SRAM Type 2 Rear Derailleur - First Ride

Mar 15, 2012
by Mike Levy  
 
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Views: 23,280    Faves: 66    Comments: 8

Filmed and edited by Taylor Sage

Press camps, those media gatherings where companies often do their best to drown us journos with an unrestrained flow of product information, usually seem to take place is a somewhat 'sterile' setting. Hotel meeting rooms filled with people like myself who are furiously scrawling down notes to keep up, often resulting in a sort of completely indecipherable and useless chicken scratch. SRAM's 'Trail House' gathering - notice I didn't refer to it as a press camp - takes place in Santa Cruz, California, and is a completely different experience. Our accommodation was a house located only feet away from the sandy beach, a novelty for this land lubber, and instead of throngs of journalists all converging at once, there would only be two or three hacks in the house at a go. This setup meant that we were able to get far more one-on-one time with the people responsible for the products that we'd be using during out stay. Home cooked dinners, pre-ride coffees from down the street and post-ride beers on the ocean view deck, with long rides and plenty of shit talk between the two. In other words, a great setting to learn about the new Type 2 derailleur while also making the most of our surroundings.

SRAM Trail House
SRAM Typer 2 rear derailleur w Cage Lock
  Yes, there was some work to do in between shredding and drinking Tecate. SRAM's Tyler Morland answers my questions (left) before we head to the hills to sweat out last night's spirits. We covered the ins and outs of the Type 2 rear derailleurs, as well as Grip Shift and the new four piston XO Trail brakes. You'll get to read about the latter two, including proper ride impressions, in an upcoming article.

SRAM Type 2 rear derailleur w Cage Lock
  Evan Warner, SRAM's race support tech honcho and Monster connoisseur, performed double duty as the Trail House mechanic as well. We spent time on two different bikes during our three day stay, a Giant Anthem 29er that suited the area's fast rolling terrain, and a Yeti SB-66 that had me making moto sounds far too often. Evan kept both of my steeds running smooth and trouble free during my visit, not a small feat considering I was riding far above my head in an effort to keep house guest Kyle Strait in sight on the trail, much to Strait's amusement.

SRAM Type 2 rear derailleur
Roller Bearing Clutch
The plus size knuckle on the XO derailleur shown above houses the unit's new roller bearing clutch, a system that applies friction in the forward swinging motion of the derailleur's cage while letting it pivot backwards easily. You'd be correct if you're thinking that you've recently heard about such a system being used on another company's derailleur - they both share the same goal: adding tension to the chain to keep excess slap to a minimum in order to improve shift consistency, lessen the chance of dropping a chain, and greatly quiet noise from chain slap. How they go about it is quite different, though.

How is it different to the competition?
Although the end goal is the same, there are some big differences between Shimano's and SRAM's clutch designs. This not only includes how friction is applied, but also the ability to adjust it... or rather the lack thereof on the SRAM unit. Without comparing how the two systems perform head-to-head (that will come down the road), lets cover how they go about accomplishing similar goals with different designs. Inside the Shimano design you'll find that the friction is provided by a steel band that wraps nearly completely around a cylinder attached to the derailleur cage, while the SRAM design employs a tuned polymer bushing and needle bearing combination. While we were denied any photos of the SRAM's internals at this point, they do claim that their layout provides a complete 360 degrees of bushing contact, while Shimano's steel band concedes a small gap between the ends of the friction providing steel band. Does that fact matter? Only time will tell, but SRAM asserts that their bushing design has shown to provide more consistent friction in the long run. Again, we'll have to ratify that claim with a longterm review before agreeing.

The two designs also vary greatly when it comes to being able to adjust the amount of friction applied to the cage. Shimano's setup features two adjustments: an external gold lever that either engages or disengages the friction band, as well as an internal spring adjustment (accessed by removing a plastic cover) that adds tension to the steel band via a nut that increases the bands tension around the cylinder. At the other end of the spectrum is the SRAM roller bearing clutch. It comes preset from the factory with a calibrated amount of tension, and while there is no on/off switch, the Cage Lock feature is utilized to allow the cage to be locked in a position that allows for easy wheel removal. Does one system have an advantage over the other? Does simpler win out, or are the adjustments needed? We can't say at this point, but we're looking forward to a proper head-to-head review in the future.





What is Cage Lock?
Put simply, Cage Lock is a small button that locks the derailleur's cage in the forward postion, thereby creating excess chain slack that makes for painless wheel removal and installation. The goal behind Cage Lock isn't to reinvent the rear derailleur, and SRAM doesn't claim to have knocked down any technological doors with the simple push button system, but the idea is simply to make dealing with wheel removal a bit easier. If you are thinking that any mountain biker with his salt shouldn't have trouble dealing with reinstalling his rear wheel, we completely agree with you. But the system starts to look interesting when you consider that it adds only mere grams to the derailleur's overall weight while making life easier, and that it doesn't alter the derailleur's compatibility with any pre-existing components. Oh, and the upcoming Cage Lock equipped Type 2 derailleurs will retail for the same price as the current non-Type 2 version.


Step 1.
Flat tire? Push the derailleur's cage forward to create chain slack, then push the Cage Lock button (at right, circled in red) to lock it in place. All of the chain tension will now be removed, creating enough slack to make the job even easier than it is without pushing that little button. While the chain slack created does make removal easier, it mostly comes in handy after you've fixed your flat and comes time to drop the wheel back into the dropouts.

Step 2.
With the cage held in a forward postion, the derailleur and chain are now free to swing out of the way of the cassette. Once your wheel is back in place you simply give the derailleur cage a small nudge forward to release the tension on the button, allowing it to retract instantly and the cage to return to its usual position. What happens when you forget to release Cage Lock before continuing down the trail? Absolutely nothing. The Cage Lock button will release as soon as you hit the first bump, acting as a failsafe and quickly reverting the derailleur back to normal. It also looks like it would come in handy when installing a new chain, thanks to the ability to remove the cage's tension and allow the two chain ends to be joined easier.



SRAM Typer 2 rear derailleur w Cage Lock
  SRAM plans to offer Type 2 derailleurs in both 235 gram XO and 250 gram X9 flavours, but their top tier XX derailleur will remain unchanged due to the Roller Clutch's 30 gram weight penalty that pure cross-country racers would likely hold a hunger strike over. The other end of the price scale, X7 and lower, will also remain clutch and Cage Lock-less, although we fully expect both of those features to migrate down the product line in due time (X5 is now 10 speed, for example). While non-Type 2 XO and X9 derailleurs will still be able to be found as original equipement on certain complete bike models, SRAM says that all aftermarket XO and X9 units will be of the Type 2 variety - but it is key to remember that the MSRP of both models will stay the same - $260 USD for the XO model and $116 USD for the X9. Each model will also be available in your choice of long, medium, or short cage options depending on your needs. Availability is set for August.

SRAM Type 2 rear derailleur w Cage Lock
  Santa Cruz's high speed local trails turned out to be the perfect place to test the Type 2 derailleur's roller bearing clutch system.

On The Trail
We were able to spend three solid days of riding on the new Type 2 derailleurs, and while that certainly doesn't come close to qualifying as a true test, it did give us an idea of what to expect down the road. We first rode the derailleur on a bike equipped with standard XO trigger shifters (the second day was spent on the new XX Grip Shift - stay tuned) to give us an idea of how the clutch system affected shift effort, with the conclusion being that while it was certainly noticeable, it was a lighter feel effort-wise than the competition's friction clutch model. This may come as a surprise given the purposeful 'ka-chung' feel of SRAM's shifting - that was still very much the same - but we'd have to venture out on a limb and say that lever force required to shift to an easier gear was lower with the SRAM roller bearing clutch derailleur than what we've felt with Shimano's setup. It is still very early days, though, the first day actually, and this impression could very well change as the system gets much more trail time on it. As for the Cage Lock, it works just as advertised. We suffered a flat tire that gave us the perfect opportunity to test the system while fixing it, and came away impressed with how easy it made the job. We certainly have no problem removing and installing a rear wheel, but we're not on too high of a horse to admit that the tiny button made getting the wheel back in easier, especially because without it the derailleur's roller bearing clutch would make the job difficult. Call us sissies, but we like it.

And what about dropping chains and noise? All of the test bikes were running dual ring XO cranks and front shifters during our stay at the Trail House, a setup that can lead to a dropped chain every now and then when on rough terrain, and especially when not in the ideal gearing combo, but there was little to no bother to be found. Both of our test bikes came through each day's ride without a hint of trouble, and there seemed to be only a single bike in the group who's chain dropped down from the big to the smaller ring on more than one occasion. Not a bad first showing at all. Chain slap noise is harder to quantify given we were riding unfamiliar bikes on very unfamiliar terrain, and we'd hesitate to say that the system makes for a night and day difference in trail noise. But we are confident in admitting that the bikes did seem quiet on the fast Santa Cruz singletrack, it's just that we'd have to ride with the Type 2 derailleur fitted to a bike that we're better acquainted with, and on our local trails, before making an honest evaluation.

SRAM Type 2 rear derailleur w Cage Lock
  Mike Levy aboard a SRAM Type 2 derailleur equipped Yeti's SB-66. The 6'' travel bike proved to be a fun machine for the Santa Cruz terrain. No, the trails are not insanely technical, but their high speeds and challenging corners add an element that will keep any rider on their toes.

Three days on the Type 2 rear derailleur left us eager for more, not due to it blowing us away with how it performed, but more out of curiosity. The new derailleur isn't a paradigm shift in drivetrain technology, SRAM readily admits that much, but rather it looks to be another piece to the puzzle that improves our bike's drivetrains one step at a time. The question is, how does it perform over the long haul? We'll be able to answer that for you in the near future.


Stay tuned for more from the Trail House, including the first ride impressions on both SRAM's new Grip Shift setup and Avid's four piston XO Trail brakes.


Photos by Adrian Marcoux
www.sram.com
Must Read This Week

116 Comments

  • + 36
 do you get cage lock? alot of men have it but never get it treated. if you have cage lock you need to try valtrex. Valtrex may make you ride like an idiot, and if you get an adjustable erection seatpost for 7 hours or more consult the bartender.
  • - 16
 adjustable erection seatpost buahah, good one dude Big Grin The erecting post
  • - 28
 fuckin polish
  • + 10
 yea Live-4-weekend, yer wee basterd, f*ckin polish, you can polish my shoes yer ginger bagger. Every night you go around sheep pastures and spread Valtrex pills on the grass aye? yer bloody pervert!
  • + 0
 Apologies for Live-4-weekend...he's British. I on the other hand am Scottish. I still want to know what these clutches do to rear suspension performance. I said the exact same thing when Shimano's came out so I won't bother repeating all of it, but anything that prevents chain growth must surely damage rear sus sensitivity?
  • + 1
 @thestigmk1 That's a really good point I hadn't considered it. However, now you mention it, it makes alot of sense.

It may also be the reason that Sram have gone for a less (by the sounds of it) restrictive system to Shimano's offering.

Lets hope someone gets it on a dyno soon!
  • + 1
 LMAO 'yer ginger bagger'
  • + 1
 Hey what the hell is a ginger bagger? I try using that one on Linden Blvd and this slim thuggin pull out on me blasting.
  • + 2
 Introduce them some wee wellies then! They stick forward a bit, perfect to put sheep's legs into them - it can't run away while you shag it! For additonal experience, put it facing down the edge of the cliff - it pushes back better!
[Reply]
  • + 25
 I think that's a quite well looking design, much more modest than Shimanos. I still don't get it though, all of that to improve chain tension and shifting a bit, with the only signinficant improvement with wheel changing? Shimano deserves a slap for that - since around 2000 they have been installing softer and softer springs on their XT and XTR models what ended up with the whole thing making noises similar to two skeletons having sex on the thin sheet of metal. SRAM kept high tension and yea it's a pain in the ass to install the wheel, especially on short cage derailleurs, but I'm not sure if upgrading my rear mech with such complicated and expensive thing would really turn a crappy day on trails to a happy orgy of whips. I just hope that when the day comes to say farewell to one of my derailleurs, I will still be able to buy the good old stuff
  • - 6
 I agree, I really don't see the purpose of upgrading to this either. Man up and change a wheel. Personally I'd take the Shadow Plus by Shimano over this. I feel like it would work a lot better than this system.
  • + 48
 Really don't think it's a pain in the ass to install a wheel, sram or shimano
  • + 11
 Goosh, You haven't seen the internals of this one or probably ridden with either, how can you make a decision about which would work better?
  • + 3
 @PDSRX - You're right, installing a rear wheel is easy on with a standard rear derailleur. The thing is that it instantly becomes more difficult when you factor in the derailleur's clutch friction that is applied to the cage pivot... That is where the Cage Lock button comes in.
  • + 3
 It's not necessarily upgrading-- you break a rear mech and you buy a new one. They are going to offer it at the same price as the the non-type 2 x9 and xo models and its only 5 grams heavier. I'd definitely give it a try when it comes out if I break a rear mech.
  • - 3
 You really think SRAM and Shimano are going to switch derailleurs for gearbox? they make loads from derailleurs, plus personal opinion is a bike isn't a bike without a derailleur Razz
  • + 7
 SRAM could have made a gearbox years ago with all the hub technology and patents they inherited when they took over Sachs-Huret (Sachs made some fantastic hub gears)

and Shimano certainly have the experience with their Alfine and Nexus hub geared technology

all of the tech that SRAM and Shimano own could easily be transferred into gearbox design for mountain biking (some custom frame builders have used Alfine for their gearbox frame designs)


but as the accountants at SRAM and Shimano would undoubtedly inform the engineering staff, there is very good money in the derailleur-driven chain drive transmission we all currently use Wink
  • + 2
 The advantage to the cage lock for me is installing a new chain. I normally use a toe strap to hold the cage forward to release spring tension. This makes it easier than normal for both wheel installation and chain installation.
  • + 5
 been using / working on SRAM mechs for years, never needed to use a toe strap to counter the spring tension in the rear mech?

it's all about correct technique...
  • + 2
 So you just grab the chain under tension and put the master link in huh?
  • + 6
 or you could just install the chain in top gear and off the front rings. then just put it on.
  • + 1
 Assuming you don't have a front chain device to pull it onto the front ring that is fine and assuming that you have the chain device set-up correctly. I can see when having the clutch on this would be a useful feature. Also have to say that holding the tension on the rear mech while installing a new chain on a short cage does seem to be more difficult as it is harder to position it while placing the power links in comparison to the medium/long cage set-up.
  • + 1
 They couldnt really make much hype about the clutch system because shimano already made it first right? I think Im right but correct me if Im wrong
  • + 1
 shoxxer, you are right in a way but more I think about it, more I realize that majority of hype is generated by forumers themselves by their speculations, Ohs & Wows & Sicks.

The Industry does stuff in a proactive way not reactive, it does not wait for "clients" to tell them: oh a clutch in the rear mech would be cool - can you make on for us? They sit there and think how to improve stuff (whether it is actualy changing something, it's another story), rarely make up something completely new. It is easier to make money on evolution than on revolution. Then they release it and generate "initial excitement", which is understandable: this is what we just made, it's gonna come out somewhere in 2013 bladi bla. The hype sht starts when they plant a "seed of confusion" release more info about properties and features of the design, usualy obvious or irrelevant pros like: "this lowers the center of gravity of the bike", or stuff that sounds meaninglessly complicated: rising frame rate in the last 30% of the travel. But it is people on forums that start trolling on these irrelevant features wondering whether something that comes as a byproduct of certain design decisions is good or bad. Amazing example is the use of carbon fiber in DH frames: Santa Cruz could have shown the V10c frame being hit against the concrete wall long ago - but if they would people wouldn't be talking that much about it, isn't it?
  • + 1
 nicely said....
  • + 2
 dualsuspensiondave has hit the nail on the head, Yeah its nice that wheel removal and replacement is easier but this really appeals to me for the chain removal aspect. if it doesn't affect the price, what the hells your beef? extra feature for no extra money.
  • - 1
 BenCtheMusicman - which nail has he hit? The one sitting in a lazy ass? it does affect the price, and it is a few more moving objects added to the puzzle, therefore more stuff to fail /wear out. If you do need such stuff to change your chain then please... harden the fk up - making something that makes installing a wheel or changing a chain easier is not worth a single additional penny. Bitch please, who's life isn't comfortable enough already. A hint: If you can afford a mountain bike you are living a life of comfort

www.youtube.com/watch?v=1EY7lYRneHc
  • + 2
 You called me a bitch, nice Waki. You're constantly complaining about every innovation in the industry. Nobody NEEDS these extra features to make life easier, and nobody claimed that. Why don't you embrace new technology that keeps us riding better bikes year after year and what keeps the bike industry alive? It's 2012, grab my hand and I'll pull you up from the mid 90's.
  • + 2
 we'd never try (in the workshop) to install the master link (power link / lock) with the chain held under tension by hand?

you either derail the chain on the front chainring(s), install the link, and then remount the chain to the chainring

or much easier is to take a bicycle spoke, cut it 4-5" long with pliers, then bend 1" of each end past 90 degrees (both ends pointing downwards) and you have a chain hook to hold the chain ends in place whilst you install the link Wink


its also a great little tool to help catch the chain end when feeding the chain through a chain device as this be a little tricky at times
  • + 1
 I see, a toe strap is just real easy to use here in the shop. Cheers! With a chainguide of course.
  • + 1
 WAKIdesigns, I presume you have typed that message out on your type writer and asked a friend to send it for you rather than make your life too comfortable with modern technology?
  • + 1
 exactly why I run Saints
[Reply]
  • + 25
 I have to say, very well written article. Unbiased, realistic about expectations and impressions, and devoid of any marketing hype. Nicely done.
  • + 2
 couldnt have said it better myself
  • + 8
 Thanks for the props, stever!
  • + 2
 It's funny that someone neg. proped Levy here. WTF?!?
  • + 5
 must have been a troll, a common phenomena in these parts
  • + 2
 A troll, on PB? Don't be ridiculous ;-)
[Reply]
  • + 13
 anything to make my orange sound like less of a tin can
  • + 1
 buy a santa cruz - elevated chainstay Wink
[Reply]
  • + 4
 Ah, if there's one thing we know from the 90s, it's that "tuned polymer bushings" aka elastomers and the like are [sarcasm] really great ideas that last a long time, never wear out, and are never affected by the cold [/sarcasm].

Still, it's good to see that SRAM is adopting this, as the XTR version is pricey and I want one. The saint shadow derailleur is still the best I've ever used though.
  • + 7
 If there is one thing we know from the 90's it's that mobile phones are the size of briefcases, only make phone calls and weigh 25lbs. Technology moves forwards.
  • + 1
 ...Polymer bushing AND needle bearing combination. I would agree if it were just the bushing, but the addition of the needle bearings should keep the wear to a minimum and should be much less affected by varying temps.
  • - 1
 polymer is polymer, and will be till the end of time. if it were a different material they would be all over it and hype it up to be some bullshyt space-age material. stikes me that anyone could do this by just installing a nut and bolt on one of the derailleur joints and over-tightening it? cause thats really all they're doing here...not to diss SRAM mind you, id never use anything shimano again.
  • + 1
 ^ You really dont know what youre talking about.
  • + 1
 ^ You really need to look at his pictures.
  • + 1
 haha thanks raleigh. and yes mtaero, i really do think i know what im talking about in this case...
  • + 2
 Well the Shimano one does kinda work like (from what I've seen) that but a roller clutch is kinda different. They're pretty much perfect for this application
  • + 1
 What do his pictures have to do with a discussion on derailleurs? Being a basement frame builder does not make one an expert in all things bike. (Nice looking frames by the way) If you were to simply tighten a bushing down with a bolt and nut on a derailleur joint, tell me how it would hold torque in one direction and not in the other? SRAM says outright, its a ROLLER CLUTCH, not a simple bushing. Ask google how a roller clutch works.
  • + 2
 i was more refering to the Elastomer thing, and being an engineer helps. iv never seen a clutch bearings that isnt a one-way bearing; my understanding of this system is that it is just a simple bonded elastomer bushing twisting a bit against the joint's movement. it works by relying on the fact that the springs pull it back but there is no force pulling it the other way (forward)- so they're just putting a small torsionally flexible grommet under the bolt that tensions the deraileur pivot. so its gonna move slower in both directions but it will resist its forward movement more effectively as there is no resistive force in that direction. its a pretty common application of elastomers in other industries.
  • + 1
 What you just said makes more sense than simply overtightening a bolt. It certainly is a possibility, but what about the extra tension on a twisted elastomer as you row through the gears. I guess we will both have to wait and see whats "under the hood" so to speak. Good talk. Smile
[Reply]
  • + 3
 Generalizing Santa Cruz trails as "high speed" and "rolling terrain" is the most absurd oversimplification I have ever seen here on Pinkbike. There are trails technical enough to give the v10 a run for it's money; obviously you guys didn't see the same Santa Cruz I ride in.
  • + 1
 Not clear wording, I guess. The trails we rode were mostly fast and rolling, but there is no doubt more goodness to be found.
  • + 1
 was this test at Demo Forest?
[Reply]
  • + 2
 I use the Shimano XTR Shadow Plus on my Dialled Alpine hardtail, no noise, no chainstay protector, no hassle removing the wheel. The clutch was the only reason I spent the cash and went XTR, when they do a short cage version i'll put one on my DH bike. Well worth the money in my opinion, and saves me buying springs for my ancient Bullet Bros chain tensioner!!! Who is old enough to remember those???
[Reply]
  • + 4
 When I think of type 2, I think of diabetes.....Still, hopefully it'll be price right. Shimano XTR version is price out of my range.
  • + 2
 Yea they are about to put a secret plan into motion, change all rear mechs to hae that thing! The operation is called... Preparation H!!!
  • + 1
 @Jhou - Shimano's system has spread down to SLX for 2013, and I wouldn't be surprised to see Type 2 make it down to X7 and lower in the future.
  • + 2
 Preparation H.... XD lol
[Reply]
  • + 2
 My 2c = Mountain bikers care too much about pointless crap!

If you're that bothered about this "new" "technological" "innovation" just buy a cheap mech and shove a washer in between the cage and the body = exact same effect.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I think a lot of people are missing the point, Like the first comment. Companies are always working to improve their products. Nine speed might be a small advantage over an 8 speed for a trail rider but you don't go looking for the good old stuff. This is a slight improvement on the old x9 and x0, and guess what, it's the same price as the old ones. You don't have to upgrade. When your current derailleur breaks you'll just buy the same level one which by that time will probably have the same tech as this.
[Reply]
  • + 5
 for a part which is inches from rocks and roots it looks way too nice
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I quote "shimano works" it's a shimano phrase because it does what it says on the tin! I have been working in bike shops for years and I work with SRAM and shimano daily shimano parts are simple yet cheap and effective and you can mix shimano parts with shimano parts if you have to and it works. With SRAM you have nothing but problems because it is exspensive and sh*tly made who wants to spend money on things that don't work?? Shimano all the way !!
[Reply]
  • + 2
 The x-9 looks better with all black than the x-o with the silver. Is there a large enough difference between the x-0 and the x-9 to spend the extra $140+ dollars? Or are 15grams equivalent to $140??
[Reply]
  • + 1
 If we run out of ideas we add a thingy or two, put a bold sticker on it and invent a story to go with. Who buys into that kind of crap marketing driven innovation anymore? Me, not.

Come on Sramano.

All your todays stuff shifts under load but is otherwise worse than my 1976 Shimano 600 derailleur which still is alive and well after 16 000 miles even though it would not shift under full load and which is ruining even todays shifting gear.

Adding a rubber donut is pure nonsense. Removing a wheel and putting it back is a nobrainer. Short cage, 9 at the back, 1 in the front and a chainguide is definitely the better and lasting solution than litte balls, weak springs, cages made from stamped toastbread and overlong chains.
  • + 7
 So you're down with short cage, 9 speed, and a single ring up front, but not feeling the newest gear? Fair enough, but remember that at one point not long ago that 9 speed kit WAS the latest and greatest. Drivetrain development moves in small jumps, not leaps and bounds, and I know that it's getting better each time I ride an older bike compared to a new test rig... but on the other hand I can certainly see how new bits coming out every season can make someone jaded. The price to pay for moving forward?
  • + 1
 I am running 1 x 10 on my 2012 Stumpjumper 29er Evo hardtail with the highly sprung short cage SRAM X-0 rear mech, 11-36T cassette and E13 XCX single ring chain device

works fantastic, very solid shifting, not dropped any chains, simple to clean and maintain


definitely a step above my previous 1 x 9 running SRAM X-0 / X-9 which always felt was lacking a climbing gear when really needed, and required an E13 LG1+ to really keep the chain under control...
[Reply]
  • + 1
 This is great addition to the already awesome SRAM technology. I like the Shimano for the built in clutch, eliminating the chain slap, but dislike Shimano's shifting feel. Hence going to SRAM for smooth shifting but still having some slap. Now I have the chance to get the best of both worlds in one..awesome smooth shifting and no slap.
  • + 2
 Exactly. Without turning it into one of those whole 'V.S.' things, Shimano and SRAM offer a different enough feel to appeal to different people. Now the clutch action can be had in both flavours.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 They still didn't understand that the rear derailler is that one piece of bicycle equipment they need to get rid of and find a better solution, eh...
[Reply]
  • + 1
 No mention of 9-speed configurations or options. Would this be a 10-speed only thing? Would be sad to see companies suddenly stop improving 9-speed stuff already and move onto 10-speed.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 The cage lock looks like it would be great for trailside chain maintenance too!! Rather than making a buddy hold the cage or jamming a stick in it while removing/replacing a link.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 That looks great. can't wait to get one set up with a gripshifter combo.. SACHS I mean SRAM is great
[Reply]
  • + 2
 I wish grip shift was less gay just to inject something different into the whole shifting game.... but it is gay Frown
[Reply]
  • - 1
 Is anyone else offended by this? I mean 10 speeds was bad enough now this! Seriously? Like I'm gonna pay more for a deraileur that is 30-50g heavier that helps reduce chainslap (get a thick chainprotector) and helps decrease chain drop IF you don't run a chainguide single chainring system.
I predict that Sram/Shimano will come out with a 1x11 system (already exists for road bikes) in 2014-2015 claiming it is simpler, lighter, better shifting and ofcourse better chain alignment. The cassette will be 11-38 and 12-40 and the biggest 3 cogs will be made of alum with a carbon spider. The chainrings will be 34, 36 or 38.
I'll be sticking to my custom 1x8 speed system and wait for either micro drive cassettes (now that is a good idea!) or more pinion equiped bikes!
[Reply]
  • + 2
 Typical of sram. A plastic bushing! Stop copying shimano. No wonder the Syndicated drop them.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 why was there an in house mechanic if one of the biggest new features of this is the lock for taking off the rear wheel, shouldn't that have been tested?
  • + 2
 There was a mechanic on hand because many bikes need to be kept running nicely (there were quite a few SRAM employees there w/ bikes as well) and parts needed to be swapped daily.
[Reply]
  • + 0
 That's a some real nice derailleurs.. I have the Sram XO in carbon fiber and mine doesn't have the lock outs. I still haven't found one that has the same carbon look. weird.. That lock out seems real nice to have.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I wonder if Type 2 SRAM derailleurs will be compatible older shifters (1:1 ratio)?
  • + 2
 The Type 2 derailleurs are 100% compatible with SRAM's current 10 speed kit.
[Reply]
  • + 0
 Am I the only one who doesn't get this clutch nonsense, surely if you want more chain tension pulling off the front ring, just put a stronger cage spring in?
  • + 4
 yeah, but then the shifting would be really hard, so the idea is to create more chain tension without needing to go to the gym to train your thumbs for shifting!
  • + 1
 Shift effort is certainly higher on both Shimano and SRAM's versions, though.
  • + 1
 I didn't think the effort would be any different because the parallelogram spring and cage spring are separate.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 anyone feel kinda sorry for the guy at the back? - he only just makes it into the shots but gets cut off - haha
[Reply]
  • + 1
 why have an on/off switch just to remove the wheel? check this out:

www.youtube.com/watch?v=R9eHUWFCObg
[Reply]
  • + 1
 love the cage-lock add-on! taking off rear wheels with that would be a breeze... great design!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 why they dont make a video of it while riding....how can we see it working ?
[Reply]
  • + 3
 MEC gloves, Mike? nice.
  • + 2
 Yup. I've been using them for awhile now... I like 'em!
  • + 1
 does the new x9 look like a flimsy x7 top half with the new clutch lower half?
[Reply]
  • + 2
 Tensioner looks much more sano than the shimano version
  • + 0
 in english?
[Reply]
  • + 1
 chainslap noise ?? headphones'll take care of that nicely Smile
[Reply]
  • + 1
 man bond bromance kinda vibe to that video haha
[Reply]
  • + 2
 Zerode is the answer!
  • + 7
 If they came 10lbs lighter...
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Is the Type 2 derailleur more quiet the the normal sram ones???
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I'm interested in those four piston X0s!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Man..those derailleurs look absolutely beautiful.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I think is just good to see technology moving on a bit in the world of MTB
[Reply]
  • + 1
 i'm LITTLE CONFUSED here, Sram already had a stable rear mech, and...?
[Reply]
  • + 1
 cool. I hope the next is a gearbox
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  • + 1
 i am speechless......
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  • + 1
 Mmmmm...dat X9 Drool
  • + 1
 take a closer look, to keep the cost the same they are using half of an x7 with the new lower half sporting the cam/lockout. now you will have to buy the xo to get a reliable unit. i hope that changes when they go into production or i'll be switching back to shimano. i'd rather buck up and spend a little more for the obvious improvements than skimp on the parallelogram.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Dear Santa .....
[Reply]
  • - 1
 what do you bet its gonna be 400.00 usd msrp lol
[Reply]
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