SRAM Debuts Wider Carbon and Aluminum Rimmed Wheelsets

Apr 11, 2013
by Mike Levy  
 
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SRAM TRAIL HOUSE: SEDONA, ARIZONA
RAIL and ROAM
Wheels

WORDS Mike Levy
PHOTOS Adrian Marcoux and Sebastian Schieck


A Different Approach

Last month we visited Sedona, Arizona, for SRAM's annual 'Trail House' press camp event that puts a focus on riding product instead of just talking about it, and while there we were able to ride and gather a first impression of RockShox's 2014 Pike fork. We also got the chance to put some miles on new wheel offerings from SRAM, with a set of their 2014 Rail 50 wheels fitted to our Santa Cruz Tallboy LT Carbon, as well as gather some first hand knowledge from the minds behind those and the new carbon fiber Roam 60 wheels. Many miles were ridden on Sedona's dusty and rocky singletrack, a lot of fun was had, and we managed to escape with only third degree burns to our pale Canadian skin.

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  School's in session. SRAM's wheel project manager, Bastian Donz, talks to the group about the new wheels before heading out to kick up some dust.


Wider is Better?

While the answer to that question is often a clear "no" when talking about certain things in life, the general consensus these days is that a few millimeters of added rim width truly does offer some benefits over a rim with more traditional dimensions. SRAM apparently agrees, with their new Roam and Rail wheel series sporting inner profiles that are a few millimeters wider than usual: 21mm for the Roam, and 23mm for the Rail. Pinkbike's own Richard Cunningham recently laid out his arguments for the acceptance of wider rims, making some very good points that are certainly relevant here considering SRAM's move to slightly wider profiles.

More tread contact because the tread deflects less dramatically under lateral loads and remains more parallel to the rim.

Stability is increased because rims add a significant amount of lateral support to a tire - especially large volume tires like the 2.35'' and 2.4'' rubber that has become regular fare for XC/Trail and AM riders. A tire casing could be made lighter weight and boosting the tire’s lateral stability should eliminate burping.

Weight savings. Consider the tire and wheel as an integrated unit. The tire weighs much more than the rim, so a wider rim, though slightly heavier, adds volume to the tire without adding additional rubber and tire casing. This could be especially beneficial to 29ers because the big wheel already spins way too much rubber.



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Roam 60 - Strength Before Weight

Ask the average rider what type of use carbon fiber rims are best suited for and there is a good chance that you'll hear cross-country racing as their answer, although that train of thought is slowly changing as burlier carbon rims become available. And while there is no argument that there are already carbon rim and wheel options out there intended to be used for some aggressive riding, the $2199 USD Roam 60 marks SRAM's first foray into such territory, with their older Rise series of carbon rimmed wheels being aimed at the cross-country set. In fact, SRAM is confident enough in the their new Roam 60 wheels to state that the are "strong enough for the toughest enduro races''. The 1495 gram (26'' set, claimed ) Roam 60 wheelset is far from being heavy, although SRAM's wheel project manager, Bastian Donz, told us that the carbon fiber was actually added to the rim to greatly increase strength - they could have been even lighter.

2014 SRAM Roam 60 Details
• Intended use: trail/all-mountain/enduro
• Available in 26'', 27.5'', 29'' sizes
• Asymmetrical, Taper Core carbon fiber rim
• 21mm internal width, 29mm outer
• UST rim bed shape
• Double butted, straight-pull stainless steel spokes
• Locking aluminum nipples
• Tool-less axle conversion to all sizes
• 9, 10, and 11 speed XX1 compatible
• Uses DT swiss' 36 tooth Star Ratchet driver
• 26'' - 1495g, 27.5'' - 1550g, 29'' - 1625g
• Available this July
• MSRP: $2199 USD


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Rail 50 - More Aluminum, More Aggressive

While the carbon rimmed Roam 60s shown above are a lightweight option for those who are looking for a feathery wheelset that can stand up to some solid riding, the $1072 USD Rail 50s are an aluminum option that SRAM claims can ''can withstand the most aggressive all-mountain/enduro riding...''. At a more than respectable 1690 grams for the 26'' size, they are also light enough to not put off most of us gram counters. The key difference between the two wheelsets, besides the carbon and aluminum rims and the price gap that comes with that, is the rim width: internally, the Roam rim measures 21mm while the Rail comes in at 23mm. It may only be two millimeters, but that can make a big difference when an aggressive rider is using a wide, 2.4'' tire as so many do these days. The result should be more support for the tire casing, a larger footprint, and less chance of burping tubeless setups.

Both the rim material and rim width may be different, but the same principles found on the Roam series can also be spotted on the Rail 50 and Rail 60 (SRAM didn't comment on a carbon rimmed version of the Rail, but we can assume that there will be one and it will be called the Rail 60 ). Stainless steel, straight pull spokes are used, leading down to smart looking hubs that can be converted to any axle size without requiring tools, and the rear hub employs DT's Star Ratchet driver system. The Rail rim uses a UST rim bed profile, and 26'', 27.5'', and 29'' sizes will be available when the wheels hit the market this coming July.

2014 SRAM Rail 50 Details
• Intended use: aggressive all-mountain/enduro
• Available in 26'', 27.5'', 29'' sizes
• Asymmetrical, Taper Core aluminum rim
• 23mm internal width, 28mm outer
• UST rim bed shape
• Double butted, straight-pull stainless steel spokes
• Locking aluminum nipples
• Tool-less axle conversion to all sizes
• 9, 10, and 11 speed XX1 compatible
• Uses DT swiss' Star Ratchet driver
• 26'' - 1690g, 27.5'' - 1750g, 29'' - 1830g
• Available this July
• MSRP: $1072 USD




Taper Core and UST

Being able to put extra material only where it is required is key to manufacturing a component that is both relatively light and strong, but doing that isn't exactly easy. From the outside, SRAM's three new rims, the aluminum Rail and both the aluminum and carbon Roam rims, appear to use a somewhat standard shape. The cross-section view (shown at right ) of each reveals more of the story, though, with it being clear that there is some internal trickery going on. Did you spot the varying thickness of each rim's sidewall? Much like the butted tubes of a bike frame, SRAM's extrusion shape (and mold for the carbon Roam 60 rim ) places material at the sidewall and rim bed junction where it adds support to the sidewall itself. The result should be increased dent resistance, although we'll need to put some proper trail time on the new wheels to see if it really does help. Arguably more important than the Taper Core rim wall shape, SRAM has chosen to use a UST rim bed and bead hook on all of their new rims. This is a welcome change that will greatly limit the chance of burping a tire, not to mention making tubeless installs much easier.



New Hubs, One Spoke

The fresh rims aren't the only talking point, with SRAM designing completely new hubs for both the Roam and Rail wheelsets. Yes, they still use straight pull spokes, but that is about the only thing that they have in common with the older hubs employed on their Rise wheels. The shell features stacked flanges that allow the spokes for each side of the rim to sit as outboard as possible for better dishing and a stronger build, and SRAM told us that this also allows for slightly better vertical compliance without sacrificing lateral rigidity. Precise flange height dimensions also mean that only a single spoke length is required for the entire wheelset. Front, rear, drive, and non-drive all use the very same length - 270mm for 26'', 281mm for 27.5'', and 300mm for 29'' - cue golf claps from mechanics all around the world.

Internally, SRAM has made a big change from the traditional pawl layout employed in their older hubs to DT Swiss' proven Star Ratchet driver. We're
excited about this move as, like many riders who have used DT's hubs, we've had zero trouble with their simple two spring and twin ratchets. This will also make getting parts quite easy, with the Star Ratchet system being widely used for many years.

Duncan Riffle
  If you're a fan of racing you'll likely know of Duncan Riffle, one of the fastest American downhillers. Although he will likely contend the Enduro World Series, Riffle has taken a step back from racing downhill fulltime and taken a positon at SRAM - the pace at press camps is going to go up! A small off-trail excursion, a costly error in Sedona, put Riffle into the cactus and required twenty minutes of trail-side tweezer time to remove the offending spikes during one of our rides.

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Rail 50 Ridden:
bigquotesWe spent two solid days in Sedona with our Santa Cruz Tallboy LT Carbon sporting a set of the new Rail 50 wheels, and that is far from being enough for genuine review, we most certainly went out of our way to take some questionable lines in the name of testing. The result? Nothing, and we mean that in a good way. The wheels were invisible under us, which definitely counts for something in our books. Shod with Schwalbe's sticky Hans Dampf tires, they felt rigid and didn't make a single pop or squeak. The front tire, a burly 2.4'' pick, looked imposing mounted on the 23mm wide (internal ) rim, as did the 2.2'' rear tire, and the wide profile surely helped to protect the rim despite the relatively low tire pressure that we chose to run. One particular section featured an extremely hard mid-corner compression that had us wondering if we were going to pull the tires off given their soft pressure, something that more than one rider in the group openly questioned, but none of us managed to burp either the front or rear tires during either day of riding - moving to a UST inner rim profile was a smart choice by SRAM. The same could be said of them going to DT's Star Ratchet hub internals - why try and reinvent the wheel if something works so well to begin with? While SRAM isn't the first company to begin producing slightly wider rims, we feel that it is a trend that makes a lot of sense. We're looking forward to being able to perform a proper test of the new wheels that should flesh out any potential issues, so stay tuned for long term evaluation down the road. - Mike Levy



www.sram.com

86 Comments

  • + 57
 The new Industry 9 Torch 29 wheels are 23.5 mm internal rim width and weigh 1570g taped for tubeless and with valve stems (I weighed my own pair) and only cost $1100! I agree SRAM that wider is better but compared to the competition you are: 1) not wide enough, 2) too heavy, 3) too expensive! Step in the right direction, but try again.
  • + 39
 SRAM hasn't been building all mountain wheels for very long.
The good news is:
1) They have a huge R&D compared to small companies.
2) They are making an effort to get better.
3) They will catch up.
The more competition there is, the better choices and prices the riders get. It's a win/win for us.
  • + 4
 Dear god! My entire bike cost less than one of these rims! I wouldn't mind having a pair, as soon as I sell my left kidney...
  • + 2
 The Rail 50 wheels look pretty competitive when compared to the Mavic Crossmax SX, wider and lighter. Will have to wait and see how the Australian price compares.
  • + 1
 My thoughts exactly. The new stan flows on hope hubs are wider for 600$. They're 300g heavier than the roam but they're alu... and you get a killer rear hub sound. Can't fault them at all so far. I'd say sram are wayyyyy off with their pricing.
[Reply]
  • + 29
 $2199 for a pair of wheels no thanks SRAM,i buy for 1/2 the price a Syntace MX wheelset that are on par with almost the same weights with wider rims
  • + 4
 dude for that much cash, I'll go buy a set of king hubs, ti sapim CX-Ray spokes, and I will lace it to the classic 719 AL. probably still cheaper. and probably same weight range.
  • + 3
 Not to mention custom wheels will always be better than stock wheels
  • + 8
 People are missing the point, even if they don't directly beat the competition in every category, now there is more incentive to run SRAM wheels at all, where as before people might not have considered them for AM/Enduro category. They're stepping their game up and heading in the right direction, that's a good thing for the whole industry. I don't care how cheap your alloy wheels are compared to high end carbon mountain wheels.
  • + 12
 Big reason i would like carbon is that you cant put a ding in them. Ok they can crack but it will take a much harder hit to crack a carbon rim than it takes to dent an ali one. One day i might be able to afford them and try out this theory.
  • + 12
 Rims this expensive are for sponsored riders who get em' for free. Everybody else is either rich or a fool, or rich and a fool...
  • + 6
 @ Summit....I guarantee you won't build that wheelset. Sapim doesn't make Ti CX-Ray spokes.

As for the article goes....Carbon wheels will always be for the pure racers or people with deep(er) pockets. I don't understand why people seem to think otherwise and/or complain about the cost. For the normal folks, you can buy Stans rims that are REALLY close to carbon wheel weights for a tiny fraction of the cost. You can also lace them to hubs like King, Hadley, I9, and Hopes and be 100% positive your hubs don't suck or you can go with some shoddy SRAM/DT hubs and hope your stuff doesn't break.

But, SRAM's awesome they're bringing more to the market. That's always positive, no matter what the product is.
  • + 2
 sorry misinterpreted "light as titanium" always thought they were ti. either way, that wasn't my point, my point was that you could be a stellar fully custom high end wheelset for less. wheres the fun in buying stuff out of a box. if your gonna drop the cash may as well enjoy it and build something custom.
  • + 2
 The new Roval Transerse on the 13 Enduro S-Works...those wheels are $1650 and are lighter I believe and wider....SRAM can't come in at those prices IMO
  • + 1
 @Shoe2190 read PB's review of the Enve DH Wheelset before making a decision...
  • + 1
 If its the review I think your on about it was a biased review by a carbon hater who had made up his mind before he even got on them.
  • + 1
 "that's a good thing for the whole industry".

Those rims are nothing special and they cost a small fortune compared to the better options. Correct me if I'm wrong but if bike manufacturers start speccing those on complete bikes with sram mechs, you'd actually pay more money for less quality.
[Reply]
  • + 8
 Rad write-up.
I'm stoked on this - Hub flanges designed with dish and balanced tension in mind from a major player? Asymmetrical (also wider) rim profiles and straight pull spokes, too? Sign me up - I'm glad to see the attention to wheel design here. The focus on strength (see: stiffness) is definitely nice, considering these are aimed at the rough-and-tumble part of the trail. I know other companies have had similar tech in one place or another but this is one of the more intelligent designs I've seen that is utilizing more than one or two good practices to improve strength.
I will say it's difficult if not impossible to spec and build a custom wheelset with optimized straight-pull flanges, both asymmetrical and wide rims, and be able to offer XX1 compatibility at the same time as coming in at weights competitive or better than Mavic offerings (don't forget the same-size spoke lengths per wheel size, that's a knowing wink to mechanics from SRAM, and a trick that almost nobody has bothered with). Naturally the price is high, I would say fairly so, just because there is clearly a lot of work behind these wheels. I'm excited to see these out in the wild. There will definitely be people interested enough in these to drop the extra cash over other (not only cheaper but some more expensive) options. Pre-built wheels from well-known brands are only getting better and better, if you wanted a custom wheel that was this well designed you'd be paying much more and probably getting a little less.
  • + 3
 I got to see a pair of the rails a month ago while i was down in colorado springs at a brewpub right near by the RockShox HQ, trinity brewing co. It had quite a few nifty bits on it including a cnc machined lever that was obviously in early prototype phase mater to an XO caliper. Wonder what else they are brewing overthere.
[Reply]
  • + 10
 cough...FLOW EX 25MM INTERNAL WIDTH...cough.
  • + 2
 And a pair of Flow rims alone are nearly a kilogram in the 26" and over a kilo in the 650B and 29er models, nevermind the weight of spokes and hubs. They also are not UST rims and still need to be taped and run sealant to seal tubeless-ready tires. Hell the Velocity P35 is only slightly heavier than the Flow EX's but are also tubeless-ready (with tape/sealant), are significantly wider (35mm outside, about 31mm inside), come in ten different colours, and cost less.
  • + 4
 Iam running blunt 35s right now they are great for the price.
  • + 4
 spank subrosa = 24.5 internal
WTB I 23 = 23mm internal

...as well.

Loving that the options are starting to pile up for wider rims.
  • + 2
 Hell, six years ago... Velocity Blunts, 24 internal / 28 external, for a 460g 650B rim.
  • + 5
 Deeeight, for a start if you run true tubeless tires you don't need sealant on flows, my flows burp less and hold tires better than my ust 823 mavic rim FACT. They also cost less. True they need taped but I bet your the sram wheels need taped to because there are holes for fitting spokes. It's not exactly hard to fit a strip off tape in fact it's much easier then messing with the stupid mavic bolts when building a wheel. Come on mate it's not rocket science.
  • + 1
 I have Blunt 35's on my Canfield Yelli Screamy and there is a huge difference between these and my old Arch's. The extra 10mm of internal width makes a huge difference.
  • + 1
 If I'm not mistaken, a complete 26" flow ex wheelset is 1780 grams and they're significantly wider. For 600$ it looks like a much better deal.
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  • + 8
 Sod it! Im buying a fatbike!
[Reply]
  • + 6
 "WHEELS SHOULD NOT COST 2f*ckING THOUSAND DOLLARS" DOUCHE BAGS.. ANY f*ckING WHEEL......... THIS SHIT IS GETTIN OUT OF HAND.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 Who is buying this sh*t? Seriously? $2k wheels, $5k frames, $2k forks... it is getting absurd, and I bet a majority of those purchased are from "serious" riders, you know the type. Only out when it is sunny, 70 degrees, and garage art the bike the rest of the year.
[Reply]
  • + 6
 2mm wider ? really ? that is less than the width of the rim wall..
  • + 7
 true, and it'd be nice if they listed the individual rim weights so the rank & file doubters could compare them to their fanboy favourites.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Sorry but Pinkbike is kissing SRAM's ass here. These rims are nothing new, just new to SRAM. They devoted so much space to basically a product launch. Look at Salsa Gordos who went 35mm years ago and Velocity Blunts are that wide today. I'm a true believer in wider is better and I'm not interested in anything less than 30mm outside rim diameter. The Syntace wheels look very promising, but they are pretty expensive as well. Those puppies go to 40mm!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Has anybody else here tried 2.35 high rollers on a 19mm internal rim and found that the grip levels are insane at all lean angles, despite having to run quite high pressures? I've found that with this tire I prefer a 19mm rim over a 21 or 23mm rim which I find quite baffling. All other tires I've tried I prefer on the wider rims. Thought it may have something to do with the extremely square profile of the high roller but can't think of why.
[Reply]
  • + 3
 +1 for true UST bead. The only way to go. Stan's was good for old, regular tires, and with EX series they are moving in the wrong direction.

UST works.
[Reply]
  • + 3
 Wider, is definitely, always better when it comes to round things that bang.... trail banging of course you dirty minded people
[Reply]
  • + 1
 that first comment is perfect, why advertise wide, if it's not even wide? 23mm is pretty common now, I would call 21mm narrow, too narrow for me at least. If I were to dial up some carbon rims I would go beyond 25mm internal (Flow EX, Equalizer 31, etc.)
[Reply]
  • + 5
 21MM internal width? Wow, nobody has thought of that have they ? Wink
  • + 3
 I had a chuckle as well. I would have thought 23 - 25 mm might have gone down a bit better if they were trying that on for size.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Wow, when they say varying thickness in the rim sidewall - check out how thick the sidewall on the carbon rim is (midway between the spoke hole and rim bed/where a brake track would be - particularly the right side). I know carbon is strong, but what is that 1 or 2 layers? I'd be concerned over having a sharp pointy rock coming in contact with that (and I've got enough evidence of that happening on my aluminum rims to know it happens) - and enough experience riding carbon windsurf boards for years in Hawaii and Hood River to know that while carbon may be strong as %*?! generally, it isn't impact proof when it comes to sharp pointy rocks...
  • + 0
 I have a custom made Epoxi-glass-clarkfoam waveboard from 1990 - still going strong and looking almost fresh after many years of use in Spreck, Rio Vista, SofF . All the while I haven been using up 4 or 5 carbon/epoxy/styrofoam boards. Layerseparation and waterleakage turned them goey. Impactresistance is definitely lower. Weight is roughly similar.


"state that the are "strong enough for the toughest enduro races''.
Means XC...

Who pays 2k for Sram plastic wheelset?
Who pays 1k for Sram alu wheelset?
I for sure wont. Proven though wide rimmed Sunringle dh-rated wheelset with Novatechubs run around 300-350. Immoral and unjustified markup. No sale here for stickerware.
  • - 1
 In the cut-away view image, the rim in the center looks asymmetric.. It could be how it what shot, but it appears to lean to the right..
  • + 1
 Carbon is far stronger than shitty e-glass, it's also a third of the weight or Something crazy.
  • + 0
 carbon is less brittle but far more flexible than epoxy glass.. epoxy glass reaches a breaking point, then just goes without any prior bend, wheras carbon will bend half a mile before it cracks.
  • - 1
 @robin: Epoxi comes in all kind of hardness, shoregrades. From almost rubbery to crystalbrittly. A carbonmatrix can be strong but most consumergrade carbon is of the cheapvariety. Minimum amount of carbon - resins and fillers and you have an inferior product that is about on the same stability level as glass/epoxi.

Marine certification standards, without testing procedures.
exchange.dnv.com/publishing/tap/TAP1-501-19.pdf

I don`t think vietnamese rim and frame mfgs. are actually capable of setting up such standards and manufacture carbon accordingly.

a. because rawmaterials are of suspect quality. (russian Epoxi in chinese carbonprepreg made under appalling environmental conditions.
b. rawmaterials differ wildly from batch to batch.
c. production is inconsistent.
d.translates into wildly inconsistent final products.

Aluminiumsheets usually fullfill min. standards and are well understood in bikemanufacturing.
Boeing and Airbus do not procure from these sources.
  • + 1
 well it's a good thing frame manufacturers aren't in vietnam then isn't it? Almost all bicycle and component production is done in taiwan, and their standards can be exceptionally high. Santa Cruz, Trek, Giant, and Specialized are all made in taiwan, even their carbon frames; and Santa Cruz arguably has the best carbon fiber frames on the market.
  • + 1
 @wakaba, fairplay, im going off knowledge about boats, not bikes!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 You can buy carbon rims from Chinese suppliers for a little over $100 each. But they fail under hard use. We need a company like Superstar to step up, explain to the factories what mountain biking is, design a decent rim, and then bring it to market under $200. It can and will be done.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Are light wheelsets even worth the cost? I ride 2100g aluminum wheels on my all mountain bike and they work. Will spending one or two grand to knock off 500g of rotational weight make THAT big a difference? Worth the $$?
[Reply]
  • + 1
 try and try you might but you just aint no spank wheels .. boss hogs aka the Spank Stiffy ! ... gettin my dream set of Tank and bomb proof wheels .. spank STIFFY hoops with the E 13 chub hub ... indestructo front wheel
[Reply]
  • + 0
 Bontrager has been keeping it real for years! 28mm wide Bonty Rhythm Pro TLR is how I roll. SRAM needs to spend more time in the forums before wasting their money on stuff that has already become standard for other companies. If you want a carbon wheelset for $650 shipped 28mm wide go to
www.light-bicycle.com

Be Happy!
[Reply]
  • + 2
 Sram, great work and i hope you continue with this trend. I need them wider though.... Thanks!
[Reply]
  • + 3
 For this kind of dough, I'd rather give my money to ENVE.
  • + 2
 3k that will probably end up like this : www.pinkbike.com/photo/8921633
[Reply]
  • + 2
 hahaha, I realised this over a decade ago.wtf took so long? and those hubs are soooooo Sexy Big Grin
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Light-bicyles.com

$570 for a pair of the same thing essentially. All mountain. So the sram stickers cost 1600 dollars??

Yea. Its out of hand.....

Just my two cents....
[Reply]
  • + 1
 i could buy a new bike on that budget, or cop three low-end rides off buy/sell. bike+"meh" wheels > high-end wheels+no dough for a bike. the choice is pretty clear
  • + 1
 also you could commission custom wheel stickers that actually look good with the left over money.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 they have the prices too damn high so only the top 3% can buy it.......... its SRAM remember
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Great that you're using the star ratchet SRAM, but give us some 29 mm or at least 25mm rims please! Oh and pricing for mere mortals would be handy too. Thanks!
[Reply]
  • + 2
 I have been using 23mm internal width rims for a while now and the tire shape is completely different to my old wheels tbh
[Reply]
  • + 4
 I need a better job.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 love sram. hope to see more products like this out soon, just gotta save up i guess ha
[Reply]
  • + 1
 HEY! Why don't someone try another color rather than RED on bikes or components.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 A few months ago, PB did an article on a brand that had EXTREMELY wide rims. Anyone remember what it was?
  • + 2
 Syntace. They do 25, 30, 35 & 40mm external widths. Available in 26", 650b and 29". 28 or 32 spokes and compatible with any axle standard. They'll be my next purchase (35mm).
[Reply]
  • + 3
 sorry, how much?
[Reply]
  • + 3
 SYNTACE!!!!!!!!
[Reply]
  • + 2
 Can the 97% feel the difference?
  • + 1
 Probably not, but at least we can get our hands on them.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Are we going to be able to buy the rims alone?
  • + 0
 that's what I would expect.. bummer because 36 poe is weak for a 2 grand wheelset
[Reply]
  • + 0
 Stickers are gay
  • + 5
 Too right man!! Too many companys are overdoing graphics
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