THAT Was a Bike: 1988 Yeti FRO

Mar 4, 2014
by Richard Cunningham  
 
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CLASSIC BIKE:
1988
Yeti FRO
WORDS: R. Cunningham
IMAGES: Nick Martin

bigquotes This Yeti is my personal daily driver and it brings a smile to my face every time I throw a leg over it. - Nick Martin, Founder, The Pro's Closet

John Parker founded Yeti somewhere back in 1985, when he knew a lot about fabrication, but very little about making bikes. All that changed when he hired the Herting brothers, Chris and Eric and later, Frank "The Welder" Wadleton. Chris and Eric were already making bikes out of their garage, Frank was a whiz with metal and Parker was the promoter extraordinaire. The TIG welded chromoly FRO was perhaps the most iconic Yeti, with its Desert Turquoise paint, top-tube-mounted cables and curved infinity rear triangle design - it was the dream bike for almost every racer wannabe in the sport's formative years. Today's classic bike is a Yeti FRO prototype made by Chris Herting for his personal ride - circa 1988/1989 - and while it is outfitted in period parts that are a close representation of its original pedigree, A few bits are not original because this beautiful machine is also a daily driver. FRO means "for racing only" and this one is now owned by Nick Martin, the founder of "The Pro's Closet" - a second-hand cycling retailer that buys, sells and consigns quality bicycles and components on its E-Bay store of the same name. The Pro's Closet is presently building a museum, where outstanding examples of the vintage road and mountain bikes the staff has acquired and restored will be on permanent display.


Construction details: (clockwise) Chris Herting's initials TIG welded into the bottom bracket shell, and a look at the reinforced bridge between the bottom bracket and the chain stays. Yeti was ahead of its time with a straight-blade unicrown fork. The winner of the head badge with the most personality award and a look at the top tube cable routing that made the FRO famous. Long, 135mm stems were commonplace in the '80s, as were threaded headsets. Curved tubes at rear dropout were the Yeti trademark. Yeti made its own hardware to convert Shimano's bottom-pull front changer to a top-pull system.


About the Bike

The story goes that Chris Herting, who stands quite tall and produces a lot of power on a good day, built the bike a bit tougher, with extra gusseting at the bridge which joined the seat stays to the bottom bracket shell - a weak point where early Yeti frames would often crack. The frame would be an extra large model today, which was a size that was never offered in Yeti's John Parker years. Herting signed his work by TIG-welding his initials onto the bottom bracket shell. The seat and head angles appear to be slacker than stock as well, If I remember, Yeti FROs had a 72-degree seat and a 71-degree head tube angle, but Herting's appears to have a seat tube around 70 degrees and a head tube angle close to 69 - numbers that would have given Herting a leg up on the downhills - then and now.

Beyond Yeti's famous racing turquoise color and the Abominable Snowman head badge, the FRO was etched into the imaginations of early mountain bikers by its curvacious, "one-piece" seat and chainstay design and its ovalized top tube. The icing on the FRO's cake was the parallel top tube cable routing that gave the chassis a race-car edge and kept the rest of the bike looking clean and uncluttered. Ironically, the Yeti name, its logo and the three most sexy aspects of the FRO's design were "repackaged" from different sources: a mattress factory, a mountaineering company and some top name BMX bikes. Random pieces, reassembled by a visionary wild man and a talented team of builders into a legendary bike - and the heritage brand that still rocks today. It also helped that Yeti's were some of the best handling mountain bikes of their time.


Chris Herting's Yeti FRO Build

Fork:Yeti chromoly straight-blade unicrown, one-inch steerer
Stem: Currently Tioga T Bone chromoly 135mm (original was a Yeti FTW Cook Bros stem)
Handlebar: True Temper, chromoly
Grips: Tomac ODI Mushroom
Seatpost: Shimano Deore XT, chromoly shaft
Brakes: Shimano Deore XT cantilever
Brake Levers: Shimano SLR BL-M733
Shifters: Shimano Deore XT SIS 7s thumb
Front Derailleur: Shimano Deore XT
Rear Derailleur: Shimano Deore XT
Cassette: Shimano Deore XT, 7-speed 13 x 30
Chain: Shimano HG93
Crankset: 184mm Bullseye TIG-welded chromoly, integrated tubular axle, 24-36-46
Pedals: Shimano Deore XT PD-M737 (Shimano's first SPD model for MTBs)
Quick releases: Ringle Holey Cams
Cages: Ringle aluminum
Headset: Chris King BMX, one-inch
Rear wheel: Tioga Disk Drive / XTR HUB / Mavic 261 Rim
Front wheel: Shimano Deore XT / Araya RM-20 Rim
Tires: Tioga Farmer John's Cousin, 2.25"
Saddle: Selle Italia perforated Turbo


Components

Component development was raging in 1989, and mountain bikers were hungry for any new gadget or frame design - especially if it came anodized in a candy color. Reliability? Well that would have to come later. In a way, the components on the FRO represent the pivotal moment in the development of the mountain bike, where boutique manufacturers and major brands were on equal footing in both technology and know-how. If this bike is outfitted exactly like Herting rode it, his component selections reflects a great deal of knowledge about parts that did and did not work during the mid '80s.

Bullseye's TIG-welded chromoly crankset was so far ahead of its time that it has been forgotten twice. Roger Durham built them in his small shop near Pasadena, California. It used an oversized chromoly tubular axle that was welded to the drive-side crankarm and spider. The left end of the bottom bracket axle was splined, and the left arm was clamped to the spline section with a pinch bolt. A special washer on the pinch bolt (missing in these photos) keyed into a hole in the axle to prevent the crank arm from slipping off, should the bolt come loose. Basically, Roger Durham invented the modern bicycle crankset.


Vintage parts: (clockwise) The Bullseye crankset's hollow crankarms were formed from chromoly sheet metal, bent and welded into a rectangular tapered shaft and then welded directly to the oversized, tubular bottom bracket axle. Shimano's tubular chromoly Deore XT seatpost was one of the rare posts longer than 200mm. Tioga's DIsc Drive rear wheel in all of its glory. Tensioning and truing was done with screws that pulled on aluminum bits that the Kevlar strands wrapped around. A look at the control room - a 24-inch-wide chromoly handlebar, moto-sized brake levers and indexing thumb-shifters. The "grips" were Tomac signature models. The "Shark Fin" was supposed to catch the chain and keep it from getting sucked down between the frame and the chainrings when it derailed. Cantilever brakes were the best available stoppers.


Tioga's Disc Drive tensioned-disc rear wheel looked like what the word, "Rad" was originally intended to express. Kevlar yarn criss-crossed inside transparent plastic discs made a wheel that that screamed "high tech." Claims that Tioga's wheels were stronger, tougher and more aerodynamic were reinforced by life sized posters of the mighty John Tomac streaking downhill - the raw image of speed. In reality, however, they sucked. Tomac and the one or two other Tioga sponsored pros who dared run Disc Drive wheels, sounded like the were being chased around the race course by large dogs roped to industrial-strength cardboard boxes. Between races, mechanics struggled to keep the beasts tensioned and true. That said, there has never been a more awesome looking wheel on a mountain bike - and probably never will be.

Shimano's index-shifting Deore XT ensemble was on its second iteration and the big news was that you could again get round chainrings and skip the chain suck and derailing that were the hallmarks of too many years of ovalized BioPace sprockets. The "Shark Fin" chainstay protector was Shimano's stark admission that its engineers had not yet figured out a solution to keep the chain on. Another thankfully missing component was the U-Brake that came on almost every other bike of the time. Yeti's extensive racing experience ferreted out that donkey early on and they spec'ed a cantilever rear brake on the FRO. The last bit of the Shimano story are the PD M737 pedals - its first clipless mountain bike pedal and the first of its type to actually function well on the dirt - probably the most revolutionary item on the Yeti.

One may wonder why most vintage stems and handlebars were made from steel, and the answer lies in the small diameters of the steerer tube, seat posts and handlebars that were the standards of the day. the center of the bar was slightly less than an inch in diameter and the inside of the fork's steerer tube was only .875 inches (22 millimeters) so anything else would bend. There are few items on the Yeti that have not been eclipsed by new standards. Quick release dropouts, threaded steerer tubes, steel frames, long stems, narrow bars, thumb-shifters, triple-chainrings, skinny seatposts, 24mm handlebar clamps, rim brakes, inner tubes, rigid forks, (and maybe its 26-inch wheels), have all become collector items.

Final mention goes to the gearing of the Yeti. First of all, it has, what we would call a mid-cage rear derailleur today, and it would have had a tough time spanning the range of the Yeti's three-by-seven gearing. Herting would have had to know exactly which gear he was in at all times to prevent trashing his mech or breaking the chain. You don't see too many riders sporting 46-tooth big rings that are driving a 13 by 30-tooth seven-speed cassette (although SRAM's new 7-spd DH group may change that). Some downhillers raced with 50-tooth big rings. Herting's crankset has an aftermarket granny gear that appears to be an Action-Tec 24-tooth sprocket made from stainless steel. It replaces the stock, 26-tooth item. His 24 by 30 was the lowest gear range available. Climbing was a lot tougher in the early days.

March 1989 Yeti Catalog Scan
   Team Yeti, Circa 1989, rides for a photo shoot in an image scanned from a sales brochure. Recognize any familiar faces?


Credits: If you like what you see here, check out The Pro's Closet and if you want to see the full sized detail pics, they can be seen here. We'd like to thank Nick Martin for the opportunity to feature his Yeti FRO and for furnishing the images. Look forward to drooling over more of the museum's collection in the near future.
Must Read This Week

118 Comments

  • + 54
 That's a sick bike! Thanks for following up with my suggested Yeti bike...
  • + 26
 HA! I was wondering if you were going to remember.
  • + 26
 Yeti needs to bring back that symbol
  • + 2
 I am waiting for you to pull a 19" Cunningham out of the garage maybe we can work out a deal for a Zerode!
  • + 2
 I hard out wanted the Disk Drive back in 1991. Tomac used them, what more did you need? The ridiculiusly high price for the time of five hundred quid would be seen as a bargain today!

And I'd forgotten about those Ringle botle cages. Still look cool as hell after 20-odd years. I'd have one now if I used bottle cages.

I even had a few pairs of the ODI Tomac Attack grips, becase that was the only pimp upgrade I could afford as a lad. Shame they didn't come with end plugs though, because they always got holed through on the ends of the bars.

Anyone else remember the IRC Yeti FRO tyres? They were good all rounders.
  • + 2
 That was great Richard. I love these please keep them coming! Somewhere in my parents attic live the Mountain Bike Action mags from my youth and I'm very close to digging them out. I remember one issue prob mid to mid/late 90's featuring some of the best DH rigs of the day..... if you are looking for ideas I'd love to revisit that!
  • + 3
 @RichardCunningham Let's see a Fat Chance Yo Eddy or a 1990 Klein Attitude Dolomite with the green white magenta paint job!
  • + 1
 My Hero at the center of the picture......remember the advertising where somebody yelled at him "go Johny go"?
I got to do it at the world championships in Chateau d´Oex Switzerland 1987!!!! what a rider.

Cheers
[Reply]
  • + 10
 hells yeah '88.

classic 1988 racing action from blackcomb here.......

www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ztdut22_YBo

in the blue zone.
  • + 1
 that was sick!
  • + 2
 YES! Vetta helmets, Mt.Zefal Frame pumps, and 20" wide handle bars....I would love to take a Intense Tazer FS back in time and race down that slalom course.
[Reply]
  • + 11
 Bullseye cranks and XT thumb shifters... I held out as long as possible before switching to trigger shifters...
  • + 8
 Ha, ha, shifting used to be a skill!
  • + 26
 25 year old bike has 7sp drive-train. sram launches innovative hyper priced 7sp drive train in 2014... suspect
  • + 8
 no Bio-pace........?
  • + 2
 If you read the sram post you would know they had protos for a 7sp drivetrain system 20 years ago but there was no need
  • + 3
 I still have XT thumbshifters on my town bike. And they work great.
[Reply]
  • + 7
 I'm surprised that with all those other top end components, there wasn't one a Hite-Rite added, the pre cursor to the hydraulic seatpost.
fcdn.mtbr.com/attachments/vintage-retro-classic/267517d1180490381-hite-rites-hiterite_1.jpg
[Reply]
  • + 6
 Brilliant. Takes me back.

Geez, the roadie is strong in this one. Remember when standover clearance was one of THE most important aspect of an MTB? Now we take sloping top tubes for granted. And saddles like that gave you blood blisters on your inner thighs. They were just terrible.

I like the point about reliability being low on the priority list. We just accepted that you would break or bend something if you rode hard. And a few years after this came the obsession with making things as light as possible and components got even weaker. Lucky that fad didn't last long.
  • + 4
 Seatposts were not made long enough to allow for sloping top tubes of any useful angle. Oversized seat tubes (another "new" standard) made long seatposts possible. Charlie Cunningham made his own posts and used radically sloping top tubes early on.
  • + 1
 Is he related to you?
  • + 1
 RC - Saw a guy the other day on a Nishiki Alien - it was his daily drive and looked it, but you could still make out your signature on the elevated chainstays. Would love to see one of those featured like this.
  • + 1
 My brother has one in mint conditions if you want to have a picture.
[Reply]
  • + 4
 "Oh holy flashback, Batman! Yes, Robin, they're here again."

My first mtb was a 1991 Diamond Back Ascent. Same cantilever brakes and rigid everything, bar ends, tall gearing. I remember using it to race my friend's downhill at Big Bear CA before DH racing became popular. We never even thought of lowering the seat for better control. Silly.

Then, circa 1992, I bought a Trek DS2 fork. $290 installed by my LBS. I thought, WOW, this is smooth (We didn't use the word "plush" yet).

THEN 1993 I bought my first FS bike. A Cannodale something or another, with the funky Headshock. I thought that was the greatest bike invention yet.

Circa 1995 I bought another bike with V-Brakes. Wow, cool.

1996 I bought a bike with disc brakes, Hopes. Wow, even better and more expensive.

Same year, I bought the Outland VPP. Yep, the first ever VPP suspension frame on the market. Boy was that a high-maintenance flex machine. Even though it was a DH bike, I was replacing the pivots and titanium shafts seemed like every 50 miles. Phew. It was very different design from todays VPP.

Still in 1996, I ohhh'd over having the Marzocchi Z1 4" travel single crown fork. It was thee hot fork of the day.

1997. I smiled having a triple clamp, dual crown fork. An RST something. Flexy as heck compared to today's forks but still miles above the single crown fork.

1998 I paid $2400 for an Intense M1, pre-FSR linkage. JUST the frame. That did not include the 4-piston Hope brakes, the first gen Boxxer, and wide heavy ass Mavic 321 DH rims and IRC Missle tires. Wow, and that was 1998 dollars. That might be like $4000 today's dollars. Crazy.

Wow, has the industry changed.
  • + 1
 I had the San Andreas with the Prostop Hydro brakes what a change from canti's and Z1's on the front. So much fun but the pedal feedback was ridiculous with the single pivot.
  • + 3
 Crazy when I think of how many bikes and money I've spent over the years. I've also many first gen designs of frames, suspension designs, and products. The first VPP, first URT Ibis Szazbo (THat was a scary bike on tech DH), first M1, first disc brakes, first V-brakes, first front suspension, first full sus, first triple clamp fork.

As a kid, I had a Schwinn Stingray which morphed into a pseudo BMX bike before that became the rage, pre-On Any Sunday era (for those of you that know the movie i'm referring to, not to be confused with the Al Pacino movie of similar title).

Being old school (and likely older than most of you readers here), I did not have the first of the newer tech. I was a carbon holdout, stayed with 25.4 bars, QR front and rear axles, tubes, for a long time. I still don't have a GPS, Go Pro, and only recently bought a Gore Tex jacket. Lol
  • + 2
 Ibis Szazbo wasn't the first URT... Trimble/One-Off titanium is the true origin to the modern URT... Steve Castlewhatever its spelled, the guy who designed the "sweet spot" bikes ripped the idea from Roo Trimble & Mike Augsperger who had their WhizBag bikes as they were called already reviewed in magazines in 1993.

mombat.org/693Gizbag1.jpg
[Reply]
  • + 3
 I have an 1989 FRO in black that is still my daily rider. Mine was originally set up very similar except for some notable differences......I opted for a "Frank the Welder" aluminum stem and my bike was and still is set up more for cross country, and it now has more modern parts. However, all the originals are stored for a future restoration. Some of the parts on this bike are not true to late 80's Yeti's...Case in point is the Chris King headset, back then they ran cheap GT bmx headsets. The thought was change them often they were cheap and easy to replace. Wheelsets back then were typically Araya RM20 rims laced to your choice of hubs. I ran an American Classic MTB hubset laced up to the RM20's. I like the choice in cranks - I ran a Bullseye, 190mm in length. This bike must be built on a 20" frameset due to the elongated top tube - the same as my 20' frame has. My buddy bought an 18" frameset at the same time I did and his came with a round toptube.
  • + 1
 You win because you have the FTW stem. Man, I remember drooling over them, even when Answer started producing the (licensed) copy, the ATAC. RM20s were great rims, too. Pretty light, pretty cheap, pretty great.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 I just read the whole article and wanted to thank the author for writing it. It was pretty interesting, not only because I like Yeti. I've learned something new about mountainbike history. I'd like to see more articles like this in the future.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 Thanks so much for a great article on a bike/ rear wheel I'd never even heard of before today. This is a great new series that is bringing back many fond memories of the bikes I used to daydream about. I truly appreciate those who are taking the time to write these articles and I hope that the history lessons keep on coming. Thanks again.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 I bet the very sight of this bike sucks the breath out of todays racers. Rigid, probably closer to 30lbs, 26" wheels, no 36 or 42 low gears. straps instead of clips. the days when mountain bikers were rugged.

I wonder if there any classic mtb events?
[Reply]
  • + 1
 the three cables on the top tube, was so awesome because they were far from mud build up, until you crashed with them and they did a number on your inner thigh. Somehow in milliseconds, hundreds of hairs on your leg would wrap around them and get yanked out in unison. Today's riding shorts would alleviate the issue of course, but back then we rode in whatever...
[Reply]
  • + 1
 A few details are clearly wrong...

#1 Shimano never offered a 7 speed 12-32 cassette. The only way you got that range was assemble one yourself. They had 12-28, 13-30, 13-34, 14-32 and by the mid 90s 11-28, 11-30 and 11-19 once they started doing compact drivetrains.

#2 The rear derailleur is what shimano called a short cage length. The first offroad group derailleur to have a "middle" cage was the 1992 XTR group.

#3 The standard inner ring size for shimano Deore XT chainring sets was a stainless steel 24T not an aluminium 26T. XTR was the first to have 26T in aluminium when it was introduced in 1992.

#4 While RC already mentioned the M737 SPDs in another response, the Ringlé parts aren't exactly correct to a 1988/89 build. Jeff Ringlé didn't start producing the skewers until 1990 and the bottle cages until 1991. Also again the XTR group didn't even become available for racers until the 1991 season and it was still called Deore XT-R (R stood for Race) so its the wrong rear hub. Wrong rim too (the Mavic 261 didn't exist yet) and I'm pretty sure neither did the Tioga tension disc system for that matter.
  • + 15
 I bet you can ruin even the best dinner party
  • + 1
 The frame is a little off from some of the parts, so it's more like a 88 bike upgraded a few years later. Only thing that looks really out of place is the Tioga wheel. I didn't see too many Tioga wheels back then, but if the ones I did see always were on a bike with a front shock. But its cool because Tomac rode for Yeti on a frame similar to this and was THE rider associated with that wheel so there is s connection. Ringle always looks good on a Yeti so that is forgivable, but if it is going to have thumbies it should have 7 speed hub which means XT hub. Sweet bike though, love that color.
  • + 1
 All the cranksets back then had 46, 36, 26T chainrings, even Biopace. You had to buy an aftermarket 24 to get a decent climbing gear. You were correct on the cassette though. 12 x 28 or 13 x 30 were the '89 Shmano options. I counted the teeth in the pic to arrive at my original numbers. Thanks for the catch - Fixed.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I remember seeing people installing the UNI fabric disc's on their back wheels of their mountain bikes only to have the things peel off and jam everything up in the trail as they tried to look like a Tioga... Great post... keep them coming !
[Reply]
  • + 1
 what the heck were we thinking?! the gear, the geometry...back then, people would have drooled over a bike like this and now it looks practically unrideable. cool, definitely, but I wouldn't want to ride that thing, and I started on a similar bike. my gawd mountain biking has come a long way.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Excellent, creative writing with lots of detail. RC has pretty much been there through it all in mtb since the 80's, and his passion and knowledge for the history of the sport makes for a great read in these kinds of articles. Keep writing about your favorite bikes!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 The dude up front on the last picture must be Aron Gwin in his early days for Yeti, a time where he wasn't the fastest but the smartest ; )

Lovely bike that good Yeti.
How's about an old Rocky Mountain? they hade that carzy chainstay design ... (I am not talking about the RM9 that was just ... aaahhhh)
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I had a '90 FRO...once yeti adopted the neon green/yellow fork / stem. Answer made those parts. It was a beast and it handled everything I threw at it. Back then, the big choice was fat chance or yeti. The geometry and stout build of the Yeti were perfect for my 18 year-old-self.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Awesome bike! That crank looks pretty high-tech even by todays standards. I remember having Farmer John's tires on my bike. It would be great to see a lot of the old school tread designs being made again into a modern high-tech tire.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 My first mt bike was an 1986 Fisher Hooku Eku. it was fast as my road bike up to 25 mph. Handled like crap in the dirt. I endowed, flying W time hitting a small depression. Coming from a road bike I couldn't figure how to ride these things in the dirt; ) I wished I still had it!!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Had that Stem 150mm on my Fillet Brazed 1988 Fisher Mt Tam. Did I love that bike awesome race bike 72 deg Seat tube and 70 deg headtube. Same angles as my new Yeti Carbon Arc and just as wonderful handling. Does it all really really well. Looking at all those old parts makes me remember how we used to completely tear down and rebuild our bikes every three weeks during racing season. Great photos and article.
[Reply]
  • + 4
 I want to see a Mantis build on the next go.
  • + 1
 I should get my ass in gear on this build.

a href="http://photobucket.com/" target="_blank">img src="http://i273.photobucket.com/albums/jj209/audistuff/XCR-EC/IMG_1680_zpse1d496bf.jpg" border="0" alt=" photo IMG_1680_zpse1d496bf.jpg"/>/a>
[Reply]
  • + 4
 Very cool, Love the Bullseye 2 pce cranks!
  • + 1
 Shimano couldn't release their Hollowtech 2 crank/bb setups until the US patent on the Bullseye cranksets expired.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 Makes me really want to finish my Schwinn Maximizer. Dug it out of a dumpster. Not even pretending to rebuild it to stock, but she will be a great fun singlespeed.
[Reply]
  • + 3
 Mountain biking in Whistler in 1988. www.pinkbike.com/video/230889
  • + 1
 that was such a nice video mate! Only when you watch this stuff we understand how much bikes have evolved. But nice moves there seriously that was true classic.
  • + 0
 hahaha quote from your video comments: "It's this gay shit that got me into MBing XD"

Sick video dude. Loved it.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 The title said fro, I was expecting an awesome old school pic of Tippie rockin a metric shit ton of hair.. Oh well, sweet bike. I'd mob that. With a shorter stem anyways Big Grin
  • + 1
 This bike predates The Fro Riders by 10 years.
[Reply]
  • + 3
 god this brings me back, I remember getting my first 21 speed bike back in the day.
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  • + 2
 I had a disk drive on my 1991 GT Zaskar Made the Bike faster in corners and sounded like THUNDER FROM VAL HALA!!! Scientific fact
  • + 1
 Sounds like a sweet bike. Mag 20 or 21?
  • + 2
 Greg Fuquey custom rigids
  • + 1
 Oh, assumed it came with shocks but I forgot not all bikes did in 91. I'm guessing you bent the original rigid forks?
  • + 1
 Think the Zaskar LE had the rock shox?
Replaced the originals ad an upgrade cos they had those adjustable rake dropouts that worked loose after a while
  • + 1
 OH and the Fuquey's looked like Fat City Cycles team Yo Eddy forks wich I couldnt afford......
  • + 1
 best sound ever.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 That made feel very old, but glad, to have been around mountain bikes from the start and still going and now I have my wonderful 575. Ps the guy earlier was bang on about the logo, lets have the old one back. we are Tribe
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  • + 1
 I remember that bike from a big review in mba back in the day. I still have my gt Karakoram from the same year as the yeti inly slightly less cool
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  • + 2
 wow dual water bottle holders, you just dont see that kind of craftsmanship these days...
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  • + 1
 That's awesome. Even then yeti had a slack head angle! I like it but don't ask me to ride a-line on it, I'm very happy with modern technology :-)
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  • + 3
 I think it is awesome that Pinkbike is doing these articles!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 As a younger rider, I feel we need more of these. They're an awesome way for me to find out more about old school mountain bikes and are a great read!
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  • + 2
 I love the sound of that tioga disk wheel when I went to the races and saw Tomac pinning it...the original farmer John!
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  • + 1
 review of the greg herbold's Koga miyata plizzze.. that was also a piece of art !!
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  • + 1
 That is not Tomac in the photo. Left to right; Russel Worley, Mark Langton, Greg Dres, Paul Thorson, Sue Fish
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  • + 1
 Shark Fin protector ftw... i had one of those! www.pinkbike.com/photo/4832566
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  • + 1
 The only thing I don't like about this is the title.......It STILL is a bike. Great read, love the history
[Reply]
  • + 1
 moar old bikes for moar interest! being a young laddie still I really enjoyed this article. more please pinkbike! Smile
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  • + 2
 Might just b me but...why is everything in italics?!?
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  • + 1
 Thank you for the write up Richard! We appreciate the support and your expertise. Best of Rides, Nick Martin
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  • + 1
 RC, there's got to be a few Mantis' in your garage. I want to see those profiled next!
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  • + 2
 Love to see the history of DH. Makes me love it all over again.
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  • + 2
 My first real mtb! Ran cook bros cranks and an accutrax fork
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  • + 1
 Thats a Dh headtube angle right there. Sick!
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  • + 1
 Needs toe clips on it. SPDs weren't around for another 7 years!
  • + 1
 Shimano released M 737 pedals in 1990, but it may have been possible, considering how high profile Yeti was at the races that the team got the stuff early. Regardless, its owner Nick Martin rides it often, so he chose the earliest clipless pedals that were in costume for the time.
Shimano timeline: mombat.org/Shimano.htm#1988
  • + 1
 I stand corrected sir.
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  • + 1
 The amazing fashion in the eighties: WHITE SOCKS and HARD HATS
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  • + 1
 i had a set of those cranks back in 93 on my proflex. ace
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  • + 1
 6 7 speed lasted many years
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  • + 1
 I got excited when I saw this
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  • + 1
 that color is so YETI! i am glad they stick to that color nowadays
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  • + 1
 Is this really a '98, the components seem earlier than that?
  • + 1
 Oh I see now. The headline says '88 but the first pic says '98.
  • + 1
 '88... ten years earlier than '98
  • + 6
 And of course now they've corrected it leaving my comment totally out to lunch.
  • + 2
 h82crash^^^ I was making my final checks after the story went live. You posted that...and the nine magically became an eight.
  • + 2
 No worries. Lovin' 'THAT Was a Bike'. Keep it coming.
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  • + 1
 I recall those forks were referred to as Accu-trax. Great read.
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  • + 1
 That CK headset looks a lot like a GT headset!
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  • + 1
 biult? looks like a super sick bike though!
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  • + 1
 I have an old TIOGA disk drive and I remember my RTS1 dual suspention.
  • + 2
 RTS1! My dream bike... until I saw a San Andreas.
  • + 0
 if the kevlar cord isn't shot then it'll still fetch a good amount on ebay
  • + 1
 That Tioga disk drive really make a special sound when you ride. I remember the original price was us800 or us900. The wheel its ok no damage,but I cant used,too much show off for the streets. Im a target if I ride it. Here is a real f'jungle. Talcking about my GT RTS1,I send to a store for sale and when I come back from vacations,there are no more store they gone and stolen my two GT's, a Zaskar and the RTS1.
  • + 1
 I can't believe a Tioga disk drive is being ridden as a daily driver. That scares me greatly. Those things were crazy but so lust worthy!
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  • + 1
 beautiful one
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  • + 1
 we are from that time
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  • + 1
 nice i have that seat
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