Gravity Light Components - Eurobike 2010

Sep 6, 2010 at 16:36
Sep 6, 2010
by Mike Levy  
 
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Gravity had their range of Gravity Light race and jump friendly components out for all to see at Eurobike 2010. Inside we take a closer look at their impressive new 3D forged stem and clean looking chainguide. Audio inside!

Read on...

Gravity Light Components

A lot of work goes into this small piece of hardware. The new refined Gravity Light stem is not only dressed up in new graphics for 2011, but also sees a major change in how it is made. The previous version was CNC'd which took quite a long time, but also used up too much material. The model pictured here is manufactured using a 3D forging technique - massive amounts of pressure are used to bring it to a nearly finished state, with it only needing to be cleaned up a bit and sent off to get colors done. The Gravity Light name makes sense here as the stem shown above weighs an impressive 145 grams, yet is still built to take whatever jump you have in mind. Three lengths are available, 90, 75, 60, and the 45 mm that is pictured. Oversize 31.8 mm bar clamp only. If you have a 1.5
A lot of work goes into this small piece of hardware. The new refined Gravity Light stem is not only dressed up in new graphics for 2011, but also sees a major change in how it is made. The previous version was CNC'd which took quite a long time, but also used up too much material. The model pictured here is manufactured using a 3D forging technique - massive amounts of pressure are used to bring it to a nearly finished state, with it only needing to be cleaned up a bit and sent off to get colors done. The Gravity Light name makes sense here as the stem shown above weighs an impressive 145 grams, yet is still built to take whatever jump you have in mind. Three lengths are available, 90, 75, 60, and the 45 mm that is pictured. Oversize 31.8 mm bar clamp only. If you have a 1.5" steerer there is also an option for you, but only in a 50 mm length.

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The 3D forging process that creates the Gravity Light stem involves a much larger machine than you may expect. These massive machines shape parts by sheer force which takes an incredible amount of weight and pressure, and no doubt creates quite a racket. Some of the advantages of forging include less wasted material than you'd have by using a CNC machine, as well as preserving the grain during the manufacturing process, thereby increasing strength. Listen to the audio to learn more about the process.
The 3D forging process that creates the Gravity Light stem involves a much larger machine than you may expect. These massive machines shape parts by sheer force which takes an incredible amount of weight and pressure, and no doubt creates quite a racket. Some of the advantages of forging include less wasted material than you'd have by using a CNC machine, as well as preserving the grain during the manufacturing process, thereby increasing strength. Listen to the audio to learn more about the process.

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While not quite ready in time for Eurobike, expect to see some sweet signature Andrew Taylor graphics debuted for the Gravity Light line in our upcoming Interbike reports. It will be bright.
While not quite ready in time for Eurobike, expect to see some sweet signature Andrew Taylor graphics debuted for the Gravity Light line in our upcoming Interbike reports. It will be bright.

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Admittedly, Gravity isn't the first name that comes to mind when thinking about chainguides, but their Gravity Light model may have people changing their mind. The design is simple and clean, as well as using Dupont's Hytrel material for strength and quiet running action. The aluminum backplate fits both ISCG and ISCG-05 mounting tabs and will work with 36 or 38 tooth rings. Yes people, it does look like other guides... There are only so many ways to keep a chain in place.
Admittedly, Gravity isn't the first name that comes to mind when thinking about chainguides, but their Gravity Light model may have people changing their mind. The design is simple and clean, as well as using Dupont's Hytrel material for strength and quiet running action. The aluminum backplate fits both ISCG and ISCG-05 mounting tabs and will work with 36 or 38 tooth rings. Yes people, it does look like other guides... There are only so many ways to keep a chain in place.

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Gravity uses Dupont's Hytrel composite for the guard, lower guide, and upper guide piece. The material is designed to have enough give in order to prevent it from breaking, but be strong enough to stand up to hard everyday use. Sounds like interesting stuff.
Gravity uses Dupont's Hytrel composite for the guard, lower guide, and upper guide piece. The material is designed to have enough give in order to prevent it from breaking, but be strong enough to stand up to hard everyday use. Sounds like interesting stuff.

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Not only does Gravity use Hytrel for the guard, it also manufactures it in such a way to have a controlled failure if the worst does occur. On that day that you miscalculate your speed and end up 50/50'ing that big step down, the guard features a bevel that lets it fail - if it does fail- away from the chain rings, therefore hopefully limiting the size of your repair bill.
Not only does Gravity use Hytrel for the guard, it also manufactures it in such a way to have a controlled failure if the worst does occur. On that day that you miscalculate your speed and end up 50/50'ing that big step down, the guard features a bevel that lets it fail - if it does fail- away from the chain rings, therefore hopefully limiting the size of your repair bill.

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Visit the gravity website to see their entire lineup.

Stay tuned for more Eurobike coverage!
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61 Comments

  • + 10
 Hytrel is actually a very good idea. The material itself is very resilient. It is used in Industrial coupling applications. It has a high torsional load rating and its wear properties are excellent. As for the components looking cheap, they save on excess material using the forging process. It's cool to see a company utilizing different materials and processes outside the norm. Diversity only leads to better innovation.
[Reply]
  • + 3
 I have to agree with the others, the graphics make these products look "off the shelf" at Walmart. Fire the graphic designers. Designs from the late 80's early 90's was never good to look at, even then!
  • + 1
 I don't think its bad...at all. Graphics are actually neat. Stem design looks good, only thing I'd leave out is the graphics on the side of it, rest is pretty nice!
[Reply]
  • + 2
 stuff looks good, but surely the bottom wheel on the chain device would cause an issue?, if you end up scraping your chain device across anything its going to hit that point of the jockey with a bit of force no?
  • + 1
 I think that, with the guide at the correct angle, the bottom guide will be out of the way. In the picture I don't think the chain guide is at the proper angle.
[Reply]
  • + 3
 i love the fact they've intelligently designed the bash guard to prevent costly damage - if only i needed a new chainguide...lol
  • + 1
 yeah, seems a really good idea as bike parts cost so much
[Reply]
  • + 1
 just a thought re: colours on components [ i also find yellow is hard to use w/ other colours ] colour is really a subjective and personal preference, so for all us fashion weenies i believe components should come in neutral colour or a spectrum to choose from - good marketing at the least...at the end of the day there isn't any colour that ever helped me ride better, maybe just prettier than i already look :-)
[Reply]
  • + 0
 i have not got a great idea of gravity's quality but i know from people who ride some of their wide bars that they are good. i am defiantly a little skeptical about the chain guide as it is their first (that i know of) and things that are new usually are good to get once some of the problems have been work out.
  • + 1
 It isn't their first chainguide and this model has been around for over a year. I have one and it has been great.
[Reply]
  • + 3
 It says "the 45mm that is pictured'' and on the stem is says 60mm xD
[Reply]
  • + 1
 wonder how it stands up to straightlines chain guide: inexpensive, very light but strong w/ no moving parts to wear...hmmmm.
  • + 4
 Funny, because guides without moving parts actually wear more quickly than those with. A chain rolling against a stationary plastic plate is going to wear through pretty quickly, while a chain rolling over a roller or pulley is going to last way longer.
  • + 1
 i guess the physics of wear may be that the movement of the chain and the movement on a roller are [both] creating friction although i would agree that a non- moving part would seem logically to wear out faster [ the polymer being used for the Straightline is apparently very hard but has 'flexable' molecular structure for long wear properties ] i talked with several Dunbar Team riders who are using the Straightline including the owner of Dunbar who has been running the non-moving parts Straightline Guide all year and he says: 'it is the best guide he has ever used and is still showing no signs of wear and needing a replacement part' [ replacement parts cheap $6 up ] apparently in some roller type guides, while working well, wear the outside of the chain down faster too and that can create problems with chains bending and cassette wear.
The Straightline is the same type of guide used in motocross and eventually the chain does wear its own groove or channel that actually helps to stabilize the chain. i have a roller type guide on my Bottle Rocket [ set up for DH and some Freeride ] that is very basic and it seems to be holding up well enough but i will be using the Straightline on my new TR250 next year so i guess i'll be better able to compare then, but in meantime i will trust the guys at Dunbar who feel[ especially for the $$$ which is always a complaint for the cost of bike swag ] the Straightline w/ non-moving parts is the simplest low cost effective guide on the mkt...bottom line for me is not so much that it may or may not wear out faster but that it is low cost and last long enough w/ cheap replacment parts.
[Reply]
  • + 3
 Some sweet stuff
  • + 4
 liking the guide.
  • + 9
 that stem is lookin the shit!
  • + 4
 Yeah i agree with dirtmonkey, that does look like shit.
  • + 2
 chain guide looks nice...but...not replacable taco?....basically when you bust it out you have to buy a complete back plate....
still, really good for weight freak
  • + 0
 Pretty sure thats a 60mm stem pictured, hence the '60mm' stamped on the side lol. Looks really nice though, definitely one to consider in future.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 the chain guide is very beatiful
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Looks like the colours were inspired by a Bumblebee. Still sick though!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 i love how everything says "Light"
[Reply]
  • + 1
 i like the chain guide it looks sweet
[Reply]
  • + 0
 the new guide is so sick, pretty clean looking
[Reply]
  • + 0
 why yellow!?!?!??!?!
  • + 2
 it's really difficult to build up a bike/race outfit that looks good with yellow.
  • + 2
 There are tons of yellow components out there these days. Just look around. Deemax wheels, Nukeproof headsets, MG-1 titanium pedals, etc...
  • + 1
 maybe true but I still think it's hard to make look good...idk, maybe I have a vendetta against yellow bike stuff.
  • + 1
 Anything Nuke Proof comes either in yellow or black with yellow highlights!
[Reply]
  • - 1
 The chainguide is simply amazing!
[Reply]
  • - 1
 its crazy...but i must aggreeConfused do not know the reason..but as you wrote, on second look it does look kinda cheap. anyone else gets the same?
  • - 2
 ^^ yea me too
[Reply]
  • + 4
 Your not the only one, I wrote a comment that was polite and a personal opinion but it was deleted. Mods are kids here and clueless at how to be impartial or fair.
[Reply]
  • - 3
 then stay off the site, the mods do a great job
[Reply]
  • + 2
 Loaded You ain't got nothing to say but slate other peoples opinions.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 you need to understand.. if you disagree with Loaded... then you are wrong and deserve to have your opinion and equipment insulted.
  • + 1
 Ha Ha Buhgerer, have we met? You know me so well. You'll be my age soon enough and by then you might have learned how to ride rather than pose.
  • + 1
 Ha Ha Buhgerer, have we met? You know me so well. You'll be my age soon enough and by then you might have learned how to ride rather than pose.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 You need to understand sessions that I am always right and there is no point in arguing with me, EVER! haha BTW you have a really nice bike, just hope you can use it!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 don't you worry cupcake. I can use my session just fine...
[Reply]
  • + 2
 I was never worried
[Reply]
  • + 1
 girls girls! put yer claws away...old balls, young balls, no balls, shred the trails not each other - my balls are old...but HUGE! [ probably from all the slams i've had ] and i'm guessing if we meet on the trail opinions are just like rocks and roots - something to get past so we can rip...
[Reply]
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