Pinkbike Poll: Did you pay full price for your last bike?

Sep 6, 2013 at 12:14
Sep 6, 2013
by Matt Wragg  
 
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Chris always tolerated me hanging around the shop. I like to think he enjoyed having someone around to talk about proper mountain bikes with. In between the crazed commuters, haggling pensioners and whatever else the city centre hurled at him, we'd grab a few moments to talk about the World Cup results, new bits and where we'd go riding when we had time. As he dug out inner tubes, panier mounts and obscure bolts for whatever broken shopper had been wheeled in (the shop made its keep by stocking inner tubes in every weird size and shape you could imagine), he'd dispense his wisdom on the world too. There's one thing he said that stuck with me, one weird little gem that is lodged in my brain: "Downhillers are a nightmare for shops. None of you f*ckers ever pay retail price for anything." Looking around at our friends, he was right: I had Chris helping me where he could, some trawled the websites and others the classified ads. All of us had put our bikes together the best we could on our small, student budgets.

Bagnoli Bike

Davide from Bagnoli bike, offering advice on bike setup.


Nearly a decade now separates me from those words, but they come back to me from time-to-time. Chris was right, but on a much larger scale than maybe he knew back then. The cost of mountain bikes has continued to rise as more and more space-age technology gets hung on them. Carbon fiber, highly refined suspension technology, light-but-powerful disc brakes – all of these things add up to a hefty bill at the register, and makes them even more difficult to attain, especially for those on a limited budget. With prices climbing into the five digit range, it's easy to have a knee-jerk reaction when faced with the price of a new, top of the line mountain bike. “$10,000? I could buy a (car, truck, motorcycle, jet ski...) for that much” seems to be the refrain every time the latest carbon wonder bike is revealed. Certainly, it's frustrating to not be able to afford the bikes found at the top tier in a company's lineup, but these show pieces are used to demonstrate a company's latest technological advancements, advancements that no doubt cost a fair bit of time and effort, not to mention money, to bring to market.

Plus, realistically, how many people walk into their local bike shop and plunk down the full retail amount for a bike? Even those that do pay full price are often given perks, like a year's worth of free service, or discounts on additional parts and accessories. What's often overlooked is the fact that much of the technology on an exorbitantly priced new bike will be trickling its way down to more affordable offerings in the near future. Remember when hydraulic disc brakes were a luxury item? It didn't take long for them to become standard equipment, and we now we take it for granted that our next bike will have them.

All of this brings up the question: Did you pay full price when purchasing your last bike?

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401 Comments

  • + 211
 "none of you f*ckers ( downhillers) ever pay full price"
well im sorry but none of us f*ckers have moneytrees growing in our back yard ! i hate this part of the hobby when people look at you differently when they found out how much less we paid compared to them. the way i look at it, i feel sorry for you guys that paid full price for your stuff. things break often in this segment and parts arnt cheap to start with. f*ck Retail !!!!!
  • + 11
 i totally agree. sorry guys, it's not my fault i am such a poor fucker
  • + 274
 Actually it IS your fault you're a poor f*cker.
  • + 37
 okay, fair enough, you're right. but f*ck the retail price, there is absolutely no need to buy a brand new thing, if a used once was regularly serviced. and if you do buy a new thing - as soon as you put in on your bike and make a meter ride - it's worth half a price less. so why would i pay?
  • + 21
 Preaching to the Choir on that one brother
  • + 18
 Got my bike 1 or 2 months used for a third of the price MSRP. It's a no-brainer!
  • + 10
 Its absolutely crazy when you find out how much a product is actually marked up in cost. Even if a shop gives you a deal on a product, that discounted price could still end up being highly marked up from what the manufacturer is producing it for. Now i do know its a business and stores have to make money, but a lot of people i think realize that, and tha'ts why they are constantly asking for deals. i myself do it. So in this article i think its wrong that Downhill riders are singled out, because anyone who does any style of riding may end up thinking the same thing, and in return ask for deals at their local bike shop.
  • + 28
 I paid cash for my bike - that means the shop doesn't have to pay whatever card transaction fees are associated with Visa/Mastercard/etc that occurs for both credit and debit payments.

It can work out to be cheaper for both of us....and let's be honest, it's a poor financial move to finance a depreciating asset (like a bike). If I don't have the money in hand, I don't buy it. Plus you feel like a B.A. paying in cash!
  • + 5
 Hard to pay full price for everything, especially in downhill, I mean, stuff ALWAYS breaks. And what are riders who got a new bike supposed to do with their old bikes? Bin them?
  • + 25
 Got my $2,600 XC bike for $1300 from an Elite athlete who had a $1,000 SID fork upgrade on it and only rode it twice. My trail bike that was $2600 brand new, got it for $1900 after a photo shoot tradeout with a friend who owns a store. And my $1000 fixed gear track bike for $600 off a friend who rode it once and realized fixed gear wasn't for him. On a sport that's so danm expensive, being clever is not an option, is a most!
  • + 2
 At first place everyone gets sponsored by his local dealer right?? ....but when it comes to answering "how much your bike costs/ how much u spent on it" people tend to claim they payed the list price! lol .....ridiculous
  • + 8
 After years working in bike shops, i've realized that it's not that downhillers have less money than others, it's just that they feel entitled to getting everything for cost and it can get really annoying bc they come and argue pricing constantly. that's why the employee in the article said that about us.
  • + 9
 I decided to pay full price at my lbs however I have to admit I like the constant bargains a preferred treatment since more than worth it!!
  • + 13
 The reality of the situation is if none of you people will buy full price then you're just taking the availability of these bikes out of your local shops. The industry develops and engineers and the shops support the local community with top of the line wrenchers and service that you wouldn't get anywhere else. Sure go ahead and buy that bike from your friend or buy it off line and use a used bike. It's still ultimately bought by someone at full price somewhere and you're losing out on the biggest perk of all - your local shop taking care of you cause you're not a pill. When I have a customer who does't ask for a deal I usually end up giving that person a good price just because they are a pleasure to help. KARMA The line is getting blurred for many and I'm in the same boat even at EP pricing. It has gotten ridiculous and it's only a matter of time before bike companies feel the hurt of over producing. Then the retail end will get stuck with stocking them and just getting them out the door for barely a profit margin. The industry needs to lower the overall pricing on these goods and streamline it or they will just have to cut their production lines in a very unspecific pattern.
  • + 13
 Is no one going to mention that the majority of articles we see on PinkBike about new bikes are focused on "these show pieces [that] are used to demonstrate a company's latest technological advancements". ??? We all think we need the latest and greatest and that's what ends up on store shelves, but we hardly get a focus on the bikes that should be *good enough* for us to ride and can be ridden just as well without all the latest componentry. Just my 2 cents.
  • + 17
 I started out paying retail, but then, when you're loyal to your bike shop, eventually you get a pretty good loyalty discount (20-25%) . Your LBS is there for a reason, when you need something fixed or you need something right the fuk now you're happy they're there. If everyone buys their stuff online in order to save 8.99$, your bike shop will stop carying parts and you'll be miserable next time you need them. If you complain how stuff is expensive, then stop riding XTR or X-0 parts or change sport.
  • - 4
 Ya but how much did you have to spend before you got the discount. Probabaly way more than if you'd bought online in the first place. I'll go to the LBS when i need something right away, even then, i'm not happy to have to pay 50% more for the same part I can find online.
  • + 4
 They should reword the poll. I'd like to see how the different disciplines compare. In the article it says that downhillers don't pay for anything but not everyone on this site is a downhiller and not everybody's last bike was a downhill bike. The results don't back up the intent for writing the article. C'mon pinkbike... Although it is interesting how many people bought their bikes brand new, one way or another. I was expecting more 2nd handers. Somebody has to get the bikes off the shelves!
  • + 9
 this is not meant to be a sweeping generalization, but a majority of the downhill market is youth i feel like, who won't have the kind of money to drop on the latest and greatest wheelsize/seatpost/carbon stuff that jacks up prices
  • + 5
 @saint4life, Right on brother! There is on way anyone can convience me that even a top of the line rig ANYWHERE NEAR what is being charged. A bicycle that cost almost as much as a motorcycle? And the space age materials and all the other tech stuff from brakes, tires, and suspension are already trickle down tech from other markets just repackaged for bicycles.
It cost me $243 for a set of Bridgestone HS20 sport bike tires. Bridgestone M403/404 MX $185. A set of Muddy Mary Verstar? $190. There is something definitely wrong with that picture.
  • + 6
 Try racing motocross too ya cry baby!
  • + 16
 This is the worst article ever written on PB. No wonder the LBS is dying.
  • + 5
 I've been working in bike shops for 10 years now and I agree, downhiller's are as tight as a drum, as are all semi pro roadies and tri athletes. Partly the reason I don't bother stocking DH bikes, why would I bother when I have to drop the ass out of the price and loose money on a bike that sits around for 6 moths of the year.
  • - 1
 I paid full retail price for my bike (2009 DH0) to support my local bike shop.. Unfortunately for my next bike I can't buy direct from him because they aren't a dealer of said bike..
  • + 6
 @DrSanchez. The decline of the LBS has nothing to do wi...

no, you're right. This is exactly why. This article put me in a really bad mood, and the inane comments only compounded the issue. I guess bike shops aren't paying Pinkbike's bills any more, so there's no need to try to throw them a bone.
  • - 1
 retail pricing is for suckers,,,sorry...
  • + 7
 It's also about relations with the lbs and them promoting the sport u love which will help drive prices down and keep race series alive for decades to come... The sport needs to grow more main stream in order to make things more affordable
  • + 1
 I paid retail for my first bike as a complete and wasn't happy with it so I paid retail to change every part of it and had the shop mechanics build it for me. It was embarrassing telling people how much I paid for it. I invested over $5000 when the complete of the same frame cost only $3700 and had arguably better parts though less durable. I would find myself riding with people who paid $1800 for a similar setup. My new frame I bought old new stock to get the warranty and everything else on it is used and other than shifters, cables and some brake bits always will be.
  • - 1
 Honestly, I hate people that buy online. Half of those idiots don't know how to build a bike, thus the amount of money you will pay in the long run getting it fixed or tuned cost more. I understand not having the dough, but those are the guys supporting the riding in the community and putting money into the trails(at least we do). Plus someone has to keep LBS alive. Ya some people have bad shops, but if you talk to your LBS they will probably help you out. I know we would if you buy from us.
  • + 2
 I love biking, but I am not dropping 5 plus grand on a f*cking bike that has low quality spec'ed parts. My Flatline I bought from Endless biking for $2900 because it was a rental bike. The part that drew me in is that they only use the frame while the stock parts are stripped and they spec the bike with components from companies that sponsor them.
  • + 1
 I just sell the used parts lmao
  • + 22
 False. Bike sales really don't make most shops a lot of money, ESPECIALLY if you get 10% off the bike. That 10 % may not seem much to the customer but it equates to about a third of the shop's margin. Try running a business where half the customers expect you to cut a third off your margin just for them. Then we can talk.

Aside from the wholesale price you need to factor in shipping, time spent receiving, labor for assembly (a big deal with high-dollar. full sus bikes), time spent stocking and merchandising, and time spent on selling the bike to you. Suddenly the shop really isn't making much money off the bike
  • - 12
 i dont know about you guys but i hate having to walk into my bike shop i feel like they keep a magical vaccum cleaner that just sucks all the money out of my wallet
25$ for a derralluir hanger f you im gonna make my own one
  • + 13
 Here's how it works: Let the rich men (doctors, lawyers, business etc.) buy the expensive bikes. Wait a week or two till they brake their face, or realize pedaling is not for them, or decide to sell their bike because of the color, or whatever reason they may have to sell the bike. Then go to Craig's list, and buy their brand new bike for half price or less. The LBS makes money, the fool who paid all that money gets some of it back, and you get a nice new ride for half the price with warranty. Everybody's happy...
  • - 4
 Well I'm an AM rider and I didn't pay full price... much like I haven't f*cked my mom either.


It was one of the Trek's that Highland had as demo bikes that they had to get rid of because of their new demo bike sponsor. Got the heads up from a family friend's bike shop, with insurance from my last rig that was stolen, it was free... plus some pocket change to upgrade to the parts I had before. $5,000 MSRP, got it for $3,000 at S&W in Concord, NH.. I think that's where they're located, haha.

But advice to anyone buying a rig, look into demo bikes. Contrary to popular belief, most are not beat on. A majority of rental bikes are rented by people who only ride the smooth, machine-groomed runs at a slow pace. give it a brief inspection and you'll notice that most are like brand new, albeit a season or two old (LOL).
  • + 1
 Back in 08/09 I was at the local mountain bike race. I was standing in line at the shuttle for the DH, and I saw one of the mountain bikers ride back to his brand new BMW E60 M5 at the parking lot. he was a XC rider, but still that car was soooo badass. All his other buddies were literally coming on his face. Those are the people that buy full retail and dgaf on prices. But for people like us (which is probably like 80% of us in this sport). We'll always be on the pinkbike classifieds looking for the best deals for our next bike or bike parts. heck. i got my iron horse sunday frame on here for $600 which included a rear wheel, headset, BB, and 2 shocks. and the bike still rides like a champ today.
  • + 10
 I'm sorry but anyone who says that bikes have high mark-up are just downright stupid. Bikes have some of the lowest markup of any product pretty well anywhere! Most bikes aren't even a 1.5 markup. So if you can't afford an expensive bike that's why they make a cheaper one or buy used.
  • + 1
 Manufacturers go to Asia for cheaper labour, so they can maximize their profits. So the way I see it, nothing is wrong with some one trying to get a deal on a new bike.
  • - 8
 Bike manufacture makes bike for $500, sells to wholesaler for $1000, they sell to the bike shop for $2000, then try to sell it to you for $4000. Then you bitch when we want 20% off!
  • + 6
 where is the option of working for a shop/company?
  • + 1
 Yes Joe-Gray.... one big plus about working at a bike shop is getting bikes for cheap and if your lucky... FREE!!!
  • + 3
 I always buy stuff second hand. Why pay 400 euros for a new DHX that's reasonable at best when you can snatch a second hand CCDB for much less?

It helps though that I know how to fix and service stuff but learning this can save a lot of money/gets you a much better bike within the same budget.
  • + 4
 I make about $40,000 a year and I bought my bike new for $5000 not just rich people who buy new bikes!!
  • + 2
 well good for you. what else can we say
  • + 1
 I don't mind paying for a great product. I paid $1500 for my first 29 Hardtail and every ride something was breaking or rubbing or needed adjustment. I bought my current bike and just beat the shit outta it and very rarely have to touch it. Worth it imo
  • + 3
 $6000 demo ii practically new with zero shuttle love, I paid 1700 oh and it had new xt brakes with ice pads :-)
$6000 superfly 29 so new i thought it was stolen from a shop turns out old rich dudes sure like spending money. Especially the full xo build its sporting thanks to the previous owners wallet. I paid $1500. Both these deals have been great I punish both and they keep going.
Paid full retail for my carbon Jekyll and that broke in a matter of months. Luckily and I supposed not so lucky since it broke but at least I was able to warranty it.
But As my mamma always says aint not reason to ever pay full retail for nothing unless of course your a middle aged rich a hole who likes buying $6000 dollar race bikes and then never ride them! :-D who don't love a good bargain haha
  • - 2
 Ok so lets say I want a bike that's a newer model bike that's only available if I order it custom from the bike company itself. I get what I want, with the parts I want,when I want it. And it's NEW with full warranty and service. Cause second hand buyers DONT get any warranty or if u have a transition NO lifetime frame crash replacement.
I would rather buy a $5000 bike once every 5 years, than a $1000 every year for 5yrs or $2500 in parts to replace the parts that break on your second hand bike. Or to customize it just the way you like!
If you can't afford a $5000 bike in the sport you LOVE a bike I ride 30 km everyday and your on here complaining about it. Then ur just a HATER and when u can afford it you will but that bike NEW with all the peace of mind that comes with it!! And I'm middle aged , NOT rich, and ride everyday! So your stereotypes are just bs!
Ohhhh I like the fact my bike has ONLY been ridden by me!
  • + 3
 This is such a ridiculous statement. Downhillers are not the only ones who don't pay full price. *LOYAL CUSTOMERS* get discounts to reward them for spending their money at the shop. I'm willing to guess that the hardcore roadies get just as many or more discounts because of the amount of money they spend. People who buy big ticket items get big discounts. People who buy entry level bikes don't, simply because there's not as much markup to be generous with. This has nothing to do with being a downhiller, or being cheap. In fact, it's the opposite. Downhill bikes and equipment are big ticket items, hence the discounts.
  • + 3
 Jeff you are not yourself when you're hungry. Here have a snicker!
  • - 2
 Nobody hungry here. But nice story bro!
  • + 0
 @smike I completely agree!!
  • + 3
 If you always go to the workshop armed with some cakes or donuts, you will never pay full price ever again. Fact.
  • - 1
 True lol I go with free stickers and decals
  • + 1
 A couple of points:


- DH riders are usually young guys; students or at similar age. They don't have much money. XC / Road cyclists are really often men in their midlife crisis. Having a good job and a lot of money, and no knowledge about bikes at all. The 40 years old big guy that squeezes himself into a lycra outfit and buys the most expensive bike at his LBS, because "if it's the most expensive, it must be the best". The same rider who goes back to the bikeshop when his spokes need to be tightened or when he has a flat tyre to get it fixed.
The DH rider is usually younger, has less money and does a lot more research to find himself the best deal so he can keep his bike rolling.


- Even if you have the money to spend $3000,- on a bike for example. Why would you settle with a $3000,- bike at your LBS, when if you search around on other bikeshops online, you can find a deal on a bike that usually costs $5000,- and you can get for the exact same price ($3000,-). Be honest, what would you choose?
  • + 3
 - Everyone here acts like online bikeshops are from the devil. They are not. Take ChainReactionCycles for example. They started out as a small bikeshop on the corner of a street in the middle of nowhere. They were the smart ones that realized that the internet is becoming a bigger source for people to buy their stuff, and they jumped on it. It's their good service and fast shipping what got them this big. If I'd get my LBS to ship me some parts, I'm not kidding here, it would take 2 weeks for it to get here! While it takes only 1 or 2 days for it to go through the mail services. So they wait 1,5 weeks before sending my package?! And even tho shipping only costs €6,75 here, they will charge me €15,- just for shipping it. Why on earth would I wait 2 weeks AND get raped on the shipping costs, while I can get high quality service for a generous price at a shop like CRC? This whole thing is NOT unfair: They started out the same, CRC was much better towards the customers, and now they became more successful. We should be proud of them rather than hate them.

- Just because you have a decent LBS doesn't mean others have too. Most people here have shit LBS's where they only sell commuter bikes, but not for riding as a lifestyle. Except for maybe 3 shops in my whole country, you can't get freeride/downhill/dirt parts at ANY of the shops. Here we have no other choice than buying our stuff online. And why not just take that nice deal? We don't have a decent LBS who could support us anyways...
  • + 1
 stupid pinkbik automod didn't allow me to post the whole message because it thought it could have been spam. please get that automod fixed, don't want to get banned AGAIN for being helpful to people like I did last time when several people asked help and I replied to 3 or 4 of their comments with a very useful informative link (which was a link to a page on pinkbike)
  • + 1
 Mattin I agree with 100% of your statement, however being employed in a bike shop myself if we didn't sell commuters or cheap entry level stuff I wouldnt have my job. The dh market is so small and the high end mtb market is only slightly larger... It's so nice to have an actual mtber come in and want to talk about and buy cool stuff as opposed to the usual punter walking in looking for a dh bike and walks out with a $400 job... I don't mind those people but yeh it's certainly a breath of fresh air to have an actiual mtb rider asking about stuff. Usually with these people you don't mind doing a deal or throwing in some freebies and in the end they keep coming back...
  • + 1
 Well put. I think the LBS' that really feel the impact from online shopping should look at their own service first before pointing the finger at CRC. Where I live (Rotterdam, large city in the Netherlands) the shops that are affected the least are the smaller, specialist stores that have a loyal customer base and are more service-oriented...exactly the kind of shop you'd really miss if brick and mortar shops would really become extinct.

Another category I don't see disappearing anytime soon would be the larger store focusing on bike sales. Most people will still want to test multiple bikes before buying and quite often it will be their first bike so in most cases they won't be able to build one.

I do feel there's getting less of these shops but the ones surviving actually appear to be growing which could be a good thing as a larger shop can store more bikes, giving the customer more to test before making the decision.
  • + 3
 @mattin enough with every dude that's over thirty on a high end bike is rich and having a mid life crisis. That's just utter bullshit
  • - 1
 @jeff444: I didnt say that. I just said that there are more midlifecrisis-riders in the xc/road.scene than in the DH scene. And how they spend their money differently than students for example.
  • + 5
 I would stop complaining cause all these kids under 21 riding around on bikes worth over $2000 are all paid for by guys like me over 35 who work our ass off to get the money we have so I can buy high end bikes and parts and don't forget about the travel and gas for our children to ride.
Doesn't matter a age. Don't b a hater cause people are successful and work hard and want to spend there money. Cause if we did not this wonderful biking culture would not exist! All your stereo types are not accurate and complete bs!
Not true if u go to the mountains near my place there are plenty of dh guys and enduro guys over thirty and forty. With sic ass bikes like mine because we do research our bikes and know everything u know and more! We follow pink bike and watch all the races and wear the swag and kool shit just like u! Trust me I know a dozen guys just like me!
I have spent at least $10,000 this year alone on all our bikes,parts,gear,travel,gas,races,hotels. So u should praise guys like me keeping my kids involved and spreading the stoke every chance I get. Not insulting us and grouping us into category's with bs stereo types. Cheers and happy trails!
  • + 2
 @Mattin.....

It's not about age and how much money you have to burn at all.
It's about building relationships with the guys in your local.
All shops have one motive. To make a profit.
For this they may make observations of the customer. If they seem to be as you say a 'mid life crisis' customer, who probably won't ride for years and be a repeat customer then they will most likely charge full retail.
If however you just make yourself a repeat customer by always using them for lots of smaller purchases, and taking the time to have a chat and introduce yourself, when you do make a large purchase you can talk to them about it.
As they know that they can rely on you to keep giving them profit, albeit small, on a regular basis, they should be more willing to make less per sale.
Just talk to the guys there, go riding with them, and when you go to see them for a mech cable or something, take a small token of appreciation like some biscuits for their tea break.
Try it.
You may be surprised!
  • + 2
 @oldmandan u hit the nail on the head. Just irks me that all these kids think cause we are older in life that we are all posers!
  • + 0
 Where are you guys getting from that I would be hating? I never said ALL 'older' riders are in their midlifecrisis. And I never said anything negative about older riders in general at all. I also never said older riders are posers. Neither have I been negative about people spending a lot of money on bikes. I'm sorry if I made you guys feel like I was generalizing, I really didn't intend to come off that way and that was not what I ment(/said?).
  • + 1
 No worries its not just your statements but a lot of others! Cheers and happy trails
  • + 4
 Mattin: yes you did, and now you're trying to weasel out of your shitty commentary like a pussy. Let me help you spot your stupidity:

"XC / Road cyclists are really often men in their midlife crisis. Having a good job and a lot of money, and no knowledge about bikes at all. The 40 years old big guy that squeezes himself into a lycra outfit and buys the most expensive bike at his LBS, because "if it's the most expensive, it must be the best". The same rider who goes back to the bikeshop when his spokes need to be tightened or when he has a flat tyre to get it fixed."

Tap dance all you'd like, you're clearly hating on older, well-financed riders because they have a larger budget. You call them fat, spandex clad, and insinuate that they equate price to quality. Hell, you even put that insinuation in quotes as if you'd actually heard someone say that.

You're a hater, and too much of a pussy to own up to what he says. As a 40-year-old "big guy" who's been riding since before you were even a wet stain in your mother's pants, go f*ck yourself kid. Go get a f*cking job. With your limited intellect, there must be some level of work for you sweeping floors, or scrubbing toilets. Not that you'd be any good at it.
  • + 3
 Ok or what he said @iofthebeholder lol was just tryin to b nice and put an end the bs!
  • + 2
 Iofthebeholder you just made my day....
  • + 2
 Question: are you a part of the xc/road scene? And if not, then what are you basing this on? I bet most middle aged guys can out pedal you, especially if you only ride dh. One thing I have learned from years of cycling is to never make assumptions about other riders. That balding spandex clad guy on a road bike may very well kick your ass on a dh bike. Real cyclists don't discriminate. They just ride bikes.
  • + 2
 That was directed at mattin of course
  • + 3
 Hey, I am no longer a spring chicken, and I take no offense at what Mattin said because frankly it's true. Have a sense of humor about your age. I have often joked about my latest high-end Mojo HD as being my "mid-life crisis" bike. I don't harbor any secret shame in the fact that I can afford high-end bikes or high-end components because it's people like me that keep this industry afloat, which keeps the younger folks sponsored and employed at bike shops, and I'm actually quite grateful to be in a position where I can contribute to the economy in that way. I have been working for 20+ years more than the young ones, and have had time to progress in my career and figure out how to make more money and I've had 20 or so more years to put together some savings. The only lazy bums are those kids who live off of their parents' trust fund. Most young people these days work their butts off for not much money while trying to get a higher education or (at least in the US) pay off ridiculous student loan debt. And I am really sick of this DH snobbery (OK, I guess this is pinkbike after all), but it's not an insult to be called a XC rider. That's what you guys read into it.
  • + 4
 I say fuck the age, fuck stereotypes, fuck price, fuck fashion and glamour, I say get on your bike, ride more and talk less, and never forget the real reason why you started doing this shit....
  • + 2
 Its all true! There are a lot of snobs and a lot people with a lot of money and no skill or knowledge. I rode with one last weekend, he happens to be my uncle. He rides a brand new carbon santa cruz. I heard him behind me come skidding to a stop to avoid a curb sized drop and then asked me if I had hit that. haha. I told him thats what his suspension is for! I made fun of him and we both had a laugh. We both had fun. I also bought my last bike from a guy who had a mid life crisis, bought a bike, decided it wasn't his sport and sold it for dirt cheap. Win Win! There is plenty of room in this sport for everyone but I cant stand all the negativity. Mountain biking is all about positive vibes. Lets keep the good vibes and trails flowin. This issue isn't exclusive to mountain biking. Have you ever surfed before?
  • + 0
 I surf... And I can reassure you the macro economics is held together by two things:

1) middle age men who have done the sea change thing, moved from the city to the coast and therefore must learn to surf. Attempting to relive there glory days.

2) sex appeal used in advertisements (if Alana Blanchard rides an al merick/channel islands I will to)
  • + 1
 this is as far as I can go with all the moronic, sophmoric comments about "old guys of 40". someday you won't want to be an adolescent troll anymore and you may realize you don't need to be a 14 year old moron to be a core rider and that age has nothing to do with it. yes, one of the perks of not flipping burgers for a living is being able to buy a nice bike. without customers like us that lbs would disappear in a month!
  • + 2
 codypup- I think you're a bit old to be taking the internet this seriously... remember, you're a mature adult now that should not care about insignificant stuff like what "14-year-old morons" post on a biking website Wink Relax, bud. Level-heads know that age is only a state of mind... minus the years of injuries and abuse on the joints and the longer periods of time it takes to heal and the greater sacrifices that are made in case of injury, such as time lost at a career that's needed to support the family and/or oneself.
  • + 0
 I'm sorry, but this literally sounds like it was written by a 5 year old
  • + 1
 @klopp 10-4 on that shit
  • - 1
 @iofthebeholder: I said it happens 'often' in the XC/Road scene. Compared to the DH scene I ment (as you quoted out of context). I never said that every middle aged man on an expensive bike is in their midlife crisis and has no idea about bikes. That's where you're misunderstanding me. These are obviously two different types of riders. Truth is that the first one I described happens more often in th XC/Road scene than in the DH scene. And that is why I think that more XC riders spend full price for their bike, than DH riders. I tried to give a colorful description about the first group, to make it more clear why I think they spend more money on their bikes. People who work at bikeshops will notice that these types of riders are often the ones that come into the store and just buy the most expensive bike they have laying around. I never ment to disrespect the older fanatic riders who have a real passion for mountainbiking. I know many of them and also ride with several of them sometimes, and they are cool. No disrespect for them. Hope you're getting my point.
  • + 1
 iofthebeholder said: "As a 40-year-old "big guy who's been riding since before you were even a wet stain in your mother's pants, go f*ck yourself kid. Go get a f*cking job. With your limited intellect, there must be some level of work for you sweeping floors, or scrubbing toilets. Not that you'd be any good at it."


Wait, I thought you were supposed to be the mature one here? haha
  • + 1
 Wow Mattin i would say a bit to far but it made me laugh so props
[Reply]
  • + 82
 Missing option, no i work in a shop
  • + 4
 Likewise, my most recent bike is a combination of second hand, resurrected (pulled from trash and fixed), and new parts (employee discount). Sooooo I guess option 5 is close?
  • + 19
 Seriously, though. What's funny is that almost every penny I made still went back into the sport...
  • + 4
 I got mine WHEN i worked in a shop, still get some discounts. Somehow, even while working at the shop, i always spent more than my paycheck....:doh:
  • + 10
 love the smell of a new bike. and it's so shiny and new. Buying DH stuff second hand is always a risk. you never really know what it's been through.
  • + 2
 Ya I was looking for this option... Frown
  • - 1
 me too. i love EP, it makes buying shit so much easier
  • + 2
 ditto, therefore didn't vote on this. can definitely tell you that if or when i ever leave the bike industry i will have a hard time ever paying full price again
  • + 2
 they should have put in, grassroots/sponsorship.
  • + 0
 I've bought a few new bikes, and they are only new for 10 minutes... I like buying everything used, except for bars, grips and saddles.
  • + 1
 Needs a "No, I'm not that stupid" option as well. I managed to score $600 of my new reign by shopping around and going to a few different places untill i got a price nobody would beet.
  • + 1
 Lloydie, I was irked by that as well.
  • + 3
 I love working at a bike shop for the discounts I get. Especially good when we'll sell off the demo fleet
  • + 2
 I only clicked through cos I was curious how many folks here checked the "in the bike industry" option. Perhaps the buying habits of the guys working at the bike shop are of less interest to pb.
  • + 1
 yeah it needs a proform box because i can not choose a box
  • + 2
 I only ever bought my first year's bikes, because all the rest have been paid for by selling the previous years bikes. As long as you change your bikes every year, you never really "buy" a new one.
[Reply]
  • + 60
 Retail pricing = emergency only.
  • + 4
 lol amen to that? wheni needed a 1.5 reducer headset i had to pay $60 for what i can get online for $20, the day before we rode.
  • + 2
 or when you really want it
  • + 7
 I bought a spoke the other day for FULL PRICE!!!!!!!!
  • + 1
 $2 and it came with a nipple! Nipple, nipple, nipple! Sorry got a bit excited.
[Reply]
  • + 26
 DH parts go through too much abuse to buy stuff brand new. I also have an affinity for running into trees so my parts don't last as long as they're designed too.
  • + 17
 to*

I'm a moron...
  • + 13
 That's a bit of an oxymoron. You'd rather buy stuff that is already beat to shit than buy it new and get more life and use out of it?
  • + 14
 Not everything used is beat to shit. You can find a ton of basically new parts. Or rebuilt.
  • + 3
 I bought brand new $150 pedals and trashed them on my third ride. Sucks!
  • - 14
 If I rode downhill all id buy is second hand wtf is wrong with it any way. If I needed to bail on a downhill run I wouldnt want to worry about damaging £6000 bike, id want to be bailing on a good condition £600 bike and then if it gets f*cked up ill be able to get another £600 no probs. I dont understand how people spend so much on a DH rig when theres a very high chance that you could destroy part or all of it every time you ride.

And for no money you can pick up excellent quality second hand stuff some times like new stuff for nowhere near the proper price. Its all thanks to the f*cking dick heads with too much money who get into biking cause its the " in thing", then get fed up or come off and say f*ck it time to put my £4000 hardly used bike that I was never good enough to ride in the first place up for sale.......and then proper bikers can reap all the benefits. So thanks dick heads you know who you areSmile
  • + 19
 zer0c00l44:

there is actually very little chance of destroying a bike every time you ride. a $600 bike is probably a piece of crap and will probably break more than a $2000 bike.
  • + 2
 There's nothing wrong with buying second hand. Just check out the pinkbike buy/sell market. So many of those bikes are in Good to Great condition. You would be a moron if you didn't inspect what you were about to buy before paying for it... I got my current AM bike from the pinkbike market for a third of the cost, and my current road bike for half the cost. I am quite happy to report that they still run great after 2-years of abuse.
  • - 4
 Nobble no thats no correct bud. What im saying is there is a very real chance you could come off on a downhill course every time you ride due to the fact that your riding gnarly stuff at high speed compared to an xc rider who doesnt ride stuff any where near as dangerous. And there is a very real chance that you could seriously damage your bike as a result of the crash. And I meant that you can pick up a very decent second hand downhill bike for around £600, ive seen an intense M3 with fox 40 forks and other quality kit sell for £700 on ebay and it was in superb condition. I thought all that was obvious in saying what I said.
  • + 2
 A well built dh-frame and proven parts and the bike will hold up for a very long time.
X9, Descendant, Thomson stem, bar, post, cheap Boxxer, DHR, Sun MTX, Novatec41,Acepedals, Acesattle, Elixir5, MPR. All problemfree for years.

Expensive boutique parts dont usually last well. My stuff has to have a paint a RAL finish or solid black anodizing in aircraft quality. Makes touching up easier. Carbon is no go.

As for pricing. MSRP is fantasy, Streetprice is -20%. This price dictates additional discounts. Chainstores are usually overpriced and show little flexibility. No buy.

I buy my parts at an average of 25-30% off MSRP. I dont gauge and dont want to be gauged.
  • + 3
 ...afterall parts and bikes aren't produced used. There'll allways be downhiller who buy the stuff knew!!
  • + 3
 new parts for things like grips, bearings and headsets, second hand for everything else. Especially upgrades are always second hand, noone can afford $2000 pair of forks
  • + 1
 Oh that's fine and all...but if are buying someone used and abused DH parts, really how good are those used parts?
  • - 2
 Ive got a zerode for sale, real good deal if anybody wants to play
[Reply]
  • + 22
 You all could buy a new bike every year if you limited your beer/weed/fast food intakes. Budget properly like your Dads been telling ya for years... this instant gratification trend is destroying any of you from actually NOT living pay check to pay check. Save and Play
  • + 4
 Nice try, bike shop owner! just kidding. That is good advice.
  • + 5
 Boom. Truth-bomb dropped.
  • + 3
 Don't forget their all inclusive smart phone plans.
  • + 0
 Typical western consumer mentality.
I CAN buy a new bike every year, but WHY should I pay €400 if I can get the exactly SAME thing for let's say €300? WHAT would I get for the extra €100?
In other words, just because I can afford something doesn't mean that I will buy it. After all, doesn't THIS mean budgeting properly?
It's same as buying food - I won't buy a pizza for €3.50 if another shop sells the same pizza for €2.50.
  • + 1
 haha. your name is extremmist! no false advertising here... I hear what your saying Extreammist... Although I think believing your getting the same thing at a better price is naive. Good shops are in it for the long haul and will be there for you when you need them... that costs money. Poor shops will do what they think they need to to get YOUR money NOW!! Selling below MSRP leads to struggling shops that are more worried about making their next bill payment then fixing your bike right the first time.... and maintaining the ability to pay techs that have the experience YOU should be demanding from your shop. PS Very close call Steevo3030!
  • + 1
 Not sure how it works in Canada buy when I need my bike fixed here in Ireland, I need to pay for it anyway (when I needed to have a part of the headset removed from the fork steerer, the guy in a shop took some tool, removed the ring (it took him about 10 seconds to do it) and asked me to pay €5).
Moreover many people can fix their bikes themselves (especially with YouTube videos) so I don't see a reason why should they pay extra money upfront for something they may or may not need.
[Reply]
  • + 16
 the problem isn't that DH'ers are cheap, its that bikes have gone from 10-15 years ago used to be top of the line and cost "only" $3000 to now bikes are running $10,000+.
$3k barely gets you in the door at most bike shops. Kids cant afford it, parents can't afford it, working people can't afford it, no one can afford to pay retail.

You want to bring more people into the sport, stop cranking the price up year over year. I dont believe the unit cost to produce a bike has doubled, but end-use cost sure has.
  • + 4
 While it's true that prices have gone up almost 3 fold, you also have to look at what they're made of. Top tier products are largely carbon, which is more expensive than aluminium. A top tier aluminium bike is just a little higher than what inflation and increased manufacturing costs would be compared to 15 years ago.

There's loads of bikes in the $1000, which is where a person just getting into the sport is likely to spend their money. More of course if you want full suspension, but again, most people would probably start on a hardtail.

I work. I've paid over $3k for each of my last 3 bikes. It wasn't an issue, because it's my hobby and what I enjoy.
  • + 5
 DH bikes are cheaper than they have ever been. And better. Back in the day you could not buy a complete DH bike off the shelf. You had to buy frame-only and build it up. And they were crap. Crap suspension, crap brakes, cranks sucked etc. Yes, you can pay lots for a bike now, but you can pick up a complete Glory for a quarter the price of my san Andreas shockwave.
  • - 2
 3K is far from the entry level to the sport, but people still act like it is. I will never understand this. Every shop I've been in carried bikes from the absolute basic entry level hardtails that sell for 300-500 up to the mid and mid/high end of stuff. I have seen a top of the line bike that costs over 5-6K maybe three times out of all the shop trips I've been on in all the states I've visited.

Most shops don't carry the super high end stuff and will ONLY order it if you pay up front.

I can walk into my shop tomorrow and buy an awesome full suspension 5" travel bike for 1,500 (my shop has a fuel ex 5 for 1,550 and they always can be haggled down if necessary) probably less with good parts that will last a long time. Now why is it I am the only person on pinkbike that can do this? Why is it if I go to MTBR and talk to people they say they can do this? It's only here that being capable of doing this is impossible.
  • + 1
 how many of those high end bikes do they sell a year though? they have to jack the price up because they sell so few every year, cruisers on the other hand are super cheap and that's because so many people buy them because the majority of people want a beach cruiser with shimano acera or worse, the mtb industry is small and has very little money being made in it so markup is increased for shop owners to make it worth carrying high end bikes in their shops, they're human just like you and they need to eat, have a place to sleep and sometimes support a family and all that requires money
  • + 3
 I completely disagree.. DH/FR bikes have actually decreased in cost. For starters, in 2006 when I bought my first proper bike it cost me 2,500AUD used and that only got me an average Kona Stinky. I noticed Kona's DH bikes were 6,000+.

Now, for six grand, you can get some high end shit and you can get brand new downhill bikes competitively specced from 5,000 and down.

If you think 3k barely gets you anything I think you haven't been doing your homework very well.. This on the cross country side of things, but I got a fully race specced cross country bike for 2,500 dollars from my local LBS.

It is also my belief, that the only reason companies are coming out with 29'ers and 27.5 inch is to keep the cost of bikes at a premium as well as parts.
  • + 2
 Guys, just prepare for the downvote brigade. Logic and facts don't matter on this website. All my time here has taught me that.
  • + 2
 They have a point here, for example you can get decent new completes for crazy low prices. For example the bikes by YT-Industries(.com). But then again, if the bikeshops are complaining that it isn't fair, they won't thing cheaper companies like YT-Industries would be fair either because they sell similar stuff for less money (=less range for profit for the bikeshop).


I think the main problem here is that bikeshops are complaining too much. So your customers are smarter than you? Don't blame the customers for that, blame yourself. So CRC has become much more succesful than your shop. You're a businessman, stop complaining and get your shit right! You can't blame others for not being succesful yourself.
[Reply]
  • + 19
 Dude if you get a pro deal, don't post it here. That's incredibly poor taste, and in violation of all pro deal terms.
  • + 1
 Turbodog,what blockhead posted their pro deal? Didn't see it.
[Reply]
  • + 14
 I bought an S-Works helmet one time - price was $225. The store accidentally showed me their cost. $75 bucks. At that moment all my preaching about "support your LBS" went out the door. If they offer value, they will get my business, not just because they happen to stock a bunch of entry level 29rs and tubes. Last items I bought were Zee brakes and a dropper seatpost. For both I found the best deal on line.
  • + 7
 That's because you were buying specialized... I guarantee you for normal products at a normal lbs the markup would not be 300%...
  • + 5
 Have you ever met a shop owner riding a ferrari or even a BMW? If no don't complain about prices. It's a small industry so margins get big just to survive. I admire anyone in the bike business. You have to love it to work in it when in any other field of work you would easily get 2-3 times more.
  • + 3
 I work in a bike shop which is a specialized dealer and I can assure you, they are not 300% on anything, they're actually one of the best for pricing...
  • + 15
 I run a bike shop and i can't think of a single item in our store that has a 200% markup on cost like that... if only margins were that good... retail of any kind, across industries gross margin is usually 50%(which equals 100% markup on cost, buy for $10 and sell for $20). most hardgoods are 35-45% margin, and thats before they give you that 10-15% discount just to keep you as a loyal customer... i wouldn't be hasty to assume all LBS are like that...
  • + 4
 agreed with Liam-Walker - Specialized is never a huge money maker; it's usually less than 50% margin. The only time they ever make you decent markup is when you buy huge amounts for a slight discount, and even then it's not always great. It's not just the consumer, even we pay for the Specialized name.
  • + 0
 Same with Fizik - I bought a saddle (Aliante), the guy who was selling it told me that the shop gets them for about €40 or so and sells them for over €100.
  • + 1
 Thats not 300%? What exactly are you showing me?
  • + 1
 thought you meant 30 but still those bikes are too pricey. As a spesh-dealer you should know this.
  • + 1
 That's still BS. You think a shop makes 60euro on you and you cry outrage while you forget about the costs and the small quantity of sales the sohp does. Try to start a business in a high end market like dh bikes. Then I'm pretty sure you would not be complaining.
  • + 0
 @spaced That' the shop owner's problem, not mine. Why sould I as a customer care about that? All that's important for me as a customer is what do I get and how much do I need to pay for it. And if I can get the same thing from two sources, I choose the one that gives me the best price. It's call free market.
If a shop owner isn't able to sell something for a reasonable price, maybe he should close his shop and do something else.
It's like opening a petrol station on the 5th Avenue and charging $20 for a gallon of petrol because your rent is too expensive.
  • + 2
 Free marketeers always forget about secondary costs.

Yeah you will get some stuff cheaper online but an online shops will not: Service your bike, sponsor a local event, sponsor you as a local rider, give you advice, store a bike for you. It's good that you can get free parts but some local shops do A LOT for the local scene and without them a ton of riders whould surface, a ton of events wouldn't happen. Remember a lot of the big events/riders start locally.
  • - 1
 1. If they service my bike, they'll get paid for it.
2. I don't race and I ride on my own so I doubt someone would sponsor me.
3. If I need some advice, it takes less time to Google it than to walk to the shop.
4. I store my bike in my garage and I don't know anyone who would store his bike in a shop, apart from the people who work there.

So nice try, but nothing for me. If a shop was sponsoring a bike park, I'd be happy to spend some money there, but there are no bike parks in (Republic of) Ireland and I know I won't attend any races.
  • + 0
 @Extremmist if you and other people out there think that bike shops don't serve any purpose in the biking community then i am truly worried for the future of biking in all it's shapes and forms.

some would argue that a bike shop is the 2nd most important establishment in a community after a church...
  • + 0
 What do you mean after a church, bikes are my religion and bike shops are my temple Wink
  • + 1
 That could explain a lot. I'm a pagan, I don't need a church, the forest is my temple.
  • + 1
 @Extremist - and there are no local tracks sponsored by shops in Ireland? No shops oranize dig days in your country?

Also do you really want to live in a world where biking has NO events? It makes you sound so true and hardcore but in reality without them you wouldn't probably find about the sport and you would have the chance to feel so superior to other people who care...
  • + 0
 Well, ironically I have, myself, put on many bike festivals and races. It was difficult to get our local shops to be a part of some of them! Not always, but these happen (at least around here) on a grass roots level. I have a LBS that does work that I can't do, but if they want retail business, I won't be shamed into it. It will happen if they offer the best value. I'm not new at this, so for me to maintain my hobby would be impossible at retail prices. When I win the lottery, I'll go to my LBS and buy a 10K bike. But until then, I will scour the internet to find the best deal. Sometimes that happens to be at an LBS. As far as me crying about the markup - I expect 100% markup - something costing the shop $50, being sold at $100. But $75 cost and selling for $225? A Styrofoam helmet? You have to be out of your mind.
  • + 1
 And you need a 10k ? A 4-5k bike isn't enough?

Also no you can't expect a given markup. The markup is what it needs to be. Also go design a styrofoam helmet. It's going to be cheap. Who cares about meeting safety standards, development, engineering... Why do people on pinkbike that the mfg cost is not the total cost of putting something on the market. If you want that buy a cheap chinese copy of a good FF helmet.
  • - 1
 I'm guessing you skimmed over my reply. I said " When I win the lottery, I'll go to my LBS and buy a 10K bike." So NO I don't need a 10K bike but if I hit the lottery, I would do that. Intense Carbine 29r with XX1 group and some ridiculous wheels. Maybe that won't be 10K. So a 5K bike is plenty and that is what I have. And come on! As far as engineering helmets - the low end helmets have just the same "protection" as the high end helmets. You are buying style and more plastic covering of the styrofoam. I'm opposed to getting ripped off then an LBS telling me I should patronize them..just because! I'm all for paying for things of value!
  • + 1
 bottom line is that w/o LBS then there would be a lot more obstacles of entry for new riders because they have no where to go look at, touch, feel, test-ride, repair, buy parts, etc... which means there probably won't be any new riders. when there are no new riders eventually the sport dies. there would be no more market for parts and that means you can't find anything, even on the internet. good luck and go buy everything you can from the internet machine!
  • + 1
 Orastreet you have to be kiding me if you think a 40-50$ helmet and a 200$ helmet offers the same protection. A helmet is not just "put some plastic and styrofoam together". It's how they absorb energy at what impact speed, how the shell cracks and at what energy. How much away from the face it is.

I've seen way more cheap helmets colapse than more quality ones.

I agree the differance between a 200$ and a 500$ helmet is smaller if any but the low end you are very faar from the truth.
  • + 1
 Well my point is, even the cheap ones (and I wasn't talking about full face helmets, but the same applies) they all have to be crash rated to be certified by CPSC, SNELL B90A, CE and AS/NZS. $25 kids helmets and $250 Prevail Helmets all have the same certification so that is what I mean by they all offer the same protection - but perhaps it would be more clear if I said the same "minimum" protection. More expensive helmets cost more because of the material and you will notice the more expensive helmets have more plastic covering the Styrofoam. Also remember, hit your head once and have any decent impact with your helmet and the helmet is no longer deemed safe. You have to buy a brand new one!
  • + 1
 Expensive helmets are expensive because of only two (and a half) reasons: weight and ventilation.
Yes, protection is the same (minus the new MIPS system which is supposed to reduce concussions, hence the half a reason), but a $50 helmet will weigh twice as much and use twice as much material as the mentioned Specialized Prevail. Because the lighter, more ventilated helmets have to deal with less material but still maintain the same safety standards, they have to use more advanced technologies and materials, and thus become significantly more expensive.
So no, a $50 helmet can't hold a candle to a $200 one when it comes to comfort, ventilation, and weight, which all contribute to a much more enjoyable ride (especially on a hot day!), and the newer designs do actually protect slightly better (ie. MIPS).
  • + 1
 @orastreet - no the cheap ones only have the necessary certification not ALL of it. That's the difference.

As for helmets not protecting outside of mips. The chins on some of the cheaper helmets can be very fragile. Sorry but no thanks. I don't care much about weight I want decent ventilation and decent comfort but I won't trust a sub 100$ helmet because of protection.
[Reply]
  • + 13
 Honestly I am sick of bike shops acting like the bike world owes them something. It is us that keeps you in business, if people aren't paying your prices, it's time to change your business model. Note to bike shops (and all businesses) if customers aren't paying the price you are setting, your price is wrong - basic principle of economics. The bike world owes you nothing, stop acting as if it does, because you are just driving more customers away.
  • + 7
 Lowest gross profit margins are from bike shops. They hardly make anything. I worked in a shop and people are so dumb. People really think that your shop is all rich corporate people. Umm no, the owner lives in that tiny house across the street and works 60 hours a week to deal with d-bags who don't understand economics. One actually has to make money on every purchase.
  • + 5
 You miss the point Dave, if a bike shop can't make money selling bikes - then don't sell bikes! Get a smaller shop, and just service them. Don't expect customers to pay a premium to keep a bike shop in business, when they can get a better deal somewhere else.
I think you are the one who doesn't understand economics, so here you go www.capitalisminstitute.org/principles-of-economics, pay particular attention to trade offs, incentives and margins (remember customers have margins too).
Also, don't call a customer "dumb" or "d-bags", it reinforces my belief that bike shop workers believe they are the top of the food chain, and that everyone else should bow down to them - it's not an attitude that attracts people.
  • + 0
 Yeah so they all should go bust and then you can all complain about the evil industry. I don't work for a bike shop but I know a few guys who own them and all of them are faaaar from rich so complaining about them trying to do what they love and bring a product to you is simply being an asshole.
  • + 0
 Get real spaced, bike shops are a business, not a charity. If they want my money, they have to earn it by giving the consumer a product they want at a price they are willing to pay. Them doing what they love is completely irrelevant. There are a lot of things that I love to do which don't pay anything, and I don't expect someone else to fund them.
  • + 2
 Just to be clear here, I am not anti bike shop at all, I am just anti the bike shops that think consumers should "support" them like they are a charity. I am all in favor of any bike shop that can compete in the modern market place, and I think the bike industry on a whole needs to take a good long look at what that marketplace looks like in 2013, and consider how best to meet the consumers needs and stay profitable. There are a lot of excesses in the industry that can be trimmed e.g. I know in Canada that there are too many middle men taking a cut, this makes the final cost higher than it needs to be, and so the consumer goes on-line etc. There are ways around these issues that the industry needs to consider. If bike shops aren't making money, they need to consider what they are doing, not complain that people aren't paying them enough to support their methods.
  • + 4
 would be cool to see a bike shop that buys second hand equipment online and assembles effectively brand new bikes at significant discount to MSRP.
  • + 4
 I like the second hand idea, and there are a few shops like that around. Giving trade in dollars as well. When shops barely get by as it is, they would be foolish to only offer parts and service. The goal of a successful shop includes properly fitting, selling the bikes to an individual, then properly servicing the bike or bikes purchased. Building good relationships and being honest to keep customers coming back and referring other people.
  • + 2
 It's not like the car industry, you are not busy enough year around to stay a float just servicing. Again, bike shops aren't gold mines. I have no problem calling people stupid that feel entitled to the point that people can't stay in business. These are the people that would beg you for a free favor, then order parts online and then want a big discount on service.
  • + 5
 There is alot to this argument. Local bike shops for the most part are not going to be able to compete with many of the large online retailers. Its just not possible. Its just how the economics of selling goods works and its not exclusive to the bike industry. It applies to everything. Local shops of all types are hurt by the big online retailers like Amazon. Local retailers can rarely compete with online prices simply due to volume. Expecting them too is not realistic. The online retailers sell alot more so they can make less on each transaction but make the money on volume.

But there is something to be said for the local retailer. They offer what some online shop can't and that's the customer service to go along with your purchase. They are there to answer your questions, help you pick products and setups, and service you bike for you. And we can all agree that having a good LBS is a definite plus. So with that said, perhaps you do 'owe' them something. Maybe its not to much to ask to pay $5 or $10 more for a part, or maybe pay and extra $200 for a $3K bike in order to help these shops that we rely on in business.
  • + 1
 @NZstormer get real yourself. If you know they are a business you should know they can't offer at too low prices or they would go bust.


@sino428 exactly. Not to mention a ton of local spots and events get sponsored by LBS. They also sponsor a lot of starting riders. I know a ton of stuff at a local scene wouldn't be done if it wasn't for those bike shops.
  • + 2
 If every consumer knew exactly which bike, size, and options they needed, they could just order from companies and shops wouldn't need to exist. But shops exist to help the consumer who needs help. I work at a shop and spent an hour of my day with a customer trying to figure out whether to buy a Stumpy 29er, Camber, or Enduro 29er. All of which would've included a year of free service, guarantees, warrantees, free flat changes, and as much advice as necessary. If he had gone online, he would've bought the wrong bike and had no way of returning it. You don't just buy a bike at an LBS, you buy an LBS.
  • - 1
 Yea, I hate the support your LBS crap - it's a business - they want my money, they'll have to earn it and so far a lot of the LBS have been poor at that.

High prices, nothing of use in stock, bad service.

@spaced wtf, so I should pay a high price so other riders can get a deal, bs..
  • + 1
 So you dont care about local riders and spots? Also you could be one of them
  • + 1
 I don't need a LBS choosing for me what to with the surplus. I build trails, help friends with bikes etc the way I want.

Why would I let someone take money out of my pocket and put it in someone else's? I don't do hand outs.

I want to pay a fair price cause my money is hard earned. I don't want a hand out.
  • + 1
 What about the guys who work hard in the bike shops? Constantly getting the "Can you just fix?..." questions. Where you stop what ever you're doing, help someone out in an emergency, then they kick off when there is a labour charge. Guys who work in bike shops are offering a service for people.

You wouldn't walk into a bank, and ask for a bit extra money? You don't go food shopping and ask "well it's only an apple, that doesn't cost anything right?"

Show a bit of respect for shop guys, they are doing their job!
  • + 1
 If I take my bike to a shop I'm a pay for the labour, I don't expect them to do it for free. Some guys are great and sometimes I pick up stuff from those shops 'cause it's convenient but expecting people to support their LBS for the cause is BS.
  • + 1
 @MendelMu because they agregate money and help to organize it. You with your friends don't have enough reach to gather a lot of money, gain sponsors to create a low to mid level event like an LBS can. They don't do handouts. They use their position to help the local scene. A good (important) shop does more than sell parts. They can do much more for the local scene than you can because of their size and because it's their job while you don't have time for it.

Using your logic why buy redbull - you can organize Rampage yourself. Just gather a few friends, phone some guys with cameras, phone some telecom company. They shouldn't decide for you what you should do with your surplus money...
  • + 2
 Well, I can agree with you to a certain degree, it's just to many of these shops dont take that stance and sell last years stuff for full price etc. or sometimes even last year bikes. If a shop shows up for your events and trail days there is valid point in "supporting", then its more of an exchange, but we don't get that from the most of the shops around me.
  • + 1
 Yes bad shops shouldn't be supported that is obvious. I don't spend my cash in such shops but I know shops who give riding clinics to everyone who buys a bike, create great events etc etc. I wouldn't be able to organize myself even if I wanted to (and I want but I also love my non biking job)
  • + 1
 if (and that's an if that would really need to be proven out) it's true the bike shops arent making enough money, or that LBS owners are by and large 'barely scrapping by', then, clearly, the manufacturers are taking too much. strange there is no union for bike shops to band together to demand better pricing etc. also, it takes time to find the right shop spaced - there are no 'certifications' to help guide us (zagat style). at the end of the day, lack of organization is hurting the consumer.
  • + 2
 spaced - your last point was a summary of what I think most of us are saying "bad shops shouldn't be supported". I, and most people don't mind paying extra for good service when it's needed, or a bit of a premium to get a part today, rather than waiting for it to be mailed. The big issue I have is with what I guess you would call bad shops - that never have the part you want, that aren't able to give you any better advice than I can find by talking to friends, that don't do a thorough fitting when you buy a bike etc. Unfortunately, in my experience, there are a lot of these shops around, and these are the ones that should not be supported. Let the good shops rise to the top, and let the bad ones die. The phrase "support your LBS" should be amended to include "if they're good" at the end. In saying that, I still think there is a lot of industry change that needs to happen (in Canada at least) in order for bike shops to be more viable.
  • + 2
 Haljohnson - That's exactly how it is. I work in a shop, and I can assure you that even the owners and service managers make less than they could in most other fields/industries. The owners drive cars over 10 years old, for instance. Manufacturers are taking a lot, margins in the bike industry are some of the lowest around.
Sure, a markup of 100% (margin of 50%) may seem like a lot, but in the bike industry it's barely enough to keep the doors open and it's a lot less than you would see in other industries.
The reason this is tough is keeping product on the shelves.
If you walk into our store and see 4 brands of DH tire, we bought all 4 because we didn't know which one consumers would prefer.
Typically, one tire will be significantly better, enough so that we now have 3 brands of tire sitting around waiting to be sold (or not) at a low clearance price.
Even if we sell all of one brands tires, we can lose money just by trying to keep tires on the shelves to keep DH riders happy. And this happens in all sections of biking. By charging 50% margin on products, we can keep the doors open and product on the shelves.
  • + 2
 @Haljohnson I agree it takes time. All I say suggest your LBS IF IT'S GOOD because that's rare and such places should be supported.

As for mfg markup as greendarthtater suggested. Mfgs are not making huge cash. Used to work for a local polish company, knew the guys working for it the top guys are not swimming in cash. Far from it. A job with comparable responsibility in a typical corporation would probably yeald 3-4x as much cash.

People need to realize big margins are not because someone rips them off. It's because high end mountain bikes is a super small market. I'm pretty sure you have more people willing to spend 6k on a Robert Pattinson sex doll than on a high end bike.

@Nzstormer - I agree. I know 3/4 of the shops in my city are crap but the good ones I will support and send customers their way.
  • + 1
 spaced - two things. 1) the market for RPSDs is massive. 2) The manufacturers aren't doing too badly. For example, GT Cannondale, Schwinn, Mongoose, IronHorse, SUGOI, Pacific, Dyno, RoadMaster, PowerLite and InSTEP are owned by a Canadian company called Dorel. they are a mid sized conglomerate (billion+ market cap), and wouldn't be in the business if they couldn't grab the margins. i highly doubt they're paying thousands of dollars to manufacture each bike, however you can check their FS (they are public) and find out for sure if you like. The big 3 are likely in the same braket. Keep in mind, these bikes are made in china with cheap labour using economies of scale.
  • + 1
 The big 3 are probably not doing business the same as Dorel. The only high-end companies there are GT and Cannondale, which are very recent acquisitions and most likely not making them nearly as much money.
  • + 1
 Not sure what you mean by 'very recent.' Cannondale was acquired in 2008 for 200 million dollars. GT was acquired in 2004 as part of its Pacific cycle deal for 300 million. In any case, if somebody were interested in finding out exactly how much it does cost to make a high end bike, this would be a good place to start.
  • + 1
 Since when is GT a high-end company? (No offense to them, they go make some good bikes).
  • + 1
 @Halijonson yeah Schwin and Iron Horse are so massive they are not anymore in the high end bike market... Dorel makes most of its money on supermarket bikes.
It's like saying Ferrari sells millions because it's owned by a big company.


Also no they are not paying thousands of dollars to mfg each bike but that's the error most people make about the cost of making a bike. They thing the mfg cost = total cost of bringing the bike to you. What about shipping, designing, engineering, marketing (if it wasn't for it you wouldn't know about most of the bikes), sales dpt costs etc etc. Have you never worked in your life?


As for aquiring brands - they are worth more than just the bikes they make (patents for example. That's why google bought motorolla).


@Extremmist any DH bike is a high end bike.
  • + 1
 Going back to my original point, if the bike shops aren't making money, then I'd be interested to know who is - especially considering the cost of an entry level MTB (or as you might call it a 'Ferrari.') I don't think anybody can deny Dorel is a decent sized player in the space, so I don't see why we can't look at their numbers more closely, given they are publicly available.
Looking at Ferrari, they own and run Fiat, which just bought GM, and these operations fuel design and growth of their high end segment - a virtuous circle (if that model ends up working - an open question).

Nobody is debating there are additional costs above manufacturing, I'd just like to understand what those costs are a little more clearly, because at the moment it seems like the LBS is bearing a lot of the burden, and they are then forced to pass as much of that burden as possible over to the consumer (i.e. me).
  • + 1
 No one. The cost of entry is high because of small volume, not because someone makes a ton of money. Using the logic that people who make expensive products are rich is a bit faulty. Meet someone who actually makes jewelery. He works with super expensive stuff but makes pennies.
  • + 1
 tentatively agree when it comes to the smaller companies, but I'm yet to be convinced that's the case for the larger companies. but let's just say for the sake of arguement you're right, how then do companies like Kawasaki and KTM build, design, engineer, market and distribute motocross bikes at a similar MSRP to high end motorless MTBs? Conversley, and perhaps this is a better comparison/question, how is it the very same companies that are in the MTB segment can build, design, engineer, market and distribute high end road bikes for more than double the MSRP of high end MTBs (It's not uncommon to see TT's for example of upwards of 15k to 20k)?

I have to ask you now Spaced - have you never worked in your life? have you never sold anything? how exactly did you decide how much to sell it for?
  • + 1
 hahaha. sorry. the more i think about it the funnier your answer becomes. "no one" bahahahahahah.
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  • + 7
 I did a combination of the above: I bought half the parts from my LBS with some discount as a loyal customer, and the frame and some other parts I got by hunting around for online deals. Paid much less than full retail, got a totally custom bike, and still supported my LBS.
  • + 1
 Same here... Frame and fork online, group from LBS with larger discount than online Smile
  • + 1
 Tried to do the same thing; I ordered a wheelset and a saddle in my LBS, got the other parts online (mostly eBay, maybe half of the parts came from USA).
Result: I got the parts ordered from eBay within 4-5 days, maximum 10 days on one occasion.
I got the wheelset (Mavic) after almost 3 months and after more than 4 months of waiting I canceled the order of the saddle and bought it second hand.
So LBS nevermore!
  • + 1
 It doesn't mean all LBS are bad, only yours. It could happen the opposite and you could end up with a shitty online store and a good LBS.
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  • + 7
 f*ck no. Wait for the end of the year and pick it up off P-bike or ebay or an online shop. Bike shops know how ridiculous the prices are. They'd never pay those same prices. Why would anyone else?
Bike shops should incorporate brew-pubs/coffee bars or vinyl shops or indie comics/books (etc.) into their stores and become social hubs as opposed to ass-raping retailers. Actually, after a few beers a guy might be more likely to pay full retail. Shops should stick to parts and repairs and display bikes as eye candy until they can put them on sale at a "discount".The quaint idea of "main st. mom and pop businesses" is fossilized. The way of the future for shops is to diversify the experience for the shoppers.
  • + 2
 Parts and repairs are the only place where shops make money. If you had any idea how little these shops make on bike sales. Margin on bikes is very minimal in comparison to ANY other market on earth. We weren't able to sell bikes for 20% off until they were 3 years old, and that was losing money after stocking them for so long.
  • + 2
 A proper small town bike shop is just like you described, malathion. with local riders lounging, maybe drinking beers, talking bikes, working on their own bikes. although they don't make any money off of being a hang-out spot, the riders who hang there give the shop their business for small parts, tubes etc and are generally loyal to that shop and probably get the bro-deal if they were to buy a new bike there.
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  • + 9
 BTW nobody pays full retail for cars either...maybe Obama should have bailed out the bike shops OH!
  • + 1
 If no bailouts then war will be waged!!!
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  • + 5
 I hope a big wig out there in a board room some where will take note I know over heads are higher on small scale production lines but if prices were lower me and 100's hell 10,000's of other people would be more inclined to hit the high street and buy new every few years instead of buying 2007 bikes cos that's all we can afford.

Just look at your local mall the designer stores are empty but the shop who has £10 jeans people are queuing a mile down the road to get in.
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  • + 4
 When I was in college all I bought were 2nd hand. I really took advantage of the LBS as well. When I graduate, said I, I will have a good job and I'll buy a retail bike at full price to say thanks to the LBS.

Well, when I graduated I had no job and lived off of contract work for a year.

When I landed a good, full time job making decent $$ this summer, I got married and bought a house a month later, and now I'm poorer than I was in college and I still there wondering how I can fix the leaking seals and blown compression on my fox 40 (that I bought used 3 years ago with my PELL grant in college
)
  • + 3
 last time i complained about bike prices on pb i was told to 'get a better job' - and all i could think was, this guy defo has no kids.
  • + 3
 Haha, yeah no one said to, "get a better job, and have kids, then overextend yourself with loans to the point that the better job doesn't add up to more spending money". I understand though, life happens.
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  • + 4
 Whistler ex-rental bikes, last three bikes, less than half price, always checked over before they sell it to you and they fix broken parts. Then I sell at the price I bought it for a year or two later and my only cost is to go back up to Whistler, more than happy to do that for a new bike!!
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  • + 4
 LBS is the way to go! Just find one that has good service and one that has a bike with a good warranty to back it up and it will always beat out used bikes or online! I'm not saying that online dealers don't have good deals now and then. Just always remember if it's so cheap online there is a probably a reason it's there.
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  • + 7
 Payed the full price - and then some (shipping box and shipping).

Still a good deal though, the bike being a YT Smile
  • + 1
 Dame here but it don't think you could call YT full retail. Its half the price any other bike is with the same spec or even sometimes lower spec .
  • + 2
 me too, full price and still a better deal than any sale bike you could ever find
  • + 1
 Theres a reason its half price. No distributor
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  • + 3
 I paid full at my LBS, guys there are awesome. It took a year to save and decide what I wanted. I spent lots of time in the shop asking questions and picking their brains. I have a great warranty, they do excellent work and they back it up. Also being a good customer I also get constant deals.

LBS are on the frontline and they ought to be compensated for it. If you want to see it, hold it, try it on or get info they're there (that's worth something). I work hard for my $$$ and so does my LBS. I feel good about supporting the people that help make this positive communty. LBS are more than a place to go to get the goods. It's where you get the haps on trails, trends and freakn talk bikes, face-to-face!

Get deals when you can but remember, racing for the cheapest deal creates a lot of losers.
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  • + 4
 i spent $2200 building up my last bike....nice bike but i think it is really expensive even second hand parts.....cost almost as much as the car i drive which has a f*cking engine, mountain bike parts are freaking expensive!
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  • + 6
 Missing option 6! "I build my own bikes and buy my own parts for my own needs"
  • + 1
 I vote option 6 plus an option seven where by getting things on finance
  • - 3
 Missing another option, though it might be more limited scope
7) No, I get pro-deal as I work in the industry

Alas, I never pay full-retail for anything. Bikes are bro-deal from the manufacturer, and all parts are at cost from the distributor. Yes, I am very fortunate.
  • + 5
 so nice of you to point that out. You're doing your industry a lot of good by bragging.
  • + 2
 How is he supposed to tell people the parts he sells are any good? I get free shoes a lot for selling them at work. I would have never thought some of them were as great as described if I hadn't tried them for hours on end. Same with bikes. Retailers and even engineers and distributors want to know the quality of the product first hand, the best way to do that is to own the product, and they can't afford to do that every time a new product comes out. I am glad to know they have the opportunity to gain knowledge about their product before they shove it down our throats *cough*cough* 650b...
  • + 1
 Yeah re-reading my succinct post I can see how it may have come across but that wasn't my intention. I was merely highlighting there are more options than those listed (as is often the case in these polls). R-trailking-S is right though; I'm fortunate enough to have access to cheaper parts because I work in the industry, and from that I am able to review and evaluate gear for myself and promote it for the manufacturers.
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  • + 2
 The last time I truly didn't pay retail was the time I helped a friend by working at his shop building bikes. Tried my hand at selling over the Christmas season too. I learned a lot. Like there's not much margin in the bike business when you've got peeps who want deals, employees, rent, and utilities. I didn't pay retail for my current ride either-some goodies and a few perks thrown in-but I also know what the true cost of all that is now too. You don't sell bikes to get rich. You sell them because you love the sport and it pays the bills.
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  • + 2
 While it's true markup is pretty high in the cycling industry, the local shop owner HAS to do that just to stay in business because there isn't a huge margin for profit in the local shop business. Online bullshit is running them into the ground because they are lacking the support they really need to stay open. That's not just buying your tubes and tires there. It's actually buying bikes there. No matter the deal online, if you care about the local riding community and have a shop in the area, go to the shop. Don't buy online. They provide (or support) most all of the races and trails in your local area and deserve the support way more than any online bullshit.
  • + 1
 you have to look at this another way - cycling in all forms has grown massively over the last few years, seriously massive and this is why there are so many online stores and why so many LBS also sell online too!!! you could argue that online and direct sale have also helped boost the uptake simply because of their lower prices and this in turn then benefits the LBS as many, like me, use them for spares, repairs and other bits relating to the bike - i both use online and in store. TBH my LBS is not interested in me, im a budget rider and they are now only interested in the big money trail bike buyers, those riders that many here kinda despise, those that bike giants are aiming their bikes too - they spend the big bucks and me, the little guy who loves riding but has little budget gets pushed aside its a massive massive market out there and shops have to adapt, like ours is, they look to the big spender, mid-life crisis audi driving newbee or the the big spender who requests a full on 5-10 grand bike build for riding the fireroads!!! - me and my buckled wheels have to book in and wait 2 weeks for a time slot!!!! 2 WEEKS!!!! - in my BMX days we lived in the damn bike shop, lways hanging th
  • + 1
 I feel for the LBS' and want to support them, but for many people it's a simple matter of economics - they don't have the money to pay full-retail at the LBS. Certainly the few of us who can afford it aren't enough people to keep them profitable. I don't have the answer for how to keep the LBS' in business and out of the "labor of love" category, but If the business model is not working then how can it be changed to work better so our LBS's can make a good living? I don't think we are going to fix it by a few of us martyrs boycotting discount online retailers and buying everything at the LBS, because the majority are by necessity looking for the best deal. The LBS' need to get more creative about marketing and be more service-oriented.
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  • + 2
 I work in a LBS and if you ask me for a deal on a bike you better be able to cash that cheque when I hit you up for a deal where you work. Contrary to popular beliefs margins aren't what they used to be. Stop blaming your bike for why you suck, thinking you need the latest and greatest... Get out on what you have and ride more!
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  • + 2
 Interesting how back in 1996 an Azonic/World Force Deluxe Shorty stem was £115 and a MRP chain device was £180. On a whole everything is more expensive of course but back then that was almost a weeks wages! Not everything is more expensive I assure you. Then take inflation into account and some things are loads cheaper.
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  • + 2
 I buy new frames and transfer parts that I've accumulated over the years to build them up. and I prefer to support my LBS by buying new and in turn getting a warranty, great service and discounts on any new parts as i need them. unfortunately, if/when i move to a new area, that relationship disappears, and i'm stuck back on square one.
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  • + 2
 when I start looking for my bike I was thinking maybe a mix of new and used parts So I can save some money , but I noticed That sometimes used parts are more expensive than new So maybe I bought all the parts including brand new frame on 15 or more diferent stores online and local and I did save more money . Takes time but if you start doing some research you can save money.
  • + 1
 I do the same thing. I will spend an evening drinking beer, surfing the web to save 10 bucks on a component
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  • + 2
 I bought my first ride brand new, but over the years bike have become overpriced imho. The 222 was a great example, back when it was new a few race spec was £3,000 when the 224 came about being pretty much the same bike, it was near £6,000 ?

Bike frames are like £3,000 now and when you consider you could buy a car it's worth isn't justified.

I love bikes, but if I had to buy retail I probably wouldn't have one now, nor upgrade.

I got a M9 and built it up from stuff I collected on PB, and even the M9 came off here, but to buy it new, a dream....

my first bike was £1500 for reference.
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  • + 2
 Yes, YT Tues Pro, practically giving it away at €3200 with BOS suspension. Having said that, had to pay up front, wait about 3 months for delivery. The forks had a warranty issue, had to send back to Germany so they could look at them before sending them to France etc etc still awesome value though
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  • + 2
 bike companies screw the LBS year after year by coming out with bikes that have very little change from the year before, ie: new stickers or colors, "better" components, etc, in an effort to sucker the end user to buy something new every year. How this affects the LBS is that at the end of every season these bikes will HAVE to go on sale online or else nobody wants them next year or ever after. Now, what sells will sell, and what doesnt sell, stays on sale almost at cost.

i work in the auto industry, but the main difference here? networking
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  • + 2
 I think used bikes are the fastest growing threat to LBS and people willing to pay full retail. We switch from DH to Enduro to 4X and back so often that there's simply so much inventory to choose from on the used market and a marginal difference (in some cases) year to year.
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  • + 2
 Could it be that us f*cker downhillers are used to breaking parts and making trail repairs? Why pay so much money to a shop for something I can build myself for a fraction of the cost? What incentive does a free tune hold to anyone that rides daily and tears down their bike on a monthly basis for a full regrease and rebuild? Race car drivers do not take their cars to the dealership between races, and it is absurd to expect an amateur racer to cage and strip a brand new car, so why should us mountain bikers be expected to do so?

While we are on the topic, my last few ventures into motorsports have cost me less than my last few mountain bike races... which is sad
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  • + 1
 DH is just one of the many pointless products for the lbs to carry. It's not profitable and as such it won't support the people that work at the shop, the owners or the initiatives they try to support in the local riding community. Lets not forget that the lbs supports the trail builders that create the trails you ride. Go buy from crc and save a few bucks. Let's get everything made offshore while we're at it. It's a race to the bottom. Short sighted savings hurt us all in the long run.
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  • + 1
 I like the second hand bikes but there is nothing compare to have a new from package bike jejeje I have a second hand kona, then a new giant trance x, then a new scott gambler 2013, then a second hand glory 2012 a the last One for this year a new scott gambler 2013!
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  • + 1
 Always get between 20-40% off bikes by either:
- building myself from components in sales, eg buying last years frame/components - around 40% off
- negotiating in a shop - 10-20%
- buying in an end of year sale - 20-30%

Eg:
Santa Cruz Aluminium frame with Kashima upgrade rrp £1950, in sale for £1100
2013 Reverb RRP £299. 2012 Reverb in Chain reaction Xmas sale £144...
Etc
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  • + 1
 I almost never pay full price unless I'm at the LBS and they are buying parts I don't really know much about (BBs, bearings, etc). ChainReaction etc. is so damn cheap, and shipping is free after a measly 100 bucks.

But wanna save real money (DH'ers not inlcuded)? Buy a hardtail. 2500 bucks and you'll be riding a sweet machine that'll let you hit almost anything. Plus, you're frame will cost about $0/year in bearing replacements and shock maintenance! With mid-level bikes being 4000+, I see a lot more people moving back/away from rear suspension, cause companies are charging ever growing prices for "new" technology instead of finding efficiences and dropping costs on existing stuff. Also, riding a hardtail is just fun, but it's been easy to forget with all the press around FS bikes.
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  • + 1
 Its so tiring listening to people moan about prices of bikes. Bikes have got loads cheaper. When i started riding 2k got you an elastomer sprung 2 inch travel full susser with terrible components. Now you can buy a race ready scalp for that money.
If you want to buy used thats fine just be careful.

if you want to save real money buy from a direct company. Its the distributors that make the real cash. A certain dh frame over here that originates from canada has an 1800 pound retail price yet staff at the distributors can buy one for 750 pounds. So a 60% approx mark up from distributor to shop.
thats why stuff is so expensive.

another reason dh riders dont want to pay full price is the fact that its much more likely to get crash damaged than a trail bike thats going to last years longer.
Smile
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  • + 1
 I am not exactly hurting for cash for good toys, but I buy everything online, for cheap. Not just to save money, but also to build my bike EXACTLY how I want it. And I do not have a problem paying full retail for a frame, if that is what I want and a deal can not be easily found. Everything else is online, often for less money that many local shops can get at cost.
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  • + 1
 it all depends on who you are.............dirt bag dh riders with no money who just love to ride, build, and live, but also pump (word of mouth is gold) their lbs because they are the ones supporting local people and help dirt bag dhers out(like me).........................or your the mommy and daddy bought you everything new every year and a pass to whistler even though you live in florida.............used bikes need love too!
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  • + 2
 i worked in bike shops and i now work as a carpenter with a family and still love 26ers so please embrace 27.5 so i can get the best 26 inch wheeled bike second hand and barely ridden for cheap that would be great
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  • + 1
 Soooo...in my country a spz demo carbon costs $15.000. A simple HardRock costs $2.000. I really will not pay these prices and shop owner I attend quite understand it. If I need to pay so much I would never be practicing Downhill. 2hand for almost everything!
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  • + 1
 I decided that i wanted a Nukeproof scalp as they were getting good reviews left, right and centre and they look pretty sweet. Couldn't find one 2nd hand in the UK for less than £1400 and CRC were selling brand new "soiled" Scalp's for £1800. Never did manage to find the scratches.
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  • + 1
 Clearly it's different over seas, but in New Zealand I find that the mark up on bikes actually isn't that huge; around 40% off retail and you've hit the price the manufacturer demands($4000 retail= $2600 manufacturer). The real money, however, is in parts. That's where the real markups are... (think 110% mark up on consumables; break pads cables etc).
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  • + 1
 dh rigs have become better and better value over the years. todays $2799 msrp dh rig would seriously destroy a top end DH rig from 15 yrs ago that would have had a msrp of $8000.

Entitlement is partly the problem in that folks actually believe they 'need' the top of the line, but are not willing to pay for it.
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  • + 1
 I paid in my noisy kona coilair 2011 that is a shit bike in US and cost 2000 USD there, about 6500 USD here in Brazil,where the taxes are crazy,, almost in the beginner of 2012, , and took like 6 months to get here, I could get a nice used demo8 in the US for that price. kill me please.
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  • + 1
 If you don't want to pay retail, fix your own f*cking bike! O wait you can't because you have not dedicated your life ( and your home) to this sport. I live in Prince George, a small town of 80 000 people and 6 bike shops, one drives around in a Porsche laughing his ass off to the bank, and the other ( Ruckus ) builds trails, supports local riders, advocates for more legal trails, and genuinely loves the sport like we all do. In order for them to keep their doors open and live a modest lifestyle they need to be profitable. Tell me, when was the last time the owner of MEC or Chain Reaction Cycles picked up a shovel or sponsored a local event??? Take care of your local shop or face the reality of no support. Their mark up on high end product is not nearly as good as you think it is. BTW to support this statement I've had 6 years of experience in the the industry and have seen it first hand. Be diligent in who and what you support, look past your nose and wallet for the greater good of MTB'ers across the board.
  • + 2
 MEC gave us 5000$ for our local trails. That's 5000 more than le LBS.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 The mark ups on MTB's are ridiculous! My friend runs a bmx shop and the mark ups are tiny in comparison. As I have no lbs I browse online for the cheapest deal usually on last years stock. It's usually Heavily reduced as shops need to clear it out to make way for the latest hi tech parts. Sometimes the only difference is the color!!! Can save a fortune that way My current frame is Atherton surplus!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 The past bikes I have owned were a '97 GT LTS-2 for $300, an Azonic Steelhead for $350 (sold for $275), a Verde Cartel ($100), and now a '09 P1 for $400. My budget is tiny and I often scour for months before I find something my heart and wallet agree with. None of these were particularly great, new, or remotely perfect. Which is fine. I'm going to use it, beat it, fix it. But I can't even fathom buying a USED DH rig right now. Simply can't afford it with college tuition and car payments. But god, rental prices kill me every time too....
[Reply]
  • + 1
 this sh*t almost sounds like a shop owner or some sh*t started it ,,,who would pay top price just for the hell on paying full price ...F.O.H !! I love pinkbike but cant believe this topic really got any play !! ,,,,,,alright in all fairness ,, youre shopping for a new set of hubs,crankset,fork or some other big dollar item for your fav bike and you got 3 shops to choose from shop 1. retail price shop 2. labor sale shop 3 your homie works there gonna give you his 10% off da sales price ....................................WHAT SHOP YOU GOING TOO???..................................ONLY SHOP OWNERS WANT YOU TO SPEND MORE !!!!!!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I never pay full price cause i like to build my own

TBH im glad there are people prepared to pay full price, cause without them, there wouldnt be such a good 2nd hand market for bike parts

2010 Tracer VP with Chris King, 10 speed XT, Saint cranks, Renthal, Fox 36 RC2, Vivid Coil R2C, Easton , Fizik etc for £1,500

Versus £1,800 for frame and shock alone

No brainer
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I started by taking everything to my LBS. Then I worked there, built up two new bikes using my discount (not amazing, but it definitely helped). Now I use the knowledge I gained while working there to work on my own bikes and order parts online when I need. Not a fan of the insane mark-up in prices for the Canadian market.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Hell yeah I'm going to find and get the best deals, shit ain't cheap any. I remember when 5 bucks gas could get you somewhere besides the next stop light. You need at lest 3k to even think about getting a DH bike then another 2k for gear. I have 3 jobs, part-time student, and my diesel ramcharger project. money is always tight
[Reply]
  • + 2
 Who pays full retail for a brand new car, or a house? I would hope nobody, haggling a car salesman is part of the experience so why should I roll over for an equally priced bicycle marked up at a shop?
  • + 1
 DAM couldn,t agree more .......................hands down best response ( even better than mine ..lmao)
[Reply]
  • + 1
 It's just good shopping if you shop around. I get pro deals and also buy eBay or used stuff, a brand new bike is only brand new until you break something. And in downhill that usually is with in a week. I buy used and shop around and haggle. It's just fun
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I bought my bike at lbs pay full price, didnt ask any deal or anything, they give me excellent services after. From time to time
I buy Stuff online i dont have a problem with That. lbs was asking like 175 $ for e13 bashguard, paid 90$ online....why should a Feel bad it s my money after all.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 i dont see the need to buy a brand new bike unless you have pockets FULL of cash, i am not against buying a brand new bike for the RRP in a shop, however whats the point when you can get the same bike for much less and which has probs been upgraded as well.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I have been biking since the early 90's. the prices the last couple of years has made it so i am thinking about changing to a cheaper sport, It is getting way to expensive and a lot of my friends have switched to dirt biking as they sa it is cheaper and easier.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 No because stores put so much market up they can afford to come down significantly in price. Albeit stores need to pay overheads, wages and all running costs. But store still manage to sell bikes at 30% off and make a profit so With a tight budget I'm gonna milk what I can for my pocket.

I bought my bike on sale about 30%off I ungraded parts at the store so I got trade in ended up with a bike that was probably 2k less than full retail.

We have massive mark up here in aus too most due to the excessive shipong and extra exchanging of hands before it gets to our stores. we are always looking OS at CRC to get better prices.
  • + 1
 at 30% off there is no profit left. seriously.
  • + 1
 Maybe in Canada over here its appears to be very different with some stores at least. There are the few who are getting very close to OS prices and they are the ones surviving the online battle we have over here. I'd say 30% would be the limit they can go, I wouldn't expect them to make much profit off that point.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I like to build my bikes custom as opposed to buying a complete bike and I always try to buy what I can from my local shop but it has to be within reason. As long as the LBS is within the same ballpark on price for the parts I need I'll shop there, but at the same time sometimes there are just deals you can't pass up. If I can save a few hundred $$$ on a bigger ticket item online then I have to do it. Regardless, my local shop get plenty of money between the parts I do buy there and the shit they are fixing that I broke.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I think the more interesting poll would be who plans to buy a downhill bike (period) in the next 6 months or so? With Enduro becoming more popular, and true DH riding pretty hard to find unless you live right next to a ski resort, how useful is a DH bike for anyone but a small number of elite and pros requiring sponsorship anyway?
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I might not mind so much if you actually had the option to ride the bike on a proper trail before you bought. At least the bike shop could carry a couple of demo bikes ... but far too many of them only let you ride it around the carpark as the "test ride", which tells you squat, or show you a pretty frame and tell you how much it is to build it up. It's pretty easy to make a very.expensive.mistake.

I bought my first two bikes used. I sprang 3K for the park bike new last summer, and 3K for the new XC rig this one. I'm still paying them off :-( and replacement purchases will likely be used.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 This should be read by the corporate giants and realize that despite working on the best technology and latest gear, most end users always look for quality and affordable products to satisfy their biking needs. Yes hardware contributes to biking but the hell with it when you end up broke. Worst than crashing that pricy bike!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I've loved riding since I was a kid, so right after college I got myself a second job at a bike shop to afford the good stuff. Every single penny I made from there went into new gear. Glad I almost killed myself doing it too. The markup on ANY bike product can be extremely high. For example a 75 cent tube got sold for $7. You can only imagine what the $ figure markup for the bikes were.

As for me,4 of my 5 bikes were all bought brand new from the shop, none of which were full price. Yes I lost a lot of great riding while working at the shop, but it was worth it. I'm now happily "retired" from the industry but miss some of the perks.
  • + 1
 Yeah, how high were you when you worked there? Tubes have a huge mark up, however bikes do not. Maybe you never worked in retail anywhere else, where you were able to see real profit margins.
  • + 1
 Stone cold sober. Not a high mark up? LOL. I picked up my carbon Enduro for $1500 in the box right from Specialized. Retail was $5500. want to tell me that again? No, I honestly never worked won't ever again work retail but don't you think charging double for a part that you don't carry in stock AND get free shipping is a bit high?
[Reply]
  • + 1
 not even going to read the start of this i bought my bike new . i went the demo days and had tried lots of bikes then tried some more till i was sure then asked lots of questions about the bike i was wanting and then some more then got it down to 2 bikes then got the bike i wanted this took a year and was right for me .
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I'm loyal to my LBS and in return am offered fantastic deals on complete bikes and parts. They know they'll get my service work and upgrade part purchases, sometimes I pay full price, sometimes I get a discount, other times they'll throw in small stuff to sweeten the deal. I get to support my LBS without pain in the pocket and they've enjoyed a loyal customer for over 10yrs. Hell, they'll even tell me when to just buy something online because they know it is the best deal and I'll appreciate the tip and come back for something else. It's win-win and I couldn't be happier to support them.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Ebay bargain I got a mint and I do mean mint 2007 GT dhi for £600 bought for him by rich daddy who payed £3500 as a xmas present only to ride it to the shops and back. Just serviced it and going to hit the local trails. Rrp I dont think so!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 A couple things I learned while working at a shop & how to get discounts on new stuff:
1) Those uber expensive bikes on the floor are not stockpiled in the back collecting dust. A good store knows its market and caters to them. The "uber" high end bike becomes eye candy to entry level customers, getting them thinking about maybe spending more than they originally planned on a slightly better model (but almost never on the "Uber" unless they are a Visa Black holder). Uber Bikes are a risky purchase even for a shop. It might stay on the floor for months or even years before recouping their cost. Go for last years model.
2) Going in once and expecting a deal never happens; come in a lot. Get to know everyone in the shop even if it means using the excuse of needing air. We love to talk with people about the industry we don't see every day at work. Just don't do it when they are crazy busy. "Friends" of the shop rarely ever pay msrp.
3) If you get a great deal never tell friends what the exact cost was. Sure it is great for bargaining with other stores but one of your buddies going into your local shop where you made the connections asking for your price makes YOU look bad to both the shop and your friend when they get shooed away. Say it was a good deal and brag about their service which is their real bread & butter.
4) Concept stores that specialize in just one brand or chain stores have very little wiggle room. Go to an indy.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 you might as well just wait a few month until they announce the newer models of bikes, or just go ahead and buy second hand. Because once they announce the newer models, I.E. 2013, in my case when I bought my 2012 Status, the prices just drop a heap, you can buy the Status 2 now for 1.5k£ or cheaper online if you look around. But when I bought it, it was in the 2.5K£ range. Do I regret not waiting and saving my hard earned money? Yes, Do I wish I bought a Devinci Wilson instead? Yes. Especially when Stevie Smith signed to them haha
[Reply]
  • + 1
 There was no category for "No, I walked into a reputable shop with a big inventory in winter and asked how much if I have CASH"

I didn't know anyone in the shop and I got my brand new 2013 DH bike for exactly 40% off retail price... really makes me wonder how much those things are marked up, but I was happy.
  • + 2
 Bikes are usually marked up less than that. Hence, why one doesn't make much more than minimum wage working there. Far as retail, profit as a whole doesn't get less than a bike shop.
  • + 1
 I've got a relative who owns a bike shop. He tells me that industry average is 38%. Obviously the big chains are going to get a large reduction on that and can therefore offer greater discounts.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Unless you have endless amounts of cash buying used is where its at. As long as the frame is good, the rest is maintenance, I bought a 3 year old Transition Covert custom build with top of the line equipment, well maintained for 1400 vs the 7-8k build price it cost him. He shelled out 10-11k for a new Santa Cruz Bronson. Money is all in the eye of the beholder. 10k to him was nothing, to me and others its a lot. To each his own. wealthy or not, we are all here to have fun and enjoy biking and adventure.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I do both. I love my local bike shop and I get a little discount because I been shopping there since I was a little kid riding bmx. Now I'm 31 have 3 boys and buy their bikes and parts there too. But being that I have 3 boys that are rough on parts and bikes and I am as well I have to shop for used parts and try to get deals any time I can. I don't mind supporting my local shop when I need tubes, tires, and small stuff but this site has been a god send for me to get good quality used parts at a bargain price!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I work in a bike shop. People think we get such a great deal. We do. But we don't make a lot of money. My pay check is tinny in comparison to someone that works in a city and makes 6 figures and drives nice cars, owns a big azz house and can afford and trips all over the world. Yes, Bike shop people get great deals on parts but we sacrifice the rest of our vises for it. So being of lesser income, we need these deals. We are heavily encouraged to have all the new parts so we know what it all rides like. So we are constantly buy new bits all the time. So it adds up.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I think it's the bike shops to blame for all this, because if you would not put your bikes up for sale at does prizes like 35% and in some times even 50% then maybe you would not make us loose all that money when we come to sell our bikes as second hand, it's you who force us to buy only when they are on sale. What's the sense to buy a bike for example 3000 euros and then after one year you want to sell it as a second hand bike and you cant even sell it for 2000 euros because it costs less new from the shop just because it's on a 35% sale that sucks, so we end up selling our bikes just after one at less then 70% of the money we payed one year ago :/ When you stop f*cking up prises then maybe will start paying the retail prize.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 First thought popped into my head: "NO WAY! ARE YOU F$CKING HIGH????" I choose save a couple Gs on a used demo, thanks. Did you know its used a couple rides after u bought it new??? It's true!
[Reply]
  • + 3
 Yes, I paid full price, but on the Cycle to work scheme we have in the UK I saved 40% in income tax on it! Smile
[Reply]
  • + 0
 All I have to say is f*ck retail! I understand making a profit but margins on bikes and parts seem to range between 60-90%, absolutely ridiculous!!! Way too high!!! Bike companie need to not feel the maket for what price they seem the market will pay and stop the triple or quadruple markup problem. This is why the procucts seem to be soo expensie. Too many individuals are in the chain making huge profits.
  • + 0
 That's no where near accurate. 35% is about average profit margin. For reference, in any other market, 50% is usually bare minimum to be successful.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I'm glad to see that used bikes are the most answered question! I had stuck up bike snobs that think they're all that because their bike is the newest and greatest. If you have fun on your bike that's all that matters.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I bought a bike at an LBS, but they price matched an online bike with a similar build kit.
And it was only really 5-10% off of full retail.

But it's a great bike, I don't care about the price, except when I crash.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 I find that the people who are always preaching "SUPPORT YOUR LBS" are the same people who are not paying retail for their bikes
[Reply]
  • + 0
 You know what I feel like doing after reading this? Closing my shop and getting into finance.

Everyone can buy second hand crap, fix their own sh$t and drive two hours to the nearest discount mega store to get served by some 14 girl who doesn't know what a derailleur is, OR buy all the wrong stuff online.

I'll see you on the trails instead of being stuck in the shop.

Good day!
[Reply]
  • + 3
 There wasn't a "I pay wholesale suckers" option to the poll unfortunetly. Wink
  • + 3
 Yeah, it's not there because it's a dick move to brag about it on the internet, and makes you look like a complete tool. The one saving grace of this shitstorm of a Pinkbike article is that they DIDN'T put that option.
  • + 2
 Hell often I pay well below wholesale. Industry contacts are a great thing. Of course every shop owner is in the exact same situation. That's why so many people OPEN bike stores to begin with. Subsidizing your own bike habit (sure isn't to get rich).
[Reply]
  • + 3
 haha $10k for a Rig i struggle pulling the trigger on a mint condition downhill rig for $3,500 off craigslist
[Reply]
  • + 2
 I follow 2 rules:
Never buy whole bike, you won't get the stuff you want.
Never buy new parts, unless it's for filthy cheap in the sales.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I know of this website called Pinkbike and I usually buy replacement parts new and used for cheaper prices than the dealer. I don't know about you kids but saving money is important to me.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 This is the best poll in a while. It shows quite clearly why the engineers/bike companies seem out of touch with the kids on pink bike. You don't buy new products, so they aren't marketed at you.
[Reply]
  • + 0
 What on earth is the point of this poll??? To show that if you ever paid full retail price on a bike you are either stupid or have cash to splash or both?

Or is it to make us feel sorry for the lowly bike shop owner? This ain't charity; if I have a good relationship with a LBS the must give me a discount off msrp if they want me to stay loyal plain and simple.

Now to be fair there are an annoying population of pink bikers that revolt anytime a product is featured that they can't afford...you price haters should give it a rest; you are wrong!

Did not partake in the poll (in case my salty post didn't make that clear)
[Reply]
  • + 1
 i always try to buy decent parts new/unused but with large discounts, i know what parts i like from ridings friend's bikes and search for the best deals online. being a student i just cant afford a 3-5k bike.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I got my frame from Silverfish on Clearence, and the rest of the bits were in various sales around the place all about hunting the deals out i probably saved like 1500+ in deals
[Reply]
  • + 0
 last time I paid for a new bike , in a bike shop , was 2005 and never again . I do my own research and buy "used/almost online new from the person that likes to impulse buy but has no passion for riding , I also do all my maintenance , repairs etc so never have to drive to the LBS and wait on their schedule and pay the grossly inflated prices for services . A bike isn't a difficult piece of engineering , heck it doesn't have a motor or electric components for goodness sake.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I pay retail price for my stuff. Last time I bought second hand from this site the bike snapped in half. I have the pictures to prove it.
[Reply]
  • + 3
 wheres the i work at a bike shop option?
[Reply]
  • + 1
 the first bike I paid in full, the second was 2/3 of msrp and the third I shopped around and built it myself. And the third was by way the cheapest.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 never buy a new dh bike lol. i got exactally 20 grand worth of dh bikes, and i paid umm, 4k over time just for bikes, not parts.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 Or Buy YT Industries or Canyon Bike and you get Sick deal with Sick Components for nice money Smile
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Even it is carbon fiber or an exotic metal i can still get literally tons worth of steel for the same price in only a 5 year old vehicle
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Almost always used, most bang for the buck. Although I will by new, not full retail, of a carbon 27.5 enduro in the near future.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I bought a 2010 glory in 2011 second hand for £2000. Lads riding Hamsterley said that they knew a dealer who was selling them new at the same price. That pissed me off!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Thanks to pinkbike and a user that messege me I saved £300 on a 2013 nukeproof mega am frame. And found a new shop I trust and like a lot . :-)
[Reply]
  • + 1
 If it wasn't for having worked in bike shops in the past and now having friends in shops, I wouldn't be able to have the bikes I have. Retail pricing is ridiculous. Smile
[Reply]
  • + 1
 The cost of a bicycle (sure of dh spec) is absurd... but we pay it. Those who pay full price, I salute you. You are the reason i can afford to ride a bike.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Never paid full retail and won't. The cost of DH bikes is highly inflated in my opinion. I always buy used and change as I see fit.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 Working as a mechanic, getting most of my parts directly from the manufacturers for about 1/3 of the retail price.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 I build my own bikes, with exactly the parts I want bought online. Or second hand from PB.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 When you got a family and ur oldest son wants a nice mountain bike to go riding with you, as a parent we have to get the best deals. Sorry to disappoint.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 None of those options apply to me :3 Mine was marked down from $2500 to $1500 because it was an 09 and I bought it in 2010
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I forgot thats why we all works our balls off, to hand over our said earnings to another group of dudes who are working their balls off....vicious cycle
[Reply]
  • + 1
 How many times a year you meet the same xc biker in your shop and how many times a year you meet there the same gravity rider?
[Reply]
  • + 1
 does anyone knows how much can cost to manufacture a bike that in shops costs around 10.000 ???
[Reply]
  • + 1
 This article must be home to the longest single posts back to back in all of pinkbike.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 full price for a shiny bike in a shop window, or half price for one that has sat in the garage for 6 months?
No brainer
[Reply]
  • + 1
 If nobody bought new bikes, there would soon be no second hand ones left to buy :/ I guess its a delicate balance
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I need 10% off if you want to earn my custom. RRPs are an arbitrary piss take.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 Most riders bought a used bike according to the poll......... RECYLING! Smile
  • + 2
 Haha plus one to that man! You even get to know nice people when you buy and sell stuff on line! I know we all love mountain biking and everything but there are just more important stuff that is worth saving money for. :-)
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Buying last years model just after xmas when there all 50% off is the ticket
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I always build my own! At least I get EXACTLY what I want. And no other "fukcer" has the same bike!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 why can´t I choose: I know somebody who knows somebody who knows somebody...
[Reply]
  • + 1
 paying retail just doesn't make any sense especially in DH...i don't care how rich you are.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Support your local bike shop and if they are worth shopping at they will support you with good prices. FACT!
[Reply]
  • + 2
 Got it on pinkbike saved 60%
[Reply]
  • + 1
 They forgot one "I live in whistler and pay more than retail anywhere else in northamerica" thank god for connections
  • + 0
 You can afford it if you live in Whistler Smile
[Reply]
  • + 2
 Dh'ers and Tri-geeks - both tightwads.
  • + 0
 Haha. I'm both lol
[Reply]
  • + 2
 how come theres no option for guys like me who work in a bike shop?
[Reply]
  • + 1
 One of the perks of being a trailbuilder is getting a lot of love from my LBS Wink
[Reply]
  • + 1
 what about the option of, I work in the industry so I get employee discounts....
[Reply]
  • + 1
 You left out the "I work for a local bike shop and can purchase certain brands at cost - or just above cost".
  • + 1
 One of many reasons I work at my local shop part time.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Nobody pays full price in Slovenia. You get ~20% off just by walking through the shop door. At least more or less Razz
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I bought mine from a shop but found the shop onlone and they gave me a great deal
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I tend to buy frames used and the rest new, but I don't think I paid retail on any of the new parts.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 bought a 6 month old used frame, used fork (since they cost more)everything else in new.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 discount for working/ pro purchase should be an option
[Reply]
  • + 2
 there should be a "no - i work at a bike shop" option on this!
[Reply]
  • + 2
 Why is there no option for "shop employee?"
[Reply]
  • + 2
 Im a bike mec for a shop and I have employe discounts
[Reply]
  • + 1
 i already spent near 6300 bucks on bikes this year and it is so true that this is definately not a cheap price for bikes..
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Work seems to insist on buying me a new bike every coyple of years and who I am to say NO to perks like that. No big deal
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Why is there no option for: No, I work in the bike industry, so I get dealers prices.
[Reply]
  • - 1
 and all bikes shops Suck. unless they dh / bmx/ xc specific. they are all the same, bunch of xc and road crap. you never find a bike shop that stocks some sick stem, or ever a dh tube.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 There needs to be a "No because I work at a shop and I get cost or better" option.
[Reply]
  • + 0
 When you find out how much trade price is, you realise all the companies are making an absolute killing!
  • + 1
 Wrong wrong wrong, go talk to a LBS owner.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 This is like asking how many surfers pay full price on boards.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 You wouldn't pay retail for a car, why would you pay retail for a bike?
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Got a wc commencal supreme for a grand Smile no problems mint condition ha
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Usually i do, but my last bike no..
[Reply]
  • + 1
 none of the above cause i work in a bike shop.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I buy last years model at half price.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Youre all whinny bitches!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I'm waiting already 2 months which is my 2014 in Portugal
[Reply]
  • + 1
 You are a dummy if you ever pay full price on any part of a bike.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Where is the "I work at a bike shop" option?
[Reply]
  • + 2
 Suckers pay retail!!
[Reply]
  • + 2
 buy/sell on pb
[Reply]
  • + 1
 i work at a shop and i get my bikes 35% off wholesaleSmile
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Chinese open mould frames for the Win!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 wrong answers !!!!!!
[Reply]
  • + 0
 yeti minus 25%, scott -30%, giant -25%, kona -30%. love my friends!
[Reply]
  • + 0
 I've never paid full retail price for a bike lol
[Reply]
  • - 2
 Who the hell pays full price at all? I dont even understand the term "fullprice". Maybe the folks who shit the money, or the ones that are suckers for marketing bullshit.
[Reply]
  • - 1
 I buy online because I am a cheap F***er... yup!!!
[Reply]
  • + 0
 MSRP is for suckers!
[Reply]
  • + 0
 Will race for gear.
[Reply]
  • + 0
 no i get free shit bro
[Reply]
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