Old School Tech: Cannondale Fulcrum

Apr 13, 2012 at 0:07
Apr 13, 2012
by Matt Wragg  
 
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Cannondale have always done things differently. They have never simply accepted the conventional logic, preferring to walk their own path for bike design. At their team camp in Finale Ligure in Northern Italy last month they had this beauty of a downhill bike out on display - David Vasquez's World Cup downhill race bike, circa 1998. Identical bikes were also piloted by Missy Giove and Anne-Caroline Chausson. The engineers behind this bike were clearly pushing the envelope of what was known and possible with these bikes, it also shows how far bike design has come since then in some ways, and hasn't changed much at all in others. We take a closer look...

1997 Cannondale Fulcrum

1997 Cannondale Fulcrum
First off: geometry. That's pretty slack and the chainstays looks pretty short, but for a modern bike that BB is way high. And yes, it's not what you'd call light.

1997 Cannondale Fulcrum

1997 Cannondale Fulcrum
What the hell? That's the first thing people usually say when they see the crank/drive arrangement. Like everything Cannondale did with this bike, there's a reason for it though and a singularity of focus you don't find too often. Look at those linkages for the suspension, do they look familiar? They should, as Santa Cruz and Intense (who license the design from Santa Cruz) use a variation of them for their VPP bikes today. Cannondale's engineers optimised the linkage to work with a specific chairing size, a larger or smaller ring would affect the performance, but their racers still wanted to be able to change their gear ratios to suit different courses, so this system was developed to keep that size constant.

There are five rings in all, but it is the ring on the non-drive side crank that drives the system, in the same way that the chainring(s) do on the bike sitting there in your garage. That power is then transferred by the first chain up to the sprocket sitting forwards and above it. A fixed axle transfers that power through to the sprocket on the driveside and a chain connects that to another sprocket sitting behind the larger driveside chainring. There is then a system similar to a freehub engagement to turn the main chainring as it is not directly attached to the crank arm. To adjust the gear ratios the team mechanics could change the size of those four sprockets driving the chainring - although it wasn't too popular with them as it was so complicated.

1997 Cannondale Fulcrum

1997 Cannondale Fulcrum
The "Super Downhill Moto Fork." What a name. Essentially it is two modern Lefty forks, bolted together at the crown.That means each leg has a complete, separate damping system. You can't see it because of the boots, but they don't use a round tube, like modern stanchions, instead they are square and use needle bearings instead of bushings. For this length of fork, Cannondale felt that the twisting forces from compression and braking compromised the kind of bushings every major manufacturer uses today and meant a loss of performance. This system of square tubing and needle bearings completely separates the vertical movement of the fork from the forces acting on it.

1997 Cannondale Fulcrum
The idea of adjusting geometry at the headtube is nothing new - here you can see offsets in the headtube to help slacken out that headangle. They are custom-machined eccentric cups for the headset bearings to sit in to give a couple of degrees of adjustment. It's also worth noting the size of that headtube - Cannondale invented the 1.5" headtube as they realised the larger area meant they could build their frames much stronger. On this bike the fork uses a 1 1/8" steerer, which gave them the room for the offsets.

1997 Cannondale Fulcrum
While some of the bike was well ahead of its time - the rear axle still had some way to go, as nobody had started using burly through axles at this time - that came with the next generation of their bikes.

www.cannondale.com
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205 Comments

  • + 105
 The first high end mountain bikes I ever looked at were when I begged my dad to take me into a shop that sold cannondale, I would have given my huffy and an un-descended testicle for one
  • + 8
 I still have one of those XT axles on my bike.
  • + 1
 Me too. There is one on my bike now.
  • + 18
 If it ain't broke, don't fix it!
  • + 17
 I was a little kid when my older brother told me about the amazing and innovative mtb company called cannondale. I dreamed of flying off cliffs and jumps on them. By the time I actually started getting into mtb though they had really been eclipsed by a lot of other companies. They were still there but a lot of other great companies drew my eye away. It is nice to look back and see what we were drooling about.
  • + 0
 i got an old xt axle aswell
  • + 41
 I wonder if walmart bikes in 10 years will look like your average v-10 I wonder if that'd be a good thing...
  • - 53
 Im amazed, todays hi-tech bike industry seems ti stick at the same time since `90, only new is the shitty carbon and lower bb.
kids, seems that we are all brainwashed
  • + 12
 The only new thing is carbon???? Do you not remember the crazy links and terrible suspension designs of the 90's? Everything now is so refined and proven, for the most part. And Carbon rules, not very new, except on DH bikes. Been on road bikes for years. I wouldn't trade today for the 90's ever.
  • + 4
 Cannondale had some unique ideas and were really inventive, but they are probably the ugliest bikes next to Klein. But again, there were advanced and i respect them for breaking the mould.
  • + 8
 It would be sick if tomorrows sequence Saturday was a sequence of cam mccaul doin a flip on this thing.
  • + 2
 Stefan-ram you are so so wrong!
  • + 2
 I wish they would have pulled up the boots so we could see the square stanchions, sound interesting, did a quick search but found nothing on them.
  • + 3
 Just google info of the Lefty fork
  • + 12
 i'm stuck on 90's bikes cause its all I can afford.
  • + 1
 I still run that brake on my jump bike. Performs better than my mates ultimates
  • + 1
 I ran a pair of Hope C2s on my old Kona, they weren't half bad brakes.
[Reply]
  • + 49
 I wonder if we'll see hipsters riding one these down the slopes soon...
  • + 14
 yeah would be ace, I also think that all the old school DH bikes left out there should be paired up with one of todays world cup riders and a race organised to see how well they do, could be interesting..
  • + 43
 Hipsters ride sessions demo's and v-10's, If you saw someone riding this down a hill it would be out of respect and the love of the sport and its history not just cause its the flavour of the month like skinny jeans, ray bans, undercuts, turnups, boat shoes, kony 2012 and who ever wins the next world cup race!
  • + 3
 I think allowing a top pro ride such bike on a world cup, even practice might put a huge questipn mark on marketing efforts of all big names in the industry. I don't think a guy lik Gwincould win on such thing but top20 - maybeee?

Mah, forget it, when DirtTV went around pits and measured the weights of top pro DH bikes ending up with numbers around 38lbs, that still didn't stop weight weenies from going for the quest for sub 30lbs DH bike
  • + 2
 They won' let anyone ride it, trust me I asked. Playing with it in the car park it's obvious the bike has been, errr, well-used...
  • + 3
 Hipsters ride fixies, which would make for an interesting dh rig
  • + 1
 clearly were to old and should know better i seen a new rotec the other day can believe the deviated away from what they were doing with the rl9 also another bike th test the spooky bandwagon or metal head can't remember the exact name of it steve real used to ride it
  • + 1
 Fedz thats a great idea! I'd happly loan my dho to Mad Matt Farmer to see what he can still do on it!!!
[Reply]
  • + 17
 Old school cool retro dh monster pinkbike you should do a retro rides subject for instance the old gt sts series that would be pretty cool
  • + 3
 If you know where one that's in good condition is, you should let us know! Although personally I'd rather find a Lobo...
  • + 7
 I saw an LTS-1 not so long ago I nearly lost my bowel it looked so good! The memories...
  • + 1
 Ask GT? I'm sure they have a museum back at their head office! I bet they'd send one ASAP if you did some advertising on the fury in write up! Could be like a timeline of each company?
  • - 1
 There was a Lobo frameset on egay until some days ...it sold for 250bucks...what a shame , I saw it too late! Certainly a better pick than this odd Cannondale.
  • + 2
 the GT STS carbon framed bike was my favourite back in those days.. i miss old school, sometimes
  • + 1
 Id love to get hold of a Lobo, used to drool over that bike when i was a lil lad, essence machine
  • + 1
 I tuned up a Lobo in Toronto a couple of years ago. There's some guy still riding it around, v-brakes, Judy DH and all!
  • + 1
 i still have old mtn bike action mags, with pictures of 'kooka' cranks, 'caramba' double barrel cranks, 'altek' brake levers with 'shark fin' for centering the cables.. those were the days when billet aluminum ruled, especially with purple anodize !!
  • + 4
 I've got a friend that collects/restores old mountain bikes. He's got a mint condition Yeti DH8, several Mantis bikes (Valkyrie, Pro Floater, XCR, Flying V) and several Cunninghams, Fat Chance Yo Eddy, a couple of Manitous, etc. An awesome collection for sure. I'm sure if I asked him he'd be happy to have someone come out and photograph all of them.

I'd personally like to see a writeup on the Sunn DH bikes. Always liked those...
  • + 1
 Hopefully Someone hopefully does something now!! Only time will tell..
  • - 1
 Funny, thought the Lobo was disc only.... I smell BS
  • + 1
 BS yourself. He'd put a Judy DH on it, who knows why or when, but if you're old enough to remember there were DH races before there were disc brakes. I can't remember what was on the back. I do remember thinking it was a damn nice riding bike, though, and that it would be a sweet AM bike, and wishing I had one myself.
  • - 1
 Yeah thanks i remember those days very well actually right back to canti's, rockshox mag 21s and gt zaskars winning world cup dh, rts, lts.... lobo didn't have rear v-mounts, yeah judy dh did but the lobo usually had dho's or boxxers 151(both did have v-mounts though) BS back at you pal, but its not BS hahahahahahahahahahahahahaha-aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa-hahahahahahahahahahahahahahaha tooool
  • + 3
 Chill out guys! Everything on this site resorts to arguing! It's getting boring!
  • + 2
 god that escalated real quick...........
  • + 1
 god has pinkbike?
[Reply]
  • + 15
 this has made my day, such a classic bike. lets get a weekly retro ride write sorted eh????
  • + 2
 Agreed! I always soak up every detail in DIRT when the old school rigs are featured in the back pages.
  • - 9
 Oh really? They haven't featured 'old school rigs' 'in the back pages' in DIRT. BS once again on this site....
  • + 3
 Addersc that's a bit hardsh no? And sorry to point this out but I have many issues of dirt that feature the old skool rigs, granted they are the older issues (haven't bought a issue of dirt for many years now), but sure they had features on old skool dh rides. Maybe you have a different view on what old skool is. Either way keep it rubber side down!
  • - 6
 Yeah long time ago now, ok i was being harsh, iam a pen1s but its so fun sometimes
[Reply]
  • + 11
 So Cannondale invented the 1.5" Headtube, the angleset, Virtual Pivot Suspension, and were the first to realize that a slacker head angle was better for DH racing?

Sounds pretty innovative to me. It's a shame they had to sell themselves and stopped producing race bikes like this.
  • + 1
 Couldn't agree more. Didn't the next version of this bike have a gearbox as well? I vaguely remember Cedric rocking one in the early nwd vids.
  • + 1
 The motorcycle division drove them into the ground. Joe had a serious " I am not going to fail" attitude and that was the beginning of the end of the original company structure. I knew the guys well, rode R&D for them testing the geminis and remember these bikes well.... I actually got one of the pre linkage ones at my shop and custom built it up for a good customer of mine at the time. There are pics of it on my page. The good old days !!
  • + 1
 if you look really closely on the headset you'll see the beginnings of Cane Creek written on it
  • + 0
 Cannondale was the first production DH Bike but they weren't the first to realize slack head tubes were best for DH. I remember hearing that the Sunn bikes were the first to use slacker head angles. When Nico went from Sunn to GT he requested slacker angles, then everyone started doing it.
  • + 1
 Protour: um NO... Actually the first produsction DH bike was the Answer DH frame (the one that looked like it had a set of fork legs -and DID- for seat-stays). Cannondale was in there pretty early, but they weren't the first, not by a long shot. GT, Yeti and Schwinn were some of the VERY first as well...

They had some other "questionable" firsts too... the two-shock DH rig was pretty awful, and they didn't earn the name "Crack'nFail" for nothing (this has NOTHING to do with their current bikes, only that when there weren't really any real "FR/DH bikes" being made "back in the day" and people were abusing XC bikes at the begining of our sport and Cannondale's weren't up to this... lots of tothers weren't either. They also had some bad luck early on with teir "real" Fr bikes not being up to the task of sustained abuse without sponsorship). I'm just bummed to see Cannondale COMPETELY dismiss our whole riding acene. The Claymore is great and all, but it's not real an FR or a DH bike, it's like they've only designed bikes now for the riders they sponsor... Chase doesn't want something a little burlier then the CLaymore??? I know he loves his HTs
[Reply]
  • + 9
 I raced this bike for Cannondale in 98' and it was an incredible DH bike. It did weigh 58 pounds and needed to be on the mechanic stand more than I got to ride it, but it insitilled a tremendous amount of confidence in the rider. We could keep our feet on the pedals and just pedal through the corners, while other riders would be feet off hoping for traction. Lucky for me it hangs up in my office, and every time I see it it takes me back to that Awesome 98' season with Mylo, David, Oscar, and Missy, Dalton, Big Mike, Stephanie, and all the team staff. We made/had some wonderful memories.
  • + 3
 58!!?!?! HOLY. CRAP.
  • + 4
 Thats one hell of a strong wall mount!
  • + 2
 Cool info, you were on one of the most legendary teams ever.
  • + 1
 awesome simply awesome it would be nice to see one
[Reply]
  • + 7
 Thanks for all the great comments. Not often does Cdale see love on the web. These bike were a challenge to build but keeping them running was easy. Please consider there were 7 riders on the dh team and took the three mechanics 1+ hours to swap tires for the mud. Forks were a challenge and the little shock got a serious workout. Rock ran a 900lb spring talk about fade! Axle for the rear came the next rev when I built them for dee max, a 15 non and a 12mm drive side it was cool. Another thing not many people know is we made three swing arms with different lengths to change chain stay length depending on the track.
  • + 1
 Cannondale can never be accused of being afraid to try new things and it was because of guys like dalton who weren't afraid to push conventional wisdom and also because your bosses let you fly with the ideas!
  • + 1
 DD - was it your idea to create a dual-crown out of two Leftys? I had seen this bike before but did not know what the fork was made from. Elegent, and brilliant.
  • + 2
 Close but it was the other way round, the needle bearing structure was first for the headshock, we grew that for the dual crown and always knew it was possible as a single sided unit. ( SS didn't go over well in germany so the name "single sided" became the "lefty") there was one prototype when I got to Ct in 98' a proof of concept but it was 100% the downhill racing effort that made the long travel needle bearings structures work and thus leading to lefty protos in 00'.
[Reply]
  • + 5
 If my memory serves me correctly they are Coda (the Cannondale in-house parts brand) Magic Motorcycle cranks. They were two halves of very thin aluminum glued together - if they last more than a few months they would last forever. They were an outboard bearing crank - AFAIK another first.

Those tires are IRC Kujo DH (named after a film about a rabid dog). At the time these tires were the muts nuts - they have a very good pinch-flat resistent sidewall. It wasn't long after that the Maxxis Minions and High Rollers came along and their reign at the top continues to this day.

From the looks of it, those rims are a set of Mavic 321s, which were also the top DH rim of the day until the yellow DeeMax rims came out.

All in all, this bike was blinged out.
  • + 3
 Those are the rim brake version 521's - the original Fulcrum's when the team still played in red/yellow colours used the older 121's.

Those Kujo's never compared to their older Missile's which just seemed to be a much nicer tyre.

No matter what people say, Cannondale have had a huge influence in the sport as we see it today.
  • + 1
 I still have a set of Missiles rolled up and waiting for some kind of retro build, along with my AC Cranks and hubs, 321 rims... It would have to be for looking at and not riding though, because as cool as those old components are - I'm glad they don't make em like they used to! Let's just say, the sport has become a lot less expensive in the last 15 years for those of us who are a little hard on our bikes.
  • + 2
 My mates been hammering his 321/hope sport wheelset for 12+ years now. Those where the days I used to drool over the bikes in MBUK. I always drempt of having a top class DH i could rip daily, now I've got one I don't get time!
  • + 3
 Someone should do a retro race. Only pre- whatever year bikes allowed.
  • + 2
 Cloverleaf - good eyes. I just went out to the shed to compare to my mint 321s I haven't had the heart to throw out, and the braking surface gives it away. Missile? Kujos? Come on - the best thing about them was the red sidewall!! Smile

Only this week I've found a home for my 321s on a friend's original Foes Mono DHS that is being built mid-school (I would call the Weasel Old School). I can't wait to build them up on the old Hope hubs I also couldn't throw out.
[Reply]
  • + 8
 "super downhill moto fork".....i wanna get me one of those!!!
  • + 1
 Why dont bikes nowadays have those stantion guards. Is there a reason other than it doesnt look as good?
  • + 4
 People said that crap use to get stuck inside them and end up making it worse. Also seals have improved so some say they're not necessary... but it's probably mainly that they look stupid.
  • + 1
 The quality of the seals has improved to a vast degree and has eliminated the need for the suspension boots that many forks used to use.
  • + 1
 Surely its more of case of protecting expensive Hype-shima fork legs than keeping the internals clean?
  • + 1
 Dirt and other debris would get caught inside and scratch the stanchions.
  • + 1
 Not with these modern seals every one says are so good now Smile
  • + 1
 I mean the debris would get caught inside the funny looking stanchion guards.
  • + 2
 I mean if they use these modern seals on the stanction guards then nothing will get in Razz
[Reply]
  • + 4
 Back in the day you couldn't buy bikes like this. These bikes were never planned to be sold to the public.

The bike companies were racing prototypes. I know they still do today. But we can get hold of the kit they use within a year or two.

That's what I like about the scene today.

You can go out and buy a Giant, Yeti, Mondraker, Santa Cruz, Kona, Trek, Commencal, Specialized, Nuke Proof or whatever
and you know that apart from a few small changes (bit of geo, shocks, colours) its what all the pro's use. FACTORY STOCK.
  • + 1
 I still have a Karpiel armageddon, when I spoke to the guys in karpiel they said they came up with the orignal vpp design, and the rest copyed them that was at a N.O.R.B.A round at Mammoth in 2001
  • - 1
 Yeah well the Karpiel guys are talking crap...
  • + 1
 llaarrggee, the other massive difference is the price.

Back in the day there were little-to-no DH bikes ready off the rack - you bought a frame, forks, brakes, drivetrain etc separately and bolted it all together. And here in Australia that could cost $8-12k. Full-on DH was seen as a tiny market. Only serious racers had such bikes.

Nowadays, every ski resort is a bike park and forests are full of stunts and the Giant Glory 2 is $3000 and lighter, stronger, and better in every way than anything from back in the day. It's not just a quarter of the price, but taking inflation into consideration it is like a sixth of the price. The top Glory is only $5k - an absolute bargain.
  • + 1
 Am sure cannondale sold the design as such to khs and they did their own version of it, not sure how it rode or what but looked rather tasty.
  • + 1
 The Karpiel was the first double parrellelogram design bike that I remember seeing, but I don't think it was actually designed around a virtual pivot.
[Reply]
  • + 3
 too bad cannondale doesnt make nice dh bikes nowadays! was a huge fan off them 10 years ago. allways nice welding and good tube shapes. had i carbon super V 9000 at one time. looked sick,, ride like my granny, yeah i remember, it had a noleen fork on it! can any one remember that. its the kilo fork from now a days, but industructable!!!!
  • + 1
 i remember noleen ! are they still around?! do you also remember there was an aftermarket noleen for pro-flex girvin front forks?!
  • + 1
 Noleen bike division i believe is gone, but i think stratos makes a shock for the Girvin vectors.....
[Reply]
  • + 3
 Didn't Karpiel have a similar linkage system before this?
Their Karpiel Disco Volante was certainly out in 1997.
'Dale weren't the only guys to be fiddling with designs like this back then Smile
  • + 3
 i think this debuted at the cactus cup, early 1997... not sure about karpiel, but that was close. outland vpp bikes were certainly already out by then... history is (re)written by the survivors... Wink
  • + 4
 I don't remember exactly how the Karpiel worked, but the important thing with the VPP patent is that one link moves in an anti-clockwise direction and the other moves clockwise. Bikes like a Giant Maestro or a DW-Link have both the links moving in the same direction, so even if the Karpiel did pre-date it and looks similar that doesn't necessarily mean it worked in quite the same way.
  • + 1
 nice oneSmile
  • + 1
 The Fulcrum was first shown at Cactus Cup in '97- I was there and got to check it out first hand. It was my understanding most of the riders hated it. Enter the Cannondale Gemini twin shock bike...

Outland had bikes and patents dating before then and the LOOK bike with Fournales air shock with near identical links was out around this time as well (Jean-Pierre Fournales patented the frame design)- I'd have to do some research to see whose patents came first and exactly what they entail. There were also other twin link bikes like the RockShox LTD that Trevor Harris designed (completely different function though.)

Every DW-link bike from Turner and Pivot has a lower link that switches rotation direction. VPP is less about the links and more about how the suspension behaves.
  • + 1
 Your right they weren't ....but they were the first ones riding and winning on the world cup and national circuits with them !!
  • + 1
 Yep- from what I remember the Outland bikes destroyed pivots like nobody's business. The LOOK bike was pretty much non-existent. The RockShox LTD was a cool design but it was a URT that wasn't really meant for DH racing- Tomac put it to good use though (under the Giant label.) The only other people racing the LTD were the RockShox DEVO team- I remember it being a bike that climbed really well, descended poorly and was relatively fragile as the design was tough to build into a light frame. The LTD was built around '94 and Tomac won on it in '95.
[Reply]
  • + 3
 I'd love to see 2 lefty's bolted together like that again. Lefty's are without a doubt the best XC fork I've ridden, make it longer travel and have 2 of them, it would be incredible!!!
[Reply]
  • + 2
 Love cannondale have a bike from them my self. Always doing somthing diffrent, im just wondering why is there a big Volvo tag on the bike? Did they help them with some components?
  • + 4
 The team was Volvo/Cannondale - Volvo were a huge sponsor for many years.
  • + 1
 Both in DH and XC
  • + 4
 Back when money was in DH.
  • + 1
 Volvo was there main world cup and NORBA national team sponsor then.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 I still have my copy of Mountain Bike Action when this was released, ohhh the memories come flooding back. The brakes look like Hope C2's with sport levers, they were my first set of Disc brakes..
  • + 2
 Yeah look like C2's to me!
  • + 3
 Do you remember the versions with the plastic housing that covered up the brake rotors and other parts susceptible to mud?

And I remember Cannondale putting electronics on their bikes - I think it was so that the suspension could 'learn' the course, and get softer or stiffer depending on which part of the course it was on - e.g. it would get really stiff during pedalling sections. Memory is hazy, but they did put telemetry gear on their bikes at one stage.
  • + 2
 I can remember something like that, i think they strapped a black aluminium box to the down tube. Must have collected suspension data etc...Also vaguely remember ELO, Electronic Lock Out. I am sure it was on a dale???. Someone reading this may put a link up..
  • + 1
 The Hope C2 was my first disc brake ever, as well. Had it on the front of a Hardtail and man did it suck balls.
  • + 1
 The only real problem is the massive pump they get when they get hot where you have to keep winding them out all the time. With a decent sized rotor they're actually not too bad. Ok they lack a bit of power compared to brakes these days but the bite adjust made set up a hell of a lot easier than the open systems of the day. Good brakes for their time and still have their uses now. Solid and reliable and pretty bombproof.
  • + 2
 I had no problems at all with my C2's, they worked flawlessly on my TEAM LTS. I have more grief with my current V2's than i ever did with brakes of yesteryear. Very bizarre!!!!!
  • + 1
 Yeah the ELO was on the early lefty forks...
  • + 1
 @iamamodel and davidstuartkelly;

I remember this being on the old K2 bikes but not the Cannondale...it was called the "Smart Shock." Took a 9V battery. Ha

www.neebu.net/~khuon/cycling/bikes/K2/1999-OzM/smartshock.html
  • + 1
 C2's did rule back in the day, mine were faultless, never had issues with pumping up or fade, never had any issues with them at all in fact, unlike certain brakes around today, ahem... AVID...
  • + 1
 KrashDH85, I do remember that K2 with the electronic Smart Shock, but Cannondale were testing similar stuff a few years earlier.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 The first VPP by outland was in 95 , a few years before the c-dale. Outland then redesigned the vpp in 97 to have 6 inches of travel.
Then Azonic had a vpp frame , it was a brazed cro,mo . 97 Karpil VRS and then in 98 the cdale came out with the fulcrum.
the vpp was designed in Calgary , in your home town PB.
also the intense vpp was worked on by another calgary dude.
Cow town produced some tallent ( who remembers COGG'S) back in the day , way before DW was riding a bike .
  • + 2
 DW, ummm, that stands for? Oh right Dave Weagle, sole saviour of all things suspension, right? Or so he'd like us to believe... HYYYYYYYYYYYYPPPPPPPPPPPEEEEEEEDDDDDDDDDDDDDD
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Even though this was the first counter-rotating link virtual pivot mountain bike, and thus way proof of prior art to the basic concept, Santa Cruz is still attempting to sue Yeti over violating their rather broad VPP patent (Yeti's SB linkage employs an eccentric pivot that for part of the wheel travel counter-rotates).
[Reply]
  • + 4
 Love it, I've still got my cannondale killer V from the same era, use it every day to commute.
  • + 3
 Haha, right on! I still use my Super-V for the same.
  • + 1
 I had a '94 Killer V. So light and stiff. Unfortunately I sold mine. The 1-1/4" steertube pissed me off when I tried "modernizing" it.
  • + 1
 @ smike - that sucks, mine has the 1.5" headshok.



boo86.pinkbike.com/album/Building-the-cannondale-from-scratch
[Reply]
  • + 2
 The Fulcrum is a work of over-engineering art. I've promised myself that and a Lobo. I will have them hanging up my place one day.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 Thats so cool! Bicycles are always pleasing to the eye because you can see how everything works right there! I wanna see more!
[Reply]
  • + 2
 I'd like see a old school race. Cannondale and more brands.. (schwinn, giant, specialized...)
Also every friday, Old school post! Smile
  • + 1
 Friday = Old School. Superb idea!
  • + 1
 Nostaligic Friday Smile
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Much respect, for sure, but try actually maintaining a cannondale with all that lovely "innovation". I'd take a lodgepole pine to the face before getting another one of their bikes.
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  • + 1
 Add a new dh category to races. Bikes 10 yrs or more in age. Sure it would be a novelty, but it would be pretty fun and interesting to see the progression of engineering and design through the years all on one race day.
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  • + 2
 cannondale invented the 1.5 headtube.... hmmm did Klien not have insanly large head/steerer tube set up previously?

i could be wrong my memorys not too good nowerdays Wink
  • + 2
 It was a big steering tube with Klein, but it was another standard.
  • + 1
 Cannondale didn't, they had an even larger steerer actually that was metric (40mm) and that's 1.575", so they were able to adapt their frames to take 1.5 steerer forks easily with simply different bearings for the headsets. Klein used 1" steerer tubes but had oversized headtubes and much larger bearings (exactly what motorcycles use to this day).
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  • + 4
 IRC MISSLES were the shizzles...Remember the bacon smell they had?
  • + 1
 Ha! They did have a strange smell, I don't know about bacon though. More like burnt chemicals.
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  • + 2
 Oh, man! I remember being at Plattekill circa LATE 90'S and saw a fleet of these sitting outside the lodge. It was a day I will never forget!
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  • + 2
 Who remembers this bike from Headliners when Missy was on this rig? 98 was a long time ago but seems like yesterday for old farts like myself.
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  • + 4
 awesome to see the "angleset" on a bike back in 1998!
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  • + 1
 I love that bike.

I recently picked up a pair of the old DH pants that Missy & Myles used to wear; the red/yellow ones, perfect condition, on ebay for .99
Schwwweeet

Now if I only still had my old red/yellow Super V
  • + 0
 Gosh, bet the pants are now fully jizzed up now, aye mate?
  • + 1
 DH pants you say?

In Miles' and Missy's day didn't they wear skinsuits? You know, back in the day when speed was more important than looks.
  • + 1
 They both wore pants near the end of their careers, except at World's.
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  • + 1
 There is a GT lobo on ebay for £300 OK its not the carbon one, and before you ask its not mine
cgi.ebay.co.uk/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?VISuperSize&item=300695101678
But do have GT LTS & ATX one
  • + 1
 Alloy ones were better anyway, Peaty won at Snoqualmie on the alloy one, the carbon ones snapped like carrots
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  • + 1
 Outland did the VPP in 95/96, few years before Cannondale. This bike was 97/98/99 i believe, but I am sure the Outalnds were pre-fulcrum.
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  • + 1
 the dual shock fulcrum i had was probably the worst bike ive ever ridden. i cant believe the top cdale pros were ripping it up on them
  • - 1
 Thanks pal
  • + 0
 sure thing slick
  • + 0
 Nice mullet in your pic...bet you get the ladies with that style... or just the guys...or possibly just the animals and children...
  • + 2
 haha, ill let the Dude know. and the Dude doesnt have a mullet! moron.
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  • + 1
 Anyone want to buy my old yellow Super-V frame? Its a large and 1.5 ht. Rear perfect condition. I will send u pictures if ur interested.
  • + 0
 No. Just throw it away.
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  • + 1
 They bankrupt tring todo motocross bikes
Way ahead of their time
Yamaha just Introduced cannondales " airbox in the front" concept this year
Too bad
So close but no cigar
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I remember this bike, I seen it once in person. It looked like a complete nightmare to work on. An weighed more than just about anything else out at the time.
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  • + 1
 Kudos. Love to see articles like this. I remember seeing those bikes on the circuit back in the 1990's. I would like to see more articles like this.
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  • + 1
 I remember reading that this bike weighed in at over 60lbs. 60lbs and a little pinner rear axle! Things were ca-razy back in the day!
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  • + 1
 I remember Missile Giove riding those! It should be good if they will revive it! Much better using a combo of Hollowgram and Pinion.
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  • + 2
 I was trying to follow the drive train description, but you lost me after the third time you wrote 'sprocket'.
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  • + 1
 I remember drooling over one of these in Banana Bikes of Woodford Green, it was so so expensive and way out of my pockets range.......
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  • + 2
 I was just talking about this beast last week. Still have the MTB Action introducing it.
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  • + 2
 the saddle is pretty nice tbhSmile
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  • + 1
 I would love to see some pictures of people riding these bikes back in the day
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  • + 1
 Csnnondale do some crazy shiz! I mean look at their electical lefty fork that can adjust itself like a car damper! Crazy
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  • + 1
 The good old time, when Cannondale was not under the supervision of Dorel :'(
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  • + 1
 Please do my bike 99 Giant ATX DH wc !! Many would appreciate it, legendry Status !
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  • + 2
 Pinkbike, you win the internet today.
  • + 1
 no jessica moore banging wins for me today
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  • + 1
 Doesn't it look like a Brooklyn Machine Works? Or really, vice versa. Still a slick ride.
  • + 1
 It looks like the jackshaft system from a Brooklyn That is about it.
  • + 1
 Looks like a TREK hahahahahahaha
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  • + 1
 Its the tyres id like to get my hands on,irc missiles or the kugos,they were good tyres,where can i get them?
  • + 1
 I still ride IRC Kujos for everything from trails to trials... best tires for the price.
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  • + 1
 Another one of Cannondale's awesomely horrible ideas brought to life! Long live Cannondale!
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  • + 1
 The Intense m`1 was around and was way more advances. It had a 12mm through axel and supension which worked.
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  • + 1
 Great! I still ride my old Super V, still an awesome bike and still going strong.
  • + 1
 I had a 1998 super v. It didnt have the carbon swing arm. If l recall it was a nice bike. I do remember it being flexy and l could never get the suspention working right.
  • + 1
 How long ago were mountain bikes made from carbon... seems longer then I thought.
  • + 1
 My mate had an original silver Super V with the carbon fibre swingarm, it was mounted different from the modern Super V's though, don't think it worked as well. It looked space age at the time when frames were usually all diamond type.
  • + 2
 I owned a Giant CFM3 in 1991. The frame was made from carbon tubes glued to aluminium lugs. My first real MTB. Loved it. Only a few years later I had a Trek OCLV that was a monocoque frame. It was so strong I raced DH on that sucker back in the day when if you had a full suspension bike you had to go into the top class. When I finally killed the frame in a crash riding street, I tried to break other parts of the frame and failed. I had to take to it with a hacksaw to get it into the garbage bin.
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  • + 1
 those were the days! cannondale was always coming out with cool shit! I miss the old cannondale...
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  • + 1
 That's a bad ass bike!!! Giant ass rear derailleur cable that hella needs to be trimmed.
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  • + 1
 Salute so ahead of its time. that drive train is nutts! pure race machine Helmet
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  • + 1
 I raced against myles rockwell back in the day and he and jimmy deaton were on those bike ! Fun time ! Love to ride
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  • + 1
 I want to see more of this!!! maybe Peaty's Lobo, or Mickael Pascal's B-1...definetely Cedric's and Nico's steel Sunn...
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  • + 1
 I ride a cannondale now and its my favorite xc bike so far. Glad they arent afraid to try something different
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  • + 1
 Cannondale were and in some ways still are pioneers of the sport. I'll always have one in my garage!
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  • + 1
 the worst dh bike .missy hated that bike
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  • + 1
 Oh my, i remeber Missy Giove with that model on Winter X-Games!
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  • + 1
 that thing is a Piece of shit compared to todays rigs
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  • + 1
 I know this is like a collectable and all that but a video would be sick !
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  • + 1
 Beautiful and way ahead of it's time!
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  • + 1
 Square stanchions!? What is this madness!?
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  • + 1
 this is what gee is gunna be racing on next year
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  • + 1
 That bike reminds me of MBUK when I was in school. Yes I am that old.
  • + 1
 He he me too
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  • + 1
 imagine your brakes after 10years...
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  • + 1
 Why Cannondale stop producing downhill bike?
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  • + 1
 wow! how things have changed.
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  • + 1
 looks like them cheap NEXT bikes
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  • + 1
 i like the fact that they put a double chain from the cranks
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  • + 1
 i want to race that down fort william!
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  • + 1
 World force vr1 (azonic)
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