Intense Spider Pro – Review

Jan 13, 2015
by Richard Cunningham  
 
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Intense has been on the move, cranking out carbon superbikes for almost every category – that’s no secret – but it got me wondering about what the boys and girls over in Temecula, California, have been up to at the home factory, a facility completely devoted to aluminum frame production. When I got a call from Intense to review their latest bike, the first image that came to mind was a faithful aluminum copy of their sell-out, Tracer 275 Carbon. What I got was the Spider Pro, a 130-millimeter-travel trailbike with a lightweight build and fast-rolling Maxxis Ardent 2.25-inch tires. I’d have to admit that the Spider came as a surprise, considering how many mountain bikers are clamoring to buy burly enduro racers with at least 160-millimeters on each end. “Either this bike is something special,” I thought. “Or, this review is going to be very short and to the point.”




Meet the Intense Spider Pro

Intense bills the Spider as a trail bike, plain and simple. It looks long and low, with one water bottle mount in the right place, and a component spec on the lighter side of all-mountain that squeaks the medium-sized Spider Pro off the scale at 13.16kg – just under 29 pounds. The Spider’s aluminum chassis follows the storied bike maker’s tough-is-better rule of design and construction, with oversize butted and hydro-formed tubing throughout, connected by the company’s signature CNC-machined linkage hardware and frame junctions. New for the Spider are serviceable, collet-type pivot axles and the “i-Box” - a rigid box-section, machined into the bottom bracket structure that anchors the lower rocker pivot to the main frame. Rear-wheel travel can be set at the upper rocker link for either 115 or 130 millimeters without altering the frame geometry, which is optimized for a 130-millimeter fork.

Intense offers the chassis in three relatively affordable builds: The $5999 SRAM X01 based Spider Pro that we review here, and the $5650 Shimano XT based Spider Expert – both with RockShox suspension - and the $2999 Shimano SLX based Spider Foundation with an X-Fusion fork and shock. Colors are Flo Red (Day-Glo orange) and Silver Flake powdercoat finishes. All models share the same chassis, and Intense offers legitimate small, medium, large and X-large sizes.

2015 Intense Spider 27.5
ISCG 05 chain guide mounts hint that the Spider is intended for much more than weekend trail rides. There is plenty of room for larger rubber for big days on the mountain.
2015 Intense Spider 27.5
Grease fittings ensure that the Spider's lower link will live a long and healthy life. The link pivots inside the rigid i-Box bottom bracket structure.


Construction Notes

No surprise that the profile of the new Spider follows that of its recent predecessors and that it sports a VPP dual-link rear suspension. Intense has spent a lot of time perfecting both. The rest of the Spider’s design is all over the map. The party starts with two key design elements: very short, 16.5-inch chainstays (419 mm ) and a long, stem-corrected top tube (597 millimeters or 23.5 inches for a size medium, if you are curious). The head angle is on the steeper side of current fashion at 67 degrees, and those who think that isn’t slack enough, may want to skip to the end before passing judgment. Another key element that could be a performance booster it its slightly slack, 72.5-degree seat tube angle, which reigns in the front center of the bike and prevents the addition of a long top tube from over-extending its wheelbase.


Intense Spider geometry 2015



Details

Details throughout the chassis stand out, like its 142/12 taper-lock rear axle, grease ports on the lower link pivots, ISCG chainguide tabs, a rubber port for the dropper post housing and a flattened top tube to mute the “effects” of a slipped pedal. Intense chose to keep the Spider’s cables and hoses on the outside of the frame, and routes them all on the upper surface of the down tube on three not-so-good-looking weld-on guides. I heartily agree that exposing brake hoses and control housings to mud and rocks on the bottom of the down tube in the interest of beauty is a bad call, but the Spider’s cable routing is a visible panty line on an otherwise beautifully dressed machine.


Suspension

Spider Pros sport a 130-millimeter-stroke RockShox Revelation RCT3 fork, which is a notable performer among sliders that still have 32-millimeter stanchion tubes. The Revelation’s eight-position Motion Control compression and Floodgate adjustments are proven tuning aids. The shock is a RockShox Monarch RT3, tuned for a firm feel in the mid-stroke. The Spider pedaled so well that we left the shock in the upper, 130-millimeter, location on the link and never bothered to try the shorter, 115-millimeter suspension option. Those who want a firmer pedaling platform can flip the Floodgate compression lever to the second position, which is easier than most to operate on the fly, because it snaps into place with a loud “click.” Forget the lockout option unless you ride the road a lot.

bigquotesBeing a smaller, maverick bike brand gives Intense some freedom to pick and choose the components it actually wants on its bicycles, rather than bending to pressure from prominent component makers for complete spec on particular models.


Key Components

Being a smaller, maverick bike brand gives Intense some freedom to pick and choose the components it actually wants on its bicycles, rather than bending to pressure from prominent component makers for complete spec on particular models. So, the Spider Pro gets Shimano XT brakes with ICE pads and rotors, a SRAM X01 and X1 eleven-speed drivetrain, Stan’s NoTubes Arch EX wheels, a Thomson stem with a Renthal Fatbar handlebar and a KS LEV dropper post, topped by a WTB Silverado saddle. Intense’s specifications may seem like a mixed bag, but those who put time on the dirt and buy their own parts would probably agree that the Spider Pro is thoughtfully appointed for a fast-break technical trail bike.
2015 Intense Spider 27.5
The Spider's custom-tuned Monarch RT3 shock worked with the VPP suspension to provide a firm, supportive suspension platform.

2015 Intense Spider 27.5
We didn't think that the 32-millimeter-stanchion Revelation fork would be up to task, but it pulled its weight.


Full Specs for the Spider Pro, Expert, and Foundation






bigquotesThe Spider feels so agile and capable, that we were pushing to the bottom of the suspension almost everywhere we rode.


Considering that the last full test I had done on an Intense was aboard the Tracer 275c, the Spider Pro had a high bar to hurdle if it was going to make a positive impression, but that is exactly what it did. The first ride aboard the Spider was an eye-opener. The test area we used most often offers up a variety of mini-DH tracks that are perfectly suited for 160-millimeter bikes. With the Revolution set on the firm side to match the VPP rear suspension, and trail conditions moist and tacky, the Spider worked magic, carving tight lines around flat and bermed corners with its improbably bald Maxxis Ardent tires. It wasn’t as if the tires were gripping all that well, they weren’t. It was that the Intense didn’t seem to mind if it was sliding or holding fast to the soil. The Spider always felt locked into its line.

OK then, sure the bike can turn corners, but can it accelerate and climb? Well, it turns out that the Spider gets moving quickly too. Dare I say that it could out-gun the Carbon Tracer in a sprint? I’d bet my Troy Lee A1 on it – and even though the Spider gives up almost two pounds to the T275c, it pedals uphill at least as well. Is the Spider a cross-country race bike in disguise? Hell no. I am comparing a six thousand dollar mid-travel trailbike with a ten thousand dollar elite-level enduro racer. Neither can hope to match the spunk and efficiency of a fly-weight XC racer, but both pedal effectively enough to earn high marks in their respective categories. In the case of the Spider, I found myself jumping out of the saddle often and spontaneously, where with the Tracer, I was more deliberate, choosing to stand only when it paid dividends.

The Spider feels remarkably well balanced and is very intuitive to kick around. Short chainstays keep your legs back, which helps to move weight to the rear tire for climbing traction. That, and the Spider’s roomy cockpit, tend to stretch the rider between the wheels, so it is not necessary to move back over the bike as much when descending steeps. What came as a surprise to us was that the Spider’s numbers worked magic with its 67-degree head angle, which felt as stable scratching down boulder rolls and chutes as we would have expected from a bike, two degrees slacker. Intense specs a 70-millimeter Thomson stem on the medium-sized Spider 275, and yet neither test rider felt the need to scale back to the 50-millimeter stems that we normally prefer.

No bicycle design comes without compromise and the Spider Pro’s tradeoff for its rapid corner exits and out-of-the-saddle spurts is a firm ride – everywhere. The Spider feels so agile and capable, that test pilots were pushing to the bottom of the suspension almost everywhere we rode. Its exemplary cornering and the fact that much of the testing took place on hero dirt, meant that we could turn the Spider hard enough to fully compress the suspension in the turns as well.

For those who have become used to longer-travel machines, the Spider Pro will be a rough ride at speed. I pinch-flatted both tires at different times (the bike’s NoTubes Arch wheels had tubes installed). That said, the Intense begs to go fast and to RockShox’s and the VPP rear end’s credit, the Spider doesn’t ever bottom harshly. The evidence was in realizing, after the smiles wore off, how much of a beating that our hands and arms took after sessioning downhill trails.

The plus side of riding hard and fast in technical terrain on a 130-millimeter bike with a firm suspension tune is the sense of support that the Spider has. Sure, it beats you up, but knowing that the
2015 Intense Spider 27.5

bigquotesI found myself jumping out of the saddle often and spontaneously, where with the Tracer, I was more deliberate, choosing to stand only when it paid dividends.
chassis will be within a degree or so of its intended geometry whether it is going up, down, or sideways, provides a sense of consistency that longer-travel machines lack in certain situations. The minus side of burning DH runs on a short-travel machine like the Spider is that when your luck runs out, there will be little left in its handling bank to save you from disaster. Always having a little extra handling in reserve is the argument for the modern long-travel trail bike.

2015 Intense Spider 27.5
bigquotesThe Pro's SRAM X01 one-by eleven drivetrain reminds us once again that the right side of the handlebar is for controlling gears and the left side is for controlling fears.


Mechanical Performance

Intense chose the Spider Pro’s components to maintain the edgy performance necessary to hit all-mountain lines, while making an effort to play to its published role as a sporty pedaling trail bike. Let’s face facts here: no customer who understands the legacy of Intense will be walking into a bike shop to buy a fast-rolling, skinny tired bike to bang out KOMs on groomed hiking trails. The Spider Pro was born to be a ripper, which makes us wonder, “why the 2.25-inch Maxxis Ardent tires and a 32-millimeter Revelation fork?” The answer for the tires may be weight, as jumping up to capable rubber like the High Roller 2 would push the Pro over the 29-pound mark. (The tip-off was that Intense sent our test bike with an HR2 “…just in case we needed more grip up front.”) The Revelation fork puts in a bang up performance, so we can proffer up that the lack of a Pike had more to do with keeping the Spider Pro’s MSRP below six grand than a nod towards XC performance. Otherwise, the Spider Pro left nothing to desire for top riders who can’t or won’t pop for a pricy carbon alternative.

Shimano XT ICE Tech brakes: We applaud the choice of Shimano XT brakes with a 160-millimeter rear and a 180-millimeter front rotor. The smaller disc minimized brake lock up and the system’s crisp response and shorty-levers were a good match for the Spider’s edgy handling.

SRAM one by eleven: While the lower division Spiders feature two-by-ten Shimano transmissions, the Pro’s quick-shifting SRAM X01 one-by eleven drivetrain reminds us once again that the right side off the handlebar is for controlling gears and the left side is for controlling fears.

KS LEV Integra dropper: Speaking of the left side of the handlebar, the 120-millimeter stroke LEV dropper has been a hit-and-miss performer, with the good ones reliable for years and the not-so good ones failing within one or two rides. This one began with intermittent refusals to extend completely, but the moment I was ready to type out a scathing mention of its anticipated failure, it snapped into health and never gave test riders a problem again. Well then: cheers to a good dropper with a long enough stroke to face steeps in both directions – and a remote that I dare say, is more user-friendly than the hydraulic button of its well-respected competitor.

RockShox suspension: It would be in fashion to report that the Spider Pro was under-gunned by its RockShox in-line Monarch RT3 shock and its companion, the 130-millimeter Revelation RCT3 fork, but both put in a great performance and, truthfully, the only time I thought about alternative suspension upgrades was when I was looking at the Spider, not while riding it.

Cable-guide party foul: We usually comment about construction issues earlier in the review, but this one popped up during testing. Intense welds the middle housing guide that leads to the rear derailleur on the outside of the right seat stay. There is no apparent necessity for the placement and it randomly contacts the rider’s shoe while pedaling. The seat stay tubes are already on the wide side in that area, which further aggravates the placement of the guide. Hopefully, Intense will make a running change and tuck it under the tube.
2015 Intense Spider 27.5




Pinkbike's Take:
bigquotesPinkbike tech editor Mike Levy posted a prediction two years ago that top bike-handlers could squeeze more enjoyment from their riding and make the trails in their backyards more challenging by choosing a capable bike with less suspension travel and snappier handling. Levy may have prophesized the debut of bicycles like the 2015 Intense Spider Pro, but back then, a 130-millimeter-travel trailbike would have been pegged as a somewhat sluggish climbing all-mountain sled. Much has changed since. Fast-rolling 27.5-inch tires and the confluence of new-school frame design with pedal-friendly long-travel suspension have altered the rules. The appearance of the lightweight good-climbing 160-millimeter AM/enduro racer has ushered in the opportunity for bike makers to use the knowledge gained to re-think the role of the mid-travel trailbike.

Being crafted from aluminum assumes that the new Spider chassis will be heavier than a similarly purposed carbon frame. Currently there are a number of trailbikes available with identical travel that weigh significantly less. That said, few can touch the Spider Pro's playful feel or its eagerness to climb or descend anything in front of it - and fewer still corner as brilliantly. If Intense's new Spider is any indication of how this potential genre will pan out, I think a lot of experienced riders will sign up. Until then, ride the new Spider Pro and get a feel for what the future may hold. It's a ripper. - RC


Visit the gallery for full size images and review specs and geometry here.




MENTIONS: @intensecyclesusa @SramMedia, @Maxxis, @lambertphoto, @iMountainBike


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183 Comments

  • + 106
 Wouldn't it be cool if for 2015 reviews like this could include videos of them being ridden too? I mean like that awesome of The Following was about a week ago. Would be cool to see the in action as opposed to just reading about it. So we can see how capable these bikes really are when ridden by skilled pilots. Just my two cents.
  • + 21
 Agree 100%. It may take them a lot more work though, as a consumer and not a photographer/film maker I cannot imagine what it takes to put together 2 minutes of riding. I always really enjoy interviews though. Especially if they include Warner Masters or Palmer!
  • - 2
 +1
  • + 13
 @Spark24 : you mean... like an advertisement?
  • + 33
 AM I THE ONLY 1 who is more than a little annoyed by the statements of the revelation potentially being undergunned?

really wtf is going on PB? the revelation is outstanding. come on.
  • + 17
 I prefer words and pictures to video, videos always end up either being awkward or feeling like an advert. Plus I can read a review in bits and pieces at work.
  • + 3
 @spark24 you have your wish on the homepage

vid just released
  • + 12
 Video also might expose that some of the people testing these bikes aren't particularly skilled riders whose opinions you shouldn't necessarily trust. Not saying that's the case here, but sometimes I wonder. ...

Does anybody testing the bikes at Pinkbike race? Or at least have legitimate race results at least at the expert level? It's easy to say you have expert-level DH skills, but it's harder to prove it. Just curious.
  • + 1
 Guardia who is doing this particular vid has a "reasonable" level

but i do see your point, add to this that a dh run is classed as such by the rider who is on it, i will say safely that a SO CAL dh run does not compare to ours over here......again, as with all things its subjective information to be used sparingly
  • + 8
 I don't want to buy a bike thats great for a racer though. Reviews should have a good mix of input to get a truly balanced outcome.
  • + 2
 Navigate over to www.vitalmtb.com/product/guide/Bikes,3/Intense/Spider-275-Pro,15616#product-reviews/1986

They include a video and list the background/qualifications of the testers.
  • + 2
 @jmbrit: I've owned and ridden several bikes with the Revelation on them and always found it to be outstanding....as a 26" fork.

I found the 29" version to be a little scary however. The damping/suspension action was outstanding, but the flex and "tuck" you could feel coming from the fork were not good.

I've never ridden the 27.5' version, but I'm sure it closer in performance/feel to the outstanding 26" version.
  • + 1
 @zede I don't mean ridden by company riders in an ad... I mean ridden by PB staff or journo's reviewing it objectively (yeah I know, many think PB isn't objective these days but hey it's worth a try)
  • + 2
 Spark24- go to BikeMag on YouTube. I like the long narrative reviews by BikeMag
  • + 27
 @Spark24 - The trouble with video is the amount of time it takes to produce a quality product. With photography the time commitment is much less, which gives us more time to actually ride the bike long enough to produce a thorough review, rather than posing for the camera. And @Protour, I can assure you our bike handling skills are up to par. Come on out and ride anytime - I'd be glad to show you around.
  • + 39
 If Protour does come out, can you at least make a video of that?
  • + 0
 I have been thinking this for a long time.
  • + 3
 @Protour - Fair point about reviewer riding skills. RootsAndRain.com is an easy way to find racer's results. @mikekazimer can back up his words with results, but you can't say that for all the guys writing reviews... Those Vital guys on the other hand...
  • + 1
 Bike magazine makes some nice videos!Specialized Demo 8 II: 2014 Bible of Bike - Mount…: youtu.be/Fl2oTtifa30
  • + 4
 I know the rider in the pics and he is legit. He was also the one who did most of the riding on the Cannondale test recently as well. I have no knowledge about the rest of the staff except RC s who's opinions I respect. He does not rode at the level he used to but old age is a bitch. Ask me how I know.
  • + 2
 I'm not fast, more of a trick rider.

youtu.be/ArOxDlJFpmQ
  • + 1
 @Protour- hahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahaha!!
  • + 1
 Protour - I'd like to see a video of RC riding down these tracks at a pedestrian pace..
  • + 1
 @mikekazimer Something similar to the Vital RAW edits that are shot with Iphones (or at least were at the beginning) would to suffice to show the reader the speed and riding style of the testers, type of terrain the bike is tested on and how the bike is operating with those factors. That would seriously help readers make informed decisions about how that product would suit their needs and have faith in what the testers are saying. Shooting a 1-2 minute with a smart phone only takes about an hour and would be very informative.

Knowing the testers is important. For instance if the tester is a nationally ranked downhill racer he can provide insight to a different consumer base that rides aggressively and have DH backgrounds than if the tester rides at a causal pace. If an experienced downhill rider says he notices a bike hangs up slightly in high speed chunder when riding at full pace, a casual rider likely will not encounter that problem, and could be more inclined to purchase that bike for its other qualities. The opposite is also true. If the tester rides at a more casual pace his feedback will be directly applicable to the vast majority of mountain bikers, but the aggressive, downhill-oriented consumer will know that they will put the bike through more abuse. For example, if the casual tester says he notices some real wheel flex, you can be sure that a downhill racer or aggressive enduro rider will experience too much flex in the bike and will likely be dissuaded from purchasing it. While pinkbike does give some insight into the riding style and capabilities of the testers, one person's definition of "fast and aggressive" can be very different than another person's. Having some raw video of the testers riding the bike will allow us (the consumers) to see the pace of the tester, the terrain, how the bike sounds and most importantly, how it rides, altogether making for a more empirically sound and informative product review.
  • + 8
 Typically, photo shoots take place in pleasing locations that depict the style of riding that the bike is intended for and not always where we ride-test them. Video content would be produced similarly. We ride the bikes in a number of locations, and we use more than one rider to ensure that the review does not represent one narrow viewpoint and skill level. Top racers and riders (in any discipline) tend to use wildly individual setups and typically ignore the deficiencies that those settings create in the wider scope of the bike's performance to highlight one important aspect of their riding. Dan Atherton, for instance, sets his fork and shock springs so stiff that I can sit on it without visibly sagging the suspension.

With the exception of a dedicated race bike, which should be reviewed by at least one top-level competitor in category, a decent review must take into consideration the range of riding styles that the bike is intended for. So, to span the gap between those who believe that they are the best riders on the planet and weekend warriors, I balance my reviews using top-level riders, (some who cannot be named or used in photos because they are sponsored athletes), with my experience as an above-average bike-handler who has first-hand knowledge of riding an international variety of trails and a wide range of bicycles. I filter the personal quirks of the pro-level guys and compare their reports with mine to achieve a balanced review, with riding impressions that any good bike-handler who actually has ridden that particular bike would wholeheartedly (or at least generally) agree with. Those who read a review and need information more specific to their skillsets can send me a PM and I'll be happy to reply.
  • + 3
 That's a pretty solid response...well said.
  • - 5
flag bonkywonky (Jan 21, 2015 at 7:04) (Below Threshold)
 So basically you don't always test them on the terrain they're aimed at?
  • + 5
 No. We always test bikes in the terrain and situations that they are intended for. We often choose photo locations that are more scenic or unique looking than where we actually ride the test bikes.
  • + 32
 The world need more bikes like this. Short travel, poppy rippers with bigger bike geometry. I've been saying it for years but imo they're so much more fun and playful than bigger #enduro rigs and tbh many people are massively over-biked for what they ride and would no doubt be quicker and have more fun on a shorter travel bike.
  • + 2
 IMO 140mm is about the max travel you want on a trail bike, and less is more controlled. So i agree with you with this bike. I like Whyte bikes, there trail bikes are 120/130mm. I also think that anything more than 120 is overkill on a hard tail (there are some hard tails out there this year going 140, even on 29ers, and its too much)! Got to think what that geometry is doing on full fork travel, the more travel the steeper that head tube is getting on big hits and the twitchier the handling gets.
  • + 3
 Completely agree, 140mm is max what you need for 90% of stuff in the UK you're likely to ride on a trail bike. Only time I've ever felt like I need more is taking it places like BPW and Antur which are both bike parks! A quality frame with 120-130mm travel and a beefy 130-140mm fork is all you need on 650b, slightly less if prefer 29. Add in a long (and by long I mean Mondraker Forward Geometry style long, 70mm stems have no place on a trail bike!) reach, slack headangle, low BB and short chainstays and you have THE bike you'll ever need.
  • + 1
 Completely agree with you there. Though some dont like Mondraker style forward geo, I do agree with the longer top tube shorter stem. Just built a 456 evo 2 and ive got a 140mm fork on it. Would have rather had a 130mm and a lower BB, got a 65mm stem and its a fab bike. The fork is a Suntour Epicon, its good but would rather a Rockshox Revelation with 130mm but all I can find at mo are 150mm, to much!! Not that im in a hurry to change the fork at mo!! I have a 140mm full sus 29er, its overkill and to high on the front and dont tell er in doors but its not getting used that much as its too lofty and has barge like handling that gets a bit twitchy on big hits.
  • + 2
 I had a 160mm mega AM then sold it and got the mega shorter 130mm travel TR I jumped dropped railed all the same trails on the shorter travel TR and had lots more fun . So I agree big is not allways best
  • - 1
 Its amazing how a lot of manufacturers keep going longer and longer travel, just plain silly. Stick with a proven geo and travel, as they say if it isn't broke........
  • + 3
 Just started running a 160mm fork (Pike RCT3) on a hardtail (Cotic BFe). I know it's overkill, but it still rides and looks like a beast.
  • + 1
 my Wilson has a HA of 63.5 on slack. my 224 had a 64 HA. i am seeing so many trail bikes with similar HA and more and more people buying into it that they need it hahahahaaa it's daft it's not required unless racing proper steep tracks but whatever, you see more people complaining about the hype behind wheel sizes than the arguments that actually matter.
  • + 2
 Lukearts, 160 on a BFe, at least your keeping it real! GR8 fork!! jmbrit, your spot on. I think for trailing biking 67 is about right, may be a bit slacker on a HT due to sag as per Whyte's design. I dont do down hill racing, not got the b..ls for that, though i do enjoy the down hill sections on trails. Now, wheel size, where are we.......lol
  • + 1
 Have to agree with lawman91, currently riding the Rocky thunderbolt with a 130 Revelation and its amazing. Feel just as confident going down techy stuff on it as I do on a mates nomad. You really don't need over 140 for the majority of the UK.
  • + 2
 @lawman91 they are coming, banshee, kona and now intense have released similar, beefy short travel 29er's and I dare to say that more will follow...
  • + 1
 its completely subjective to what and where you are riding ie xc / trail a bit steeper trail / enduro with the odd uplift / dh thrown in then go a bit slacker. My last 2 bikes have been 66.5 and they feel spot on the money
  • + 1
 I love my remedy. I occasionally wonder what I am missing with a revelation fork. It feels pretty good to me, though i have only ridden a half dozen times (snow fell) and not at all on the rough single track around here. Not flexy so far, and the damper seems to keep up with the chatter. I wonder since I have had an old recon, a durolux, and a domain since I sold my lyrik and I wonder whether I have just forgotten what good feels like.
  • + 2
 I run a 150mm forkon my BFe and it handles great, though I very rarely use all the travel, but the geometry is pretty much spot on at 150mm so I'm chuffed with it. @willstuart94 Would love a go on the Thunderbolt BC Edition, looks like my kinda bike! Here's hoping the theme of short travel burly 29ers transfers over to 650b bikes a little more, some great bikes out there atm but definitely scope for even better bikes!
  • + 4
 Big travel bikes are trendy due to enduro but overkill for the majority of the people. I choose a big travel bike because I live 75 minutes from Trestle and 10 minutes from a number of trails that justify 160mm.

That said there are times when I miss my 120mm XC (gasp) bike. It's hard to have a real "do-it-all" bike but I feel like we get closer every year.
  • + 1
 all I know is I can ride the dh tracks in the uk with my mates who have nomads bronsons etc and I am never feeling underbiked on a stumpy with revelations we ride greno, wharncliffe, hopton, eastridge etc etc so they are reasonable tracks, plenty of root, rock, gaps, drops and massive holes. I keep wondering why the hell i've got a wilson just for racing DH.......all of 6 times a year wtf
  • + 3
 I've got a 130-160mm DLA Slant on my BFe. 130 rips round any trail centre fine, 160 lets me stick it down a downhill track and survive!
  • + 1
 I just threw a Fox 36 150 on my TallBoy with 100 in the rear. Love it!!
  • + 1
 @ballarfski. You have a very good point. I've recently upgraded my Whyte T129 120 mm travel bike to a Whyte G150s with 150mm travel. Even though the G150 feels far better to ride I cannot get anywhere my fastest times on it in comparison to my T129.
  • + 1
 Ive found I had the mega AM set fast times on that but can not beat my times on the mega TR and the TR has rear lock out .this is very odd indeed
  • + 5
 Every body is different. I found out that i can only use the full potential of the 160 - 170 mm bike when i am at the peak of my performance (mid summer or so) any other time of the year i feel like having sex on a hammock.
some other kids ride those 160s 170s anytime anywhere.
  • + 3
 @lawman91;

Agree. I'm just looking for the new bike and, at first glance, Canyon Strive with 160 mm was obvious choice, but more i think about it, more i'm sure that Spectral would be better bike.

I have to be honest with myself and admit that I will not race that bike more that once a year and that I will not be spending my days in lift assist bike park, that most of our local trails are doable even with good 120 mm bike and that no matter all the fuss about modern enduro segment, shorter travel bikes are always better climbers.
  • + 1
 I just replaced a sub 29lb Mojo SL 140mm with a much lower spec (foundation) Intense Tracer 275. The brakes suck, the 3x gearing is clunky but I threw a DB Air on it and haven't look back. I see a lot of people saying most people buy too much bike, but I honestly feel like the trails in SoCal require a burly 160mm bike. What do you guys think? Would you take the Spider over my Tracer for a trail like this:
a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a7q2toF6XI8">https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a7q2toF6XI8/a>
  • + 1
 SoDiezl350, yes I would. Of all the bikes i rode around Aliso, my old 120mm Tomac with an angle set was definitely the best choice and the fastest too... rock it has plenty of line choice and if you find the right rhythm you can get through pretty smooth...
  • + 2
 Couldn't agree more. I've got a Whyte 29er full sus (fantastic bikes imho), and although I've upgraded the fork to a fox 34 from the spec 32 so I can be a bit more aggressive with it, it's handled everything I've thrown at it with ease, including Afan, BPW, and lots of natural trails round my area (both open rocky stuff and tight muddy forest trails). I reckon if I had a 160mm enduro rig it would take the fun and adrenalin out of 90% of the trails I ride!
  • + 1
 I've ridden exactly the same bikes and felt exactly the same and my trail times came out in the same way too!!! The G150 felt great, but my T129 is faster on paper and a shed load more fun to ride when not looking at the clock! I can tear the bejesus out of the T129 but the G150 felt like it was doing too much of the work for me and really killed the grin factor.
  • + 1
 Hum, so bar a couple of exceptions most of you back up what I say. It's all about the amount of shock/fork movement and the effect on a bikes geo. Long travel, big changes in geo, and that upsets the bikes handleing to much. My feeling is 120 max hard tails, 140 max full sus. But that is with exception of a 29er full sus where 120 is max. Yes, down hill you want massive travel as after all your hitting 20 foot plus jumps. My on one 456 I do run a 140 fork, but I have the sag set up as if it's a 120 as I feel it handles far better!! My winter hack is a 8 year old GT hard tail, 100mm fork and bar the rocky patches it put a smile on my face and I also find it easier to bunny hope and the like. Large travel is not the be all and end all!
  • + 1
 I've got a Fox 36 talas on my BFe, love it!
  • + 2
 I agree 140 max is the way to go for a trail bike. The quality of suspension these days is great along with 142x12 rear 15mm front axles and 35/36mm forks make a bike that can rip any trail and still be an "enduro bike" 160mm and over for gravity and 120mm and below for XC.
  • + 1
 My trailbike is an Opus Maadh1 (140mm), spec'd with 150mm Revelations (26"), full XT 1X10, Mavic Crossmax SLR ('10),Raceface Deus cranks and Turbine kit. This is a perfect trail bike for me! 140mm travel via a floating shock VPP, with a 66.5 head angle, and with current build only 26lbs! Not any real hills around where I live, so I can get away with the SLR's. Mind you, I do like to have fun, and can get this up to speed VERY quickly!
  • + 1
 Nice build. Any pictures?
  • + 2
 soon... soon...
mwa ha ha
>:F
  • + 1
 @sodiez1350
Ya, legal trails in socal only really req. 120-140. And all new trail builds (flow trls) too.
Dbl edged sword, imba/industry need flow trails, but experts/big bikes get bored-start short cutting, illegal stuff pops up. landmanagers should legalize more of the "pro lines", rebuild some, and less new trails will pop up.
Until then, walk ur bike in and out of entrances/exits.
  • + 20
 If i hear the phrase "long and low" used to describe a bikes geometry one more time, i'm going to implode.
  • + 6
 'LONG & LOW'...........lol ;-)
  • + 4
 agreed- it's getting to the point the top gear guys got to when trying to describe driving an alfa without using the word passion...put a quid in the bucket every time you catch yourself using the word/phrase...
  • + 7
 I agree with your top gear comment. Clarkson: "this alfa romeo may break down every 50 miles but WHO CARES when it puts a grin on my face for 49 miles. It positively RADIATES charisma, like JFK in his presidential debate, and it BEAMS with soul, like Smokey Robinson's first audition for Berry Gordy - something those studious and anodyne german and jap car box tickers couldn't ever replicate"
  • + 0
 Yeah, but what's under the bonnet?
  • + 14
 The $3000 version of this bike is a screaming deal as well. Honestly this bike is a win for Intense.
I am glad to see some shorter travel bikes getting some love. I would like to hear how this does at 150mm.
  • + 9
 isn't the point of this bike is that it is a 130?
  • + 0
 I'd say the point of the bike is to have fun. And seeing as how you can change the mounting point of the rear shock to make it a 150mm, I'd say it wouldn't be out of line to want to know how it performs when setup that way. They built it burly for a reason.
  • + 2
 fair comment, i amleft wondering if the 150 setting won't be as complimentary to the ride, obviously it requires a front end change, but if i am right you can extend the length of the revelation quite easily - not sure how far
  • + 3
 It goes to 150.
  • + 1
 But now it says 115 so nevermind.
  • + 6
 Just an FYI... their Tracer T275A "Foundation" complete bike (aluminum version of their very-acclaimed carbon T275C) can also be had for $3,000 retail (link: www.jensonusa.com/Mountain-Bikes/Intense-Tracer-275A-Foundation-2015) with virtually the exact same build kit. These are both *SMOKING* hot deals on complete, ready-to-ride/race bikes with modern geometry. These bikes could easily sell for more, but it's encouraging to see Intense stepping up with competitive pricing while still maintaining their classic "boutique" culture.
  • + 2
 @taletotell, the bike has two settings for rear travel 115, and 130, no 150. I wouldn't go to a 150 fork on this bike, It seems safe to keep within 10mm plus or minus of the recommended travel for the fork, that way you're not stepping too far past what the manufacturer intended. Want a 150mm bike, they make those too.
  • + 2
 Right, the article was corrected. Originally it said 150, but it was a typo.
  • + 6
 Looks like a good bike, but it looks like it'll be even better at collecting mud. I can't be the only one who looks at where mud will gather when eyeing up a new bike, surely? There's been some much worse offenders than this bike in the last year, so don't think I'm hating on this bike, I like the look and ethos of these mid-travel bikes.

It seems to me that too many bike and component manufacturers operate from dry and dusty parts of the world, meaning the question "where is all the mud going to go?" often seems to be over looked...
  • + 3
 A few weeks ago I finally experienced mud build up so bad the rear tire ceased to roll. Three times. On a new bike. In Southern California. 350 days out of the year are above 60 degrees F and are dry as a bone. Yet right when I get my new bike I couldn't resist. Anyways I never even think to look at that but it seems to be a hot topic on most of the reviews that I read so you aren't alone
  • + 4
 hahahaa, in England its about 350 days of mud compared to your 350 of dry sun lol ok - perhaps not that bad..
  • + 2
 yeah, i grew up in that part of the world- san diego- dry as a bone most of the time. not something intense, turner or ellsworth need to think about much (ever).
  • + 1
 in san diego this April woooop :-)

is there anywhere i can rent a bike near a trail?
  • + 1
 wish i could help- been living in asheville north carolina for the last 10 years [pisgah rules!]. all of the good riding in san diego county, is in the county, not the town. you'll definitely need to rent/hire a car and do some driving. doubt if you'll find a bike shop anywhere near the better trails. practice pronouncing place names like jamul, and japatul- the j sounds like an h. cheers!
  • + 1
 thanks dude, had to ask.
  • + 3
 no worries, you ever find yourself in WNC for some reason, look me up.
  • + 1
 props
  • + 4
 That lower link and I Box is ABOVE the BB like a Nomad, M9, and original VPP bikes! This seems like a rather important feature of this bike! That's got to be a contributing factor to its pedaling performance. The thing is though- it has a FD mount. It surely has quite noticeable pedal feedback in the granny! I'm 100% for 1x drivetrains and the evolution of frame designs around it but if this bike is offered with a foundation build and a granny there is a compromise here.

Care to comment Intense?
  • + 6
 and what is all that filing on the pivot behind the chainring about?

www.pinkbike.com/photo/11796311
  • + 0
 @Krispy-at-Go-Ride - it's all about where the virtual pivot point is. This looks to have a fairly high pivot point but not necessarily worse than the older style VPP. All VPP bikes have lots of tug in the granny.

@iffy - that looks like it happened from a dropped chain. Took a chunk of paint off a marginally prepped surface.
  • + 0
 no it was ground off deliberately.
  • + 3
 Too bad the FRAME is already OBSOLETE.

142 x 12 pfft.



Don't they know its all about 142 BOOST now?

And next year it is all about 144 BOOST.

Then 143.57 BOOST PLUS.



And none of these will be compatible with each other,...or with anything else.
  • + 6
 Wonder how it compares to the Knolly Endorphin 27.5? Aluminum, 130mm travel, made burly with serious trail ripping in mind.
  • + 2
 They really need to look at the stand over height in the smaller sizes. A lot of women and some smaller men (myself included) would feel a lot more comfortable on a frame with 28" stand over, which is an attainable number which many other bike manufacturers achieve.
  • + 5
 3k for SLX version - nice. Thats cheaper than my Santa cruz Blur LT SLX build was. Nice to see some metal reviewed.
  • + 1
 \m/ >:F \m/
  • + 2
 At first I was thinking, damnit, I clicked on another 275 review, then I noticed the chainstay is 419mm, and thought, hmm, I might actually ride that bike! Not that I'm ready to give up 26 yet by any stretch of the imagination.
  • + 6
 I WILL DRIVE TO TEMECULA TO BEAT UP THIS BIKE
  • + 4
 "The Spider feels so agile and capable, that we were pushing to the bottom of the suspension almost everywhere we rode" - or turn up the SAG and compression? Big Grin
  • + 13
 We set t it up much more firm than necessary. It was the speed we carriied and the rocky terrain that ran the bike through its travel, not lack of support. It's a blast to descend on.
  • - 1
 I think it is because you run air springs which blow through mid travel too easily on VPP trail bikes then ramps up drastically. Try coil! It's going to be much better and worth the extra 2lbs!
  • + 12
 waki

otherwise translated as "knows more than the bike industry"

carry on :-)
  • - 2
 Nothing to be serious about mate, I am trolling personally on RC Smile , I still remember his article on air springs, that ended with a poll that went more or less like that - "Now after reading the evidence I presented in the article do you understant that air is better? Yes, no Wink I honestly like his opinions hardened by years of experience, because they are so... hard?
  • + 1
 i was joking bud ;-)
  • + 2
 Ha, is air in suspension like what carbon is to frames!! Steel is real people!!
  • + 2
 Ballardski - yes bu tyou must acknolwedge the superiority of Titanium. Why US blokes say AlumiNUM but say TitaNIUM instead of TitaNUM?
  • + 1
 Keep forgetting about Titanium. Thats it WAKI, my project this year! Re frame one of my bikes with a Titanium frame!! Ether that or buy a fat bike??
  • - 1
 Thai-thay-nyaem is magical! Also, if it would be a short travel hardtail you are after, get an old coil Marzocchi fork for it, possibly with RC or HSCV cartridge. I got Shiver SC and the feel is fkng amazing! Yea it dives a bit, but nothing gives such a float.
  • + 2
 Hum, now that would be nice. Old skool!! Though I cant see rim brakes in there....lol. Had a coil Marzocchi some time back, butter smooth until it came to adding air pre load, that just cocked it all up!!
  • + 1
 it's not that it's just smooth. A Fox or RS fork with RLC or Motion Control is smooth as well when you turn compression to none, but Marzocchi has this sustained floatation and it dampens bigger hits in some magic way as if it was dissapating energy, while other forks just... go up and down? There is some ghost in the machine when it comes to MZ Big Grin
  • + 1
 @waki it almost sounds like a volume reducer in the shock might help here...
  • + 2
 WAKI The three beers and pie I'm having for dinner is worth 2lbs., but you of all people should know that a 30lb bike is worthless while 28 lbs is priceless until you see $6,000 charge or your credit card.
  • + 1
 Codypup - I have pussy factor detector in form of my HT which has 3lbs heavier wheels+tyres than my FS. Detector blinks and sends electric shock As soon as my brain starts to go: ooooh I wish I had rear suspension noooow, I am so tired of lifting my bum for every root, or ooooh how sluggish I feel on this uphill, I wish I had my Carbon wheels. Honestly riding a shitty bike once in a while is therapeutical.
  • + 1
 And that's why I will never let my Bullitt go. Love it as much as a twelve year old Labrador. A trick I learned from being a super old moto-enduro rider is to use the bumps to leverage my sorry old glass knees and bum up to a standing position, once in a while.
  • + 2
 As a pure all-round user, I find the 115 mm setup more usefull than said in the review: with a 140-110 Talas fork in the short travel mode, 115 mm back and a set of fast rolling tyres and you have a serious marathon weapon! Ok, I would use it just a few times a year, but it's not bad to have that option Wink
  • + 2
 Thanks for pointing out the obvious (but for some reason often disputed) point that there's a reason for capable 5" trailbikes. They roll better, corner better, and feel more alive and fun at speeds (and in terrain) most common to most of our riding. Yes, 6" plus enduro bikes are amazing - but they aren't nearly as universally applicable as the industry wants us to believe.
  • + 1
 Anyone interested in this kind of bike should check out the Morewood Zula. Same attitude, incredible geometry, stiff, lighter and strong. Also cheaper by quite a few hundred $. At only 100mm rear it puts my 150mm Enduro rig to shame on all but the roughest, steepest trails.
  • + 1
 Great looking bike and nice review. Can't believe, however, that there was no mention of the lower link now being above the BB. This is Intense's first VPP bike to ever have it, and only the second VPP bike to use it after the new Nomad 27.5.
  • + 2
 great bike. i got a kona process 134dl. great all arounder. with more than enough travel and the bike jumps on its own. the trend is a good one. especially since mine was 3600 out the door.
  • + 1
 some of the spec amuses me- i had a WTB silverado once...awful. kinda wonder why the specced a ks lev instead of a thomson. my lev works well, and the lever is the nicest out there. but i've broken the clamp assembly twice. to be fair, i bent the rails on the saddle in one of my wipeouts.
  • + 1
 Finally, a bike priced within the scope of reality!! Thank you Intense and Pinkbike! Top build at $6000, rather than the "budget" build at that price.

How many chain drops did it take to mar that pivot? Was that a consistent issue? Seems nice that it comes with tabs for a guide.
  • + 5
 I like it. I like metal. I like 130mm. I like the spec. Nice one.
  • + 3
 I don't like the 32mm stanchion fork choice. With a 67 degree head angle I would have preferred a Pike.
  • + 2
 I don't see who this bike is for because who would spend 6k for an aluminum trail bike with mid range spec when you can get a Santa Cruz 5010c with a similar spec for around the same price.
  • + 5
 People who want a slightly more "boutique" brand or are part of the family that a few intense people cultivate.
  • + 7
 This bike is for... whomever would prefer an aluminum trail bike over a 5010c. I once bailed coming around a fast rooty corner and pitched my 6061 alloy rig off a six foot drop into a rocky creekbed. It came back up LITERALLY without a scratch - and I was sure it would, so I wasn't worried. Carbon might be just as strong, but not everyone can keep that fixed in their mind, so there's still a market for a quality alloy bike. But more importantly, I don't think you can claim they're identical - they aren't. Their head tube angles and wheelbases and front-centers differ not just by fractions of measurements, but by FULL degrees, FULL inches. They aren't the exact same bike, even if they're in the same category.
  • + 3
 Pretty good point... some people just like Intense, I don't care if my frame is alloy or carbon. Thing is Santa Cruz and Intense are pretty similar (my opinion) so it's really hard to see why this bike would be purchased other than brand loyalty and maybe a few slightly different riding characteristics.
  • + 4
 Aluminium Intense bikes are made in US - all Santa Cruz bikes are made in Asia. Hence the price difference. Nobody forces you to buy it or even to like it. So if you don't like it, write a short comment about it and please don't mention it again. You may as well wait a bit because someone is surely going to make that comment and you may just repeat what someone said Big Grin
  • + 3
 "Intense offers the chassis in three relatively affordable builds: The $5999 SRAM X01 based Spider Pro that we review here, and the $5650 Shimano XT based Spider Expert – both with RockShox suspension - and the $2999 Shimano SLX based Spider Foundation with an X-Fusion fork and shock."

$5999 with SRAM X01 and RS susp VS $2999 with SLX and X-fusion.
That means $3000 bucks more for X01 and MAYBE slightly better susp with the same travel.
Hmm....

Do they have yet more realtively affordable offer without any transmission at all ?
  • + 2
 Yeah, it almost sells the SLX version better than it does the other two, with the price difference
  • - 2
 @Bluefire - for $4504 you can get an aluminum 5010 with a mix of SLX and X0 drivetrain, a Pike RC 130 fork, a Float CTD Kashima, a Rerverb Stealth, and a Race Face cockpit. The you could spend the extra $1496 on any upgrades, like a new X01 drivetrain or better wheels.
  • + 1
 @seraph: You're absolutely correct; an alloy 5010 is an excellent value. It certainly makes sense to me - while I respect Intense as a company, I too would prefer the Santa Cruz. But the fact that the 5010 is a better deal on paper for you or for me, and that the Spider is by comparison a poor one, doesn't make the Spider worthless in GENERAL - for some people, it might be well worth the price premium, for whatever reason. I just don't think we can automatically label it a bad value for the whole market unless it doesn't sell. This bike was made for the people who want THIS BIKE, and NOT the Santa Cruz, regardless of whether or not we can understand their reasoning. It's not a bike for no one unless no one buys it. I'm not sure I see your point.
  • - 1
 Or just buy Stumpjumper Evo?
  • + 2
 Ok, the reason i brought up the 5010 was cause it was another short travel vpp bike, but there are so many other options such as a top of the line transition scout with a much better spec is $1200 cheaper. Instead of any of these though i personally would get a higher spec and nicer bike on the pb buysell.
  • + 4
 The base build with the x fusion 34mm fork up front would be good value once you put a dropper post in...
  • + 1
 "The Spider pedaled so well that we left the shock in the upper, 130-millimeter, location on the link and never bothered to try the shorter, 150-millimeter suspension option."Thanks pinkbike for the maths lesson.I thought 150 was more than 130!
  • + 2
 I'm no expert, but I think it says 115mm
  • + 1
 Not sure if its been changed but it says 115mm not 150mm now.
  • + 2
 Hey RC it seems like this is a smart R&D move theses days to get the aluminum version out first and let the masses test and make demand before the much more expensive carbon is produced. Ex trek slash. Is this planned or am I looking to much into it?
  • + 1
 Deville64 ^^^ No doubt, with Intense's push to expand its sales, that it will pop out a carbon Spider if the aluminum one hits the jackpot. I believe, though, that Intense is depending upon its aluminum production to serve the more affordable end of the market. Elite-level bikes are sales tools in that they attract a lot of media and consumer attention, but their numbers are a relatively small segment of the market. The $3,000 to $5,000 enthusiast-level performance bike is where the best value lies for riders and sales numbers are much fatter. Intense can be competitve there with its aluminum factory in Temecula.
  • + 3
 130mm is just sweet for a trail bike. Got a Blur Alu and wouldn't want it any other way.
  • + 0
 I'm confused by this statement: "I’d have to admit that the Spider came as a surprise, considering how many mountain bikers are clamoring to buy burly enduro racers with at least 160-millimeters on each end. “Either this bike is something special,” I thought. “Or, this review is going to be very short and to the point.”

Why would the comprehensiveness of the review be based on the travel of the bike or the fact that it's not an 'enduro' type bike? I've known for years that PB reviews are really only good for the pictures, but now it's basically in writing. PB really seems to be going the way of the automotive magazines - simply turning into a shill and simply a paid mouthpiece for the manufacturers that can afford to buy some front page real estate.
  • + 1
 Talking about quality & price relation. I don't now if there are in the USA, but B'Twin (decathlon) has awesome products, so why not give them a go ? I guess they'll be astonished.
  • + 4
 Show us the 2999 spec kit.
  • + 4
 boring :p i wanted to see a carbon m9 alreadyyyy
  • + 4
 Who else really really dislikes Intense's website? It's driving me crazy
  • + 2
 The bike I ride the most is a 80mm travel single speed with 120mm forks and 26" wheels. It may not be the fastest, but it is the most fun.
  • + 3
 Everything from the quote about standing and sitting to the end was italicized on my mobile device.
  • + 4
 Nimble9 ^^^ Checked the code for a glitch, but did not find anything that might cause that.
  • + 1
 hmmm that's odd, it's almost (I have no experience in html or mobile apps) as if when the text "The Spider feels so agile and capable, that we were pushing to the bottom of the suspension almost everywhere we rode" there might be an end italicize call missing. I skimmed at the source code and maybe it's because the end italicize is after the setting the font size back to 14?

Again I have no experience with html and there is no difference on my laptop.
  • + 1
 I feel like if a Canadian site is going to list prices in USD, they should at least state that. The foundation build is more like $3789 in Canada.
  • + 2
 $6k for X1 cranks? That's a bit odd. I would prefer at least a set of Turbine Cinch cranks for that price.
  • + 1
 Geez. With all these 'new' shorter travel trail bikes, maybe Specialized might think about making a 650B non-Evo version of the Stumpjumper!
  • + 1
 I'm glad they still make 32mm forks! they're good for people who still climb the mountains on their bikes.
  • + 1
 Dear Pinkbike. I'm kindly asking you to provide us with the big, new, magical Wilson review.
  • + 1
 Two different seat tube angles are shown, which is it? Vital says the steeper one
  • + 1
 Wow an affordable 27.5 bike on pinkbike is this real life ? That bike is gorgeous.
  • + 2
 hmmmmm, the $2999 version only lacks a seatpost, might be worth a look.
  • + 1
 grease fittings are the best idea ever
  • + 1
 jeeez, that review was intense...
  • + 1
 Is there white cracks on the SRAM crank arm on the second photo?
  • + 2
 How about a frameset?
  • + 1
 Where ever the pics were taken, it sure does look sunny and warm.... Frown
  • + 1
 Does it come with a TIG welder?
  • + 1
 What good would your TIG welder be if it was carbon???
  • + 1
 I want this with a CC Inline and a set of Pikes set at 150mm
  • + 1
 RC, where did you guys test the bike? Orange County? ---just curious
  • + 1
 In San Diego, we Photographed the Bike at Mission Trails Regional Park on Cowles Mountain
  • + 1
 I liked it better when santa cruz made it
  • + 0
 Not available as frameset?
  • + 0
 good bike, but i'm not interested..thanks..

Big Grin
  • + 0
 Am I the only one underwhelmed by this?
  • + 4
 Yes
  • + 4
 no. Cant say it really excites me and i'm not far off from being in the market for a 130mm shortish wheelbase trail bike.
  • + 1
 Holy reach!
  • + 1
 Nice Goggles...sheez
  • + 0
 Looks like a Nomad.
  • - 1
 Thompson? The "p" is silent...
  • + 3
 yep, i'm aware of thatWink there was a mistype in the article, i tried to point it, but it's been corrected.
  • + 4
 Cheers. "Thomson" is a continuing battle between auto-correct and proofers
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