EXCLUSIVE: Specialized Demo 8 Carbon - First Look

Jun 4, 2012
by Mike Levy  
 
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The Demo 8 Carbon In Action


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Filmed and edited by Nic Genovese Aaron Larock



Specialized's Demo 8 Carbon Explained


Views: 32,722    Faves: 265    Comments: 11

Filmed and edited by Nic Genovese and Aaron Larock


2013 Specialized Carbon Demo


What's New About The Demo 8 Carbon

• Entirely new carbon fiber front triangle
• Bare Demo 8 Carbon frame weighs 0.9lbs/408grams less than alloy frame (7.8lbs vs 8.7lbs )
• Three position, adjustable bottom bracket height can be set 5mm lower than alloy bike
• More progressive suspension (via altered forward shock mount ) to aid shock setup
• Employs new mandrel molding techniques
Demo 8 Carbon Details

• New model for 2013
• FACT 11m carbon front triangle on S-Works Demo 8 Team Replica, FACT 10m on Demo 8 Carbon 8 I
• Magnesium link on S-Works Demo 8 Team Replica, aluminum link on Carbon Demo 8 I
• Full length 1.5'' head tube
• ISCG-05 chain guide tabs
• Cartridge bearing rear shock mount
• Aluminum chain and seat stays
• S-Works Demo 8 Team Replica uses 135mm width hub spacing w/ 7 speed, 9-26 cassette
• Rear wheel travel: 200mm
• Frame weight: 7.8lbs (w/o shock ), 10.2lbs (w/ shock )
• MSRP: TBA



S-Works Demo 8 Team Replica

2013 Specialized Carbon Demo

The phrase ''team replica'', or some other words used to enforce the belief that your riding hero is using the very same equipment as you, is one that gets bandied about quite often. It rarely is applied to a bike that actually deserves the title, though, usually denoting that it has has simply been done up with similar colors to the team bikes. The S-Works Demo 8 Team Replica bucks that trend to come tantalizingly close to being an actual replica of one of the trickest race bikes on the World Cup race circuit. It is assembled around the very same carbon frame that is ridden by Hill and Brosnan, incorporating the identical shock eyelet cam that allows the rider access to the same geometry used by the team, as well as the slimmer 12 x 135mm rear end spacing that they requested due to its ability to not get hung up on tight sections of the track. Want that same 13.3'' ground hugging bottom bracket height that Sam is known to favour? You got it. Although, with just 250 S-Works Demo 8 Team Replica bikes being produced for 2013, the trick might be to actually track one of them down. Availability is set for this coming September, and although pricing has yet to be decided upon, it is fair to say that this is one machine that won't come cheap.



Seven Speed Drivetrain

Team Monster Energy - Specialized has been using their clever six speed drivetrain, developed by Specialized and their riders, for a while now. The system, which makes its first production appearance on the S-Works Demo 8 Team Replica with seven cogs, not only uses a much smaller, 9-26 tooth gear range that does away with the useless larger cogs of standard cassette - exactly what many riders have been asking for for years - but also allows the use of smaller 32 tooth chain ring. The compact ring lets a smaller diameter bash guard be fitted, hence more ground clearance on offer. The added room may not seem like that big of a deal, but remember that the Demo 8 Carbon is capable of being run with a low 13.3'' bottom bracket height, and that every millimeter can count when at race speed. The smaller ring doesn't sacrifice top end range thanks to the smaller than usual 9 tooth cog on the end of the cassette. This is all made possible by the use of a custom 12 x 135mm DT Swiss rear hub that has been made to be compatible with Shimano's Capreo freehub body, a stepped freehub that allows the pint-sized diameter 9 tooth cog to fit on the end (the smallest a standard freehub will fit is an 11 tooth cog). A burly aluminum spoke guard has been fitted in place of missing cogs on the other end of the cassette, virtually eliminating the chance of tossing a chain into the spokes during a run.



The goal of the BlackBox program is to develop performance technologies and products outside of production restrictions. While these developments may be less commercially viable, they also benefit us through lessons learned. We found DLC was not commercially viable for our consumer product and it led us to this new surface finish that has more commercial viability.
- Tyler Morland, SRAM MTB PR & Media Manager
RockShox BoXXer World Cup, BlackGold Stanchions

The super exclusive S-Works Demo 8 Team Replica is also spec'd with a very BlackBox-esque, custom RockShox BoXXer World Cup fork. The 5.9lb fork's black stanchions look to be the same as the DLC (diamond-like carbon ) coated tubes used by the very select BlackBox development program, which is about half true. It's no secret that the ultra slippery DLC treatment also happened to be ultra expensive, and it was for this and other reasons that the DLC touch was actually scrapped from the program at the end of last year. Instead, you'll see select World Cup riders sporting this new, but still black, stanchion tube anodizing process with a proprietary additive that RockShox calls ''BlackGold''. So, yes it is BlackBox. No, it isn't the actual DLC coating. We've tinkered with a BlackGold treated fork and it felt impressively friction-free, but have yet to actually put proper time on one. Rumor is that it actually comes very close to mimicking the exceedingly slippery feel of DLC, but can be applied easier and for a much more reasonable cost. This leads us to believe that we'll see the BlackGold anodizing process applied to more production forks than just that of the S-Works Demo 8 Team Replica, but it is still likely a full season away. Want BlackGold? The S-Works Demo is going to be the only place that you'll see if for quite some time.



Contact Points

Word is that Sam runs his SDG I-Fly Storm saddle year round, muddy or not, so it makes sense that the rubber-lugged saddle is spec'd on the replica bike, World Champ rainbow stripes included. Renthal decks out the S-Works Demo 8 Team Replica's cockpit, with a 780mm Fat Bar being held in place with their clever, two piece Integra direct mount stem. Specialized's own half waffle Sip Grip grips are locked onto the bars, with the small sized bikes using regular diameter versions and the medium and large sizes being fitted with the thicker versions.

Specifications
Release Date 2013
Price
Travel 200mm
Rear Shock Custom RockShox Vivid, Ti spring
Fork Custom RockShox Boxxer World Cup, Black Gold stanchions
Headset 1-1/2" integrated for 1-1/8" steerer
Cassette Shimano HG-70 Capreo, 9-speed, Micro 9-26
Crankarms SRAM X0 DH, carbon arms, micro-single 32T ring
Chainguide E.13 chainguide
Bottom Bracket SRAM PF30 DH, 83mm shell
Pedals Specialized Bennies
Chain KMC X9 SL, nickel plate
Rear Derailleur SRAM X0, 9-speed, short cage
Shifter Pods SRAM X0, 9-speed
Handlebar Renthal Fat Bar, 780mm wide, 7-degree backsweep, 31.8mm
Stem Renthal Integra, direct mount, 45mm, integrated 6-bolt
Grips Specialized Sip Grip
Brakes Custom Avid Code X0 World Cup, hydraulic disc, Code caliper, organic pad, stainless hardware, 200mm rotors
Hubs DT Swiss 240S, 20mm thru-axle, Custom DT Swiss, Capero compatible, Star Ratchet, 135mm,
Spokes DT Swiss Competition, stainless, 2.0/1.8/2.0mm front, 2.0 rear
Rim Custom DT Swiss FR 600, 32h
Tires Specialized Butcher DH, 60 TPI, wire bead, soft dual-compound, 26x2.3"
Seat Custom SDG I-Fly, World Champion stripes
Seatpost SDG Storm I-Fly, 300mm


Carbon Demo 8 I

2013 Specialized Demo 8 I

Specifications
Release Date 2013
Price
Travel 200mm
Rear Shock Custom FOX DHX RC4
Fork RockShox Boxxer RC
Headset 1-1/2" integrated for 1-1/8" steerer
Cassette Shimano Tiagra, 10-speed, 11-25
Crankarms Custom SRAM Descendant PF30
Chainguide Gamut P-30 chain guide
Bottom Bracket SRAM PF30 DH, 83mm shell
Pedals Specialized Bennies
Chain KMC X10
Rear Derailleur SRAM X9 Type 2, 10-speed, short cage
Shifter Pods SRAM X7, 10-speed
Handlebar Specialized Demo low-rise bar, 750mm
Stem Specialized Direct Mount
Grips Specialized Sip Grip
Brakes Custom Avid Elixir 5 R
Hubs Specialized Hi Lo,
Spokes DT Swiss
Rim Roval DH 26, alloy disc, 30mm wide
Tires Specialized Butcher DH, 60 TPI, wire bead, soft dual-compound, 26x2.3"
Seat Specialized DH, 8mm hollow Cr-Mo rails
Seatpost Specialized 6061 alloy, two bolt micro adjust,
The Carbon Demo 8 I may not garner as much attention as the S-Works Demo 8 Team Replica, but its less expensive entry price will make the black and white bike a more realistic option for most riders. It uses the exact same geometry, including the three positon shock eyelet cam, but is built around a slightly heavier FACT 10m carbon frame. How much heavier is it? Specialized claims that the Carbon Demo 8 I frame weighs just 50 grams more. The bike's main link is aluminum - the Team Replica uses a magnesium link - and the rear end spacing is a more common 150mm in place of the S-Works' 135mm. You also won't find the trick six speed cassette and tiny chain ring.

What the Carbon Demo 8 I does offer, though, is a very similar build kit to the standard alloy version, expect that it is all assembled around a carbon frame that is nearly a full pound lighter than the aluminum version. Pricing is still unavailable, but we're looking forward to seeing what the Carbon Demo 8 I comes in at - it could end up being quite the steal for a carbon downhill bike. Expect an August release date.



Demo 8 Carbon Geometry


S-Works Demo 8 Team Replica Frame

Want to build your own Demo 8 Carbon up as you see fit? If so, you'll get to base it around the red and black, FACT 11m S-Works Demo 8 Team Replica frame that comes from Specialized fitted with Cane Creek's Double Barrel rear shock - not exactly a shabby platform to start from given its 7.8lb frame weight (w/o shock ) The aluminum rear end uses standard 150mm spacing as opposed to the team spec 135mm width on the complete bike, clearly with an eye on giving the owner a wider hub selection to choose from for their build. Extras include a SRAM PF30 to BSA 83mm adapter that will allow common cranks to be fitted, as well as a 30.9mm Thomson seat post. The rest is up to you.

As with the S-Works Demo 8 Team Replica and Carbon Demo 8 I, the frame's price has yet to be decided upon.






2013 Specialized Carbon Demo
Demo Evolution

The Demo platform has been in use since 2004, the year that Specialized first released the Demo 9. That early version, designed during a time when weight was of less concern, was suited more toward going large than going fast between the tape. What it did do, though, was prove that the bike's novelly arranged, four-bar FSR suspension system was very adapt at handling the terrain. The design lost weight over the years, trimming down as the times demanded, but it wasn't until Specialized signed Sam Hill that the entire focus of the Demo platform changed. The design now shifted from an all-around ethos (as 'all-around' as a downhill bike could be anyways ) to one that was purely focused on racing. Hill wanted the bike lower, closer to the ground than nearly anything else out there, as well as slacker to handle the speeds of racing at the top level. Specialized accommodated Hill's wishes and the next generation Demo was raced to wins by the entire team - National wins, World Cup overalls, and World Championships were all taken aboard the new bike. The next logical step, of course, is carbon fiber.

2013 Specialized Demo Carbon
2013 Specialized Carbon Demo
Aluminum Head Tube Sleeve

There are many carbon frames out there that see their headsets pressed in to mate directly against the carbon, a layout that has proven to be trouble free over time. Regardless, Specialized wanted to absolutely eliminate any chance of an issue arising on the Demo. The choice was made to utilize an aluminum sleeve (above, right ) throughout the full length of the head tube, providing a metal contact surface for the headset cup to interface with. This route wasn't necessarily taken because the project's engineers were concerned about the carbon tube's ability to withstand riding abuse, but more to facilitate the consumers who might be removing and installing angle adjusting headsets more often than they would on a bike designed for a different purpose. The sleeve may add a few grams, but it is in line with Specialized's goal of creating a frame that exceeded their strength and durability goals. A threaded aluminum insert (above, left ) is also home to the main link's forward attachment point on the front triangle


Lower Bottom Bracket, More Progressive Suspension

The riders on Team Monster Energy - Specialized are known for preferring some of the lowest bottom bracket heights on the World Cup race circuit, a design point that made its way onto the latest generation of alloy Demos over the last few seasons. Hill requested an even lower setting, though, to meet his liking of a easy to turn but stable bike. Demo 8 Carbon owners will have the option of running that same geometry thanks to Specialized shifting the forward shock mount's position slightly on the down tube, a change the dropped the bottom bracket by 5mm to put it at 338mm/13.3''. Nervous about catching your pedals due to that ultra low BB height? The rear shock mount employs an eccentric cam (shown ar right )that can be turned to raise the bottom bracket to 353mm/13.9'', or the included concentric cam can be fitted to attain a middle-of-the road 343mm/13.5'' height.

By moving the forward shock mount Specialized was also able to build in more progressivity to the suspension rate, another request from the World Cup team that
makes its way onto the production Demo 8 Carbon. ''That makes the tuning of the shock a little bit easier for the World Cup level course,'' says Specialized's senior suspension engineer Jason Chamberlain, but we also suspect that it will allow the average rider to run a slightly more forgiving setup without sacrificing bottom out control or depending on the shock to compensate as much as it would have to on last year's Demo.

2013 Specialized Carbon Demo BB assembly

One Piece Bottom Bracket Assembly

Specialized considered multiple options when it came time to determine how the bottom bracket area of the Demo 8 Carbon would be laid out. They settled on a massive, forged aluminum section that acts as the hard mounting point for both the bike's Press-Fit bottom bracket bearings and ISCG-05 chain guide tabs, as well as being home to the main pivot location. This layout not only ensures that all of those key components will be in perfect alignment with each other, but it also meets Specialized's wish to have metal-on-metal interfaces for crucial bearing locations.

The entire aluminum bottom bracket assembly is slid firmly into place from the drive side of the bike, with the tolerances being incredibly tight - we pushed a BB assembly home into a bare frame and it went in smoothly, but there was zero ability for it to move within the frame. Channels shaped into the bottom bracket section provide area for the bonding agent to fuse it permanently into the frame.

Aluminum Rear End

Specialized chose to continue using an aluminum rear end for the new Demo, which may come as a surprise to some given that they do offer other full suspension models with carbon stays. ''In the end we determined that the biggest benefits could be had in the front triangle,'' Chamberlain told us, "Carbon chain stays and carbon seat stays didn't provide as big a benefit as we wanted, so for the time being we decided to focus on just the front triangle.'' Having said that, there was certainly a knowing smile on Chamberlain's face as finished that sentence. We're willing to bet that they most certainly tested a carbon rear end, even if they wouldn't admit to it, and that it will make an appearance at some point in the future. The weight loss in a carbon rear end is likely to be relatively small, but the fact that it would come in lighter at all basically ensures that they will be pursuing the concept in the long run.

2013 Specialized Carbon Demo
Unidirectional Carbon and Mandrel Technology

Sometimes it is actually what's missing from a design can be a most telling, and what's absent from the Demo 8 Carbon is the weave finish that many carbon neophytes associate with the ordained material. That typical carbon fiber weave appearance is a product of the alignment of the cloth fibers, and although that particular layup has benefits when it comes to certain applications, it often isn't the best choice in the bicycle world. Unidirectional carbon is just as its name would have you believe: all of the material's filaments are aligned in the same direction. This is especially important to note when you consider that carbon is at its strongest when loaded along its axis, meaning that laying up the UD carbon in a particular way will allow its strength to be fully taken advantage of. The end result should not only be a stronger finished product, but one that will also require less material to meet the design and strength goals. This is especially true when dealing with the tight curves and challenging shapes found on the Demo 8 Carbon frame, a job that is much better suited to the more pliable nature of unidirectional carbon. While this is accurate when talking about most mountain bike frames and components, it isn't uncommon for a manufacturer to apply a carbon weave to the outside of the product simply to make it abundantly clear to anyone and everyone that their goods are made with carbon fiber. This, of course, adds useless weight to the final product, weight that serves no purpose other than to yell ''look at me, I'm carbon.'' Inspect the bare sections of carbon on both the S-Works Demo 8 Team Replica and Carbon Demo 8 I bikes and you'll see none of this, with Specialized merely giving the frame a spay of protective clear coat.


We've put a lot of time and a lot of effort into our mandrel technology. It's not something that the customer can see when they look at the final bike, but if you could look at the inside of the frame it looks as nice on the inside as it does on the outside, and that's an artifact of all our work.
- Brad Paquin, composite design engineer
It's generally agreed upon that a well made carbon frame can surpass an alloy frame of similar design and intention when talking strength, rigidity, and weight. However, alloy frame manufacturing, especially when done robotically as is often the case, can be performed on a more consistent level. A carbon frame, on the other hand, requires its separate carbon cloth sheets to be laid down in exactly the correct orientation in order for the frame to be as strong as the designer intended. This is a point that all manufacturers focus on, and Specialized has put a large priority on this with the Demo. Changes to the layup and mold components ensure that the carbon sheets don't shift during frame construction, but a new mandrel technique also come into play. Many carbon frames are made using a latex bladder that the carbon sheets are laid over, followed by pressure and heat being applied from all sides by a two-piece steel mold. The issue arrises when using the latex bladder method to construct complicated carbon shapes, a task that is possible but also one that often requires more carbon and results in the bladder being trapped within the frame. Instead, complicated sections of the Demo front triangle, which is built by joining separate front and rear sections, are formed using a very special type of foam in place of a bladder. The foam used has a specific melting point that allows it to be removed from the frame when heated to a certain temperature. The result is not only a lighter frame due to there not being a latex bladder jammed inside of it, but also more even compaction of the unidirectional carbon cloth that equals a void-free, and therefore stronger, frame.




2013 Specialized Carbon Demo
In-house Testing

The goals, in order of importance, were: exceed the strength of the current bike, exceed the durability of the current bike, and make it significantly lighter than the current bike. The fourth thing is probably the stiffness. We wanted to match the stiffness of the current bike. We had to prove that we could build a better bike than the alloy bike, we had to prove that it would justify a consumer's money to pay for it.
- Jason Chamberlain, senior engineer

Specialized isn't shy about their carbon frames being manufactured in Asia, especially in this day and age when many top quality carbon frames and components hail from overseas. One point that they are quick to point out, though, is that although their frames are fabricated in Asia, Specialized actually puts each design through their own demanding tests in their in-house test lab in Morgan Hill, California. This is a step that some other companies use a third party for, or even leave it up to the Asian manufacturer themselves (producing not so objective results, no doubt ). This test lab played a large role throughout the carbon Demo's development, allowing the engineers on the project to test the stiffness and strength of each version of the frame. In all, seven different carbon layup revisions were assessed, with the final version being ''...by far the strongest bike we've ever made'', according to Chamberlain. ''So we wanted to make sure that it exceeded the strength of the alloy bike,'' he continues, "as well as exceeded all of our internal test standards''. This is on top of the fifteen to twenty different virtual renditions that were run through computer simulations long before a single piece of carbon was laid down. All told, the Demo 8 Carbon frame has two years of development and testing behind it, much of which took place in the test lab pictured above.

2013 Specialized Carbon Demo

Impact Testing

Downhill bikes, especially those that are being raced on rough, rocky tracks, are subjected to an incredible amount of abuse, but there is one area of the bike that is surely considered to be most vulnerable: the down tube. We've all seen photos of aluminum downhill frames sporting large dents on the lower portion of the down tube, but this is often not fatal for the aluminum frames so long as the dent isn't overly deep. Carbon frames, on the other hand, can be built to withstand much more abuse in this area, which is essential due to the material's ability to hide internal damage from inspection. The down tube impact testing shown above was a major focus when designing and assessing the new Demo 8 Carbon, with the frame being held stationary in a sand box while a weighted steel head is dropped from above to simulate rock strikes or the down tube bottoming on the ground. The result of this testing is a significantly reinforced zone on the lower section of the tube that features a much more robust, 4mm thick carbon layup, as well as a specially designed protector that is fitted over top.

The protector itself (shown to the right ) is quite clever, employing an angled 'V' shape that works to deflect debris off to the side. It is also spaced away from the frame slightly, adding a buffer zone that allows for flexing of the guard when it is struck, as well as making use of a padded section between the frame and protector to further absorb and displace impacts. Having said that, Specialized is so confident in the frame's ability to withstand down tube impacts that they admit that the protector isn't actually required, but is an extra level of protection that adds minimal weight to the entire package.

2013 Specialized Carbon Demo


Ultrasonic Testing

The Specialized in-house test lab is capable of putting the carbon Demo frame through multiple rigorous tests, but the key to really understanding these tests is to know how the frame is reacting to the loads internally - pushing the frame until it fails on a test rig only tells part of the story, with the test lab engineers also needing to know what is happening within the carbon layup before the frame fails externally. This is where their ultrasonic test machine comes into play, a tool that can cost well over $10,000 USD, but also one that Specialized considers vital to development. "We can scan a part relatively quickly and see if there is any damage in it,'' says Specialized's composite engineer Brad Paquin, "And also one of the key features that it allows you to do is monitor damage after it happend.'' The ultrasonic tester used by Specialized, which also happens to be the one of the very same models used by the McLaren Formula 1 team (Paquin worked with McLaren during their Venge road bike project ), utilizes a reflection method whereby it passes sound through the laminate and measures the amount of time that it takes for the sound to return to the transducer. Because sound generally travels faster through solids than through gases, the ultrasonic tester is then able to tell the operator where internal delamination has occurred due to the small air pockets that form between the damaged layers of carbon. The tool's effectiveness is increased by coating the carbon in water (see photo at right ), a step that limits lost ultrasonic wave energy due to separation between surfaces. In other words, it improves conductivity. If all that sounds a bit technical, the basic principles are the very same as when you tap the edge of a coin on a solid object and then do the same on a hollow object - the sound that the coin makes on each is very different .

Specialized employs the ultrasonic tool throughout a frame's lifespan on the test rig by checking its laminate during the test interval, be it load testing of the front end or impact testing of the down tube. Once an area of delamination has been found it can be monitored right up until the point of failure, allowing the engineers to better understand exactly how the carbon failed and, even more importantly, how the carbon reacted in the long run subsequent to the initial damage. The rather expensive ultrasonic tester is obviously far out of the realm of a local shop, and it's fair to say that many other bike companies don't even possess the pricey tool, but it allows Specialized to perform and better understand their own testing instead of depending solely on a third party.




Specialized Carbon Demo 8 Photo by margus Riga
Specialized Carbon Demo 8 Photo by margus Riga
  Troy and Sam on the Demo 8 Carbon while shooting with Margus Riga.

  Curtis Keene and Brad Benedict, development riders for Specialized, both played a large part in the bike's evolution.

  The end of a long day shooting photos and video for this article with Sam Hill, Troy Brosnan, Curtis Keene, and Brad Benedict.


www.specialized.com

333 Comments

  • + 328
 "Pricing has yet to be decided upon"....I already know i can't afford it!
  • + 7
 I'm thinking 8 grand. Might even be more.
  • + 85
 They say around 10,000 dollars...

there will only be 250 available.... this year,

/i was at the press chat 2 hours ago. That is why i know.
  • + 226
 This sport is becoming far to expensive.
  • + 13
 fav and Drool that's all i can do.
  • + 52
 1 billion dollars
  • - 7
 WOAH! I want i want i want! hopefully it actually wont cost and arm and a leg to buy these beautiful bikes!
  • + 6
 Yeah I agree man , if you want anything half decent for biking you always have to shell out the big bucks..
  • + 60
 Dude, not one is forcing you to go buy a new carbon bike. I'd say this sport is getting cheaper, you can find lightly used 2 year old bikes for a fraction of the cost of a new one with the performance you only dreamed of 4 years ago. It's the pilot, not the plane.
  • + 29
 If it only costs an arm and a leg i would be able to afford it cuz i have two of each...but then i wouldnt be able to ride it cuz i would only have an arm and a leg...
  • + 31
 I'm not talking carbon bikes , i'm talking biking in general. you can't deny it's expensive for most people to break into..
  • + 35
 how much did the pirate pay for his peg leg and arm?
an arm and a leg
  • + 4
 Only jack sparrow can answer that man.
  • + 14
 ^Let's be a little more realistic here. It will probably cost: www.youtube.com/watch?v=SiMHTK15Pik
  • - 1
 135mm hub, isnt gonna be more flexy?
  • - 7
 The YT industries Tues 2.0 carbon will be as good and most likely cost less than half the price and will have a much better spec.
  • - 23
 i bet brendan feels like an idiot now after switching to scott
  • + 2
 I couldn't buy a bike like that as I know I'd never be able to get its full potential out of it!
  • + 32
 going to the the bank for a loan. "banker" hello sir how much do you need. "me" $10000. "banker" and what is it for. "me" a bicycle. "banker" *spits out cereal*
  • + 49
 Why would a banker be eating cereal at a financial meeting? Very confused
  • + 13
 every damn time i buy something nice the company makes an even better version of it FML
  • + 3
 That's mountain bikes for you Frown I buy a Nukeproof Mega, 6 months later they announce the Rook Facepalm
  • + 7
 These bikes are an improvement by the sounds of it, but the new boxxers look seriously ugly! I'm sure not many people would have a spare 10000 bucks on them
  • + 3
 Holy shit! If I win the lottery this will be my first purchase...
  • + 3
 how long will a frame like this last??
  • + 23
 Dude, tabletop84, what are you even talking about? The Tues 2.0 is a sick bike, but YT doesn't even have produced a single carbon frame yet... And I'm not aware of them planning to do so anytime soon, so what do you know about how it's going to be like?
Are you in possession of a time machine?
Anyways... 10.000$ for a bike is just ridiculous. I'm all for "you get what you pay for", but seriously... for 10.000$ you can get yourself an mx-motobike or even a halfway decent car - and there is no doubt about it, that a car or mx-bike features ten times as much technology and material as a 16kg bike.
5000$ is plenty of money and should be the absolute upper limit for a bike - even of best quality.
  • + 12
 I think mountain biking is becoming more expensive than motocross!
  • + 4
 "Do i hear a ten thousand? Ten thousand dollars? A ten thousand dollars anyone? Come on folks for or 10 grand this bike could be yours!" *silence* "alright specialized looks like your gonna have to lower the price"
  • + 2
 Except for the ten thousand MBAs that need the best and have already pre-ordered for their kids
  • + 11
 I liked the past model boxxer decals better than these ones :/
  • + 4
 Brendog wasn't offered a new contract by MES so doubt he's lost much sleep + he's helped to develop the new full carbon Gambler, remember that Scott have an industry leader in the past with carbon fiber
  • + 4
 So we have Carbon Demo, V10, Yeti and Session, when will we see Carbon Glory and Commencal?
  • + 6
 So you are spending $10,000 dollars and the bike doesn't came with this fotos.mtb-news.de/f/0f/kb/0fkblmllcyiy/large_IMG_0271.JPG
  • + 1
 Oh yesh, wasnt that the scott endorphin in 97?
Didnt the gt sts come in 96?

Wasnt it actually the trek ocvl thing?

And when did the raven's come?
  • - 3
 Those boXXers look so much nicer without the logo going uip the stanchion...
  • - 3
 THIS IS SUCH A STUPID IDEA, THEY SHOULD DO A CARBON SCOTT VOLTAGE THEY SO GOODER!
  • + 1
 @mazze: When the revealed the 2.0 frame they said that they constructed with the focus on a carbon version, lacondeguy hinted that he may ride one for the rampage...
  • + 9
 Butt grips on the seat? Clearly I am not going to be able to afford this bicycle.
  • + 3
 A lot of money all for 0.9 lbs?
  • + 2
 with a $10000 price tag they should sell the Karpiel Apocalypse at walmart.
  • + 2
 I want to see a carbon Glory or a carbon version of the new Gambler. Carbon Commencal and Aurum would be sick too. Maybe the Operator, and Wilson too.
  • + 4
 So every popular frame in carbon.
  • + 1
 Basically yeah, but mostly just the Glory
  • + 1
 has to be one of the best looking bikes on the market, the slack top tube + with a super sleek and simple design gives it such a passive aggressive feel, almost like you could simply do a relaxing run and still be compeditive.
  • - 6
 Demo's look crap!
  • + 1
 good for you that you have a choise ;-)
  • + 1
 Whom has a choice?
  • + 1
 YOU! you don't need to buy it ;-)
  • + 0
 Yep your right. I wouldnt buy it even if i needed it.
  • + 1
 Anybody know if the Carbon still comes with the Specialized Lifetime warranty?
[Reply]
  • + 41
 You poached my trail and didn't even tell me Keene!?
  • + 12
 And trail entrances!?! Keendawgg.... may owe me some new rims HAH
  • + 10
 Grade A poachin right here Ms america is a whore now
  • + 3
 you should probably position some security guards around that trail if you want to keep everyone and their mom off of it now
  • - 2
 Yes, based on that clip I know exactly where that trail entrance is. Excellent. Not. Let me poach your trail!!!!
  • - 18
 If you can't find it thats sad, it's right near crack shack and if you cruise around that area it'sretty easy to spot
  • + 4
 no need to blow up all the trails now.
  • - 12
 everyone in this comment knows where it is, sall good hommie
  • + 14
 That was kinda stupid thing to write bro. If you didn't build or maintain it don't say the fucking directions like that on the internet... It's called respect and most kids have no clue
  • - 15
 no directions man not many people know where "the other trail" is either sall good man
  • + 7
 I think it's pretty safe to assume that this is the most-read article PB has published in years.
  • + 6
 Trail is in S. Africa. Clip filmed after the first WCup.
  • + 0
 i know!!!!!! what the hell enorbz??? iggy and all the locs worked sooo hard on this trail to to ride it not get it poached!!..............................oh wait its poached :/
[Reply]
  • + 27
 wow. is that gap at 1.44 the same one in Life behind bars episode 2 where that random guy jumps it?
[Reply]
  • + 23
 If you can not afford the $10000 bike then all is not lost.

What you will need:

1 Specialized Demo
1 digital scale
1 variable speed drill
1 3/8 inch drill bit

Calibrate your scale to zero. Chuck your drill bit into your drill. Start drilling at your fancy whilst making sure you keep the shavings. Pile your shavings on the digital scale and stop drilling when you hit 0.9 lbs. Voila, you now have a world class racing weight Specialized Demo and beaucoup bucks for beaucoup beer!

*word to the wise: go easy on the handlebars.
  • + 1
 wait the last company that did that is done- Titus...
  • + 4
 be sure to drill water bottle holder holes. a bike that light can do some serious flat XC.
[Reply]
  • + 15
 ↑ props to Pinkbike. These video / write ups have come a long way...nice work!
[Reply]
  • + 10
 Very, very nice looking, but I really don't see why 135mm rear spacing is such an advantage. 1.5cm of clearance (it doesnt affect the geometry or ride in any positive manner) at the cost of compatibility (which DT swiss has partially solved by making good hubs in that size for the team bikes) and stiffness, seems like a pointless trade off. The odds of catching the rear end on something that you would have missed if it was 0.75cm narrower in that direction, that you wouldn't have already hit with the front of the bike or your body/leg/pedal, is incredibly low. I'm just glad they didn't try and force that upon everyone by putting it on the frame only option, that would have been a really, really bad idea.
  • + 6
 Next time you are at race, look around at different rear ends. The chainstays can suffer a lot of damage - you will see lots of scratches. Every mm we can get is helpful, and 7.5mm per side is actually quite a bit. If you ride a Shadow rear derailleur you will have noticeable less contact between your rear derailleur and rocks, and that is only a few mm narrower. There really is no trade off. The rear end stiffness and wheel stiffness is actually the same. If you look at DT flange width between 150 adn 135, they are nearly identical. Heel clearance, terrain clearance, less weight - it wins all around.
  • + 2
 Why did essentially all modern DH bikes move to 12x150 then if staying at 135 would have been a better option? This is literally the first time I've ever heard of a proper DH race frame with anything but 150mm rear spacing (that could be my ignorance as far as what the world cup guys are actually running, but even then, I'm sure someone else would be doing it too).
  • + 4
 150 was started to accommodate wide tires, which meant wider cranks with an 83 shell, which meant moving out the cassette as well to maintain chainline. There was also a perceived strength and stiffness benefit.

If you are only running 6-7 cogs, a 135 provides the preferred chainline. Added benefits are more heel and terrain clearance and little bit of weight.

The stiffness was never that different and modern wheels are plenty strong.

If/when other brands realize that 6-7 gears are more appropriate for DH, you may see the trend swing back toward 135.
  • + 2
 It's kind of ironic that the industry keeps pushing 12x150 and giving you all the marketing jazz that comes with it when the pros ride narrower rear ends (which is an "obselete" standard) and notice no significant trade off. The same can be said about 10speed cassettes where the pros don't even bother and the average joe keeps screaming that's it's too many gears for nothing...

I hope this setup is more of a step in the right direction than an anomaly.

Good job.
[Reply]
  • + 10
 The precious. mine, it shall finally be mine.
  • - 1
 I hopefully will get to ride it tomorrow or monday....oh yessssss
[Reply]
  • + 6
 Why the ugly rims in red........ and why not release a full black stealthy frame, with dark grey graphics? And will there be replacement parts for the cassette etc available? other then that, the bikes looks great. Boxxer looks like the Ano, teflon jobs you can get from MX shops
  • + 1
 Yes, Specialized will most likely make cassettes available. However, they are also widely available if you know where to look. Google Capreo.
[Reply]
  • + 5
 Im sure many other carbon manufacturers have high quality control too but what I do like about specialized is they have continued the demo's original attributes of strength and reliability with the alu headtube sleeve and BB, they seem to have sat down and thought about what the consumer wants from a carbon frame with all the ooh aah about carbons real life viability (I know its stronger but if you look the consumers varied opinion does not reflect the scientific knowledge).

Problem is that all this kinda offsets the primary advantage of carbon, weight. 0.9lbs is a good saving but as someone said further up, the V10 carbon in around another 1lb less than the demo?

All in all not too sure what too make of this, it is certainly the next progressive step for spesh, particularly at the elite level. But I for one would definitely stick with a n alu and save my money for spares etc.
  • + 1
 Robbety and Pozzer you make good points both!
I would never buy a second hand carbon frame. I'd never buy a second hand pair of forks either.
I think the reliability thing is a load of bollocks. Anyone who buys this bike with their own money has the cash and the personality type to buy another one in a year or two. Anyone who gets one for free doesn't care about the reliability because if it breaks, they'll get a new one.

The Glory is a normal Taiwanese Alu frame. This is also set to be a normal Taiwan Carbon frame is it not? Or are they having them made in China?

My mate who works in a bike factory here in Taiwan told me that the production cost of carbon frames is actually lower than Aluminium if you do a run of over 500 units. 20 years ago, Aluminium was the new expensive thing. Actually it's cheaper than steel. The same with carbon, it is cheaper than what we have now. They will make us pay more though. Why? Because they can and we'll pay it!

Still, I love the look of this bike. I'm waiting for the Devinci Wilson carbon though. I'd never buy a Spesh.
  • + 1
 Will specialized be offering after sales ultra sound tests to people who have large impacts to ensure the layup is still optimized and these gaps between the layers they speak of do not form ?
Would Spec advise people to continue riding the frames after a massive impact not knowing if it's safe to ride ?
Not trying to bash here just curious
[Reply]
  • + 4
 Looks great ! Canfield Brothers has a 9t hub. It allows you to run 9-26 (9 speed) or 9-36 (10 speed). I've had the 9-26 on my bike for a full season and love it ! 32t up front is amazing with the new crop of MICRO mini guides !


9T !!!!
[Reply]
  • + 8
 Finally we get Black Stanchion Boxxers!! This bike is too fucking sick!
  • + 3
 Nah I think they look fugly as. I much prefer the old coloured Boxxers.
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  • + 7
 the sickest specialized bike out right now i reckon
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  • + 7
 I hope I never get to see the inside of my carbon frame.
[Reply]
  • + 7
 That bike is TASTY!!!
[Reply]
  • + 2
 The thing is: Danny Hart win the worlds on a regular Taiwan Alu frame by 11 sec. So whats the point.... Would you buy a Porsche of somebody can bust your ass by 11sec in a VW.
I also see a big problem selling those carbon bikes later. I wouldn't buy a second hand carbon frame.... would you???

Anyways, very good engineering work and absolutly stunning bike. But I think it is far over-engineered for the regular weekend DH racer.
  • + 1
 its not built for the regular weekend racer its a world cup race bike
  • + 1
 Not true... if that would be the case only hill & Co would race on that thing. But they are selling it to the public....the weekend downhillers... Or how many of you are racing the worldcup?
[Reply]
  • + 3
 I totally thought that Boxxer WC looked like a redo of a 05-07 'zocchi. Blew my mind for a lil bit. Cool bike though. Looks like it'll be tough to ride without that ARM and leg you're gonna give up to buy it. Razz
[Reply]
  • + 2
 On the negative: $10,000 - what a joke. They've already made the carbon rear end but they want to drop it in stages to maximise profit. Next year will be seat stays, then will be chain stays, then will be a design overhaul. Sad but true. Just like how Apple already have the iPhone 8 worked out but they want to sell the 5, 5g, 6, 6s, 7, 7.2 to all the suckers first.

Why do you keep writing "fiber" instead of "fibre"? I think you should do a survey of users' nationalities, and if there are more Brits. Aussies, Kiwis, Canadians and South Africans than Americans, you should adopt British English across the board! Yes I'm British! Yes I hate American English! Isn't this website Canadian?

On the balance: Pinkbike, how much are they paying you to run such an advertisement disguised as an article?

On the positive: I've been into bikes since 1991 and I have been totally uninspired by anything Specialized have ever designed. Never wanted anything they've made. This is the first thing that I could absolutely see myself riding. It looks totally pimp, totally desirable. Yes it costs about the same as a Honda Fireblade, but you are getting pretty much a factory bike. If you want a factory Fireblade it's going to cost you at least ten times that to even get close, and the engine is never going to be factory.

I can't wait to see one, and I'd love it if it was Hill wiping the smile, sorry, grimace, off Gwin's face with one! Or that cheeky scamp Brosnan for that matter!
  • + 6
 This guy needa to chill the fuck out
  • - 2
 Sorry jaame, Gwin and the session 9.9 will wipe the floor with this bike. Trek>Specialized
  • + 1
 It's not the bike, it's the rider. Gwin is in a different class to everyone else in terms of riding. I agree, he'll wipe the floor with Specialized (and everyone else). If he was on the Specialized he'd wipe the floor with Trek (and everyone else). This bike looks a lot better than the Session in my opinion.

I wish Specialized would sign him to ride this bike, and also hive him a personality while they're at it!
  • - 1
 I would say Gwin on a Session would beat Gwin on a Specialized. But its a useless argument cause Trek/Gwin will be on the top of the podium for a long time.
  • + 1
 I agree.
  • + 2
 bet you guys feel stupid ha
  • + 1
 Ha ha ha!
[Reply]
  • + 2
 To explain the 135mm rear wheel spacing.
By removing un-necessary gears from the cassette they can make the cassette skinnier meaning the flange spacing is approximately the same as a 150mm, to give the wheel build the same strength.
The axle is still a 12mm as found on the 150mm hubs, which turns the rear triangle into a solid unit, which is where the rigidity comes from.

Reason this isn't done on all bikes, because the bike manufactures would need to give a serious push to the derailleur/wheel-hub/cassette making companies to make a completely new standard for downhill, so the easiest way to get the issue was to make the rear hub spacing wider, sure you need new hub internals, but you can use the same cassette/derailleurs.

The option used here requires a specialist gear and hub set up, but if that's better for downhill then good on them for doing it but still giving the option to use standard kit on the bike 90% of buyers will be buying.

Most downhill bikers have been wondering why the hell we need 8 then 9 and now 10 gears? So trading the useless gears for wheel strength makes sense, and if the 150mm has proven strong enough, then going to the equivalent of 165mm is pointless, esp as any downhill rider knows that is the part of the bike most likely to clip anything (as the back of the bike turns inside the front).

I think this could be the start of another standard, but that's the progression of the sport. If you don't like it, jump back on a bike from 1992 and go down the runs on that, tell us then you think advancements in bikes haven't made any difference.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 Understanding the price is not rocket science. Whenever a company comes up with some brilliant new thing it's expensive because they want to try and recoup their R&D and tooling costs. The early adopters begin this process and eventually you see these features trickle down to cheaper models as the economy of scale improves. We're still a few years away from really economical carbon bikes and so what? You wait. Eventually they'll get cheaper.

This sort of unaffordable technical innovation isn't pointless. It gives rise to all kinds of engineering, design and manufacturing techniques that get implemented at every level of production. You know, like how we got Tang and velcro from NASA.

Setting up for new stuff is expensive. Think it's unreasonably priced or can't afford it? Then don't buy it. Eventually it will come down in price. They aren't compelling you to buy it. They're more interested in boosting the brand's image as a technical innovator, and that pays off in sales at every price point.

I have a current Demo and I can lose a pound off it for way less $ than this bike. But damn it's cool that they've built it.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 I thought I'll never be able to use these words: "this is porn". A shame that they don't make all versions 135x12. On a demo which is ridiculously stiff nobody needs 150mm in the first place.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Not quite sure where everyone's criticism is coming from on the price of the bike/frame? MSRP isn't even stated on here and already people are saying "10k for that bike... ridiculous!"

What you need to consider is that the bike is going to be a team replica, there's a lot of pricey stuff on top of just the frame like the ti sprung shock, wheelset, bar/stem combo, and then a version of the Boxxer that probably won't be available to the public in any way other than this. Add to the fact that Trek is asking $8900 for a carbon dh bike that doesn't have quite the bling parts that the Demo does. So why is everyone crying about the cost of this bike when they don't even know what it will be? The team replica is meant for the guy with deep pockets but they're making a more entry level model too that is going to be more reasonably priced and still have a spec. that is raceable out of the box.

For the ones complaining about the cost... The bike wasn't developed and created with your bank account in mind. It was developed to be the best of the best that they can offer. If the alloy Demo 8 II this year is selling at around $6500 it only seems reasonable that a carbon one with a suped up build kit is going to cost more right?
  • + 1
 If demand is high, price will be high. If demand is low, price will be low. The RRP has little to do with the cost of production. If a lot of people want something, the price will be high. If you can sell a pizza for $6000, you don't sell it for $6 regardless of how much it costs to make. If no one wants to buy it, they don't make it.

The point is, they are going to make an absolute killing on this bike however much they sell it for.

I think it looks fantastic and I'm happy they've made it, but I will never buy one because I'd never spend more than a month's salary on a mountain bike to use for a couple of hours at weekends. It's not worth $10k to me, but it may be to someone else.

Wait until Giant release the carbon Glory if you want to get a good deal.

As some said, in five years everything is going to be carbon, at the same price as we're paying now for ally. Just wait and see.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Oh ya spec stepping it up and now i part of the fam so look forward to buying one half price. 7.8 lbs a bit much then 10+ with shock. Basically a 34-35 lbs build which is good but not epic light weight like trek. Those treks getting cheesed out already so hopefully spec came stronger with they carbon. Honest just give me a good alm frame, that carbon is for small weenies weight watchers. Giant sit back in cutt like go ahead a spend 150k developing carbon rigs. They glory already lighter without having to give in to carbon.
  • + 1
 It's not about giving in to carbon, it's about making money. People want to buy carbon and if they don't want to, change their minds. Same with 29" wheels. Do we need them? No. Do they need to sell them to us to keep the money coming in? Yes.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Think about this... 'This bike is by far the strongest of any weve made thus far'.... the 2008 Demo 7 could hold a car+ on its front forks... Im *pretty* sure that IF you manage to break a standard Demo... you've got some more serious issues going on, like why your leg is up through your jaw. So whats the point of making a stronger bike if the bikes are meant to 'go fast between tape rather than going big'? Sounds like a sales pitch for bench bitching to me... I wanted to see a video of Hill going down a real DH track on that bike, one with rocks the size of microwaves... not a typical AM Enduro course.

And besides, 90% of those who buy the bike, are simply *NOT* that good and will never notice the difference. Its 80% rider, 20% bike.
  • + 1
 Check out the Val Di Sole replay or last years World Champs at Champery. Carbon Demos on real tracks.

"Stronger" is rarely a bad thing. The entire Demo line is crazy strong with a great track record. We really want customers and skeptics to know that you are not getting any compromise in terms of strength by switching to carbon.
  • + 1
 I know one thing that can be stronger, how's about SRAM's Boxxer series which you guys throw on the front end.

Do you guys autoclave this? How about throwing honeycomb Kevlar around the head tubes and BB's? Is it still old fashion vacuum bag resin tech from the 60's?

Or better yet, make something a bit more non-commodity like, using roller bearings in the pivots? How about conical? Would make sense right? Torsion left/right for stiffness and increased durability for wear? Or how about designing something that will keep the dirt out of the bearing pivots. That would be great.

Not to be bitter but this is getting retarded and irresponsible.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Why would you make a great bike and price it extreamly high in price. I mean I know it's a great bike but if you want this bike to be seccessful you guys cant make it to exspensive. You will end up making more money off the bike if you give it a cheap price so tons and tons of people will buy the product.
[Reply]
  • + 4
 Couple of years late into the carbon DH bike game, but a valiant effort nonetheless.
  • + 6
 its because they said they want to make it perfect. not like the first evil undead
  • + 4
 Bikes are never perfect.
  • + 7
 You've obviously never ridden my bike
  • + 6
 I mean that bikes are never perfect in the eyes of a frame manufacturer. If they were perfect then they would never change. There's always going to be some improvements that can be made, but it takes time and years of the frame being ridden by pros and amateurs alike to find them.
  • + 1
 @iggys i know watchu mean aha
[Reply]
  • + 2
 This is like watching top gear. I like the super cars but I probably will never drive one. All this does is let me know what i'm seeing if one happens to get lost and role through my neighborhood.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I worked at a bike shop for a few years in high school. one thing I learned about carbon....Crack....is the worst noise to hear. how do you crack carbon??? so many people came into the shop after wrecking and their bike just so happens to land right on a rock or what have you. If it were aluminum, you can weld a crack back and it will hold long enough to save for a new frame. carbon, you just can't do that. your bike's done for and you're out for the season unless you're $$$loaded$$$. thus this is the biggest waste of $$$ and time developing it. they need to work on a better geometry that makes the bike stronger while using less material....maybe take away one of the one million rear links??? this is a mountain bike not a Fighter jet.
  • + 1
 To my mind, they made this frame to confirm their top of the line status in bike industry.
If you're a pro and got sponsored, why don't you ride a carbon bike? You can wreck your frame every race and take one of the 10 new from your redbull/monster energy van=)
If not, and you (just like me) can't buy one of this carbon-future-spaceship-bikes every season, you'll get alu one and ride it, love it, clean it after every muddy weekend. As I do with my demo 8 '10 =)
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Hmmm get your facts straight guys: "Cassette Shimano HG-70 Capreo, 9-speed, Micro 9-26" but then you say it has a custom 7-speed cassette. Perhaps "Cassette: Shimano HG-70 Capreo 7-speed, 9-speed spacing, Micro 9-26" would be more succinct.
  • + 4
 It says 9spd because the 7spd, 9-26 block is from a 9spd cassette that uses 9spd spacing, a 9spd rear derailleur, and a 9spd shifter... you managed to figure it out so I'm sure others will be able to as well =)
  • + 1
 You'd be surprised at how many people you will confuse. This is Pinkbike, not...Pink...Brain...something...
[Reply]
  • + 1
 The six easy steps to successful Mountain bike sales...

Step 1. Take your old DH / Freeride model that everyone hates & calls a "Huck Bike"
Step 2. Find Worlds fastest DH racer & pay him to ride said bike
Step 3. Make minor changes to geometry but still keep over-complicated & heavy suspension design
Step 4. Build new model from Carbon Fibre. Act like you are the first Bicycle Company to do this & Market accordingly with huge, overkill press release detailing all design & production processes.
Step 5. Observe Internet forum Geeks harp on about new model with comments like: "AMAZING" & "OMG so hot"
Step 6. Announce limited run & sell for exuberant price to said Internet forum Geeks...
  • + 1
 made my day! =)
[Reply]
  • + 1
 The six easy steps to successful Mountain bike sales...

Step 1. Take your old DH / Freeride model that everyone hates & calls a "Huck Bike"
Step 2. Find Worlds fastest DH racer & pay him to ride said bike
Step 3. Make minor changes to geometry but still keep over-complicated & heavy suspension design
Step 4. Build new model from Carbon Fibre. Act like you are the first Bicycle Company to do this & Market accordingly with huge, overkill press release detailing all design & production processes.
Step 5. Observe Internet forum Geeks harp on about new model with comments like: "AMAZING" & "OMG so hot"
Step 6. Announce limited run & sell for exuberant price to said Internet forum Geeks...
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I'm impressed by the frame, no doubt about it. But these are the times where We drowning in tech bullshit, got it up my ears, I even took a sip of 10sp. In those smelly times I salute Spec for making something simplier, especially on a cutting edge bike. Tons of respect to Specialized from my side dor that drive train!
[Reply]
  • + 0
 All that work to lose 0.9 lbs... Seems pretty ridiculous. Carbon Fiber is as strong as alloy frames, but if you chip the carbon from a crash or something that spot will crack or shatter pretty easily. For 10 grand, I'd stick with an alloy frame and save the cash.
  • + 2
 Carbon frames can be repaired using the same techinques they use in the aerospace industry.
  • + 5
 And good luck chipping the carbon.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 if i got a pound for every time rob warner said "look at the time" during the val di sole world cup, i would be able to afford demo 8 carbon
  • + 1
 he said it once?
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Less than an inch and a half in top tube length from the small to the large frame, and the large is still small. I wish Specialized knew that there were riders above 6' tall.
[Reply]
  • + 0
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[Reply]
  • + 1
 The rear triangle in the grey/yellow design drawing of the frame looks interesting.... possibly asymetrical/no double seatstay on drive side on hinted future carbon rear end???
[Reply]
  • + 1
 i agree with you (ndublCool of course that this type of development it´s openning new doors, but for the most of us they are just out of reach they are to expensive, but if there anyone that could buy them, hey good for them.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 i love the demo 8 but it has to be said the manufactures are taking the piss with pricing it's getting cheaper to get in to motor x than mountain biking, 2012 demo 8 £5000 WTF you shove it for that price.
[Reply]
  • + 4
 Anyone else think it said the frame weighed only 0.9 lbs????
[Reply]
  • + 4
 I love how somebody can take something awesome, and make it amazing
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Bikes sure have come a very long way in the past 15, even 7-8 years. I'm pretty happy about their colour choices too. They look far more reasonable than some of the previous ones.
[Reply]
  • + 3
 Websters needs to update their dictionaries.. I foresee a new photo for the word "sexy"
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I have a quick question if anyone knows. You know the 5 inch bb height setting, or the "Sam hill bb setting", can you put that into a 2011 or 2012 demo??
  • + 1
 The carbon bike has a new lower option that is 5mm lower than the alloy bikes.
  • + 1
 I think what he is trying to ask, and a question i have as well is if you can swap the cams in the rear mount for the 13.3 setting or is the super low geo only possible with the carbon version.
  • + 11
 Understood now. The 13.3 low option is only possible on the carbon bike.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 great coverage here, and the bike looks sick...

if a carbon demo w/ shock is 10.2lbs, how heavy is an aluminum demo w/ a shock..?
  • + 1
 add 0.9 lbs and you get: 11.1 lbs.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Nice bike but 10000 I could buy a BMW 5series for that sort of money............ Great bike but spesh u need to sort the price out!!!!
[Reply]
  • + 2
 I spent my 10 grand on a 2012 Yamaha YZ450, FMF pipe, Factory connection suspension AND a new Shoei Helmet!!!!!!!!
[Reply]
  • + 2
 Think ill buy one just to ride to the local Sainsbury's and back to get me a six pack in style.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 im gonna wait a few years i cant trust theses new productes the second they come out it takes a another year for them to be made perfect!!!
[Reply]
  • + 3
 "Price : TBA"
Does it stand for "Too Big to be Announced?"
[Reply]
  • + 3
 song: Zeds Dead & Omar Linx - No Prayer (Keys N Krates Remix)
[Reply]
  • + 2
 Holy shit. Now i've got the normal Demo 8 bought this year and now they come with a carbon bike... WHY?!
  • + 2
 I feel your pain dude, I bought one too so i second the motion........Why?Why?
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Just ordered 5 of those things on ride to work from halfords scheme , should be nice and comfortable on the road, may fit dynamos for winter....life is awesome
[Reply]
  • + 1
 So is that rear shock mount compatible with a large variety of shocks, or is it limited to only a few like the contemporary Demos?
  • + 1
 Fox, Rock Shox, Cane Creek and probably others.
[Reply]
  • + 3
 just exclusively, now is the next giant glory!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Hey "Lily", time to go and chase some carbon demos! Love that dog and kudo's to Sam and the gang! Now go out and get us some wins!
[Reply]
  • + 2
 Wicked good write up and videos
[Reply]
  • + 2
 Made in asia? 10k? Peace!
[Reply]
  • + 2
 This makes me wanna get a job at making bikes.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 They look like they crash good have pictures to prove it from a local race in california that I was at
[Reply]
  • + 1
 10 grand for a bike is an abuse, i think is a good campaign of marketing nothing else !
[Reply]
  • + 1
 that's so awesome...
i hope can buy this bike
but that's only in my dream..Frown
[Reply]
  • + 1
 sick stuff now just bring the pitch back to life and make a carbon version of it :-)
[Reply]
  • + 2
 Would rather own a V10c. Waiting for Intense's next carbon DH bike.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 hi Found my next bike.................................../.,.//////////////////
[Reply]
  • + 2
 this shouldn't be riden, they should be in a glass desplay cabinate
[Reply]
  • + 1
 im happy with my big heavy stallion...dont need a bike like this th have fun! Big Grin
[Reply]
  • + 1
 "BlackGold" A reference to a certain coating used by a competitor, I see. Smile
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Where can I buy the Specialized Half Waffle grips? I need some lock on grips that match to my Renthal bars.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Just almost a pound difference from its aluminum, will that make any difference at all?
[Reply]
  • + 1
 The replica frame has a 150 rear and the complete has a 135 rear . Why would that be ? .
  • + 1
 Aftermarket compatibility most likely.
  • + 2
 compatibility with what? both size hubs are readily available and 150mm is common place with dh bikes
  • + 1
 The complete bike is the team replica with 9t cassette and micro drivetrain. We figured the 150 frameset would be more widely compatible.
  • + 1
 Can you purchase the 135 chainstay/seatstay or get it as an option for the frameset?
  • + 1
 I do not think we will be offering that as an option.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 And how much will one of these beauties cost? Oh sh!t 10 grand... well there goes my pay check for a few months...
[Reply]
  • + 1
 S-Works enduro is around 9 grand. This thing prob hovers around that in price
  • + 1
 I need a job....
[Reply]
  • + 1
 demo team replica, photo and article say 7speed but spec sheet says 9 speed???
FK 10 speed
  • + 2
 The cogs are from a 9spd block and use 9 speed spacing.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Just got a carbon session frame...eager to see how they both compare. Guess we'll have to wait!
[Reply]
  • + 2
 interesting choice with a 12 x 135 rear hub.
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  • + 1
 the fact thats its not a 10 speed makes me happy. who needs all those gears!!
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  • + 2
 Very very very very nice bike Smile
[Reply]
  • + 0
 Sick looking frame, the red/black color scheme is wicked. Alas, I think I would still go with the Trek Session, less bearings to worry about (me being lazy).
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  • + 2
 Too bad it will cost $10000
[Reply]
  • + 2
 i might be able to afford a normal demo now!!!!Smile
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  • + 2
 MSRP One Meeeellion Dollars!
  • + 1
 But it's the shark with freakin lasssssser beams of all bikes, dude.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 9 speed ? . What about this 6 speed thing there been going on about .
  • + 1
 I sort of Jumped the gun , i was looking at the spec sheet but yes if id looked at the bike you can clearly see the rear cassette is different . But i was more thinking that the xo 9 s was old teck and the newer 10 would have been used .
[Reply]
  • + 1
 fuck me sideways with a lunch box
[Reply]
  • + 1
 This looks great! When do we get a carbon Glory?
[Reply]
  • - 3
 blah blah blah. dont like the bike? dont buy it even if you could afford it. their sales will plummet and it will flop. 1. they'll lower the price or 2. they'll scrap this trendy useless carbon idea. the best idea is grow some balls and build things called muscles and pedal the few extra lbs and get an Apocalypse for less $$$ and literally crush this sh!t bike. people who think carbon fiber is such a rare and expensive product are complete jackasses to keep suckering into paying for it.
  • + 1
 get fucked you gay mutt
  • + 1
 yea! lets stop the human progress and simply grow some leg muscles! your the genious humanity was waiting for.
  • - 1
 well, i guess we see who the jackasses are
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I think I speak for everyone when I say"ORGASMIC"
[Reply]
  • + 1
 SIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIICK!!!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 all the rear links don't look as massively awesome like the older demos.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 damn I love my Demo!!! =)
[Reply]
  • + 1
 looks dope! too bad i already love my old demo.
  • + 1
 Your right. For the average joe like me I like my 2012 Demo!!!!
[Reply]
  • + 2
 hot, can we afford it?
[Reply]
  • + 1
 sooooooooooooooooooo sick!!!!!!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 ups! they forgot the integrated fork bumper
[Reply]
  • + 2
 weight?
  • + 1
 the 2012 demo is 16.819kg(no pedals) so the carbon one which is 408gr lighter weights 16,411kg or less i think...
[Reply]
  • + 1
 tried to keep this a secret eh mike? Wink
[Reply]
  • + 1
 ...I have no words for this.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 where was this shot? what woods?
[Reply]
  • + 1
 ____________

^speechless
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Loving the downtube protector, anyway of buying these??
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Nice Bike. Looks a lot like the Status but nicer.
[Reply]
  • - 2
 Massive shocks made to eat huge drops plus a light light frame equals human sling shot. dumbest idea to bring the "light era" to downhill. If you have a problem making fast corners, learn to ride.
  • + 2
 are you familiar with the rebound adjustment? Also consider that the shock is absorbing the weight of the rider. the frame is only a few lbs. The rider's butt weighs the most.
  • + 1
 so it seems the weight issue is the rider, huh? well maybe we should stick with pedaling heavier bikes then.
  • + 1
 yeah, feel like a couple of lbs of sprung weight are not a real big deal.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Still dont understand how a lighter bikes is faster on a downhill. Frown
  • + 8
 Its not that its faster, its that its easier to manuever on the trail, just like a dj bike. just throw it where you want it to go. making you faster on the trail.
  • - 3
 Same, me and a couple of my friends are still trying to figure that out! I'd think a heavier bike is faster down a hill...more effort but faster?:/
  • + 3
 short version - if you can shut it down quicker and accelerate quicker you have an advantage..lighter is better..
  • + 1
 A culture of speed bike shop said they built up a 26lb (don't quote that it was around there) carbon session and it was way too twitchy for them.
  • + 4
 A heavy bike has dulled responses every time you try to change direction. This is because the mass you're trying to turn away from it's trajectory each time takes greater energy to do. So where a quick flick on a light bike is easy, doing the same on a heavier bike requires more effort. This is especially noticeable on wheels and unsprung mass. A lighter bike doesn't plough in the same way so it's easier to pop over the terrain - if you look at racers very few plough through sections and instead ride far more nimbly, placing the bike on the exact inch of trail that they want or need it to be on. The lighter the bike, the more precise you can be, the less energy you expend to move and so as a result you're faster. That is, if you're good enough to make the most of these benefits. An object continues in a steady state until a force acts on it. Every time you accelerate, brake, turn etc is a force of action to take the bike away from that steady state. Less energy into your brakes means that they stay cooler, less weight means less energy required to accelerate, less energy to turn.
  • + 4
 In the WC and get the bike for free: Get a carbon


Messing around racing the locals and nationals: Get the normal


It's insane how much they are asking now. With the reported $10,000, only the Specialized team riders will be riding these suckers, or those who actually believe that an extra couple grand will make you faster. It's insane. I hate it that they can sell the Status, an amazing rig with class reviews, for more than half the price of these, yet still get away with the huge price tags. Paying for the name.

Also, it's only a single pound lighter! What's the point!?
  • + 2
 Those with too much money will buy the team replica, spesh knows there target audience, and they know products like these do sell just in small quantities.
  • + 0
 but you also get a 12x135 rear end with less parts than the cheaper model and you can get your bottom bracket practically on the ground so you can snap those X0 cranks even easier now, but none the less people will still buy it
  • + 1
 I vote that they continue to make the alloy 2012 model, but for at least $2000 less than it is now because all the r&d is done already and the 2012 model is like so old its made from metal. keep the carbon for race teams and hipsters.
  • + 2
 Thanks for trying to explain it. Its just weird cause you never hear of weight weenies in DH like you do in XC.
  • + 1
 objcets on earth accellerate at 9.8 meters per second ( given this is in free fall ) regardless of their weight, and once you hit 54 M/sec - 76M sec you arnt going any faster no matter what ( human maximum velocity 54 starfished 76 legs or head first fall ) but as others have stated, lighter accellerates faster and is less work and easier to stop,turn, and flick.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I've always wanted a normal demo...now they got even carbon !
[Reply]
  • + 0
 The Trek Session 9.9 Frame is almost 3 lbs lighter, and it looks way cleaner!! Too much linkage on the Specialized.
  • + 1
 The linkages are what makes the suspension path so progressive and linear, I'd take performance over weight any day to be honest.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Why do they put Boxxer stickers on that Marzocchi fork? =)
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Ten grand for a bicycle is plain wrong...on all levels!!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 That is the sickest specialized iv ever seen
[Reply]
  • + 1
 wondered how long it would take specialized to make a carbon demo
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  • + 1
 Let me sell my car first....
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  • + 2
 Not that really light
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  • + 1
 want, cant afford. :o(
[Reply]
  • + 1
 1 billion gajillion fafillion shabadooloolilymillion dollars
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Is the rear triangle carbon?!?!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 imagine this thing with the new fox 40s
  • + 1
 Mmmmmmmmmmm................. That would be complete PORRRNNN!!!!
  • + 2
 New 40 would be super sick, but I wonder if they made enough room on the dtube/headtube junction on this rendition to run a 40 w/o a spacer/worrying about the lower crown hitting the frame? That was a pretty big (but the only) oversight on the alu version.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 The "S-Works" decal just compliments the bike Big Grin
[Reply]
  • + 1
 SICK !!! gonna have it !!
  • + 1
 F**k u won the lottery!!!???
[Reply]
  • + 1
 shit!!!!!!!!!!!!!! one of the best bikes i ever saw
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I was hoping to see some Roval wheels on there Smile
[Reply]
  • + 1
 that's hotter than Megan Fox
  • + 1
 Megan Fox in my bed or a carbon demo????? Oh the humanity........: 0
  • + 2
 Carbon Demo in your bed.
  • + 2
 I WOULDN'T GO THAT FAR!...... But Megan fox on that.... Now ur talking!!!
  • + 2
 Who is Megan Fox..?
  • + 2
 To themountain- the very same computer you use to look at pinkbike can also be used to "Google search" the name/images Megan Fox. Try it out.
  • + 2
 yall spelled std wrong.
[Reply]
  • + 0
 Can anyone explain the benefits of a 135 mm rear hub spacing VS a 150 mm spacing?
  • + 1
 heel and terrain clearance, and a hair lighter
  • + 1
 i'm really curious about this 135mm hub... i had a 09 demo(super nice ride and i'd love to have one of these replicas, love demosWink which had a 135mm hub... but ever since the demo(demo 8 was made/redesigned) the team has been riding 150mm, and finally you guys at spec made a 150mm rear end along with the super cool new design in 2011... so now im just really curious, will the team even be riding this 135mm end or will it be more like a swap between ends depending on the tracks or will they end up using the 150mm anyways? Wink (ppl might not care, but im just curious why ya going 135mm to 150mm and now again 135mm for the high end rides)
  • + 1
 Great questions!

In 2009, our 135 Demos had an asymmetrical rear end - meaning the rear hub actually sat 6mm toward the drive side to maintain a simulated 150 chainline, and you would dish your hub back 6 mm, which built a stronger symmetrical rear wheel.

When we first started working with the Monster Team, they requested 150 and we moved production bikes to 150 because 150/83 it had become the DH standard.

Some of the things we subsequently learned from the Team were that they had too many gears, too close of ratios, wide shoes which could rub on the seatstays and they frequently damaged bash guards. This lead to the micro-drive concept - smaller chainrings, 6 speeds and 9t cog.

135 provides the proper chainline when using 6 or 7 cogs. The Specialized/Monster Team ran 135 all last year and continues to run it exclusively.
  • + 1
 ok, thats making great sense and thanks for cleaing this great mystery of mine Wink
will this 135 rear end become standart on the demo again, in the future? as in, when these 250 awesome replicas are gone, will "mortals" be able to get a 135 rear again Wink
and for those black gold forks, do you know if they are going into production any time soon? Smile
  • + 1
 The 9t 6/7 speed setup is still pretty unique. I don't think it will be very common anytime soon, so 135 will probably not spread to the masses quickly. It will only be on the replica bike at this time.

Black Gold forks will be found firstly on this Demo. I am sure they will be available elsewhere later.
  • + 1
 Will specialized be offering after sales ultra sound tests to people who have large impacts to ensure the layup is still optimized and these gaps between the layers they speak of do not form ?
Would Spec advise people to continue riding the frames after a massive impact not knowing if it's safe to ride ?
Not trying to bash here just curious
  • + 1
 I don't think there's a single manufacturer that would recommend you continue riding their frame after a 'massive' impact.

Let's face it, a large/massive impact on Alu frame would cause a huge dent or may even bend or snap the frame.

I'd be more concerned about Carbon's abilities to withstand repeated smaller abrasive forces. I know chainstays/seatstays are supposidly expensive to manufacture in Carbon but there has to be a reason why none have trickled through to the consumer yet? The rear end or my DH bike's have always taken most abuse, through chainslap, crashing etc... so perhaps there's something to read into here?

How many world cup level DH frames, carbon and Alu, do you see getting totalled at races, and they're ridden harder and faster than any of us mere mortals can manage?

All of the top guys are on Carbon bikes now. Trek, Specialized, Santa Cruz, GT, Yeti are all putting their Carbon bikes to the test on the world cup scene and I doubt Scott will be too far behind the game.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 very good!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
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  • + 1
 the only carbon downhill bike i would trust
[Reply]
  • + 1
 just another bike
[Reply]
  • + 0
 wowowowoowow no coment for this bike
[Reply]
  • + 1
 But is a beautiful bike
[Reply]
  • + 1
 So Perfect ! *-*
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Cool, Id sport one.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 wow it's sometimes!!
[Reply]
  • + 0
 Carbon can S my D, carbon blowwwwssssssssss.....
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Just too good Smile wooooo
[Reply]
  • + 1
 this is so sick
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Simply the best :O
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I WANT 1 !!!!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 insanly cool, do want
[Reply]
  • - 3
 Only pussies who can't chuck a normal bike around a dh track buy carbon bikes.
  • + 1
 So you're calling Sam Hill a pussie? wow.
  • + 0
 think of one thing though... he probably got this bike for free. hence why i said 'buy'
[Reply]
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