sterling Lorence and Dan Milner
  Our fractured group took shelter where ever we could find, from rock overhangs to a massive tunnel dug into the mountainside during the War.

Trek 2013 bikes in Italy. Photos by Sterling Lorence and Dan Milner
  While we used lifts to access the area's high mountain trails, there was still plenty of climbing to be had - much of it steep and taken at redline.

Trek 2013 bikes in Italy. Photos by Sterling Lorence and Dan Milner.
  The mountain gods smiled down upon us once we reached the saddle, gracing our descent with sun and drying trails.

Trek 2013 bikes in Italy. Photos by Sterling Lorence and Dan Milner.
  Smooth singletrack rolls just out of sight where, if you were one of the riders pictured in the photo, you'd be on the binders hard as the trail enters some very technical rock pitches.

Trek 2013 bikes in Italy. Photos by Sterling Lorence and Dan Milner.
  The loose, rocky terrain eventually gave way to more forgiving singletrack that snaked down to the valley's floor.

Trek 2013 bikes in Italy. Photos by Sterling Lorence and Dan Milner.
  The Fuel EX 9.9, complete with XO running gear and Kashima-treated DRCV suspension front and back, sits atop the range.

2013 Fuel EX - Added Versatility

Despite the 2013 Fuel EX sharing the same basic lines as last year's model, the new version has gone through a "ground up redesign'', according to Trek. Trail bikes make up between 40 and 50% of Trek's global mountain bikes sales, and for good reason since a bike like the '12 Fuel EX can be ridden by many different types of riders, and on very different terrain, with great results. Further improving that versatility seemed to be the goal for 2013, though, with its travel bumped from 120mm to 130mm, an ISCG-05 chain guide mount (!), and a slightly shorter chain stay length, as well as internal routing for RockShox's Reverb Stealth dropper post.

While the additional travel and chain guide tabs are likely to make many aggressive trail riders happy, Trek's suspension engineers, Dylan Howes and Jose Gonzalez, have also worked to improve pedalling performance. The bike is said to be more efficient, despite the extra travel, thanks to a tweaked suspension ratio that allows for a higher compression setting within the rear shock, but without the harshness usually associated with a firm tune. Up front, a new fork volume adjustment, via different sized spacers, allows the rider to tune the DRCV-equipped fork's progressiveness - possibly a great tuning feature given the fork's CTD damper.
Fuel EX Details:

• Rear wheel travel: 130mm (up 10mm from '12)
• ISCG-05 chain guide mount
• Internal Reverb Stealth routing
• 10mm shorter chain stays than the '12 model
• Removable front der mount
• Revised suspension ratio
• Added stand over clearance
• ABP Suspension

Fuel EX 9.8 On Trail

Having spent time on three generations of the longer travel Remedy, as well as both the SuperFly cross-country and Session 9.9 race bikes, we're well versed in Trek's ABP concentric dropout pivot design employed on the rear of the Fuel EX. To further make ourselves at home on the bike we swapped in a shorter, 60mm stem and wide bar combo that we're completely used to, with the hope of getting a bit rowdy on our steed.

While our black and blue 9.8 test bike sits one level down from the top, it is still assembled around the same OLCV carbon frame, but with aluminum chain stays in place of the 9.9's carbon stays. Given that we were jumping into some unfamiliar and very rocky terrain, we came away impressed with how quickly we felt comfortable on the 130mm travel bike - it didn't take long until we were just as relaxed on the EX as we would have been on our own steed. The bike's DRCV shock, which utilizes two, staged air chambers for a more coil-like feel, was quite forgiving on top, but we also never felt a hard bottom - and keep in mind that we spent a minimal amount of time tinkering with the bike's rear suspension. Up front, the 9.8's CTD-spec FOX 32 Float fork, complete with DRCV trickery, did well trying to keep up with the bike's impressive rear suspension, but we'll have to reserve final judgement until we can experiment with the fork's volume adjustment system - it could be just the ticket to tuning out the brake dive that FOX's '13 CTD equipped forks are prone to. While
we can see some riders wanting to make the jump to FOX's 120/160mm Talas 34 fork in the search for a stiffer front end, we'd say that the EX's balance and handling was spot-on with the shorter travel 32 - don't mess it up with the taller fork. Component-wise, the standouts have to be Shimano's amazing XT brakes and and the Reverb Stealth dropper post, two items that made the toothy terrain more manageable. The brakes in particular have a firm feel, offer consistant, fade-free performance, and have power to spare. We just wish that their near-useless 'bite point' screw adjustment actually changed something...

Trek 2013 bikes in Italy. Photos by Sterling Lorence and Dan Milner.
  A big climb followed by a rocky descent was on tap for the second day - a good time to be on your A-game.

Trek 2013 bikes in Italy. Photos by Sterling Lorence and Dan Milner.
  The loose surface made for some exciting moments behind the bars.

Trek 2013 bikes in Italy. Photos by Sterling Lorence and Dan Milner.
  It wasn't all rock and more rocks, though, with some equally bitch'n brown ribbons to chase each other down.

Trek 2013 bikes in Italy. Photos by Sterling Lorence and Dan Milner.
  Big Mountain Bike Adventures' Chris Winter and his guides laid out a challenging route for our two days in Cortina.

Big Mountain Bike Adventures

Putting together a trip of this magnitude, one that involves a large group of riders covering some very challenging terrain high in the rocky Dolomites, necessitates a good strategy. Trek brought in Chris Winter (pictured above) and his tour company, Big Mountain Bike Adventures, to handle the logistics of it all. Thankfully, Chris can not only throw down on a rowdy trail with the best of riders, but having been immersed in the world of an adventure travel company since childhood, knows a thing or two about putting on a good show. "I grew up with my parents having Michelin maps spread across the kitchen table,'' says Winter of his family's forty year history in the cycling tour biz, "I spent my childhood over here, then I moved to Whistler at the age of twenty and got straight into mountain biking'', which clearly shaped his tours of the future into true, aggressive mountain bike trips that just happen to be guided. While the focus of every trip on the Big Mountain roster, be it in Switzerland, Peru, New Zealand, or any of the other twelve trips offered, is to ride killer trails, Winter strives for an all-around experience that goes beyond killer singletrack. That philosophy rang especially true during our visit, where we not only rode great trails that had a high pucker-factor, but also slept in an Italian rifugio perched atop a Dolomite peak. Our home for the night was especially welcoming given the intense storm that rolled over us like a dump truck, making the hot food and drink even more rewarding than we had expected.

Trek 2013 bikes in Italy. Photos by Sterling Lorence and Dan Milner
  The wood-fired hottub, even if it was a bit of a logjam, was exactly what our tired muscles needed. The cold beer didn't hurt either.

Trek 2013 bikes in Italy. Photos by Sterling Lorence and Dan Milner
  Cabin porn? Mid-ride lunch stop at a residence high in the Dolomites.

Trek 2013 bikes in Italy. Photos by Sterling Lorence and Dan Milner.
  The Stache 8 features a FOX Evolution Series 32 fork and a set of custom green Race Face Turbine cranks.

2013 Stache - New Trail 29er Hardtail

Fitting into more of a niche category than the other models shown here, the new Stache could be called a ''play bike'', among other things. Not to say that one can't have loads of fun aboard the new Fuel EX, or even the featherweight SuperFly 100, but the 29'' wheeled Stache looks more geared for the casual rider who is looking to ride a hardtail over some challenging terrain. The two model lineup - the Stache 7 and Stache 8 - both utilize the same aluminum frame, complete with a tapered head tube and closed, convertible 12 x 142mm dropouts - a nice point if you want the ability to swap wheels between the Stache and the other bikes in your stable. Hate front derailleurs, but hate dropping chains even more? ISCG-05 chain guide mounts should eliminate that particular headache. The frame also features internal routing for a Reverb Stealth seat post, although neither the Stache 7 or 8 come stock with one, and both front and rear derailleur lines are routed within the frame as well.
Stache Details:

• New model for '13
• 29er hardtail
• 120mm travel fork
• ISCG-05 chain guide tabs
• Reverb Stealth internal routing (external option as well)
• Internal front and rear derailleur routing
• Convertible 12 x 142mm dropouts

Trek 2013 bikes in Italy. Photos by Sterling Lorence and Dan Milner.
  The 2013 Rumblefish also made an appearance in Cortina, Italy. The 120mm travel 29er employs FOX's CTD-spec forks and clutch-equipped rear derailleurs on key models for the coming year.

The 650B Question

Trek has spent a dozen years developing their 29" wheeled bikes, long before any other major manufacturer was putting weight behind the then new platform, but we've still yet to see a production 'tweener-wheeled bike from the American company. That's not to say that we won't in the future, and you'd be mistaken if you thought Trek didn't have a number of different 650B prototypes in their stable of test bikes, but they remain undecided on if and when a production model will make the cut. "We need to know exactly what it does well and what it doesn't do well,'' said Travis Brown, one of Trek's main development riders, when we asked his thoughts. While 650B seems largely curiosity-driven at this point (how many consumers have actually ridden one for an extended period of time?), many companies are debuting production models for the coming season. Trek isn't one of them, though. Travis Ott, Trek's mountain bike brand manager, was quick to point out that if a 650B platform does become a reality, it won't be rushed. "We're still moving the ball forward for 29ers, and we're not going to rush a 650B bike to the market for the sake of having one,'' said Ott. "Wheel size is one variable in the package, with the bike a sum of all its parts. The suspension has to be dialed, the geometry has to be dialled - it's all part of it. We're going to deliver the best overall package, whatever that wheel size might be."

Trek 2013 bikes in Italy. Photos by Sterling Lorence and Dan Milner.
Trek 2013 bikes in Italy. Photos by Sterling Lorence and Dan Milner.



Have the urge to visit Cortina, Italy? Like what Trek has cooking for 2013?


www.trekbikes.com
www.ridebig.com
All photography by Dan Milner and Sterling Lorence
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114 Comments

  • + 83
 Trek makes alot of really nice bikes...i just think its the price point that turns people off
  • + 15
 that is what killed moutain bike in the beginning of the 90s.. fashion killed the market by rising prices to an unaffordable level.. it is slowly coming.. history is made of eternal new beginnings.
  • + 11
 Enough manufacturers are making affordable bikes to keep it afloat IMO, I can't see it getting killed anytime soon, S
  • + 7
 Agreed, as long as the entry level price point bikes remain available, along with a healthy used market, there will be biking Smile
  • + 20
 i don't say that biking will die, as it didn't really die in the 90's but the market was only for the healthiest bikers, as the funniest bike became so expensive.. of course entry level bikes exist, i bought one, broke an axle 2 months after purchased... you cannot do serious biking with them.. What i say is that the price to pay t have a serious bike to do serious rides is getting higher and higher..and we all know that everything is coming from china or taiwan, where costs of making are not rising.. fashion rise the price.. trek does millions of bikes.. a 9.9 at 9990 dollars?? a giant glory at 6000 dollars ?? they are not supposed to be dream bike nor icons.. they slowly become that.
  • + 18
 They've gotta be able to sign Gwin and Semenuk's pay cheques some how!
  • + 10
 Its the apple of bikes lol
  • + 12
 If you want to save at least 33% off the bike, get last years model. I always do that and end up saving a lot of money.
  • + 18
 33% of $9990 is still a shit ton of money
  • + 4
 Yt will sell their carbon tues for around 3000€...
  • + 0
 and it will be misaligned! (I joke)
  • + 4
 totally agree with barrett and sissi, I would never buy a brand new bike now. They're completely overpriced for what you're getting. It's gonna have to come to a head soon, I don't know anyone who buys these £6000 bikes
  • + 2
 back in the 90s I remenber racing 5 mins downhill races in the pyrenees with my cannondale m2000 www.retrobike.co.uk/forum/files/cannondale_m2000_06_154.jpg (bought new for something like 1500$) and I almost never broke a part, although i was in the 10th most of the times.. of course no 40 feet jump or 20 feet step down.. but there were roots and rocks everywhere.. I think I could have raced the MOH with it.. and now I bought a 2400 $ enduro bike and one axle broke while enjoying rides in my local woods.. and so do my friends, whose bikes are always away for warranty( for the richest among us) or missing a broken part. and they spent money on them, wich are second hand bikes most of the time..
  • + 0
 Someone has to fuel all the amazing technology we are bebefiting from these days. You can't tell me that you don't notice the difference between a $3000 bike and a $6000 bike. There will always be a price point option for everyone depending on the level of performance you desire.
  • + 10
 You cannot seriously look at a company's top-of-the-line models and say that the whole brand is too expensive. That's ridiculous. Sure, the 9.9 is expensive, and out of many people's price range. But Trek (and most other large manufacturers) have a HUGE lineup of bikes to suit every need and budget. I believe the $2000-$3000 range is the sweet spot of any manufacturer, and I think the big manufacturers (Trek, Giant, Specialized, Norco) have that market covered with a whole lot of great products that are high enough performance to make any amateur happy, and cheap enough that most of us can afford them.
  • + 2
 not to mention they even put out stuff in the 600-1k range (basic stuff youll find at a sporting goods store)
  • + 5
 2000-3000 mid range?? one month salary for the luckyest of us... i think that brands have won their bet when I see most of the bikes in the different profiles.. people riding tracks with ultra expensive bike when a dirt bike would be by far enough.. but you wouldn't look like gwin or gracia.. but gracia is not gracia owing to a 10k$ santa cruz, gracia is gracia because he is trained and gifted and his balls.. buying an ipad wot make you the new kim.com .. marketing friendly technology names.. low prices bikes are no longer reliable.. because of the MTBF.. mean time before failure.. the one that oblige you to change your washing machine every 5 years now.. it reached our bike world.. the world were price (the highest and the more often) only matters.. 2000-3000$ is a sweet price.. and chinese don't even take benefit of that..
  • + 4
 $2000-$3000 a month would be hovering around the poverty line in Canada, so perhaps we are looking at this from different angles. If you are making $2000 a month in Canada, you might want to worry about eating instead of mountain biking Wink
  • + 3
 Totally agree...Trek leads the pack of the overexpensive (although wonderful) bikes: Scott, Santa Cruz, Specialized they have all pushed upwards the price lists just passing the ever increasing marketing expenses over to us. The tendency is now more and more visible.
Trek Slash $5,879.99- And all sold out by the way! The dealer told me everyone put it on payments! Payments?! On a bike?? May be I am just old an unreasonable.
  • + 4
 Mountain biking can be done affordably. I bought the 2 years old model new for 55% off. You gotta deal hunt, not buy the first bike you see
  • + 4
 If you can afford it, buy whatever the hell you want, if you cant, quite whining about the guys who can.
  • + 4
 people do what they want.. if you can afford a bentley continental, not jealous.. just saying that bike manufacturers are surfing on the wave of mountainbiking and sale their bikes a price wich is not connected to reality.. when we all know that mot of the work is done cheaply by china.. prices should have gone lowest when they increase insanely..that is so freaking funny that most of us cannot buy a 2012 model unless you do payments..
  • + 1
 well no, because they are using new technologies which mean that production costs dont simply decrease every year for them, the cost of production is passed along to the consumer. don't get me wrong, there is something about fashion to a lot of bikes, but i know A LOT of people who spend every cent that they have on their bike and that includes buying the latest frameset and all that goes with it. the demand is there. they don't make as much as you're suggesting on their top end bikes. and, it's my understanding that all of trek's Carbon bikes are made in their own factory in the US.
  • - 2
 My Sessions feels like the 7k I spent on it. Worth it! lol
  • - 2
 Man, do I feel lucky to be employed in such a way that spending 5K on a bike doesn't seem like an outrageous expense.
  • + 0
 I absolutely don't agree with you, sissi-chcocho. For the same money, I believe I am getting way more bike today than I was even 5 years ago. Perhaps the top-of-the-line models have gone up, but again, who cares. For the mid-range products, I quite honestly think performance has gone way up and price has either gone down or stayed the same. Just look at the components that are available at these price ranges. SLX for example, is available on most bikes in the "affordable" category, and its performance approaches that of XTR just a few years ago (if not by weight). And the price tag has not increased.

I don't think any retailers are having any problems selling current model bikes. If the prices were "not connected to reality", people simply wouldn't buy them. Trek is making plenty of sales. And the demand for high-end mountain bikes is on the rise. And if you think mountain bikes are expensive, just look at road bikes!
  • + 2
 @rolto1822: only Trek's high end Madones are still made in the US (and perhaps the new high end Domanes). All the rest are made overseas.
  • + 2
 My 2006 SWorks Stumpy listed for around $6k then. My 2012 Blur TRC lists for $5200 and is REMARKABLY better in every way. I love the way biking technology has improved and I've always been able to find online deals/sales to make it 'affordable'.
  • + 4
 the biggest problem is the mtb world is too trendy. take vehicles... if you were to get a newer vehicle like an 08(pick your brand here) it would still be considered newer. an 08 dh bike is old and nearly legendary. i ride an 08 demo and feel like i ride a jalopy when i go to places with alot of other riders. and lets face it, you spend $3,000 on a dh bike and your options are pretty limited. specialized has the status, like the frame, but everything else is wrong for a fairly serious ride. you will end up replacing nearly everything. same with the operator fr and so on. you basically have to spend the bigger bucks to get something closer to something you want. hell pedals are 100 bucks. headsets 150 now. really... you have to almost have a trust fund or live out of your car to afford a good dh bike every 2 years, that seems to be the shelf life anymore.
  • + 0
 Comparing a mountain bike to a car is not a fair comparison. Most people buy cars because they need them. We don't NEED our bikes. And for most of us, a stock Status is MORE than what any of us NEED. What you WANT is a different story. You can't blame an industry for successfully marketing to you Smile
  • + 0
 I am selling my 2012 Trek Session 9.9 for $5500- retails for $9200, I broke my thumb in the middle riding season and selling it to get next years model. Message me if you're interested.
  • + 4
 Does that 1993 S-Works FSR with cantilevers and 2.5" of travel I spent $5500 on when I made $7.25 an hour seem like a bargain to all you whiners that think bikes are too expensive these days? I'll take my carbon V10 at a price far less than equivalent after inflation thanks.

The least you could do is thank all the people that drop big bucks on cutting edge technology year after year so that you can ride disc brakes and reliable long travel suspension on $3000 rigs today. This BS that gets spun day after day about how bikes are getting too expensive is tiresome. You are getting bargains on tech we could only dream of in the early 90's. Hell, even the early 00's was riddled with garbage $6000 bikes that broke and underperformed to today's standards on incomes much less than today. Get over it and enjoy the marvel that is the modern day mountain bike and realize that the cutting edge requires either a high income or a singular priority, just as it always has and always will.
  • + 2
 I really buy everything either used or on sale. Let the people with money upgrade and then sell there "old"stuff which is still great. But it is surprising how much money people that arent even too into mtbiking will spend on the newest fancy bike.
  • + 2
 that's funny too how you say whiners for people who just want to pay what a mountain bike is supposed to cost and not what some society marketing rules and dream of a fancy commercialized life lead it to a marvel cost. I totally agree with primodevil.. 2500$ bikes are a basis for upgrades now if you want to enjoy a real ride , when they were beasts not a long time ago... this is your right to buy, you GOT to buy !! I just bought dmr simple acid green pedals, and I can see in the eyes of the young guns that they don't understand why I didn't buy some deity, or saint, or fire eye set for a dirt bike..
  • + 2
 So it is an expensive sport. Get over it. So is golf and snowboarding and tons of other sports that require expensive gear and traveling. If you want a 30-40 pound piece of metal on wheels that is capable of hucking 30 foot drops and riding down the gnarliest rock gardens in the world, you might have to pay a little bit of money. Deal with it. There is enough of us out there that will buy the new stuff, so you can buy it when I sell it a year or two later, when it's basically as good as the new stuff
  • + 1
 Snowboarding being expensive is the biggest joke. They sell no goretex oversized pants and jackets for liek 900€ here that's ridiculous. You can get all pimped out best stuff from the leading mountainieering clothing specialists for that. In that respect snowboarding is even more ridiculous priced.
[Reply]
  • + 30
 Lacks a specific 4" bike... one that a man named Brandon rides...
  • + 8
 For looking stylish on some slopes perhaps? Razz
  • + 0
 Same with the Session so there is still a chance.
  • + 3
 These are just the '13 trailbikes, all mid-travel type rigs.
  • + 2
 Im drooling over that custom slope bike
  • + 0
 I am selling my 2012 Trek Session 9.9 for $5500- retails for $9200, I broke my thumb in the middle riding season and selling it to get next years model. Message me if you're interested.
[Reply]
  • + 5
 Correct me if im wrong but during a thunderstorm in the mountains you get pockets of static in and around overhangs of rock. So your best staying away from them, unless you want to get hit by lightening. At least this is what we were told during a hiking trip in the dolomites.
  • + 1
 so overall your just f*cked?
  • + 1
 Aha aye. Well we were told to take our boots off (theyve got metal bits) then lay on the ground.
  • + 1
 and hope robert knepper doesnt come by Big Grin
[Reply]
  • + 3
 Dear Pinkbike, If you ever find that your schedule is too busy to make it to all these bike releases, events, etc I am willing to volunteer as a stand in. Just post the flight and hotel vouchers to me in Kelowna and I assure you that I will represent Pinkbike.com in a very professional manner and return with well written, unbiased reports. Feel free to throw in beer money as well with the tickets.
[Reply]
  • + 3
 People who complain about prices of upper level models in product launches just don't seem to understand that Bike brands don't bring entry-level anything to a product launch, unless its an entry level DH bike. Actual entry-level mountain bikes don't get press launches because the bikes aren't something that interest readers of magazines but they are where most brands make the majority of their profits. Brands like Trek will sell easily a million bikes a year (worldwide) at the $500 or lower price levels, and they're making at least a hundred dollars profit on each one. They really don't care if they only sell a few thousand of the $9900 bikes which they might profit a thousand on.
  • + 2
 Yeah but the kids already have their pitchforks and torches out. Might as well let em go on with the lynching.
  • + 1
 Truth be told, I would really enjoy seeing some more mid-level product launches. I love seeing the high end stuff, but after the "ooh and ahh" period, I've pretty much moved on. It would be great to see some of the more affordable stuff get celebrated by the manufacturers and properly introduced to the consumers.
  • - 6
 I am selling my 2012 Trek Session 9.9 for $5500- retails for $9200, I broke my thumb in the middle riding season and selling it to get next years model. Message me if you're interested.
  • + 4
 Brett13; its called PB Buysell.
[Reply]
  • + 6
 Those last pics look mental!
[Reply]
  • + 2
 How about to throw some Remedy pictures and first opinions in your ride report?
I know nothing seems changed with Remedy, but at least som fancy pictures..

Obviously, Trek keens on Fuel-EX this year and always putting them on the showcase.
  • + 4
 No Remedy at this event, sorry. Fuel EX, Rumblefish, Stache, and SuperFly models were shown, but I'm sure the '13 Remedy will make an appearance soon.
[Reply]
  • + 0
 "The wood-fired hottub, even if it was a bit of a logjam, was exactly what our tired muscles needed. The cold beer didn't hurt either." Usually dudes + hot tub + log jam aren't something you want to read about. Jus' sayin'.
[Reply]
  • + 0
 The new Fuel looks awesome!!! I like the added standover and the bump in travel, plus the ISG tabs are a great idea for riders who don't like 2 or even 3 ring set-ups (I haven't ridden a bike with two+ front rings in years and with the advances in drivetrains I'm likely neer to ride a 2 or 3 ring set-up again)

Now if they'd just make the Remedy SS bikes available (and bring back the the Air based FR frame/bike) they'd have every base covered... I'm hoping they don't do something stupid like poo poo the 650B bikes in favor of the 29rs...The 650B is, to me, the best combination of 29r effiancy and 26" handling. May not be the BEST choice for every rider depending on terrain (like in the SW where it's nice and open), but here in the NW I've found 29rs really struggle in mixed, tight terrain (getting going after a tight turn into an uphill root/rock strewn section I was LOST in the gearing on the last 29" FS bike I tried out.). The 650B bikes I've ridden feel PERFECT for NW Epics with some good, mild FR thrown in for fun.

I'd love to see a beefier version of the Slash too that's more aimed at replacing the Air FR bike of a few years ago since it seems that's a sailed ship (those were REALLY great bikes IMO, easy to pedal up and more then burly enough for "park work" or "full on" FR trails...) So since it's gone for good I'd like to see something actually replace it (still not sure WHY they dumped the AIR after one or two years... must have not been a money maker for them, sadly)
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Really like that Stache, I have been wanting a 29er quite a lot recently and the only one that has been catching my eye is the Kona Honzo. Hopefully more companies release some aggressive 29er hardtails Big Grin
  • + 1
 nah mate. dinnae dae it
  • + 1
 I want something I can just go cycle on the road, also cycle to Carron Valley do a lap and cycle back on crow road or something and the way my logic works a 29er won't give me finger cramps cos it will roll over all the bumps Razz I could cycle alongside you out on your runs ;D Been thinking about it for ages and still not done anything about it so might never do anything about it...
  • + 1
 Check out the banshee paradox. More like the stache than the honzo, but it seems slacker than the stache. Just built one up last month, it's awesome
  • + 1
 Hi skawt. You'll be happy to hear that the Stache was a bike we designed with UK riders in mind.
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  • + 1
 "Even though it was a bit of a logjam"... lol just what i needed this monday morning. all i have to say is, dream job! testing bikes in the italian alps, or anywhere for that matter. awesome!
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  • + 4
 Wish they would have done a 140mm version. Love the EX, but 130mm still?
  • + 2
 130mm is such an odd travel amount. It could be more about the ride than the numbers, mixed with some politics to fit into their lineup and not take out the Remedy. I ride a 140mm bike. I could go with more or less travel for my next trail bike depending on how bikes I test feel at the time. I'll probably end up staying around 140mm or going higher just because the bikes can still climb amazing while being that much more capable on the downhills for a one bike quiver.
  • + 3
 The EX was 120mm last year, so it's been upped by 10mm for 2013. But I think that wildwood has the right idea... with the Remedy at 150mm, a bit more distinction between it and the EX is needed. Dialed geo, for sure. The bike felt great, and it is more forgiving on top than most 130mm air sprung bikes thanks to the DRCV shock.
  • + 1
 I used to have a Fuel Ex, and I did love it. Badass bike and handled great and climbed great, I raised the fork to 140 at the time and it handled nicer because the h/a wasn't as steep anymore, and still climbed just as good. 130mm is fine I presume, as long as the price is right. I do like the way the frame looks like, but not sure why Trek runs those tires. Aside from all that, the DRCV rear to me has been difficult to set up, or once set up, I wasn't wow'd by it...just didn't have that factor. I fully understand it's purpose, and how it works, but riding it just doesn't feel special. Maybe it's my terrain.
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  • + 1
 $3000 is lots of $$$$$ if you have no dental or medical coverage. Just remember to go to the LBS if you are willing to spend that as it supports REAL people not parasitic Chief Executive whatevers in the most direct sense.
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  • + 4
 The Ferrari logo looks really weird in that position..
  • + 2
 That's because Ferrari is latin for "falling horse" :-)
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  • + 4
 WHERE IS THIS f*ck*** Remedy slopestyle ??
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  • + 2
 All I wanna know is trek gonna release a carbon version of the slash? If not, ibis hd 160 here I come!
  • + 2
 There's a carbon version of the Giant Reign X coming soon. Save yourself some cash and get that.
  • + 1
 When is it supposedly coming? Unless the Reign X gets a major redesign then the slash wins hands down. I rode a 2010 Reign X and the rear end was so flexy and just didnt feel very confidence inspiring. Dont forget about the broken suspension links that plauge the RX.
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  • + 1
 Trek never fails to make me proud to sell their products. I own 4 of them and wish I had the money for more! Congrats on the stellar lineup and can't wait to see the rest!
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  • - 1
 Ya know what makes me sick? The fact that they decided to go to Italy for this. With a struggling economy, you'd think a U.S. company could introduce their new bike in the U.S. while supporting the economy that helped it come about. At least if you don't like our country for your puppet shows, you could give the love to our neighbors to the north. Trek is not a U.S. company any more; Everything besides their HQ is done outside of it. Glad I don't ride their bikes anymore!!
  • + 1
 They are having a show in the U.S. this week as well.
  • + 1
 Hi MTBP. We launch bikes in Europe because the majority of cycling media that attends is based outside of the US. We have done many media camps in both the US and Canada, and will do so again in the future. Trek is also still very much a US company, but it's also true that more bikes are sold outside of the US, than in it. Also, global economies are struggling, not just the US. Just sayin'.
  • + 0
 Good call! ^. So about the slopestyle bike.....???
  • + 0
 Those are custom bikes that we do for the C3 team, I'm afraid.
  • + 1
 Ya we know...Why not come out with it? People would buy it. Trek isn't doing the ticket or slopestyle bike this year. You guys would make a lot more money with these bikes in the lineup.
  • + 1
 It would be really expensive to product these bikes on a large scale, and we wouldn't sell them in enough numbers to recoup that investment. It's unlikely that we would sell more than a couple of hundred, if that. Considering that we sell bikes like the EX in the thousands upon thousands, then you can see that we actually don't stand to make any money on a slopestyle bike. But, one advantage of being a manufacturer is that we can do what we want. If retailers start demanding slopestyle bikes, then we'll produce them.
  • + 1
 Look at Specialized and Rocky Mountain. They just released one. These 4 inch bikes have many uses like dirt jumping, slopestyle, 4x, dual slalom, and maybe some small freeride stuff. It's not just for slopestyle. People have been demanding these for a while now. Trek just singled out the dirt jumpers/slopestyle guys for 2013.
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  • + 3
 Insanely jealous of Mike Levy's lifestyle.... #winner
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  • + 2
 Wow those are some nice womens bikes but where are the real man machines? Trek??? Coils and oils????
  • + 2
 "Coils and oils" haha, nice. These are just their '13 trailbikes.. we'll see longer travel options soon.
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  • + 1
 The Stache will be mine.....Oh yes, it will be mine! I've been waiting for a slack angled hardtail with a 5" fork. Well done Trek!
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  • + 2
 The session 9.9 is also made in the USA.
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  • + 1
 i just got a trek.need to go ride it at fort william me thinks soon before the the end of summer.
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  • + 1
 The EX9.9 is a pimped bike right out of the box... Lemme see the '13 Slash 9!
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  • + 1
 No more Ticket and still no Remedy ss ?? I think I have nothing to do here...
  • + 7
 As it says in the intro, these are only their trailbikes...
  • + 1
 They still aren't in the lineup so what does it matter? ^ STUPID that they aren't making either of them.
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  • + 1
 Oh man, love that place! Definitely one for the bucket list.
Any geo numbers for the Stache?
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  • + 2
 I heard Santa's not comming this year...
*friendly pat on shoulder *
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  • + 1
 Second-to-last pic of the portage - yikes! I'd be carrying that rig down low!
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  • + 1
 DOES THIS COME WITH FREE DILDOS
  • + 1
 Yes, yes it does. Silver right.to the heart.
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  • + 1
 how is the ex on square edge bumps?
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  • + 1
 this is old news this, was released on other bike news sites a week ago
  • + 1
 Pinkbike coverage is always amazing though. We think it's worth the wait.
  • + 1
 Lmao, trek is endorsing Pinkbike now.
  • + 1
 Well sure, if by 'endorsing' you mean giving credit to someone who does their homework and writes stories that are technically accurate and don't contain glaring errors about a product so that you, the reader, are more informed about said product. Is that what you mean by endorsing?
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  • - 1
 The Treks look strangely underbuilt for Cortina. This is serious rockgarden territory.

Single ply
need not apply.
7`or less
means serious stress
airshock
wont rock
  • + 3
 The tires were setup tubeless, so flats were minimal. And I personally wouldn't want to ride a 7" travel bike in Cortina. Somewhere between 120 and 160mm seems like it would make the most sense.
  • + 1
 Yeah, I haven't ridden in Cortina, but it looks like any other high alpine area so I'd say that a bike like the Slash or the old Air FR bike would be the hot ticket. The Slash was specificaly designed for Euro Alpine riding (and "super D"/ Enduro racing)... I can see an air shock not being ideal as thy heat up like crazy in the really rough rocky terrain where they're getting worked over and worked HARD aye. I feel like a Spec. Enduro EVO would be beyond awesome in those mountains. I know that here on Mt Hood (which compared to the Dolomites or the Alps is just a little bump) that a long legged AM/Trail bike can be unreally fun for riding top to bottom and eerything in between. I can't imagine hauling around a 7" coil sprung FR bike at those altitudes unless it's ALL lift access riding. But in those places, I'd be wanting to do the true "all mountain" thing. My soon-to-be wife and I are going to the Alps for our honeyoon next summer so I'm stoked to get on a nice bike and truly enjoy our time riding (it's even ore cool to me to have a fiance who's getting REALLY pumped on riding and actually WANTS to spend our honeymoon mountain-biking)
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  • + 1
 Wow! The Fuel EX 9.9/ 8 are just sexy! Good going Trek!
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  • - 1
 well if you want quality you got to pay for it....anyway I'm from Asia and i don't think its expensive......
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  • - 1
 ummmmm no session???
  • + 4
 Coming later. This is the trail/xc lineup.
  • - 1
 for the complete line-up look at my 2013 album
  • - 3
 I am selling my 2012 Trek Session 9.9 for $5500- retails for $9200, I broke my thumb in the middle riding season and selling it to get next years model. Message me if you're interested.
  • + 1
 @Kane370: Where is this "2013 Album" ??? Did you have to remove it so as not to ruin the surprise for PB and Treck here in the next week??? I can't WAIT to see the new bikes in the categorys I prefer (DH/FR/AM).

Cheers

Dave
[Reply]

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