Industry Nine's New Enduro Wheels - Interbike 2016

Sep 22, 2016
by Mike Levy  
Interbike 2016


Interbike 2016


Industry Nine's Enduro 310 and Enduro S Wheelsets

Industry Nine is the King of Bling when it comes to wheels, and their new Enduro 310 series certainly enforces that title. They're available in either twenty-four or thirty-two spoke options depending on your needs; more spokes for larger or aggressive riders, or fewer spokes for lighter riders who would prefer the 30.5mm (internal) rim width but don't need the extra rigidity. Weights for both options are relatively low considering their all-mountain / enduro racing intentions: 1,565-grams and 1,655-grams for the twenty-four spoke wheelsets in 27.5'' and 29''; and 1,630-grams and 1,720-grams for the thirty-two spoke 27.5'' and 29'' versions.

The carbon fiber, hookless Pillar Carbon rims come from Reynolds, a company who knows a thing or two about carbon, and Industry Nine says that the 30.5mm internal width is designed to work with 2.4'' to 2.6'' high-volume tires, a width that bridges the gap between normal and less normal plus-sized rubber. A set of their Torch Mountain hubs are at the center, and Industry Nine's own large diameter aluminum spokes are used for the build. Color options? All of the colors, of course.

The twenty-four spoke Enduro 310s cost $2,550 USD, and the thirty-two spoke wheelset goes for $2,570 USD.
Interbike 2016

You don't need to spend a boat load of money to get a set of Industry Nine wheels, just so long as you're okay with forgoing the trick aluminum spokes that the company is best known for.

Their $865 USD Enduro S wheelset (shown at right) sports a 30.5mm aluminum rim that's built up with twenty-eight Sapim spokes and a set of Industry Nine hubs. Total weight for the 27.5'' wheelset comes in at 1,750-grams, while the 29'' wheelset weighs 1,800-grams. Neither are as flashy as the carbon Enduro 310 wheelset with their aluminum spokes, nor as light, but you could nearly buy three sets of the black Enduro S wheels for the price of the 310s. Options.
Interbike 2016
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114 Comments

  • + 100
 Do the S wheels sound like a machine gun? You know, the hub sound that says "I have more money than you"
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  • + 18
 haha so true, but the guys that want to shout that on the trail usually end up with that other brand with four letters..too expensive... next
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  • + 9
 @Lagr1980: Enve? You can run I9 Classic Torch hubs with Enve rims
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  • + 15
 I love the sound of $.
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  • + 7
 @Lagr1980:
Hope?

Enves come with DT 240s generally, wich are pretty quiet
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  • + 11
 @Lagr1980: Hope may be pricey, but they are extremely reliable and require next to no service.

I've had a rear pro II on my DH bike for 4yrs...shuttle 2-3days a week consistently and am at the bike park regularly during the season...work perfectly and zero maintenance
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  • + 4
 @nvranka:

The engagement sucks compared to i9s, though.

I've had hope hubs in the past and they've been wonderfully vanilla. They're reliable but engagement isn't the best.
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  • + 5
 I only have hope hubs, been using them wheelset after wheelset, best price/performance ratio.. of course I did not mean Hope ; )
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  • + 5
 @UtahBikeMike: agreed, engagement sucks on hope hubs. i mean if you've never ridden better there likely just fine but once you go to i9 or even better onyx you'll always feel how poor most hubs engage
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  • - 20
 you are not allowed yo freewheel your bike with i9 hubs at my shop. You better pick up the rear wheel off the ground or lock your brakes and skid your bike before you get a mouthful of small penis jokes.
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  • + 13
 *had* more money than you
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  • + 17
 @denomerdano: shouldn't that be an earful? Freud anyone?
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  • + 3
 @nvranka: Thats what i love about them. They just keep going. Less working on bike and more riding? Yes please!
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  • + 2
 On superiority of engagement: Wibmer/MacAskill 48POE, Leech 28POE, Lenosky 36 or 54

Think about the needs of those riders regarding freehub engagement and realiability, next time you think: "do I need more" or "My 108POE is superior, everyone should have it"
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  • + 22
 damn it boys, ride the fuck out of those deore hubs and quit whinning
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  • + 4
 @nvranka: my pro2's on the hartail did 6 1/2 years on a set of bearings. amazing quality.
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  • + 3
 @Lagr1980: Ha ha good one so true ,but I think readers who have replied to this did not get your comment
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  • + 2
 Ever since I got damn good hubs on my bike they do make that can of bees type sound. Although, it's not as loud as a few ones on the market they are still pretty loud.

The issue I have with them, that makes me wish there was an "on" and "off" switch to mute the sound is when I'm walking in the hall way of my apartment complex with my bike. In the long empty hallway DAMN are they loud AF. Annoying...not so annoying on the trails.
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  • + 1
 @LiquidSpin: DT240s - amazing and quiet hub for years
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  • + 3
 @calgarytrev: your talking out your anus
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  • + 3
 @WAKIdesigns: Would love to get them if I get a second set of wheels. However, I just have one set so the ones I have will do. No need to spend $$$ just to squash one inconvenience.
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  • - 1
 @LiquidSpin: ironically enough my Superstar hub on my DJ/commuter just died on me... 1h ago... I'm thinking Hope... super-reliable and half price of DT which would be my choice if money were no object... The noise though...
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  • + 2
 @LiquidSpin: haha yeah man, I deal with the same crap in my apartment building.

@WAKIdesigns: DT240s are loud as hell, what are you talking about? Mine have the 54 POE though.
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  • + 1
 @gromer: Ya the 54 POE makes a solid angry bee sound (although you can uses heavier grease and it will work fine AND be quiet)
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  • + 2
 @grgsmith: Good to know about the heavier grease. I honestly don't care about the loudness of it when I'm riding. Helps notify people around me that I'm biking.
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  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns: Dunno where you got those figures but what ever is good enough for Leech is way to good for me. Plus who needs the extra drag?
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  • + 1
 $2500 no problem. I have my wife sleep in the car and eat wafflehouse from here on.
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  • + 2
 @fecalmaster: I like the way you think
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  • - 2
 Oh no, more poor dudes trying to downplay money? Say it ain't so... either way, I'll keep having fun with my loud hubs and carbon rims.
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  • + 2
 @gromer: DTs are not as loud as Hope or CK, even in 54 (I have 36) and defo quiter than E13.

@choppertank3e - Ryan has XTR, Macaskill and Wibmer run Hope.
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  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns: ahh. Well they're a lot louder than the crappy SRAM X9 hubs I had on my last bike!
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  • + 1
 @Marcusthefarkus: Enough about you let's talk about you sweet baby powder rider.
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  • + 22
 In anyone's world US$2500 is a lot of money for a pair of bicycle wheels, regardless what they are made of. Someone is laughing at the mountain bike consumers, and it's probably the bike industry.
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  • + 13
 We know carbon is silly expensive...That's why we also offer an alloy Enduro305 rim ($1250 for wheelset) and now the EnduroS ($865 for the wheelset)
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  • + 4
 Dude, incorrect. To a person who flies first class ALL the time ($20k per flight) and makes more $$ than he can figure out what to do with:

These wheels are like candy to a rich person. Cheap yet delicious.

However, to the rest of us 99% it's silly expensive Smile
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  • + 3
 Check out some of the prices of carbon road wheels. Lightweight's Meilenstein wheels retail for around $8000-$8500CAD. We had one customer at my shop interested in them (He was going to trade in EC90's and pay $6750). MTB is very cheap in comparison. And I'm very glad about that.
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  • + 3
 @Zanebodd: road pricing makes absolutely no sense...never has

MTB is just slowly playing catch up
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  • + 18
 It remains a mystery why anyone would buy something other than Light Bicycle's offerings on this front. Or IBIS if you must have a brand name.
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  • + 8
 I have put the hammer on my Generation 1 LB's-- No problem with them at all! Even cased a 20' gap jump on accident once-- still no problem. Don't tell me you need brand name.
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  • + 8
 @powderturns LB +1

I recently blew up my rear LB wheel after about 1.5yrs...really can't beat +/-$150 for a replacement.


I've had more luck with aluminum EX723/729s on my DH, but I'll never buy a different wheelset other than LB for my all mountain rig
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  • + 2
 NOBL rims are fantastic as well, been on the 33mm OD (27m ID) for 6mo and they have been abused, zero issues.
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  • + 11
 I broke 4 LB rims before I gave up. Now running alloy i9 enduros and beating the piss out of them. Will probably never look back at carbon rims again, no matter the brand.
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  • + 1
 @tangaroo: hmm, that surprises me. Were they hookless? How heavy are you?
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  • + 3
 @maxlombardy: hookless with HD layup. I'm 175 geared up but I do ride aggressively.
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  • + 1
 They have a history of poor quality control and factory support. It seems that has changed in recent years, but the people I know that ran them several years ago have broken several and had difficulties dealing with the factory to get replacements. Lately, I run into more people running them with fewer issues and they seem to be getting better support. I think that is probably the primary reason, whether you agree with it or not, that people are skeptical.

I considered going LB for my 29er, the main reason I didn't is that I can't find a reputable wheelbuilder in my area that will work with them. They all refused to do a build with them. I couldn't tell if it was a business thing (they have distributor relationships with Nox, Atomik, etc) or they didn't want their reputation on them based on the previously described history. It seemed to be a mixed bag. I was willing to give them a shot, based on recent feedback, but I need to find someone willing to put a set together.

That said, why people would pay $2500+ when companies like Derby and Ibis are around is beyond me. I've ridden Enve wheels and the difference was indistinguishable to me.
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  • + 6
 @Adodero: sounds like it's time to learn to build a wheel!
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  • + 3
 @Adodero: "be the wheelbuilder you wish to see in the world". Not to denigrate the profession, but it's not too hard for anyone with a little mechanical knowledge and becomes quite fun.
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  • + 4
 Have had LB rims on my singlespeed for like 5 years. I went to true them last year and there was nothing to true. Still perfect to the milimeter.
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  • + 4
 @Adodero: it's because they wanted you to buy rims from them bro
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  • + 4
 @Adodero: Hmm, every shop I've talked to in Salt Lake City will work on them.
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  • + 2
 @cyclecuse: I agree to a point. If I charged for my services, I would get paid about 3$ an hour. I enjoy it, and I really suck at it.
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  • + 0
 @tangaroo: I'm with you. On the new Flow MK3's (laced to Kings with standard J bends) and they're plenty stiff, durable and not prohibitively expensive. I like CF in some applications but wheels ain't it.
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  • + 3
 Yup. Been pulling tires on and off those LBs with metal tire levers for a few seasons now.

Don't know what the f*ck people whine about CS for. You broke/cracked a carbon rim. It cost ~$190 USD. That isn't a warranty issue. It's you being a shitty cyclist who doesn't maintain proper tire pressure.

Maybe order three rims at once so a cracked/broken rim can be replaced without any downtime.

I'd be hard pressed to find a few hundred dollars of m0ar betterer in NOBL rims compared to LBs.
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  • + 8
 As long as the hubs are the same I'm sticking with the aluminum wheelset.for that kind of money.
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  • + 6
 Not exactly the same, but close. The 310 comes with Torch hubs in 6 pawl, 3 degree engagment, which is a $50 option on the Enduro S which comes stock with a 3 pawl, 6 degree engagement. Both utilize the same freehubs, end caps, etc.
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  • + 2
 @PHeller: That's a reasonable cost for upgrade and either way you're getting a quality hub that is the true heart of the wheel.
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  • + 2
 @PHeller: are the internals still the same though? I remember that it used to be that you could run the indy nine hubs with 3 or 6 pawls, getting 60 or 120 pts of engagement. And if it does use that same drivering, couldn't you just throw in a torch free hub with 6 spots for 6 pawls?
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  • + 1
 @millpill: Yeah, I think the free hub body is interchangeable.
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  • + 2
 In real-world riding, 3 degree engagement is crazy nice, but not necessary. 6 degrees is already really good, with less drag too.
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  • + 2
 Pretty sure they still make the regular aluminum torch enduro wheels. Those are the bees knees! $1000 is still a bunch of money, but they're one of the few bike parts I've ever bought that I think we're truly justified in their price, and I'd still call them a good value for the dollar. Super stuff, bling you Al spokes, hubs loud enough to scare bears and still run dead straight and true after 2 years of abuse.
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  • + 1
 God, so many typos in that post ^ I need to stop combing whisky and Pinkbike.
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  • + 6
 Jeezus F $2500 US for a disposable wear item . Seriously F Carbon everything is shit and just breaks anyways and costs too much
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  • + 3
 I concur - no reason to have carbon if you ride hard. A few grams and if you flat in the garden...pay the collector for a new bazillion dollar rim.
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  • + 2
 @nicolai12: I've broken so much carbon I'm over it
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  • + 5
 Agree. Got tired of always worrying about toasting my carbon rims in every rocky garden. Moved back to aluminum and noticed no performance loss. If anything the ride is smoothed out a bit.
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  • + 5
 Price vs value tells me the carbon wheels also represent a very expensive way to save 80g.
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  • + 4
 @squagles: Derby cracked the first week I had it. Never again. They are nice because they are low maintenance and require little to true, but they crack instead of bend for both daily riders and racers alike. Maybe I can sell them to these PB folks...haha by the way Derby's are too wide and their customer service is dismal.
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  • + 1
 @squagles: I'm just a recreational rider that enjoys jumps. Riding on a set of sram rise 60 carbon 29er wheels that came on my used bike purchase. Older style, I believe built by zipp? Narrow 21 inner, but holding up really well for me. Super light and stiff. Banged them quite a bit off rocks, not at warp speed though...but they were like $2k new I read somewhere!! Lots of people doubt their strength and are like, " your jumping with those!? ". Fingers crossed no explosions yet. Fwiw
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  • + 2
 @sjdeweese: doubt they will explode. They are stronger than metal for sure but failure is typically in the forms of cracking. Not worth the cost and risk unless your an industry insider and get them heavily discounted
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  • + 1
 @nicolai12: agreed, gonna rock them till they fail. Would like to compare a 27-30mm internal width rim, but trying to maintain the "if it ain't broke don't fix it mentality" . The claimed weight is under 1600g and I got the whole bike for less than the carbon wheels shown at interbike so yeah. They are labeled xc wheels, but enduro wasn't as strong when these came out, so they're just mountain bike wheels to me
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  • + 3
 @MikerJ: me too honestly , after breaking 5 rear carbon wheels including Enve M70 I bought a new set of Dt SWISS E1700 wheels off a guy on pink bike for 400$ . The bike actually rides smoother now especially on chunder (maybe cause they arnt super wide so the tire is taller, plus the Alu is more compliant maybe ? ) and I can actually change super gravity Magic Mary tires alone with no help or struggle , try changing a tire on an Enve alone in a trail ....F ! . I also think this super wide wheel thing is a trend ...
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  • + 2
 @sjdeweese: it's all about horses for courses.......I had a bike that came with 29" Roam 40...28 spoke and only 21mm. I have found them plenty stiff enough but the width didn't work as any tyre 2.3" or more just rolls on them when you push hard or in berms. Thing is I can see me keeping them to run narrower winter tyres on.

I picked up some Halo 35 (ID 30mm) to run AM/Enduro tyres and they are great. I have run them through lots of rock this summer and down a full beans DH track. I haven't even had to tighten a spoke and they went tubeless really well (tight but not too tight). They are cheap in the UK so probably close to free in the US.

After having these cheap Alu wheel sets I'm struggling to see why I should bother with expensive wheel sets let alone carbon, when a write off could be round the next berm.

I would probably have gone for some Hope wheels (finally) but they only have 25mm ID
@hope where is your 27-30mm ID rim? ....we want it now!
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  • + 1
 @MikerJ I went from DT Swiss aluminum to Enve 70's Carbon and now find that while the bike is much zippier I also find that the bike is not as smooth in certain sections and a bit harsh at times over braking bumps and over the rough stuff. Just wondering if you experience the same
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  • + 1
 @eball: the carbon felt harsher to me. Never experienced much more zip. On a 29" carbon did have less side flex.
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  • + 1
 @MikerJ: @squagles in conclusion: wider rims are a trend that's marketed as more grip / lower pressure but in reality it's a bad combination if you're riding in rocky areas and you'll crack a rim. Most riders should go 25-30mm ID, strong Aluminum rims, lighter total weight in rubber and maybe 32h if you just blast through things ....carbon cracks, can't run too low pressure, and it's about 2-3x the cost of relatively similar weight aluminum. Oh you also have to run wider tires on wider rims and that can really add up if youre running Double Down / tough casing / DH casing (1000-1300g per wheel).
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  • + 2
 @nicolai12: agree except the 2-3x cost for carbon is low in most cases.

I also agree on the trend of wider, and thus heavier rims is getting carried away. My current favorite is the new Arch mk3 with a tire 2.35-2.5. If I can't get a Magic Mary to hook up I need to find a new hobby.
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  • + 1
 @nicolai12: agree totally ! Not sure what types of trails people are riding on this " low pressure " but if I run any less than 28 or 30 psi at Whistler or anywhere on the Shore I'll break a rim 100% , plus the tire fold over and feels like shit . Only time I go really low pressure is on slabs lines in Squamish where you need mad grip and the trails arnt rough .
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  • + 2
 @nicolai12: @squagles:

Not sure why you're getting downvoted...anyone who runs low pressures is either breaking rims regularly / riding slow / riding single track.

Never met a racer/fast rider that runs low pressures.
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  • + 4
 My I9 Wheels make everyone I come up on the trail behind move over for me without me having to say a word. All I have to do is stop peddling. Thank you so much industry nine for giving me this luxury on every trail ride.
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  • + 2
 I got the enduro 30.5s a couple months ago.

It was less money than building a set of stans hoops with i9 hubs. I wanted 32 spoke wheels after a bad experience with my traverse fattie ALs and their weak and low spoke counts.

Would have got these if they were available at the time, with the +$50 hub option.

The hubs are one of the few bike componets i don't feel are over rated. The wheelset is burly, stiff and wonderful in every regard. They work flawlessly with my 2.3 dhf/mss although the MSS is pretty square.
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  • + 2
 Cheap, light, or strong- you get to pick two. I've been running HALO for years without any need for truing, despite hearing several "ka-ping!" moments of rock vs rim. Heavy as F***, but with a 36 spoke (!) rear I can huck to flat off a building. They are cheap & available, I bought them to destroy but they aren't letting me. Why would you spend tons of $$ to experiment with the lightest wheel you can get and hope they hold up? If you build for durability, you spend your time riding, and your money on something else.
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  • + 2
 Wow, nice looking wheels but you should only get these for two reasons 1) they are free 2) you're an incredibly narcissistic showoff. If you have money to burn and you're a good person you should give it to a charity.

If you like quality at a much lower price, may I suggest...

MTB180 hubs, DT Revolution spokes, and Light Bicycle rims. My 30mm wheels are 1564g, cost $608 to build, and have been bullet proof over 500 miles so far.
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  • + 1
 What happened to the matchstix that were the starring light of last year's interbike... Haven't heard a peep, still in development?
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  • + 1
 Go check out their Instagram if you want more info
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  • + 2
 Less bling? I miss MTV Cribs. Bring back the out of control mid 2000s bubble now!
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  • + 3
 Do the enduro s wheels come in pretty colors too???
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  • + 32
 Black is pretty, so yes.
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  • + 8
 since when did 2.4-2.6 become abnormal or too wide i have been running 2.5s for ever or maybe im reading this wrong
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  • + 4
 @jmartinbiking: "designed to work with 2.4'' to 2.6'' high-volume tires, a width that bridges the gap between normal and less normal plus-sized rubber" being the plus sized tires are the abnormal, True and Hopefully it stays that way.
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  • + 2
 @mikelevy: where's the white ones?
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  • - 1
 @mikelevy: any color you want, as long as it's black
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  • + 1
 @mikelevy: Ha! Henry f*cking Ford would be proud.
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  • + 2
 No point spending that much money on hubs!! rather chis king.. lol
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  • + 1
 What a waste of money I can buy a whole bike for that get the f*ck outta here with this bullsh*t!!!
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  • + 2
 Jewelry for mountain bikers. But I still want
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  • + 1
 Cute wheels. But buying these would mandate a new bike to avoid an eyesore of color mismatch...
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  • + 4
 Many many spoke color options.
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  • + 1
 check this out anolab.industrynine.com/tutorial ...11 different spoke and hub colors available and countless combinations
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  • + 1
 @Coyotecrash: People give me shit for choosing silver hubs when there's so many color options but they go well with everything and nothing to fade. Too bad the ever changing axle "standards" prevent me from moving them from bike to bike.
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  • + 2
 I'll stick with nox or noble.. Both have been absolute kick ass!
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  • + 1
 This. I just started riding NOBL rims laced to their hubs (Onyx internals). Really happy so far, and the silent hub w/ instant engagement is sublime even if it's a little heavy.
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  • + 3
 That purple is hot.
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  • + 20
 Hot yes,but not $2500 hot.
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  • + 8
 @nozes: soo hot in fact that it burns right throu your damn pockets !
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  • + 2
 @nozes:
$2550 or $2570. That's a world difference of hotness
Seriously, why $20 ? Why not the same hotness ?
Let's simplify and round this up at $2568.99
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  • + 3
 @Coyotecrash: the difference is 16 spokes.
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  • + 0
 Wow, great wheels!!
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