Manitou MY 11 Aluminum Dorado photos and full specs

Aug 13, 2009 at 0:06
Aug 13, 2009
by Tyler Maine  
 
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Manitou re-introduced the Carbon Dorado this past year and everyone was stoked to see it back in action. The down side is that is was less attainable to the average downhill consumer due to its price tag. The good news is that Manitou has created the all new Aluminium Upper MY 11 Dorado and it's got all the bells and whistles you'll find in its Carbon sibling, and at a price that is inline with the market.

Read on to learn all about the Manitou MY 11 Dorado,

Siblings

Siblings



Price
$2775
$1759
Weight
2812 g
2971 g
Color Options
Carbon
Black
Travel
180-203 mm
180-203 mm
Spring
Air
Air
Crown
Dual
Dual
Body Type
Carbon (inverted)
Aluminum (inverted)
Rebound
Open-bath, double tube rebound damper
Open-bath, double tube rebound damper
Stanchion material
36mm Aluminum
36mm Aluminum
Steer Tube
1.125
1.125
Damping
TPC+ compression damping, with adjustable velocity, pressure, and energy dependant circuits.
TPC+ compression damping, with adjustable velocity, pressure, and energy dependant circuits.
DropOut Options
20mm
20mm
Compression
Dual Air Chamber, Hydraulic Bottom Out
Dual Air Chamber, Hydraulic Bottom Out



MY 11 Dorado

MY 11 Dorado

Full Aluminum Uppers

Full Aluminum Uppers


*Please note that the graphics that you see on this fork are NOT the final graphics that will hit stores in the coming months*

The all new Manitou MY 11 Dorado features full 7050 aluminum upper tubes that are first drawn through a dye, then turned on a lathe and then butted for further strength. By creating an aluminum version of the Carbon Dorado, Manitou is able to offer a WC quality race fork at a reduced expense when compared to the Carbon version. ALL THE INTERNALS have remained the same, so you are not getting a sub par product with any less adjustments. These are the same forks, just one has aluminum uppers, while the other fork's uppers are carbon. The lower crowns on the MY 11 Dorado have undergone a different process than those found on the Carbon version and are in fact lighter than those on the Carbon version due to them being hallowed out.

Through the product development of the MY 11 Aluminum Dorado, Manitou learned some things about product that will transfer into the model year 2011 Carbon Dorado - expect it to be lighter!

Rebound

Rebound

Positive Air

Positive Air

TPC

TPC

TCP Knob

TCP Knob

Negative Air

Negative Air

20mm Thru Axle

20mm Thru Axle


The new MY 11 Dorado will also ship in the gun case as it's also a DH weapon!



The Hayes Bicycle Group offers free tech support at all the events they are present at. This is as beneficial to the privateer as it is to the Pro who are all out there riding their bikes and want them all to be tip top on race day. This is a very generous backing for a company and their products. To further support their products, Manitou's Carbon Dorados come with a free 2 year service program where riders that own them can send them in once a year for a full service on all wearable items inside the fork. This may be a purchasable item for owners that pick up the MY 11 Dorado once it hits stores.

One thing that we'd like to note after having a look at the new MY 11 Dorado would have to be the fact that if Manitou really wanted to have some fun, they could in fact anodize the uppers to create bold looking new forks that will really stand out.

If you are going to be at this year's Interbike Outdoor demo, then you'll be one of the first people that will get the opportunity to ride a MY 11 Dorado on dirt. Manitou will be at the ODD with a full range of forks to test and the MY 11 Dorado is one of them.


Related Links:
www.pinkbike.com/news/Manitou-Dorado.html
www.pinkbike.com/news/Manitou-Dorado-Preview-2009.html
www.pinkbike.com/news/manitou-dorado-my11-2009.html
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104 Comments

  • + 17
 I am new to pinkbike, but have been through the inverted/conventional fork debate before as I come from a motocross background. In simplest terms, a conventional fork and an inverted fork will exhibit different flex characteristics that will feel different to the rider. A conventional fork will have more flex at the clamp based on tube diameters and surface area. This flex results in less steering precision, but a better ride over small bumps. The brace reduces the flex, but it will not be as rigid as an inverted design. An inverted fork will offer better steering precision, but will have some binding on compression. This results in a "stickier" feel on particularily small bumps. When hitting a bump, there is a degree of flex in the stanchions. On a conventional fork this happens at the clamp, away from the sliding area. On an inverted fork this happens at the entrance to the upper, causing a slight binding.

Warren

(sorry, posted this on the carbon dorado thread by mistake first.)
  • + 1
 and thats where e=mc2 came from
[Reply]
  • + 6
 i think its a good idea they brought this out... i cant see how anyone in the world can justify spending an extra £1000 on something that works the same but only weight about 200g less...

you could loose more weight having a nice dump before your race...

it wouldnt suprise me if this results in the carbon one being discontinued...
  • + 1
 Hahahahaha man your so right !
  • + 5
 It's the carbon fork "feel" that justifies this fork for some people. Aluminum can't be as tuned as well as carbon can.
  • + 1
 Im not a racer, but im guessing any amount of weight they can shift on the bike without effecting performance is well worth the price difference. Also the R&D of the carbon probably cost a whole lot more than the ALU version, this is what you pay for when you want the best and lightest possible and don't forget..."Manitou's Carbon Dorados come with a free 2 year service program" and FREE always costs something!
  • + 1
 dont you get it IT DOES affect performance the carbon fork is designed to track better than the aluminum one can because the directions of the carbon weave can control the directional stiffness were as aluminum is just thick or thin.
[Reply]
  • + 5
 I read an article about the new Dorado and the carbon version went through flex, stress testing for a million cycles and the carbon was fine, it was the clamp bolts that broke. Even though you save a $1,000 for the aluminum Dorado, it will not last as long as the carbon version. Thing is, I have no idea how long an aluminum Dorado would last in the real world as opposed to a carbon version? If 1,000,000 flex cycles equates out to 20 years, who cares how long a carbon version will last?

On the other hand, if .4 lbs is the difference to you making the podium when racing or coming in 4th, then $1,000 doesn't matter.

I race snowmachines and just because something works for racing, does not mean it is the best thing for the average rider. Heck, consider even the guy who appreciates and can afford the the latest technology. Race quality parts are made for one thing, to win at all costs. Durability and lifespan is sacrificed for performance to win that particular race. I'm thinking there are some other downsides to a carbon fork then they are not mentioning. Carbon has traditionally proven to be brittle or tender when it comes to impacts and scrapes affecting it's durability. In the real world, who cares if the fork can last 20+ years of flexing when a simple wreck that results in a deep scratch takes the fork out of commission? The carbon fork is made to do one thing, win races. It doesn't care about longevity or your pocketbook. It is always about how much do you want to spend to go fast?
[Reply]
  • + 3
 Nice fork, both of them, you have to admit tho the carbon one looks awesome and it wouldn't surprise me if some people pay the extra for the look and just for the sake of having the top model. although 150g for $1000 is damb expansive.
and for those complaining about the price (mostly to the Americans and Canadians) if you convert that 1759 dollars to British pounds it is actually cheaper than fox 40s, boxxer WC and 888 WC in Britain by a large amount as those forks are all around £1200 or so (nearly $2000) and as with everything by the time the darados get over here they will probably just put a £ sign instead of $ sign making $1759 (£1070) into £1759 ($2900), everything is cheaper in dollars Frown
sorry about the rant about prices and America/Canada being cheaper but i find it ridiculous that companies can charge silly amounts like nearly £3000 (nearly $5000) for just a frame (intense m6) and forks are just as bad.
  • + 1
 no this fork is still roughly $100 more expensive then the 888, Boxxer WC, and the Fox 40.
  • + 1
 yes in Canada it is, my point was just the price u pay over there is alot less than over here for example if i bought some forks from America they would still be cheaper than buying them here even with the crap exchange rate at the moment and even after shipping costs and the huge amount of import tax.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 From a design and damping technology aspect these new alloy versions should really catch on as the damping system is basically the best out there, the new 2010 Marzocchi 888 RC2x Ti forks also look to be super awesome too though with all their tech additions - as long as both these companies get their quality control in order next year, I expect they'll overthrow the mighty Boxxer's and 40's in terms of sales and performance!
  • + 1
 2010, RC2x? Not RC3? Is that a mistake, or are they going back to the older damping?
  • + 1
 my bad, got confused - its the RC3 Evo Ti that its called!
  • + 1
 Nuts, it would've been awesome otherwise Razz
  • + 1
 I agree, Rc2x is sweet.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 smeckma, you do a good point... 50% of the time! I dont think you can say "we the costumers" as you are not talking for all the bike industry consumers (or target clientele for that fork, if you want to be more acurate). The point is, you dont like it, you dont buy it. But saying that manitou gambles its business based on our "poor taste" is bloddy incorrect. They give you an alternative to what is already on the market. Either you like it or not. Saying that is good or bad visually - because that is what you are saying - is more of a personal thing. Myself, I don't like inverted forks, and the looks of the carbon is really not my "thing", but the ALU looks mint. But that is just me...
[Reply]
  • + 1
 With all due respect, for it is always possible to say things insofar you're not being disrecpectfull to other people, it is only an opinion, if however wrong, I would never buy a Manitou fork. This is not so more because of any performance issues whatsoever, but due to the fact I believe it is impossible to add anything valuable to it by just adding a dash of colour. If you come to think of it, Manitou must be thinking we the costumers have poor taste and that we will content with anything they come up with which glitches, sparks or blinds the eye. I am certain my bike will look like an eyesore if I have one of those put in. And, basically, this is what I am saying.
  • + 1
 I'd have to disagree with "but due to the fact I believe it is impossible to add anything valuable to it by just adding a dash of colour"
1. This is a brand new fork made out of aluminum. This means that it offers a different flex performance. It is probably more resilient than carbon for abuse from crashes and impact.
2. This is a brand new fork for a new market. At a 1000 less, a whole new set of users can now afford the product. So relative to the normal users, it's a new product that was not available to them (their pocketbook) before.
3. It's all about giving regular users a new fork with arguably great performance with the inverted fork. Most people that ride hard want performance and don't care if a product does not come in their favorite color.
4. Even so, in the article it states that the colors and graphics are not production, so commenting on buying or not buying the product based on it's look/color is premature.
  • + 0
 Yes Radek (I remember you), but this is not what I am going on about. The only thing I am saying is I don't like sparkling or flashing colours. About performance, well I think Manitou's impressive, but I would not buy one just because of what the product looks like. I like simple things which do the job (this is me all the time).
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Agreed with the coments from maglor & ctd07. price wise, You won't see too many of either fork (ali or carbon) in the UK for a year or two. Only when people sell off to get the next years model will the market/trail see more of them on our soil. the only thing that will deter me from a for as good as this was the age old problem of the good old upsider- The Stanton guards. I had a set of the whites back a fair few years ago and that has always been a worry of mine. even more so with the development of the sport, more gnarlly rockie sections may play havoc to the common user without the endless spares trailer of the pro rider. Hopefully those guards are stronger and more resistant to the punishment of modern day DH and FR????
[Reply]
  • + 2
 I wish they would do what SRAM does and offer a couple of different levels of Dorado, rather than just the Carbon and Aluminum versions with the same internals. A $700 Dorado Coil would be pretty cool.
  • + 1
 to do that they would have to put naff internals in them, then there would simply be no point in them over a boxxer team or something - the whole point of the Dorado is to be the best out there with its twin tube damping e.t.c. its supposed to be the 'pinnacle'!
  • + 1
 The point would be that it's a less expensive dual crown DH fork from Manitou. The point is to have options.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 ok so $1800 for an inverted fork thats only on its first year back to production essentially and this is the "affordable" version.

To be honest, its a disappointment, id love the fork, but $1800 is allot of money for a fork when for $1200 at a bikeshow i can get a fox 40 or rockshox boxxer. I love dorados. Favorite of all time fork.

But for the love of god manitou please help a brother out. If you even got the price down to $1500 then it might be understandable by nearly 2 grand for an aluminum fork.. Honestly.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Hope they sell lots. As much as I can see why they release a halo product first, I would have bought one over my WC this year. Sadly I can't justify a new fork already.....maybe in 2 years time.
[Reply]
  • + 0
 Good to see them back and ditching the SPV in the forks (which basically killed them the first time).

Two comments ... I cannot see how the prices are going to compete against a Boxxer .. a fork that is made in Taiwan, whereas the Dorado is made in the USA.

The graphics .. I mean TONE IT DOWN ... Whatever happened to nice looking graphics?

Other than that, the adjustments appear to be top notch and of good quality. It will be interesting to hear how the fork performs and if the flex issue of not arch above the wheel is still an issue.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 asking if the fork could fit a 4” headtube with integrated headset. Because the removed material around the crown made me doubt about the shortest stack height possible.
  • + 0
 For those like me who would like to know it. the minimum stack height between the 2 crowns is 117mm.
  • + 0
 You can just slide the top crown down to even a minimal size headtube. The setting of the lower crown should be always around the same place, to maintain proper height of the fork.
  • + 0
 Yeah but that minimal stack height i got from Manitou directly, i guess it's with the lower crown at the highest position. I think that shouldn't be a problem as the droado has shorter stock axle to crown distance than other brands.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 The carbon set are £2299.99 in the UK so I'm wondering what the Ali model is going to cost? At a rough guess I'd say around the £1700 mark??????? If we're lucky, slighty less so I'd go with Magnor on your guess mate?
[Reply]
  • + 0
 I wonder if new Dorados are stiff enough so the front wheel is not turning under heavy braking as it used happen with the old "flexorado". It was actualy heppening even on MZ Shiver DC so i wonder how the stiffnes has been improved - yup I am bit sceptical about USD forks - love their looks and plushness, but ain't a big fan of their handling characteristics...
[Reply]
  • + 1
 wonder how these would do on Palmer's m6... oh, wait those boxxers are still about new. the bidding will start at... and he can keep the pedals for his personal shrine.
[Reply]
  • + 3
 nice, that's $1000 savings for 160g difference now that's cool
[Reply]
  • + 2
 I don't think it's 1000$ just for 150 grams less weight, isn't carbon version also supposably stiffer than alloy?
  • + 1
 yes, you would have more flex in the fork. which could be a problem for racing. I also read somewhere (can't remember but i will search) that even the new carbon version is a bit flexy. so it will be interesting to see how much flex this one has.
  • + 1
 yeah that's what I was thinking it'a an usd design, so the whole point of it was to keep it stiff with layering carbon at certain angels and then having a plushness of inverted fork and stiffnes of a conventional fork, an alloy version kinda kills the whole point of it, you might as well get a boxxer instead.
[Reply]
  • + 3
 i think i want one.looks nice.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 That, you might be right...
  • + 2
 I think I am going to post a thread on what's acceptable, manners, dress codes and etiquete, and relate everything to mountain biking as it is. In one of the posts they've deleted I was actually going on about "adjacent" beauty and the "inherent" one, speaking of which, I did borrow form Inmanuel Kant, who was a philosopher. Kant used to focus more on geometry and proportion, and came into the conclusion beauty shows best in its structural form.
[Reply]
  • + 0
 $1000 the difference in a fork that is internally the same. I had no idea carbon was so expensive, finish looks a cut above on both models tho.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 don't really like the fork, but that's so sick hayes provides support to racers with the fork for free at sponsored events!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 i got to ride the carbon one at interbike. didnt feel that special compared to others except it is ssssoooooooo light
[Reply]
  • + 1
 haha ironicly it says it's made in the USA but the color next to it is the french flag.
  • + 0
 I don't see the irony.
  • + 2
 french flag is blue, white and red..in that order from left to right. The pattern red, white, and blue is typically associated with the USA.
  • + 1
 Well yeah but you would view that sticker vertically, in which case it would read red, white, and then blue.
[Reply]
  • - 1
 they are basicly the same fork, its just the material and wieght and there is a $1000 diffence, the MY11 is still a beee-a-u-tiful fork though
[Reply]
  • + 0
 I prefer aluminum on a fork anyway.I would spend my money on something else. Looks pretty sweet though.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 They look sick how much will they be in the UK?
  • + 2
 + EU tax + UK tax + importer profit = ???
  • + 1
 isn't your tax on imports something ridiculous like 20%?
[Reply]
  • + 1
 smart move on manitous part
  • + 0
 the difference in weight is just .4 LBS so whats the point in getting the carbon one then if all the internals are the same?
  • + 0
 stiffness is a main thing. i bet you $10 if you ride a carbon one, then try a aluminum one your going to notice a difference.
  • + 0
 ya you would for sure haha, thats why there a $1000 difference in the price
[Reply]
  • + 1
 so basicly you'r paying 1 grand more for 200 grams less?
  • + 2
 With the new aluminum one it's 1 grand less for 200 grams more. Smile
  • + 3
 so you could say less is more?
[Reply]
  • + 0
 they look sik. and 2 years of free services quality
[Reply]
  • - 1
 Great to see the Inverted forks back,if it's good enought for MX than so does it for biking
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Looks promising. tup
[Reply]
  • + 0
 yes so happy....must have one!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Price in USD or CAD?
  • + 0
 well then lets hope that the Canadian $ evens out with the US $
  • + 1
 its 91 cents to the us dollar so its pretty close right now
  • + 1
 thats 10% more. thats alot especially on something so expensive. right now if the fork costs $1750 USD it costs closer to $2000 after everything is said and done in Canadian dollars. which is alot seeing as i've been offered brand new Boxxer WC's from a shop for $1200.
  • + 1
 $1200 for some 2010 WCs?!!!! Which shop is this?!!!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 can't wait to buy this
[Reply]
  • - 1
 WOOT!!! now its only................1700!
[Reply]
  • - 1
 about time! the price on these are alot better to the weekend racer.
[Reply]
  • + 17
 still a little bit expensive. but not too much more than its competitors
  • + 47
 Yeah, But why the hell not make the aluminum one in the first place? I doubt anyone cares about 150 gs for 1,000 more...And I still say it's a bit pricey. I'll stick to the used dorados for 300 off the buysell. Great fork though, and awesome to see inverted designs coming back! They've always felt smoother. Keeps the oil on the stanchions where it belongs. And for weakness issues, if invereted is good enough for a 950 KTM enduro/dual sport bike, it's good enough for me.
  • + 9
 Nice to see inverted coming back, Will stick to my shivers thoughSmile
  • + 13
 1000$ less and the only difference is 150 grams...
  • + 12
 "still a little bit expensive. but not too much more than its competitors"
But the competitors dont offer a 2 year service and a badass gun case for it. And they feel better IMHO Smile
  • - 1
 It's like $100 more than the boxxers, 888, 40s. Basically at par when you are talking about the 1000 to 2000 range.
Chart for all top forks here
  • + 9
 Radek, Yes that is true, But 888s always end up around 900-1200 after the first month. The dorados are still staying up at their 2800 price tag...If you want the best, you gotta pay for it though I supose!
  • + 4
 The exotic top of the line stuff usually stays in price due to limited supply and lower demand. This fork is meant to compete in the same market as the other top forks, so you can bet that the pricing will be just as competitive. That means usually adjusted from the msrp.
  • + 1
 It would be better if they had better customer support, they are hard to make contact with and take much too long and are less dependable than marzocchi, fox etc.
  • + 3
 Dorados are so cool!!! hum, the AL is still lighter than the 40s!
  • + 1
 nice price. i personally would choose dorado than boxxer or 40s.
  • + 4
 if you actually read into it the bigger difference is the carbons are supposed to have better engineered stiffness / flex for racing. not entirely sure if thats worth it, but at least you guys can stop saying your paying 1000$ for 100grams because thats not at all the case.
  • + 2
 I agree, carbon is alot lighter, so likely its very thick on the dorados, and allow the carbon forks to be much stronger and stiffer, yet still stay light. Besides, 150grams is meaningful to the worldcup racers, but maybe not the average joe.
  • + 0
 Suicidedownhiller, your right about the 950KTM, But all actual motocross bikes run inverted and even a lot of trail dirtbikes. The only ones that run regular forks are the cheaper, beginner bikes.
  • + 2
 There are some...most...manitou forks I would not trust, as I have broken them! But I have never seen a problem with dorados... Mcsession, Yeah I know, I just chose the 950 as an example, because it's one of the heavier, more powerful dirtdbikes.
  • + 0
 wow it costs a dollar each gramm
  • + 2
 Close its more than 5 dollars to save a gram.
  • + 1
 not only does it cost 1000 bucks to drop 100 grams, but the carbon still weighs more than the boxxer, so if you are going for the inverted fork its not for weight dropage, looks to me like manitou is wasting their time making the carbon fork
[Reply]
  • + 1
 They did sell out of the carbons this year, someones buying them... but for 200 grams I'd go with the $1759 aluminium version.
[Reply]
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