Prototype Magura eLECT Rear Shock - Taipei Show 2014

Mar 5, 2014 at 15:39
Mar 5, 2014
by Mike Kazimer  
 
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The eLECT's handlebar mounted wireless remote.

Early last summer Magura launched their eLECT compression damper, a battery powered unit designed for their suspension forks that uses 3D acceleration sensors to either increase or decrease the damping depending on the angle of the terrain. When the bike is angled uphill, the sensors communicate with a small motor and close the damping ports, firming up the suspension, and when the bike points downhill the same motor opens up the ports to allow the fork to use all of its travel. The unit also has the ability to detect when a bike is free falling, allowing it to open up a previously locked out fork in order to absorb the impact of landing.

Now Magura is working on bringing those same principles to rear suspension, displaying a prototype version with the electronics contained in a small unit mounted on top of the shock, similar to where the reservoir would be on a piggyback style air shock. Like the version already available for Magura's front forks, the rear unit will be able to communicate wirelessly with a handlebar mounted remote, where riders can choose to operate the shock manually if they wish, selecting between open or closed, or allow the sensors to automatically adjust the damping to suit the terrain. Because the shock is still being tested, battery life hasn't been confirmed, but Magura said they expected it to be comparable with the fork unit, running between 40-60 hours before needing to be recharged via a USB cord. On the front fork, if the battery dies the fork resets to a fully open state, a feature we'd assume would also be implemented in the rear shock. The shock isn't expected to be available until the end of the year, and the first run will be for OEM manufacturers only, which means that it will initially only be available on complete bikes, not as a standalone aftermarket option.

Magura eLECT prototype

Magura's prototype eLECT equipped air sprung rear shock uses sensors to detect the terrain angle and adjust the damping accordingly.


www.magura.com
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150 Comments

  • + 279
 No more electronics please! I know some people will love it, but I just can't. To me, the beauty of bicycles is the fact that they are these stunning mechanical masterpieces that connect you with the ground/trail. It's just you and your bike, no fuel, no electricity, no wind. Everything is depending on the rider, his physique, his mindset, and his ability to maneuver this mechanical art-piece using only his body and nothing else. To me, electronics on bicycles kill that feeling, and it hurts me. I don't hope it catches on. Again, these are just my two cents. Other people might have different opinions, and that's ok, I just needed to get this off my chest.
  • - 18
 To me bicycling is the act of using only your power to move yourself on two wheels over said terrain. If technology comes around so you can be more efficient, I will accept it with open arms.
  • + 52
 most of us here run dual crown forks with 8" of travel and the same goes to the rear. We spend thousands of dollars buying some of the most advanced suspension tech on the planet. with HS & LS compression and even HS & LS rebound. We ride and trust carbon fiber bikes on the most technical race courses in the world. That would have been a dream only a few years ago. We use apps like strava to make biking social. Hell we will even spend 200$ on a headset that will change the degree of our fork by 1. I dont see anything wrong with more tech. If you actualy care about bikes loosing there simplicity you should ride a steel single speed hardtail with an elastometer suspension fork. Bikes are way beyond simple already.
  • + 8
 @Waterwater,

I think there is a difference between overdone electronics, a concept that is so complex and wayyy over the top it's just pointless, VS. simple electronic-assistance technology, something that keeps things minimalistic while increasing efficiency and retain the bare human element. We definitely have been seeing a lot of crazy electronics, but I think something like this is pretty simple to begin with. Just firms up or opens up the shock's ports depending on attack angle and accelerometers.

Imo, would help because it can be perfect for trails that have tons of varying terrain, instead of just sticking with one preset for the shock or getting off bike for each section and dialing it in, can have a shock that just simply reads the inputs and adjusts according, which in my books, could be a very useful and nice feature given the read-outs and adjustments are accurate.
  • - 6
 Most advanced suspension tech? Hardly.
  • + 7
 Water is correct. I confirm. There is the scientific comparison in which bicyclist needs the less energy to move own mass, among all moving animals, machines etc. Electronics needs electric power. Why should one spoil this masterpiece of mechanics by adding electric devices that make the bike less efficient overall?
  • + 16
 I don't think its the technology per say. Having electronic parts adds a whole other aspect to the bike, there is outside power, and I don't like that. Keep advancing bike parts by all means, but keep electronics and outside power out of the equation.
  • + 1
 besides some crazy stupid F1 suspension there is almost nothing out there that is significantly better then a fox 40 or a Emerald. The idea of speed controlled dampening, bladder dampers, fully tuneable shims, and not to mention the fact that you can tune every aspect of the suspension with 2 fingers makes it more advanced then 99% of mass produced suspension
  • + 1
 electronic for F1 .. lol
  • + 18
 I never said anything about minimalism. I am all for progression and development, but not in this direction. I even approve of new wheelsizes. Again, I like how mountain biking is up to the rider and the bike, nothing else. It makes riding much more personal.
As I said, some people will appreciate the development in technology that is electronic suspension (or any other bike component), but to me it takes away some of the magic of a mountainbike. It makes bikes&riders dependent on this outside power, which takes away some of the freedom associated with just swinging your leg over a bike and going on great adventures. Biking takes me away from the world, and into this magical place where it is just me, my bike, the trail, and nothing else. The thought of having to check my battery capacity on a long ride almost makes me cringe, as it will be a constant reminder that escaping is impossible. Disagree with me all you want, but I won't have anything electric on my bike unless I absolutely have to.
  • + 5
 It's funny how they show the handlebar with nothing else on it. Can you imagine that remote plus a shifter plus a brake lever, gunna have to go with the 32" bar I guess!
  • - 6
 erm F1 suspension is actually pretty simple. They are on extremely smooth surface all the time to the point where there are bottoming out cars on street circuits. Its just a simple push or pull rod suspension with extremely stiff springs and a minimal damper.
  • + 4
 Water is correct again. I confirm. Except for the wheelsizes. Let he be forgiven.
  • + 2
 I can see the potential advantages for racers or people who want the best and most adjustable kit. At the moment I'd like to keep my bike simple and purely mechanical but in the future... who knows. As long as we get to keep the option of standard mechanical shocks this technology won't harm anybody.
  • + 9
 @georgy291 The F1 suspension involves an onboard computer correcting milion times per second every parameter of each suspended wheel in order to keep the car horisontal all the time. It's partially because it is so low over the track and there is still air flow underneath sucking it down up to 2 times the weight. If the tiny space between the floor and track is closed there is no air flow and no downforce.
  • + 8
 @jedrzeja finally someone who knows what they are talking about
  • + 5
 I'm going to keep my opinion on electronic-based bicycle technology fairly short; if it improves the riding experience without causing any perceived compromise (that is where personal preference comes in), then why not? (road bike story) I wasn't the biggest believer in Di2 when I first saw the technology come out, but after I got to build & play with a bunch of Di2 bikes & ride one of my co-workers I changed my mind partly. The ergonomics are better, the shifting is just awesome even under load & is even across all gears, braking in the drops is easier, yadda yadda. I would use it on a race bike since I'm looking purely for performance, but I would still opt for mechanical if it were my training/fun bike because it's cheaper, simpler & I still prefer the feel of throwing my shifter through the gears. My point is that until you get to try the technology you should reserve polarizing & absolute judgements.


P.S. Just a thought on the "I don't want to rely on a battery" crowd: without giving too much away, there may soon no longer be a need for a battery that needs to be charged, the technologies are out there they just need to be refined & applied properly. Would your opinion on electronic bike components change if you didn't have to worry about charging them or them dying?
  • + 2
 Yes, it would change my opinion on electrics if I didn't need to worry about charging. I agree on the racing part, I say go for it. I'm talking from a privateer racers/everyday riders standpoint, and I think I've made my point about electronics in those applications. I will try electric suspension if I ever get the chance, but as of now, I won't buy it for myself, and I don't think that opinion will ever change. It might be a sort of false romanticism, this idea of a mechanical instrument controlled by me, and only me, but I like it. A lot. If people want to run electric suspension, let them. I don't hope it causes some industry shift, where attention is taken away from the mechanical aspect of suspension/shifting and focused on the electric. It might be because of my point of view, but that would slightly break my heart. Industry, please don't.
  • + 0
 water^4: Agreed. Electronics takes the "fun" out of things. It also puts into darkness the riders personal and physical ability. When electronics become to advanced, all of a sudden everyone is good and the aids tend to easy out the drivers/riders errors.

Thats why I like kart racing. Purest form of racing. Its you, a metal chassis, engine, and ur hands. Thats it.
  • + 5
 You got 'er Water!!!! The simplicity of the bicycle is what makes it so hard for all the money grubbers to keep on because there's only so many ways you can reinvent the same old thing. Adding a bunch of gimmicky battery junk is like making the wheel size 5.5% larger or axles 25% smaller. Some dumb f*cking thing to sell to dumb f*cking people. If I'm gonna have a bunch of f*cking batteries turning motors all over my bike there damn well better be one spinning my back wheel. Say'n?
  • + 4
 Not to burst anyone's bubble about F1, but active suspension was banned a few years ago. The only settings now are done before qualifying but they do still have an on board sway bar adjustment.

As for a bike application, in auto mode, I've always wondered if it changes settings so quickly, would it recognize if you were pulling up to bump jump something or manual to bump jump. Think the shock will say, "We're going uphill" and lock out the rear. There's always a manual mode, but that defeats the purpose. They are being used on OEM's first, if it's the next best thing to cold beer, they could be on most cool bikes the next few years. RS and Fox having been working on them, so it could happen.
  • + 1
 my favorite part about this is really the wireless handlebar adjustment. I have doubts on the adequacy of the auto adjusting. What I would really like to see is a pre set feature where you can choose between various pre made setups. Hill climb, flat , technical, descent, etc. I think that is truly where the technology should be heading.

Unless the shock can actually read the terrain ahead, like some high end cars with their lasers and cameras and computers I dont see the auto adjust being anywhere near perfect, and to create a system like that for a bicycle, that can read a bike trail...Many many years away from being possible/affordable.
  • - 1
 Electric this, electric that, just knock it off!
  • + 1
 I'm all for the conservation of mechanical biking, but let me ask you this... How many of you leave your iPhones behind when going for a ride?...thats what I thought.
  • + 1
 Why the worry. Supply will stop once demand stops.
  • + 1
 ^ haha me too...
or how many bikers have sensors, gps mounts, hid lights, gopros, etc
just something to consider. There are a lot of gadgets out there. I find no issue with them, but if im gonna have one it better not take away from the riding experience. How many ways are there control your suspension damping manually? I dont see any aspect of biking to be lost in this technology. if its reliable, not distracting and doesnt make me bankrupt, then it just might be a wonderful option
  • + 2
 Exactly! The beauty of the engineering is that nothing is there to prevent the rider from hanging all of the control over anything on the bike right under him or her. Keep electronics out of the mix. The only people i see this appealing to is the riders who aren't really committed to the raw excitement and fun, but want a new toy to gadget out and ride down the street two times, and leave it on the garage
  • + 3
 Sorry Magura, looks like the second line of electronic dampers never to be used
  • + 0
 I'd like to see where this brings us in about 10 years from now... When the system has been adjusted to almost perfection and your bike sets up the suspension by itself when you hit a different kind of trail. No more idiotic knob spinning, no more annoying click-counting, just riding! = MORE FUN!

When dropper posts saw the day, people were complaining about the weight... And when hydraulic actuation was involved, people were complaining about bleeding it... Yet MANY riders use them now. Why? Because they make your ride more fun!

People really need to stop complaining about the electronic hype. When they don't replace your legs with an engine, what's the fuzz all about? Are you going to buy an unsafe 20yo car without airbags, brake assistance etc, because it's all mechanical? Well go ahead... I'm sure it's "better".
  • + 3
 Personally, i like being able to atty my own to my exact preference, programming free. And when the battery dies, then what? There's no manual override. No thanks. Magura, don't make anti lock brakes and change the way i skid too...
  • + 0
 I will gladly accept electronics on my bike if it will improve the function. Electrically controlled dropper post for example. The advantages are so blatant. As a marathon or xc racer I'd be really interested in electronically controlled suspension as well. Me as not being a racer is not... www.pinkbike.com/news/ks-electronic-wireless-dropper-post-first-look.html
  • + 2
 thats a lot of crap for a switch I would never use
  • + 1
 What if you could rig up a small flexible solar panel to power the system? Also, this is not new tech... Noleen did this back in the 90's, and then Cannondale did it too, just without the angle accelerometer. What about lights? Do you also feel they are bad for requiring batteries? I would love to see how well you would do riding a technical trail in the woods in the dark! Smile Electronics are everywhere, do you ride with a cell phone/GPS/MP3 player? What about Go-Pro?

Give me a break! Smile
  • + 0
 There is a difference between an electronic gadget like a GoPro or a GPS and something which your entire ride is dependent upon, like electronic suspension. That argument is pretty invalid. Solar panels etc. won't change my view on electronic bicycle components, and I think I have made my point several posts ago.
  • + 1
 GoPro GPS, headlight, phone, mp3 player or whichever device in use in biking It's only additional weight for other purposes. Bike performs without it as well, or even better. Electronic suspension is integral part of machine, and no power means no performance.

@whatyousaid A mobile phone is emergency device.
  • + 1
 I couldn't agree more with you, but I see a big difference between electronic controls that enhance reliability, and electronic devices that automatically set the bike without rider intervention (and perhaps not even noticing it). I think the main difference depends on rider activation, not on battery operation.
[Reply]
  • + 42
 Man our community is a sack of sobs. "650B is not innovation, give us innovation"......"Fox RAD is not innovation, why don't they showcase Suntour or Magura suspension"........."Prototype Magura eLECT Rear Shock, OH FACK THIS IS INNOVATION KILL IT WITH FIRE". I think I have summed things up enough.
  • + 6
 Pretty much. There's always something to complain about apparently.
  • + 5
 The reality is, the 26" wheeled do it all bike already exists in many forms, its be done and re-done, refined to the point of excellence and component manufacturers are so good at what they do components last for over a decade now so your bike will run flawlessly for years-onward....... all new innovation is now pointing in new directions because Brands can't just keep offering the same thing riders already have on their bike that still works fine, but the whiners still want new products and bikes that are the exact same as they already have, too blinded by consumerism and an addictive-dependence on constant 'new year model' marketing to realise the bike they currently have is doing just fine and will continue to do so for another 5+ years - they want innovation but don't need it as they already have it.....

- "I hate 650b, someone bring out a new 26" bike!" - you already have one!...
- "electronic suspension sux can't someone bring out something the exact same as I already have!?"....
- "Enduro specific is laaame, I want downhill products!"... you already have a downhill bike for f@cks sake, Brands can't sell you what you already have!

If you don't like the new products being pushed, don't buy them, just stick with your current bike as it will last another 5 years or more!

...aaand rant over!
  • + 2
 beep bop boop
[Reply]
  • + 15
 *Uses shock in Scotland... survives 73 seconds
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  • + 9
 All this electric stuff is really cool, but I think I'll stick with my standard suspension parts and bikes that should always work. And these probably won't come down to my price range for a long time anyways. Nice to see some failsafe stuff worked in there though!
[Reply]
  • + 7
 I dont understand where peoples electronics is unreliable argument comes from. Electronics is far far more reliable than anything mechanical. There is no moving parts, there is nothing to ware out or age with time. We all moan about servicing our suspension and our gear cables wearing out, but when was the last time you took your TV for a service. All they are doing here is replacing a cable that gets full of crap and needs replacing and replacing it with wireless link, and whilst your at it add some optional intelligence to it to. Just because you dont understand it, doesnt make it instantly crap and avoid etc. I dont think I understand very much of whats in my fork any more either.
  • + 1
 I completely agree that the electronic tech is reliable, and this kind of technology and innovation is great to have on the market. I could be wrong, but I don't think that the problem is that people have is they don't understand it. For me, part of biking has always been that mechanical feeling. I just enjoy having cables gears and adjusting everything myself. Don't get me wrong, this kind of tech is amazing and i'm sure people would love it, but then there's people who just enjoy the mechanics of bikes. Oh and I actually had to take my piece of crap TV in a few weeks ago to get fixed.
  • + 1
 people dont like it because batteries
  • + 1
 Haha can't wait for time when I drive 1/2 hour to trailhead just to find that I forgot to charge batteries.... you will find this beauty in bushes Smile
  • + 2
 they have a fall back that you can set your self with fingers like a normal shock
[Reply]
  • + 5
 I already have some things that adjust automatically to the terrain... my legs and arms... Only gripe I have is that top end bikes are getting past the 10k mark which is freaking ridiculous. I can't believe, whilst shopping for a new rig the other day, I looked at a $3700 price tag and thought 'That's pretty cheap'...
  • + 5
 I hear ya. I'm starting to save for something mid range. Came close to buying a brand new Spec Enduro Carbon Pro 3 years ago, it was on sale, down from $5400 to $3250... But my wife thought that was still too much. Kicking myself for not buying that because the new aluminum Evo is $3300 and the Carbon Expert is $6600. And yes I've pointed it out to my wife, "Man, I want this bike". My wife: "WHAT? It's $4200!! No way!" Me: "You know, I could have had a one with better parts for $3250..." Wife: "Yeah, should have listened to you".
  • + 6
 Ha, mate, if I wasn't married I'd have a 10k bike (or 2) for sure!
  • + 6
 The bit when you went wrong was when you considered her opinion about a mtb.
  • + 1
 Well, I took her to the shop to buy a bike for her, cuz she wanted to ride mtb with me. Well, her Myka disc now has slicks for road riding only, so you see where that went. I do like riding with her and at least she's riding. Anyway, salesman says "It's the last day of our sale, 40% off any high end bike". The conversation was slightly heated. If she wasn't there, I would have bought it... And paid $1600 for it Wink
  • + 1
 I'm new to the sport, and so are those I'm riding with. I spent $600 on a 2009 Sortie 1. It has everything I need to ride any trail that is not beyond my ability. The people I ride with are the same, brand new, their abilities are pretty limited. Yet... they made sure to get brand new "entry level" giants at $2800... and I'm seriously wondering how in the hell those bikes are going to allow them to have $1200 worth of fun more than I'm going to have when we ride together?

If you have the money... more power to you. But the more I learn about bikes and this sport, I just can't even figure out how my bike even pedals since it cost 1/8 of a popular bike from the current year.
  • + 3
 That's cool that you're new. Your Sortie 1 is still pretty current with the Knuckle box suspension. I'd say you got a very good deal, your bike was $1600 new. The answer to your question, almost everything on a more expensive bike is better some how, parts are more durable, weight, design, etc. The Carbon bike I mentioned above weighs 29.5lbs with 160mm of travel which is probably 3-4lbs less than yours. I won't get into the differences of those 2 bikes, cuz they are completely different in terms of use. But a lighter bike usually takes less effort to ride. If you ever get the chance to ride a new, $3000 bike on a trail, you'd feel it right away. On second thought.. Just ride yours, it'd save you thousands of dollars a year.. Haha.. Seriously..

I'm more in sticker shock today then you are. I started mtbing 23 years ago, back in the day $2800 got you a custom bike, custom paint, full XTR, a bike rack, a new dog, a keg of beer and pizza for 20 of your closest friends. I have only built frames up for the past 10 years, so even if I bought each part individually on sale, I was saving money spending $3250. It would have taken some serious money moving, saving, borrowing, to buy it, I don't have that kinda money laying around.

As for having more fun for the price, I've ridden about 30 bikes, owned 10 and loved 4 of them. Two of those bikes were entry level bikes. The design of a bike plays a bigger roll than the shiny stuff hanging off of it. 4 of the bikes, I hated, they were top of the line. Too flexy. One steered like a bathtub in a land slide. Broke the frame 2 times on another one. One just rode bad in a straight line.

At the end of the day, it's how much fun YOU have. I've seen guys on Huffy's high fiving after a ride. That's awesome..
[Reply]
  • + 3
 This is amazing Technology which is fantastic for a few riders who are into the latest technological fads on their bikes, but seriously, at this rate with all the new technology that controls functions of our bike soon the braking will be done for us with little eyes at the front of your bike and little '3D sensors' to detect the steepness of the terrain! This is going too far and we need to put a limit on technology before it rules our off-road weapons in the future.
[Reply]
  • + 3
 It's electronic in a vibrating wet dirty environment can anyone else see a problem here? Proper valving in current shocks do the same thing basically and will do it forever and not leave you broke when it needs fixing.
  • + 1
 Yes! mechanical stuff will wares out, rusts, requires reoiling and gets filled with crap and siezes. Electronics Dont ware out, aren't dust sensitive and can be sealed away from moisture.
  • + 2
 are you implying that there are no moving parts on this rear shock? lel
  • + 2
 Yes that's true but vibration and electronics don't go well together (even minimal vibration over time can cause damage) unless they are very well insulated and one good solid hit to the shock in a crash ?
  • + 4
 Skim reading posts when suddenly, "vibrating", "wet" and "dirty" appears lol
  • + 1
 Ha! Yeah if it's dry and you vibrate it somehow gets all wet and dirtyWink lol
  • + 1
 @jaron-g1 "electronic in a vibrating wet dirty environment can anyone else see a problem here?"

Nope. I see it everyday workin 24/7 since 2007 so no, I don't see any problem.
  • + 1
 Actually I work on aeronautical electronics have done since 95. and know very well the effects of these factors on circuitry and wiring especially if exposed to moisture from even condensation. I'm not saying it's a certain thing just a possibility and really there is something to be said about the K.I.S.S. theory. And simple fact is you can achieve these effects on damping in shocks mechanically just as efficiently as electrically as both are reactionary and not predictive adjustments.
  • + 1
 reactionary and not predictive adjustments. we are absolutely ok on this point.
  • + 1
 Yep I think a better system for damper control which also could use a Bluetooth system would be a magnetically adjusted fluid inside the shock less need for valve adjustments as viscosity of fluid changes the dampening leaving far less parts to be used or physically adjusted.
  • + 1
 But bigger battery in this case... It's already working on Corvette if I remember.
  • + 2
 Yep but battery technology will soon catch up with solar cell charging etc. Smile
[Reply]
  • + 3
 Not really for it but would be interesting to see how a magnetorheological fluid system like what is on corvettes would perform in XC/AM. Which appears to be what this shock is aimed towards.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 If you don't like the idea, don't buy it. Simple. People are saying "what if you are doing along expedition and the battery runs out?" or "How about if you forget to charge it and it dies at the top of a trail?" or "What if I crash and rip the wiring out?"... Simple answer is that this is not for you/ your an idiot who charges there phone everyday but not their bike's battery/ dont crash you fool... You do realise that there will be non-electronic options available still? I think its an awesome idea, especially coming from Motorcycling, where electronic aids can make a massive difference to the grin across your face. I've also got a Di2 road bike, which is brilliant and never had any issues with reliability or battery die-ing, due to the stupidity of forgetting to charge it. Personally, I wouldn't buy this product due to riding style/frequency, terrain ridden; not because I want to moan about tech I don't agree with or the fact that "Cycling is an art that makes my panties wet and my eyes teary, when ever I think about it". Simple.
  • + 2
 Good ideas mate! I see your point and makes sense! In 5 years this might be the norm, the beginning is here.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 First comment by water man is bang on. Get on with riding your bikes and spend the money you have feeding your kids. All this overpriced tech annoys me. Its a bike at the end of the day. Sometimes i have more fun on a muddy winter day on the old gt singlespeed than dragging a 6inch bike around muddy fields
[Reply]
  • + 1
 People who buy Specialized bikes will think this is sweet technology. Here's a secret...If you take your squishy parts to a proper suspension shop, you won't need a band-aid electronic or Brain system. What I take out of this technology is that Magura thinks its stuff is not very good and needs this to work properly.
  • + 4
 Exactly. The Spesh Brain was always a band-aid.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 So cool but so wrong at the same time! We are bikers and love simplicity in our products! Manual not automatic! Lever not button! Dial not sensor! Pedal not Cruse control. Its funny as much as I like this, I think its in the wrong direction for what a bike should be doing. And best of all what happens when the batteries run out or the computer malfunctions and you have no rebound or tons of rebound, ahahhahhahahhha Keep it simple and to the point! However at the same time I commend you Magura for taking this leap! Its ever coming and I need acceptance! RideOn!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Like it or not, the electronics are here to stay. If there wasn't a good reason to bring this to production, all of these companies wouldn't be doing it. They have done their research, they aren't stupid. You may not like it, but I guarantee there are lots of people out there who will buy it. We will be seeing the proliferation of electronics on high end bikes (of all types) sooner rather than later.

besides, most of you will be riding this shit at some point anyway...as soon as it is shown to improve 'performance' by the professionals.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Let us remember that we always have the option to not persue these technilogical advancements. But if there is something new out there that hasn't been done. These companies are going to do it because MTB is a multi-million dollar industry. Imo its pretty cool. That doesnt mean im going to go buy a carbon frame, with a brain shock and 650b's. Let us embrace the change. Were the tech era
[Reply]
  • + 1
 When can I pair my bike up to my iPhone/smartphone and control suspension setup, shifting speeds, and brake sensitivity? No Thanks!! I like my bikes to be highly engineered pieces of mechanical machinery thank you very much.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 This makes a lot of sense compared to cable actuated remotes and for people like me who forget about switching on and off pro pedal... Glad to still see external rebound tucked in there. As for everybody's comments on remotes vs buttons, it's very easy to have those buttons put into a lever configuration. Another perk of having electronic suspension/ dropper posts is that you could have one button for both. Put your shock into descend and your post auto drops.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I didn't want to like the demo Zesty I took out with the EI tech on it just thought it was a bit of a gimmick how could it be as good as they were making out? but It was fantastic worked really well rode to my local track on road nice firm ride hit the trails and wow it coped with every thing didn't feel like it let me down at all if any thing I was no where near as good as the bike and that's really the question I don't think I am really getting the most out of my bike now there is still performance left in the tech I have.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 ...So does this eLECT stuff basically do the same thing as an inertia-valve auto-lockout, like Specialized's BRAIN valve? If so, what's the advantage of electricity here? I can't see it being that much lighter, considering that the S-Works Epic WC is already sub-20 pounds. And I don't see how electrical systems would react any faster - sensors and inertia valves both need to take an impact to be triggered. One of the great appeals of the bicycle, for me, is its simple mechanical nature - no buzzy motors or twinkly lights, just straightforward, reliable performance, like your favorite pair of garden shears. Electricity has its place in lights and computers, but I don't think it needs to be anywhere else.
  • + 0
 this is basically a worse version of the brain shock. it seems like its intend to do the exact same thing, so why make it so its batteries can die on you?
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I see the benefit but whatever happened to just going for a blurb with your mates and having a laugh, the seriousness of recreational riding is getting a bit too much, we are only bike riders guys, check yourself before you wreck yourself. At the end of the day the industry tells us what we should be buying into and its a free world.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I do not want electronic stuff in my components because if it fails to work in the trail you cannot repair it but if its mechanical you can improvise something in your bike. This electronic stuff will make you get your bike to the local shop because you cannot repair it at home
  • + 0
 $ Cha-Ching $
We have a winner
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Merida invented something similar some long time ago. I mean a terrain response detector that changed suspension dynamically. It was mechanical though. There was a small ball blocking valves and whenever a bike came into a bump the ball moved shaken, which opened valves and softened suspension. This was a very simple mechanical idea. I think electronics is just an unncecessary shortcut. There can be simple mechanical detectors vulnerable to gravity working even better than this, because they would not need added energy. What if I want to use a shock like this going for a round world expedition? Flat battery and no performance.
  • + 1
 I guess you don't use a mobile phone abroad,
and spend 40-60 hours in one-go on you MTB???????
Instead of criticise come with a better idea.
[Reply]
  • + 3
 i hope to see tricycles at the next trade show. pinkbke would be wise to stay ahead of the curve and change their name to pinktrike, that is all.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 What happens when the trail rises during a fast descent? You could be compressed and riding up over some hefty terrain at high speed and then your shock and fork decide to lock up?
[Reply]
  • + 2
 Remote control this and that! Why dont they make a fully remote control mtb that will pedal itself up and go down. That way no more spending on E-parts.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 What I don't understand is why these new electronic devices aren't coming with tiny solar panels to assist with charging?! They have plenty of surface area on the remote and the component itself.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 What if the shock is mounted vertically, it will have to be 'reset' to that poistion? I cant imagine it can only be used on bikes with a horizontal shock mounting.
  • + 4
 I would expect the shock could be calibrated to the "resting" position in the bike
[Reply]
  • + 0
 I wish magura stopped this electronic nonsense and make a successor to their Wotan fork!!!! Something in the 160mm under 2kg range, and with 34-35mm stanchions... with the double arch design and their damper it could blow the Pike away...
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Yaaa..all lovely. Just DON't forget to recharge that battery before that EPIC day...boo ..not for me...electronics now days have way to short lifespan to be dependent.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 pretty sure for the money I will just reach down on my trail bike and flip a switch/lever

not a bad idea though keep on trying
[Reply]
  • + 3
 AHHHHH yes solutions to problems that do not exist.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 What's gonna happen when your going off the lip of a bigger jump? Will it lock up because the ground angle is going uphill?
[Reply]
  • + 3
 Like no fruit in beer no electronic on bike
[Reply]
  • + 1
 i NEED a battery on my bike, often in the winter months, have to check for battery capacity............. i mean all these shitty lights you have to keep charging!
[Reply]
  • + 3
 +1 for taking the time to use elegant looking bolts to mount the shock.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Pretty cool I think. I would probably always have it in manual mode and then it would be just like a remote lockout but without cables!
[Reply]
  • + 2
 oh boy now were gonna see IBM, AMD, Mac and oh god noooo Windows on bikes. NOT the $*&@'in windows, shite!.
[Reply]
  • - 1
 it sounds just like a right thing to do, I mean , why not if you can avoid complex mechanical sistems and make something simpler but.. I really don,t like electronics on my bike!!
  • + 1
 bike lights?
  • + 1
 I really don't ride at night
[Reply]
  • + 2
 They could have mounted it with some nicer bolts!
  • + 1
 Grade 8 hex bolts are this years hottest kit!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I will never, never, never miss a ride because my shock battery is not charged. Eff that!
[Reply]
  • + 2
 I REFUSE TO ALLOW ROBOTS INTO BIKING AAAARRRGHHH THE TAKEOVER IS HAPPENING
  • + 2
 'The humans are dead, the humans are dead. We poisoned their asses, with poisonous gases'.
  • + 1
 The beginning of Skynet.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Knowing my luck, I'd leave it on overnight and I'd realize it half way up the mountain. Does it default to full soft?
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I said it when they debuted the fork. " sorry guys I cant go for a ride. I forgot to plug in my shock."
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Welcome all user of Motorola Brick Mobile Phone. History Museum is on a different website.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Um...and what if it runs out of battery? Do have to plug it in and charge it like the shitty electric cars these days??
  • + 2
 how about bike lights? and electric cars are not shitty, hope will stop the US invading country's for oil!
  • + 1
 The United States awful foreign policy is not worth getting into lol. Electric cars are kind of considered shit, because they aren't up to the standard gasoline or diesel cars have set. There isn't access to power everywhere and it makes travel more difficult and a bigger ordeal when driving distances. Also, until electricity is cleanly generated even electric cars have a carbon footprint. Though electric cars are no doubt the future, they aren't up to standard yet. A 1915 Ford Model T beat the 2014 Tesla Model S from Detroit to Nikola Tesla's old Laboratory in NY; the Tesla had to stop for long periods of time to charge.
Butttt anywayyyy back to bikes. I'd stillll rather have a regular mechanical suspension (which probably is more environmentally friendly than the electronic one Razz ) Though I like the wireless adjustments!! No more reaching down for switching between shock tunes...that would be mighty handy!
[Reply]
  • + 2
 I ride my bike to get away from stuff like this
  • + 1
 Thank you for saying that......you're like me.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 Can't understand how they can do this but fox can't sort out ctd
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Total waste of innovation and research here in my opinion. Save this kind of crap for the E-Bikes!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Not EVER. And not even after that.
[Reply]
  • + 0
 Magura Gustav M. It taught me how to brake. No electronics is needed in bikes.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 have a break leaver and remote combo
[Reply]
  • + 1
 its mountain biking…. effing enough with the gadgetry!!!!
[Reply]
  • + 2
 just a tad not needed.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Umm dont Lapierre already have this technology ?
[Reply]
  • + 1
 So.. next step- an app to inflate and deinflate your tires!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 it gonna die!!!!!!!!!!!!!
[Reply]
  • + 0
 I just don't want something else that is a pain or expensive to fix when it breaks.
  • + 3
 so fixing a fox 40 is cheap?
[Reply]
  • + 1
 as long as it doesn't ask for you to "reload windows"
[Reply]
  • + 1
 2014 year of the electronic bike!
  • + 23
 And apparently also the year of shock bolts from your local hardware store
  • + 4
 for fast assembly/reassembly at bike shows. It's not even on a working bike.
  • + 2
 So funny you noticed that! Haha!
  • + 3
 any bike with this crap will never be a "working bike"
[Reply]
  • + 2
 No thanks Magura
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I still think the Brain on my stumpjumper is a better system.
[Reply]
  • - 1
 I say the most we need is a 3 position grip shift for rear shock comp settings like the guys at transition rigged up for one of their personal bikes.
[Reply]
  • + 0
 what if i dont know it catches another signal or something and locks out in mid air
[Reply]
  • + 0
 Have to say whilst I don't like eShocks, this one looks pretty good.
  • + 2
 Hang on the electric shifter, dropper post and brakes are on there way whether we want them or not...i am good without all that shit..
  • + 3
 I mean the shock itself aesthetically, rather than functionality. The remote looks terrible.
  • + 1
 You are correct....
[Reply]

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