Scott Voltage FR 20 Review

Jan 6, 2012
by Mike Levy  
 
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TESTED
SCOTT
VOLTAGE
FR 20
WORDS Mike Levy

A Summer spent in the bike park, sending that massive trail feature that you've been eyeing up for ages, or banging out shuttle laps with friends are all things that are on Scott's Voltage FR 20's to-do list. The reasonably priced FR 20 - it retails for $2399 USD - makes use of a component spec that focuses more on out-and-out reliability over saving grams, which should put it on the radar of any rider who needs a solid machine that retails for less than many bare frames sell for. Scott didn't just want to assemble an affordable bike though, but also one that could be configured to handle a variety of terrain. Its rear travel can be set at either 160 or 180mm (or even 130mm if you swap the shock and forward mount ), and three different dropout options let you alter the bike's chain stay length to suit either slow or fast (or alternately, small or massive) trails.

Scott Voltage. Photo by Brad Walton

Scott Voltage FR 20 Details
• Purpose: freeride/bike park
• Rear wheel travel: 160 - 180mm
• Adjustable geometry
• Full length 1.5'' head tube
• ISCG-05 chain guide tabs
• 135mm thru-axle or QR compatible dropouts
• RockShox Domain R Dual Crown fork
• 65° head angle, 348mm (13.7'') BB height
• Ultra short 365mm (14.4'') seat tube
• MSRP: $2399 USD


Frame Details
While a large amount of adjustability has been built into the Voltage frame, it actually employs a simple - but proven - single pivot and linkage-activated suspension layout. Scott didn't try to reinvent mountain bike suspension with the Voltage, but they certainly have put some effort into designing a robust rear end that looks to be ready for anything. Large diameter tubing, along with clevis type pivots employed at both ends of the seat stays, show that the bike should be ready for some serious abuse. It's all held together with anodized aluminum hardware. As you'd expect, sealed bearings are present at every pivot.

Scott Voltage. Photo by Brad Walton
  The bike's top tube flares out drastically just behind the head tube (left), giving it a unique, cobra-esque appearance. The rear end accepts both 135mm wide thru-axle and QR rear wheels by swapping out the bolt-on dropouts.

The FR 20's frame is the very same as found on the top tier $3699 USD Voltage FR 10, making use of extensive hydroforming to construct some very unique tube shapes. The bike's top tube flares out just aft of the head tube and reminds us of the head of an angered cobra before tapering down to where it joins the very short seat tube. The bike's low stand over height is impressive - its seat tube is just 365mm (14.4'') long on both the short and the long frame size (tested here) - giving it the appearance of a stubby dirt jump frame. This should make it easier to throw certain tricks or make a quick exit if things go awry on a jump.

The rear end of the FR 20 is flexible in a good way: its 135mm wide IDS (Interchangeable Dropout System) allows you to choose from a quick release, standard thru-axle, or Maxle system, making it possible to run a variety of different wheels if need be. The arrangement also allows you to alter the bike's chain stay length to be either 10mm shorter or 10mm longer than the standard 425mm (16.7'') length, with the shorter 16.3'' option sounding great for tight jumps or slower trails, and the 17.1'' length making sense if you spend your days on the bike park.

Scott Voltage. Photo by Brad Walton
  The mid range Voltage comes spec'd with Fox's Van R shock, an easy to understand damper - it only asks that you set your spring rate and rebound speed - that doesn't require a crash course in knob turning to get the most from.

Component Spec
Deciding the spec on a sub-$2500 freeride bike can't be an easy task, but Scott has done an admirable job of it. You won't find any carbon fiber, 10 speed cassettes, or boutique parts here - the FR 20 is all about real world function. The Fox Van R shock out back is paired up with RockShox's affordable, 200mm travel Domain R fork. While the Domain doesn't get the exposure that the pricier BoXXer receives, the steel stanchioned Domain looks to be a good option for those who value reliability and money saved over light weight and extra dials to turn. This makes the FR 20 the only Voltage to utilize a dual crown fork, a fact to keep in mind if you're a heavier rider or plan on racing.

Specifications
Release Date 2012
Price $2399
Travel 160-180
Rear Shock Fox VAN R
Fork RockShox Domain R
Headset FSA Orbit E 1.5R
Cassette Sram PG-950, 11-28 9speed
Crankarms Truvativ Hussefelt 1.0, 165mm w/ 36t ring
Chainguide E.thirteen LS-1 w/ taco (ISCG 05)
Bottom Bracket Truvativ Howitzer XR, 73mm shell
Pedals Wellgo B102U SCT, replaceable pins
Chain Shimano CN-HG53
Rear Derailleur Sram X.7, short cae
Shifter Pods Sram X5 trigger, rear only
Handlebar Scott Pilot FR 1 Pro, 20mm rise
Stem Truvativ Hussefelt, 40mm
Brakes Avid Elixir 5 Disc, 200mm rotors
Hubs Scott Comp 20mm, Scott DHL-135 12mm thru axle
Spokes DT Swiss Champion black 2.0mm
Rim Alex FR 32
Tires Schwalbe Big Betty DH 2.4
Seat Scott Voltage FR
Seatpost Scott DJ zero offset, 31.6mm

Smartly chosen components include the bike's mixed X5 and X7 9 speed drivetrain, likely putting a smile on the face of any prospective FR 20 buyers who have yet to hop aboard the 10 speed train, along with 165mm long Hussefelt cranks. e.13's steel backed LS-1 guide, complete with protective taco, takes care of the chain keeping duties. Scott has also bolted up a proper direct mount stem and 750mm wide bar, along with meaty 2.4'' wide, dual ply Schwalbe Big Betty tires, making the FR 20 ready to rock without requiring any immediate upgrades. There is no reason that the red and white Scott can't be taken straight out of the box and onto the hill, not something that can be said about all of the competition.



Riding the Voltage FR 20

The FR 20's cockpit feels a touch shorter than what you'd find on many downhill bikes, with a horizontal top tube length of 582mm for our 'long' sized bike. I wouldn't go so far as to say that it is cramped for my 5'10" frame, although lankier riders might find themselves wishing for a bit more room for their knees and arms (this is the largest of the two sizes). Having said that, the short feel makes complete sense when you consider that the FR 20 has been designed to be a big travel play bike. Throwing a leg over the top of the bike's incredibly low top tube reveals an immense amount of stand over clearance, a layout the Scott has employed for the very same reason. It is so low, in fact, that it makes other 180mm travel bikes feel as if they are on stilts - short shredders rejoice!

Scott Voltage. Photo by Brad Walton
  Far from being a pure freeride bike, the Voltage can more than hold its own on any downhill trail.

Handling
With 180mm of rear wheel travel available and a full 200mm of front via the dual crown RockShox Domain R, it should come as no surprise that the red and white Voltage can gobble up some seriously challenging terrain. The bike is incredibly stout feeling, likely thanks to its clevis suspension pivots and large diameter tubing, and tracks like it's on rails through the chunder and rough corners. There are very few rigs out there that are flexy enough to feel like it's hindering the bike's performance, but the FR 20 is surely at the opposite end of the spectrum - the entire bike is on the same plane regardless of how hard you square up, even on the most off camber of off camber sections. The Voltage isn't a downhill race bike and it doesn't pretend to be, but its sturdy character makes for a bike that can be ridden hard enough to trouble true DH machines on certain trails. This is admirable when considering that both the front and rear suspension units cost quite a bit less than what you'd find on a purpose built DH thoroughbred. Unlike many long travel bikes in this price category, Scott doesn't spec the FR 20 with flimsy single ply rubber, but rather a set of dual ply tires in the form of Schwalbe's Big Betty tires. They not only grip well, but we also didn't suffer a single flat.

A 65° head angle makes for an easy to ride bike in the steeps, while the short front seemed to make it easy to weight the front tire for hard cornering. The bike had a snappy sensation to it as long as the trail was pointing down, with its relatively short wheelbase giving it a compact feel that didn't mind being thrown from berm to berm, or getting the front end up for a long manual. It didn't take much effort to have the FR 20 sideways enough to bring a smile to our face, a trait that is a surefire sign of a fun bike.

When the ground begins to level out is when you'll find yourself at a disadvantage, with the FR 20 just not feeling as motivated out of corners and on the flats relative to other similar travel bikes. It isn't the bike's weight - it comes in at just under 40lbs, or an overly active rear end - the suspension was firm and well behaved, but the Voltage was much happier to be allowed to carry speed out of sections as opposed to having to earn it after them. A very supple fork and short top tube didn't exactly have us sprinting with the spirit of Carl Lewis either.

Scott Voltage. Photo by Brad Walton
  The FR 20 tracks well thanks to an immensely stiff rear end sticky Schwalbe rubber.

Suspension Action
The FR 20's RockShox Domain Dual Crown R fork is matched well to the bike's intentions. The burly, steel stanchioned slider is coil sprung and incredibly smooth and active, if a bit portly when compared to more expensive choices. While we'd go so far as to say that our Domain R was more active than those same pricier forks, we could also feel that its damping isn't as sophisticated when we pushed it hard, with a tendency for it to gobble up too much travel or respond unexpectedly. Adding some oil volume to the spring side is an easy way to make the Domain more progressive, and something that we'd recommend to any FR 20 rider who is either going large or large themselves.

The rear end's action impressed us, with a firm stroke (for 180mm of travel) that stayed composed over both fast, rough terrain and on large hits. It is that last point, how it handles itself on heavy landings, that is essential for a bike like the FR 20 to excel in its intended environment. Riders who session drops and jumps, the FR 20's target audience, will be pleased to find that the bike resists blowing through its rear wheel travel, even when thrown off of tall structures with poor landings. We didn't feel the need to go up in spring rate on the Fox shock, something that would have compromised the bike's performance on the trail. As it sits, the FR 20 strikes a good balance between taming trails at speed and being able to handle itself when sending something large.

We spent the large majority of the time riding the bike in its 180mm travel setting, largely due to the Domain fork's unadjustable travel/ride height. The bike felt a touch awkward when set to the lesser 160mm rear travel position, although that would likely be an entirely different story if it was equipped with an adjustable travel fork that could be set up to match the rear of the bike. We can't fault Scott too much here, though, because speccing such a fork would put the FR 20 very much above its reasonable asking price, but FR 20 owners shouldn't expect to run the rear of the bike in the shorter setting without having to swap to a different fork for best results. The bike can also be setup with 130mm of rear wheel travel, but the likelihood of many riders doing this is slim given that it requires a shorter stroke shock.

Scott Voltage. Photo by Brad Walton
  The rear suspension ate up the hard hits, just as you'd expect from a true freeride bike, but it also polished off smaller trail chatter quite well.

What about those parts?

• E.thirteen's LS-1 may use a steel back plate in order to keep cost down, but the important parts - the upper slider and lower roller - are both the same as found on the more expensive version. The guide was trouble free during our time on the bike, never once dropping a chain or clogging up.

• Schwalbe has come on strong over the last few seasons and the FR 20's Big Betty DH tires show well. The 2.4" wide rubber was very predictable, and despite having read negative feedback on them when they are used in the muck, we have to disagree - they offered a great feel when things got slimy. No, they are not a mud specific tire, but they seemed to hold onto wet roots and saturated dirt at least as well, if not better, than any other all condition choice. Scott also went to the trouble of using different compounds for the front and rear tires, with Schwalbe's soft Vertstar up front and the longer wearing Triple Nano Compound out back.

• Scott's decision to spec the FR 20 with a 9 speed drivetrain was likely a smart one given the bike's intention as a freeride bike - it's going to see some abuse. The X7 rear derailleur did everything that we asked of it, and while the X5 trigger looks lower quality than an X7 unit (as well as not being MatchMaker compatible), it also works just fine.

• The bike's Avid Elixir 5 brakes, complete with 200mm rotors, could be a bit noisy in the wet, but offered great power and feel with less dials to break off when the bike goes flying after a stunt gone wrong.



Pinkbike's take:
bigquotesDon't let the Voltage's $2399 USD price tag fool you, the red and white bike is ready for serious action right out off the showroom floor, be it smashing out laps at the local bike park or filming senders with your friends. While it will take a fork swap to properly utilize the bike's optional 160mm travel setting, the performance in the longer travel option had us forgetting that we weren't on a full blown downhill rig. The FR 20 will make a great bike for the rider that simply likes to go hard and big. - Mike levy


www.scott-sports.com
Photos by Brad Walton

199 Comments

  • + 45
 This bike is unbelievably fun! i love it to death! it fell out of the back of a truck because the tail gate fell down while we were heading up to a local trail going about 20 mph or so, and the bike is still working great and no damage except a scratch on the end of the lock on grips. amazing bike and would recommend it!
  • + 22
 I road in Colorado this year and i demoed three bikes. I was really looking forward to the Specialized SX trail and I was sadly disappointed. I road a Trek Scratch which I enjoyed but the Voltage was by far the best one. It handled like a dream. I'm "finna" get one when I'm not broke.
  • + 51
 Damn reviews... Each one I read makes me want one of these things more and more!
  • + 6
 Seems like a great deal. Great photos. Thorough review, needs proof reading tho
  • - 31
 I thought all u youngen's hated single pivots. dont they all look like bottle rockets or 'crappy' Kona's??? lol nice frame!!!
  • - 50
 that thur aint no single pivot.
  • + 20
 You wanna know why Scott rocks? They ride well, they look good, they are spec'd well, and their frame quality sets a standard that none can compete with.
  • + 16
 @ collin7, first line of the frame details "Voltage frame, it actually employs a simple - but proven - single pivot and linkage-activated suspension layout" ....
  • - 27
 aww come on! Only reason why i clicked on the article was so i could see a vid. Frown
  • + 11
 D-Owen...I agree except, ALL companies can compete with Scott. But it seems that most companies just choose to keep prices high and take advantage of our MTBing addictions...
  • + 2
 Every little bit is thought out, it's all in the details.
  • - 5
 Colin it is a single pivot with link activated shock , just that the link is the seat stay.
  • + 1
 I own a 2010 scott voltage fr 20. its sad that scott's prices for the `11 and `12 voltages went up a bit ( i paid 1650 euros for my `10). the only thing that bugs me about it is that they did not spec it with a traveladjustable domain 302 (or 31Cool which would maybe have risen the price by about 50 bucks, cause now I'm thinking about getting a new fork...
  • + 1
 The decal layout of the frame is never what you get when you buy the bike, i have the 2011 model and the official decal layout is completely different to mine
  • - 1
 why don't they use fox 36 180mm forks instead of domains? would make more sense i think
  • + 6
 the fox36 is on the top bike

take a look at my one: www.pinkbike.com/photo/7236445
  • + 5
 Johnny the Domain is a low end for so they can sell the bike at a lower overall cost, the fox is baller and would put the price way up. upgrade that domain when yer ready to plunk down some cash, smart move really
  • + 1
 yer i see your point, but even so why not use the single crown domains?
  • + 2
 why not use the dual crowns?
  • + 1
 to save weight, but i suppose the dual crowns have a stronger set up on the headtube and are more sturdy though.. but thats just my personal preferrence to go with single crowns if they are available
  • + 2
 Johnny, I believe they make a Voltage FR30 with a Domain single crown with an even cheaper build spec. Check out Scott's website if you're interested.
  • + 10
 Wait?! You judge your bikes by their ability to handle falling off the back end of trucks?
  • + 2
 i cracked my voltage today -_-
  • + 2
 gutted, i feel for you man
  • - 4
 @aaah... aaahhh, how did I miss that? Haha, saw the pivot on the rear and jumped to conclusions. But a linkage activated single pivot is still different than a simple single pivot!
  • + 5
 well no, because it's still a single pivot
  • + 1
 i love my single pivot morewood, besides the fact that its terrible at pedaling on flat
[Reply]
  • + 19
 Ugh, more companies would make bikes focused at taller riders. I struggle to find a bike that fits my 6'5 frame comfertably
  • + 7
 Im suprised on how many frames I should go with a large and Im only 5 11. DH/FR bikes got a bit too short lately.
  • + 2
 I'm 6'2 and I ride a medium commencal supreme dh v3 try the large out it might work for you
  • + 1
 I found my last giant [small] 16" was nice and im 6.2", my medium spesh is perfect though. So im thinking a large spesh, giant or commencal would fit you bang on.
And i really wanna voltage lol... i can allways dream
  • + 1
 specialized's full suspension range is good for tall people a xl is far to big for me and im 6 ft 3
  • + 2
 Ya being tall doesn't mean you should ride a huge bike. Think about handling and tech riding and you want the smallest bike possible. My friend gideon is 6'2 and rides a small dh and ht, and he has serious skills. We all started out thinking big frames are better but that a misconception. It doesn't matter how the bike fits you in showroom, go blast some jumps and see how it really fit. Guarantee that huge top tube going to make bike less snappy and responsive regardless of your height. Just look at the wheel base, that the only measurement that counts. If you sitting down too much than its an easy fix, stand up and you ride better immediately.
  • + 1
 just remember to try them all out instead of ordering online, they dont all feel he same trust me I rode a v10 and despised it immediately but I like the commencal because its nimble but has more of a racy feel then a wilson, its all down to personal preference, and btw the cove shocker in large seems pretty big to
  • + 1
 It depends on the terrain and how you like to ride. If you ride very technical trails, a smaller, more nimble bike is a good idea... If you want to ride rugged shit really really fast, a longer bike will be more stable thus possibly more useful to you. It's not because your smaller bike feels good on local trails that it will work fine for a guy who lives 3000km away.
  • - 5
 Na the size doesn't matter that much. I'll use any size at mach speed thru ridicilous tech terrain regarldess of frame size. Anyone using a large frame to compensate for lack of stability needs to learn more bike skills.
  • + 3
 Some people have obviously never rode a bike that fits them then...
  • + 0
 Your probably right, most people consider price before size. All my bikes fit me for what they intended for. Then worry about how to pay for them.
  • + 0
 hahaha if you know nothing about fit please don't comment. Both large and small frames have advantages and dissadvantages, riding a ridiculously small frame is just plain dumb maybe the bike can technically handle better but it completely fucks up how you are able to handle your bike. A bike that handles well has to be balanced between both what you are riding and how large your body is, its as simple as that. People have these opinions simply because they have never ridden a properly fit bike.
  • - 1
 I out riding while people polish they anal and properly fit bike. Measure twice and cutt you onetime.
  • + 1
 So you are not a rider if you spend some time before you buy your bike and get a proper one?
  • + 1
 It's not about chosing a frame to compensate for lack of skill. A longer wheelbase will be more stable than a shorter wheelbase. And at 5'6-5'7 im usually inbetween a small and a medium for frame size but the medium ones tend to be a little big. Unless your friend is a mutant, I highly doubt a small frame will be the best fit for his 6'2 or they just wouldn't bother with producing different sizes if small fits everybody just right... Being able to shred with a bike doesnt automatically make it a good fit. Maybe you guys would benefit in being a little more "anal" about chosing your bike.
  • + 1
 Well as I expected someone to try to tell me I'm wrong I didn't expect to get a comment like that from shishka. When you are spending thousands of dollars being "anal" never hurts.
  • + 1
 @PLC07 you can just look for very short stems. Straitline does 28mm direct mount. Mondraker has 0mm stems in their new am bike line
  • + 1
 Yeah spaced I saw that, pretty cool. Couldn't try the bike I bought because shops around here hardly ever seem to carry small frames. I got on the Medium one and it felt too high/long so I ordered the small one which should be perfect according to the geo sheet. If it's not perfectly perfect I figured I'd play around with stems. It's a little bit too much of a guess for my tastes but it looks like a good bike, figured I'd give it a shot. Slightly off topic here though...
[Reply]
  • + 14
 My Friend just got one of these bikes over the holidays. I've gone on two rides with him and before we used to be neck and neck riders for the most part. He now practically murders me on any kind of terrain, so long as the terrain is in the downward direction. Ten seconds down the trail and I can only see his dust and tire marks. This bikes a beast and I would recommend it to any rider wanting to beef up their game!
[Reply]
  • + 10
 Never did I use so few brakepads - its fearfree, fast and no breakdowns whatsoever after 400km of downhill. It is a truly modern setup - not as plush as conventional DH bikes it takes weight modulation to make the front tune to the terrain and then it truly sticks and flies as fast as big bikes without the "fixed speed" bulldozer feeling. It is what I would call a "MiniDH": Fast in, fast out on thight DH tracks. The low BB makes oldstyle DH Bikes feel storky. This is a very nimble bike.I think its pointless upgrading to a more complicated fork and its services worries, the fork is more than adequate. Little touches like soft Big Betty upfront and harderwearing Trailstar compound at the back make for even tirewear. No flats with this tire and I ride them at 1 bar. Nickleplated steel stanchions guarantee a longlife. Short and precise welds will keep the frame from splitting, bearings are large and troublefree. For most of the season my 2011 Voltage had the mods that are now on the 2012 model (no stack, directmount stem). There are many copies around, Specialized, Canyon, Rose etc., but none are really in the same league be it engineering or solid partsspec.
  • + 1
 oh, and its 180mm back- and 200mm frontravel.
  • + 3
 Had one of these beasts in green! was a great bike, never let me down it was solid and was good in the turns. always tempted myself to get another, just maybe i will!
  • + 1
 im looking at one of these. how do they do through a downhill track cause i was probably going to race a bit with it too
  • + 1
 They're doing great. Apart the heavyness, the riding with it in downhill trails is awesome! But don't forget that this isn't a bike for pro's and also, that not the bike rides the mountain, but the biker Wink
  • + 5
 buying a voltage was the best thing i ever did
  • + 1
 @zipe thanks man. i think this is probably the best choice considering the bike
  • + 2
 voltage fr20 following a demo 8 downhill: www.pinkbike.com/video/230448
[Reply]
  • + 8
 Scott blowing peoples doors off with this bike. Everyone that just got pooched spending $$$2000-$3000 on a frame are looking at this saying duuhhheeee. Haha!!! Wow that looking awesome 180-130mm travel is a first, throw your dj fork on and xc time or go full blast dh mode.
  • - 1
 For real vertical dirts it will be a bit too much of a bike but it is still pretty versatile.
  • + 1
 Most people looking at this bike are more concerned about DH presence and how the bike feel in air doing 40mph. Going uphill doesn't really matter, anyone can sit and pedal. For those who want an uphill rig to go take pics can buy a 5" travel bike. This bike is for "do it all" riders that only go up to blast down.
  • + 1
 Dirts as in DIRT JUMPS as you suggested a DJ fork. I'm pretty sure you have to go "up the hill" to reach the end of the lip Wink
  • + 1
 Ya it def not a good dj bike for steep and deep jumps. If you have the short dropouts on and 130mm front and back it a good slopestyle bike. My friend has the old fr30 and jumps everything except for bmx style dj's. The point is this is a good all around bike for most terrain with tons of setup options for what you want to do.
  • + 1
 Even mtb dirt jumps are hard on it if technical. A friend of mine on a 130mm voltage + an argyle rct faceplanted a jump recently. Landed waaay short.
  • + 0
 Nice, face go booya!!! maybe get a dj specific bike for serious jumping. If you a real jumper doesn't matter what bike you on.
  • + 1
 It doesn't? My friend who was 3rd at our DJ nats a few years ago must not be a real dirt jumper cuz he couldn't land some dirts on my old dh bike Wink In dirt suspension and tire setup actually matter a lot and them being too soft = landing short on some jumps.
  • + 1
 Ya he have alot to learn agreed. I seen kids on 55lbs DH bikes make it thru crazy tech dj's. That what i refferring to when i say a good jumper can get by on any build. Skills outweigh parts any day. Doesnt hurt to grow up riding trails in pennsyvania the dj mecca.
  • + 1
 I think you missed my point.That guy is a PRO. He is on a level probably none of the kids you mentioned are. Some jumps + some bikes just dont mix.
  • + 1
 Most of these kids in PA. shit on alot of pros in alot of diff ways. I know plenty pros that cant even get thru jumps like the ones in pa. You would be real surprised what goes on out there and most of them could care less about filming and wearing neon jerseys. The average dj rider in pa is like a top pro in europe.
  • + 1
 I get the feeling even if I claimed by friend was Sam Pilgrim you would claim your friends are better. Though the pa dj rider avg. skill made ma laugh. That's for sure. You mean they do double front flips, triple whips, flip double whips? Or back flip from 6x6m setpdowns? At the moment outside ot Semenuk all the top pros are from europe Wink
  • + 1
 Ooo ya you the bad mon, bust those tricks like you bustin shots. Dont worry about nothin next time you jump in pa.
[Reply]
  • + 5
 I had a Voltage FR20 for the 2010 riding season and I can honestly say it was one of the funnest (and most affordable) bikes I've ever owned. I rode Whistler, Trestle Bike Park, Moab, local trails, and even did some XC and every time it exceeded my expectations. If your looking for a truly capable DH/FR bike at a good price the Voltage FR is hard to beat.
[Reply]
  • + 7
 got my voltage last week!!! the most amazing thing i have owned! its so reliable and is soooooo smooth and perfect for DH. I LOVE IT!
  • + 14
 .... can you really base reliability on a weeks worth of riding........ -___-
  • + 2
 on the trails that i rode. yes. and the abuse i put it through
[Reply]
  • + 4
 I rode my 2011 model all season at Trestle Bike Park and Sol Vista and loved every minute of it. I'm about 175-180 lbs and had to swap the 350# spring out for a 300# to get it right, but otherwise it's completely dialed. Low BB makes it feel so great in the bermy stuff. I actually measured the BB height at 13.3" so every once in a while I clip a pedal, but that's not a big deal given how it handles. I'm not a racer, and not really even into jumping big stuff, so I can't comment there, but for flowy bike park stuff it is perfect. I wore out the rear Big Betty in about half a season, because the bike just begs to be drifted hard (all the edge knobs were gone or nearly so). There isn't really any reason to spend more cash on a bike for slashing bike parks- this thing is pure fun!
[Reply]
  • + 3
 that looks like a great ride, why didn't they spec the Domain 318 in 180mm form, it's single crown and has u-turn that would allow you to set the bike up in the 130mm travel position as well. just my 2 cents, i ride the domain 318 in 160mm on an Intense 6.6 with a soft spring ( i weigh 64kg's) and i think the progression is great, you need to focus on the rebound to get it dialled.
[Reply]
  • + 5
 I would like to see a PB comparison between the Voltage and the Status. A bang for buck comparison!! Anyone else want to see this??
  • + 2
 We just received a Status prior to the HOliday break, you will see that in the coming months.
  • + 2
 lookin' forward to read about it!
[Reply]
  • + 6
 Love to see what @Brendog_1 can do with Scott bikes!!

Can't wait!!!!.......
[Reply]
  • + 7
 boxxer our 66 + DHX 5.0 air + group saint! = perfect
[Reply]
  • + 5
 yeah! i loooooove my voltage, helped me rip hard at bike resorts all across the US and even whistler, with nary a complaint for three seasons running!!!!!
[Reply]
  • + 3
 I love Scott Bikes...I have a Gambler and the 2012 Voltage FR 20..Gambler is a BEAST..but the Voltage is more FUN...Only had it for a short time and I'm enjoying it more with each ride...
[Reply]
  • + 2
 Good to see a positive review of the 20 come out right when I'm thinking about selling my 2010. Smile Its been a great riding bike and I still love it, but the fact is that now a days I want to take pics more than I want to ride, and I need a new camera.

Best bike I've ever owned, best I will own for a long time.
[Reply]
  • + 3
 i have been wanting/saving-up for one of these for about a year now, and i have ridden one. I tryed tones of other bikes but none of them could live up the amazing ride of the voltage.
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  • + 2
 I got my 2012 fr30 voltage in november and because of the warm winter I was able to ride it and get used to it. At first let me say that I also have a voltage dirt jump bike the 2010 custom built yz 0.3 and the geometry is almost the same. So the bike sits very low, in comparison with the dirt jump version it's seattube is maybe 0,5" higher and the front is low too. I've already pimped it out and never got to ride it with the original setup but if you build it to be light, it's so easy to maneuver in the air and feels more like a dirt jump bike but with a lot more travel. On the technical terrain and in terms of small bump performance I would recommend to switching to another fork with a bit more setup. The rear shock on the fr30 is just a price cutter and seems to work for riding non-technical terrain. So the fr30 is a bike that you would buy for a custom build (coz the frame alone costs more), the fr20 is more like maybe riding a while and in time replacing the fork or other stuff and the fr10 is a well equipped out of the box pimped machine. The bike is funn as hell though and the rear is a bit to flexible when riding with the bolt or qr 10mm dropout setup, but nothing that switching to 12mm axle setup won't fix. The replacement parts are not overpriced too much like with my intense socom fro so you can really tune it to how you like it and ride everything with it. I would deffinetly recommend it. You can check out the fr30 frame in my profile.
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  • + 2
 I'm so glad Scott didn't go to ten speed like a lot of companies. I HATE my 10 speed on my demo but I don't have the money to change it. 10 speed doesn't make any sense for DH or even FR. Props to Scott for realizing this.
  • + 2
 they didnt go 10 speed not because it doesnt work well for dh/ fr, but because it costs more that 9 speed
  • + 1
 I'm with heropictures on that one. I never use more than half of cassete on a dh track (and so are the pros: www.pinkbike.com/photo/7070504 ). 10-speed drivetrain on a dh bike makes it more pricey, but doesn't make it any better...
  • + 1
 I barely use half my cassette on XC rides. 1x9 and lovin life. As long as I have my ratios right, I use about 5 speeds out of 9 anyways. companies have to justify their R&D budgets somehow I guess.
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  • + 1
 YES THIS IS THE DIRECTION MORE COMPANIES NEED TO GO,
build strong, simple, reliable and reasonably priced bicycles, this will both expand the sport and make everything better. i live in whistler and love dh to death but its so hard to convince people to get into the sport and even once they do they end up quitting because of the huge cost of breaking bike parts, continous maintenance and repairs, bikes are to be ridden, not fiddled with constantly and accessorized with over priced gram saving colour matched nonsense. (if thats your thing whatever, but we shouldnt let it dominate the market)
the world needs more simple and cheap freeride bikes, the sport is awesome but we shouldnt try to keep it in the hands of the over priviliged, we should share it with the people, more riders=more trail builders=more acceptance of the sport=more access=mo betta
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  • + 1
 i don't care if i'm responding to a year old post SCOTT set the standard in freeride when this baby came out
to be honest i have never been a big fan of scott bikes UNTIL i saw the the last model gambler and the new
gambler and last but not least the voltage fr 20 thanks to the good people of flatout cycles.co.uk i was able to
purchase one of these frames i can't wait to have her built! Big Grin
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  • + 3
 i have the FR30 with some upgrades (shockmount for 214mm shock, roco wc, 66' new crankset etc) i realy love this bike!! its a do all machine Smile
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  • + 1
 I have the fr 30. super sick bike love everything about it. it came with the single crown domain R so what I did was just ordered a compression damp. and put it in the fork super easy! now I'm rocking an RC and it's lighter than the duel crown I like the duel crown but it's so freakin heavy a boxxer feels so much better on this bike!
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  • + 5
 love my 2010 FR20 in poop brown!
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  • + 2
 this is only a bargain in USA/Cannada in Europe this is 2900$ which is on the edge of good value ... Scott has its base in Switzerland which adds to the prize tag in Europe. ...
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  • + 2
 scott need a new dh bike to replace the big gambler imo, the voltage is sexy tho id buy that instead of the gambler even for dh purpose, there will probably be a voltage 10 with good specs i guess
  • + 1
 The Gambler is essentially the same suspension layout. The big difference is the travel, thicker materials for better stiffness and some geo differences. Most people don't have any idea how good the Gambler rides, it's all based on looks nowadays. Sure Scott does need a new design, but why do you think they've been using the same one for so long... Because it works...
  • + 1
 i agree with you, anyway brandog will be using a kind of voltage DH next season so i guess its planned to be released soon..
  • + 1
 he isnt using a voltage for dh he tweeted that about a week ago
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  • + 1
 I've been checking some internet pages to buy this bike and I found this one..
It's the Voltage FR 30 for 850$ what do u think???
How is it possible, completely new??
www.bikesss.com/scott-voltage-fr-30-mountain-bike-2011-sale_p19653.html
  • + 1
 lol... i just checked that out, emailed and got a reply within the hour... saying "yes their in stock and yes their on sale at that price".... wtf?
Some one jump on that... i would if i had the dollar.
  • + 1
 hahaha scroll to bottom of page it reads "Copyright © 2012 bikesss. All Rights Reserved.
Buy wholesale products at wholesale price from leading Chinese wholesalers, enjoy online wholesale and become a wholesaler now!
China wholesale, wholesale from China, buy wholesale products from Chinese wholesaler"
  • + 2
 SCAM - DO Not do it!
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  • + 1
 ive always wanted a scott voltage i thought they were the sickest bikes ever and now they made one thats finally in my price range and still a sweet ride! time to start saving pennies! Big Grin
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  • + 4
 I have a fr10 and it's amazing!
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  • + 3
 that bike is fucking lush my friend just bought the green version of it very bouncy and fun would love to have one
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  • + 5
 I could Handle 2399
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  • + 3
 Sexy Bike! I rode with Kyle Jameson in whistler and he was rockin' one of these bad boys.
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  • + 3
 I can't wait to get mine - albeit a 2011, but pretty much the same spec - except in alien green.
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  • + 1
 They must want to sell this thing in the USA otherwise they've have used a horst-link rear end on it like other Scott full suspension models have used in recent years.
  • + 1
 Really... name one *recent* bike from scott that has?
Aside from the 1st generation Genius which raised the whole host link patent issue...keep up!
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  • + 1
 What will they make with Brendog on board? The new lead rider. That is the question?
Not so sure about the Gambler. Try the Nicholas "Nicky" Santoro. The collector!
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  • + 3
 Danger! Danger! High voltage!
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  • + 1
 hey anyone know how that domain dual crown feels? I had a single crown domain on my FR bike for a while. I believe there the same internals as a boxxer?
  • + 1
 The dual crown Domain has different internals than the Boxxer.
  • + 1
 Isnt it MoCo? If yes it should be the same as a 2010 boxxer race, just without the young age issues.
  • + 1
 The Domain RCs have Motion Control but the Domain Rs do not. They have more basic internals.
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  • + 2
 How come the Specialized "Status" got such bad reviews for having a 135mm rear end, and this one is "robust"?
  • + 1
 We've personally never given the Status any heat for the 135mm rear end, just to be clear about it. The slimmer rear end can be more than stiff enough, no issues there, but many times it comes down to the chain line that can cause problems. We do have a Status here in the office for testing that you'll be able to read about soon.
  • + 1
 Thanks for the reply! I guess I should have specified that it wasn't YOU that's given the bad review on the Status...but other sites and reviews I've read. I haven't gotten a chance to ride either, but I'd love to soon!
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  • + 2
 oooo the shop im hoping to get a job at is scott dealer, might just have to pick one of these up!
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  • + 2
 A lesson to other brands. My guess is that they will sell every single one!
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  • + 1
 Anyone knows if you get the 3 parts IDS when buying it brand new? Talking about the FR 20 2011 model? Cant find any info on that in Scott, maybe my Scottdealer know...
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  • + 1
 Do they still come with both ISCG and ISCG-05 tabs? Or am I thinking of a different frame? I wish more frames had both. Great read!
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  • + 1
 im thinking about switching my gambler frame to a voltage one, what do u guys think about? does it worth it????? should i do it?
  • + 1
 Depends, on whether you'd like a smaller bike with less travel. The Voltage isn't that close to the Gambler in terms of DH racing performance in stock geo, but with some tweaks it can be made into a better DH racer. However, since we have to make do with non-factory linkages, I've only got 170mm on the rear, but a lower BB and super slack HA.
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  • + 1
 Anybody can help me to specify the hubs ... are they original Scott or just the name on them ....?
If any answer ... please send me message!Thank's!
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  • + 1
 Anyone else noticed the typo on the spec '' Rear Derailleur Sram X.7, short cae'' saying cae instead of cage ?
  • + 2
 big deal...
  • + 2
 get gone fool
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  • + 1
 I just got one about three weeks ago and the front brake is a bit squeaky but after to runs its fine but its annoying
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  • + 1
 "short shredders rejoice!"

lol... that's me! I would definitely love to give this bike a try one day...
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  • + 2
 Wish u had a rabbit in a hat and a 64 impalla.
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  • + 1
 Hi everybody im thinking of buying one of these im 5'8 what size should i get short or long? will the long be massive on me?
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  • + 1
 Excellent review, i own the FR30 2011, amazing bike! and this new FR20 just looks amazing.
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  • + 1
 could you run a fork with a tapered steerer if you changed the headset mounts?
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  • + 1
 I want to buy a FR20... Has anybody ridden it? Is it worth the money? What about Domain DC work?
  • + 2
 And btw 2011 FR20 has Domain DC RC, also it's cheaper Smile I would rather buy a 2011 model.
  • + 2
 I ride the 2011 version you're after and i love it Smile not had a problem with the bike at all yet!
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  • + 1
 really nice bike but then go and put dual crown domains on it and it kinda ruins it :/
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  • + 1
 Would it even be worth it to drop the extra 1300 for the FR10? Sounds like the 20 gets along just fine...
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  • + 1
 Exactly the same spec as my 2011 fr20 when new, only difference is the paintjob.and the price has gone up by abount 200 quid
  • + 1
 the paintjob and dm stem
  • + 1
 This bike rides sweet and looks even better. Spesh in green wiv ur black 'n' yellow wheels. Cockpit is a little short for 5' 11" and above, but if your less than that, it's aw'll gooood!

Link us all a picture Pat.
  • + 1
 Hang on dude, they're a'comin.........
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  • + 2
 I want it! I want it NOW!
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  • + 3
 I like apples and milk!
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  • + 2
 great example of a balance between design, engineering, and user needs
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  • + 2
 im wondering how this will stack up against the specialized status
  • + 4
 Stay tuned, we have one of those bad boys in the house as well.
  • + 2
 Nice review! Let me know if you need any other shock mounts and drop outs for testing.
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  • + 2
 Love this bike!!! I would ride one for the rest of my life.
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  • + 1
 i do DH, but i dont wanna be a champion..... just ride and have fun
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  • + 1
 How would this bike be for a guy that is 6'2". Could it work?
  • + 1
 Well i'm around 5'8 ish and i have the longer of the 2 sizes and its about right for what i ride. I'm guessing it'l be abit short for u my friend Frown
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  • + 1
 If somebody says that it looks like a Trek, I am going to flip a table.
  • + 1
 Looks like a Banshee Scythe. *ducks*
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  • + 1
 It's the Scott (Devinci) Wilson of old!
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  • + 1
 Ordered one today out of stock, delivery date may 8Frown
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  • + 1
 A good compromise between DH and Freeride...love it! Smile
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  • + 1
 Does anyone know the prices for the two other models?
  • + 2
 Prices in Estonia (East Europe)

Voltage FR 10 3 499 eur
Voltage FR 20 2 199 eur
Voltage FR 30 1 599 eur
  • + 1
 I meant USD, but I thanks anyway. I now see that it also lists the price of the high-end model and the the cheapest one doesn't look like it has good enough components for me to justify buying one.
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  • + 1
 Anyone have input on the short vs long size setting?
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  • + 1
 I can only find it online for 3599. hoping i'm wrong.
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  • + 1
 wheres the syncros components?? hahaha
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  • + 1
 reminds me of the older Wilsons sorta...
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  • + 1
 i have one! its awesome! you should have one too!
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  • + 1
 voltage fr best Please test video
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  • + 1
 simply the best bike it is cheap ,good spec'd and multi purpose bike
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  • + 0
 You forgot to mention the bike comes with shock mounts for 135-150mm of travel as well for slopestyle
  • + 4
 First paragraph: "Its rear travel can be set at either 160 or 180mm (or even 130mm if you swap the shock and forward mount ),".
  • + 1
 Oh. Well maybe mentioning the 222mm and 215mm shock mounts would be more clear. Regardless, I feel illetirate. Great review!
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  • + 1
 If they made an xlong I'd be tempted but there too short for me. Frown
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  • + 1
 Didn't someone at at's showdown use a scott voltage fr30?
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  • + 1
 I have the 2011 FR10, it's best bike i ever have !!!
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  • + 1
 does anyone know how much the frame worth alone?
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  • + 1
 i have this bike its mint
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  • + 1
 looks like a very nice option at a very good price =)
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  • + 1
 the best Big Grin great machine...Big Grin
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  • + 1
 Sick SH bike......
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  • + 1
 that scott looks sick
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  • + 1
 135mm dropouts...
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  • + 1
 wish i didnt sell mine.
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  • - 1
 wish i was shorter lol.
  • + 1
 wish i was taller
  • + 9
 ...I wish I was a baller...
  • + 2
 I'm 6'6 and mine feels fine! I think when you are tall every bike you get on will feel a bit small, and you can really throw this thing about!
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