Twenty6 Predator Pedal Review

Nov 16, 2011 at 0:05
Nov 16, 2011
by Mike Levy  
 
You must login to Pinkbike.
Don't have an account? Sign up

Join Pinkbike  Login

Twenty6 Predator pedal: Twenty6's new Predator pedal comes from the mind of Tyler Jarosz, the man behind the small operation based in Montana, USA, and is an evolution of his much loved Prerunner design. Just like its forebear, the Predator isn't intended to be a generic or inexpensive pedal, but rather a boutique choice for a rider who is looking for a high-end, US-made option. Twenty6 is all about choices - the Predator can be had with aluminum, steel, or even titanium traction pins, as well as either cromo or titanium axles. Tyler also has you covered for colors, with your options being nearly limitless. All of the above doesn't come cheap, though, with prices ranging from $194.99 to $284.99 USD depending on axle and color choice.

Looking for something different? Machined in Twenty6's Montana workshop, the Predator pedal stands out from the crowd.

Twenty6 Predator details:

- CNC-machined 6061 T6 billet pedal bodies
- 110mm wide x 100mm long platform size
- Enduro bearings and Turcite bushings
- Quad O-ring seals
- New breakaway pin design
- Titanium or cromoly axle options
- Weight: 320g (w/ ti axles), 390g (w/ cromo axles)
- MSRP $194.99 to $284.99 USD (depending on axle and color)

The details: Twenty6's Prerunner design has a loyal following, but Tyler knew that there was still room for improvement. The new pedal's body shape may resemble its predecessor, but a subtle change to the surface area sees it sit lower relative to the traction pins, thereby allowing the pins to work harder at holding your feet in place. Pin placement is also much more spread out when compared to the Prerunner to offer more support, something that will be good news for riders with large feet. The concave body, an important factor when talking traction, has also been increased on the new model. That added concave is exaggerated even more by raised leading and trailing pin locations.

Whereas many pedals make use of off the shelf pins Tyler has put a lot of effort and time into designing and manufacturing his own. The pins on the Predator pedal can be had in either aluminum (tested), titanium or steel - all with the same shape - that thread into the face, but are accessed with a hex key from the back side. This means that you should be able remove a pin regardless of how damaged it may be, thanks to the tool access being completely protected from rock strikes. We applaud Tyler for thinking ahead, he has also gone to great lengths to make the pins as resilient as possible, shaped in such a way that their outer collar provides support and the thicker shoulder is inset into reinforced wells within the body. The pedal threads themselves, on both the pins and the body, are completely sheltered from damage. In a further effort to protect the body from damage, the pins feature a relief around their circumference that acts as a breakaway point, allowing the tip to fail before the pin is pulled out of the body.

The pedal bodies feature solid leading edges that should stand up to abuse quite well.

Internally, the Predator pedal makes use of a large, tapered shaft and a self-lubricating Turcite bushing, combined with an Enduro sealed bearing at the outer end of the axle. An aluminum nut, also machined by Twenty6, holds everything together, and an aluminum cap is threaded onto the end of the body for protection. Dual quad O-ring seals, one at each end of the axle, help keep the crud out. Axles can be had in both steel or titanium, and have a nitride coating to keep them fresh and smooth.

Twenty6 Predator Pedal
The Predator's tapered axle gets the full nitride treatment, along with quad O-rings to keep the gunk out. A custom aluminum nut, also made by Twenty6, holds everything together.

Performance: Our flashy green and purple Predator pedals garnered quite a bit of attention at the trail head, but they backed this up with great performance as well. On the trail it was easy to feel their larger-than-average platform size underneath my Five Ten Freerider shoes, with the extra surface area feeling very secure compared to more compact designs that focus more pressure in a smaller area. For the same reason, they also were far less likely to create hotspots on the bottom of my feet during long descents, something that riders who are prone to the sometimes-painful feeling will really appreciate. The 110mm width of the pedal meant that we felt less likely to need to reposition our feet during a ride, simply because there is more real estate available to use with the Predators. The obvious downside to the extra size should be more pedal strikes, but we can't say that that was the case.

Predator pedals provide a solid amount of grip that didn't have us wishing for more, even if they didn't equal the adhesion that open-top set screws offer in the long term - the aluminum traction pins quickly became dull and we found ourselves looking for more purchase after a few weeks of use. When new, though, the concave platform and ten aggressive pins per side hold your feet in place quite well, even if you are not sporting soft, sticky soled shoes. The extra concave profile built into the Predator bodies likely played a helping hand in this regard. The bodies feature closed leading edges (the Prerunners had open cutaways) and have shown to be resistant to being smashed and dragged over the ground and off of rocks. The titanium axles used within our Predators are also still perfectly straight, proving to be much more robust than the last set of ti axles that we spent time on.

Our Predator test pedals came equipped with the lightweight aluminum pins, but both steel and titanium options are available as well. Notice the small groove machined into the pin's circumference that acts as the breakaway point, preventing damage to the threads within the pedal body yet still allowing the broken pin to be removed.

We've put in loads of time using the Predator pedals and they have proven themselves to be among the best of the best platforms out there, but we do have a few concerns. Our test pedals came equipped with Twenty6's aluminum pins that, while obviously lighter than the titanium or steel options, quickly wore down to the point where traction was greatly affected. How quick? It took less than a dozen rides for the pins to become noticeably duller. We touched ours up with a file to bring some of their bite back, but we'd hesitate to recommend purchasing the Predator pedals with the aluminum pins, especially considering that the steel and titanium versions feature the same breakaway design that can save the threads in the pedal body from suffering damage.

That same breakaway pin design did raise the question of just how easily the pins should be allowed to depart. Our left pedal lost two pins within the first few rides - both instances involved lightly scraping over a rock and weren't events that we think should have done damage. Sure, the pedals do come with extra pins, but they break off a touch too easily for our liking.

We were quite surprised to find that we could actually get the pedal bodies to rock on the axle slightly by shifting our feet from side to side. What we were seeing was the rather tiny sealed bearing at the pedal's outboard end rocking enough to allow for visual movement of the body over the bushing. No, we couldn't feel it when riding - it was far too small for that - and Twenty6 puts the movement down to the bearing's drop-in fit which allows users to easily replace the bearing if required down the road. While we can't make an honest assessment if the movement will affect bearing life in the long run, Twenty6 is quick to point out that they have yet to see a single failed bearing from their design, and that the "small amount of play in the area where the bearing is seated is negated when the bearing is under load, having no effect whatsoever on the wear of the bearing".

Twenty6 Predator Pedal
Each body spins on a combination of a single Enduro sealed bearing at the outboard end and a tapered Turcite bushing (left). It didn't take long for the pedal's aluminum pins to round off enough for traction to be greatly reduced (right).


Pinkbike's take:
bigquotesThe Predator pedals impressed us with their large platform, reasonably light weight and good looks. Traction is quite good when new, but quickly declines as the aluminum pins begin to wear. Do yourself a favour and go with the steel pins if you are looking to pick up a set of Twenty6 pedals, you'll be happy that you did. Riders with big feet, or those who suffer from hot spots, will appreciate the sizeable platform as well. The Predators are not inexpensive by any stretch of the imagination, but are a good choice if you are looking for something different and have the money to spend. - Mike levy

www.twenty6products.com


Must Read This Week









123 Comments

  • + 41
 It looks as though the pins have just snapped off and not rounded off. Thats what that line is for on the pin itself, its a sheer point.
For $194.99 to $284.99 USD, they sure are fancy and all but I think there are other pedals for 1/3 the price and that will out perform.
  • + 3
 Agreed they do look like they've snapped rather than rounded off.
Maybe the steel pins will fair better!?
  • + 24
 The second I looked at the side view of those pedals, my shin's started hurting...heh.
  • + 1
 @moutnbiker: From the last picture two of the pins snapped off but you can see how the pin on the top right is still there. The anodized coating has been rubbed off along with much of the material, but it hasn't snapped yet.

I like the thought of the breakaway pin design... but I don't think Twenty6 got it right if they are breaking off on the smallest of pedal strikes. Willing to bet that the steel or ti pins will do a good bit better.
  • + 8
 You could also just buy some spank spike platforms for a little under 140, so i dont see why its nessesary to spend sooo much when you have other cheeper better options.
  • - 1
 These pedals, with straitline pins? Best of both worlds.
  • + 5
 I say they go with Magnesium pins so they throw wicked sparks/fire!
  • + 1
 After using the DMR Vault pedals, I'm likely not switching to anything else. I've yet to see a better pedal come out than the Vault.
  • + 2
 at that price for the quality I rather spend my money on another set of straitlines ... they are heavier but they are way more reliable and get the traction done even with some broken pins and are WAY cheaper to replace
  • + 1
 well thing is i got some cheap pedals with removable spikes. and i have got to say, even if the spike is snapped its still easy to remove it, as you just flip the pedal around and use the screwdriver on the other side. So i really miss the point in this whole argument
  • + 1
 What they're saying is that a pin that pops out or whatever can strip the pedal's threads.
  • + 2
 well this is another interesting point then? I have wellgo pedals (w/e came with charge blender 08, LU-a54d i think) and they cost what £30? If the pin comes off and rips the thread, i can get new set of pedals for £30.

However how much are the set up pins for these pedals? If they are going to be over £30 then whats the point when its cheaper to replace the entire pedal?
  • + 1
 Hmm, yes. I find Wellgo pedals to not be very good. The pins round off very quickly and the platform itself is slippery. After all, they're really just reproductions of higher end pedals such as DMR. My DMRs have never had a pin come off them, so I can't exactly add much to this topic.
[Reply]
  • + 15
 That caliber of quality is useless in some applications, where the pedal gets eaten up. Its a beautiful pedal, and id love to have it on an xc or light am bike, but id never put it on my street or Dh bike.
[Reply]
  • + 13
 ride them before you bury them... I have rocked every pedal from 26... from the 6foe to prerunner and ralleye ....i freedide with them, dj with them and have even won a cyclocross race on a set... the bushing system is solid and if the pins shear its better than pulling threads out and twisting cages.... and would rather spend money to support amazing people doing handmade creative ish... so if your not into them fine... go rock some taiwan crap....
[Reply]
  • + 9
 Alright, seriously, what the f*ck warrants a 200+$ price on pedals? EVER. Even if they were solid carbon fiber with gold pins they shouldn't be anywhere near these prices...the last couple pedals PB reviewed came in at a price around 150-200 for the cheap set...then nearly $300 for the expensive set...This is ridiculous. I can't believe anyone is ok with paying this for such a small part...
  • + 5
 ^^ agree

pedals are essentially "disposable" with 1 season of riding a reasonable expection, given that modern DH and All-MTN bikes have low bottom brackets which cause much more frequent "pedal/ground" contact than the old school geometry bikes experienced

personally? I run the Nukeproof Neutron pedals (same as Kona Wah Wah and Superstar) with steel axles, relatively cheap, relatively light, very grippy, wide platform, nice and thin, and easy to replace next season if they ever get smashed on rocks

no way I would pay crazy money for pedals, when there are so many good value alternatives around at the moment Smile
  • + 6
 No kidding, right?? it just makes no sense, is there a compartment on these pedals where you pull a TR 450 out of them.... Whats next? $500.00 for pedals..pfff.. sickening!!
  • + 4
 with prices like that, apparently they don't want to sell their product.
  • + 1
 So buy cheaper pedals and let those who want to spend money on these items buy them? I see no reason to get so worked up and upset over something so trivial.
  • + 7
 thanks peanut gallery :-) I don't think anyone is "worked up" or blocking others from buying the pedals, just expressing how they feel about the pricetag. Compared to say Straitline pedals, these are $150 more, surely many people wouldn't call that trivial. Besides, this is a forum.. where we discuss such things.. regardless how trivial they may be.
  • + 1
 It's not "trivial". These pedals cost the same amount to build as the pedals made by very admirable companies who are making and selling them at competitive sustainable prices. Twenty6 is using sensationalist tactics to sell their product at hugely over-inflated prices to an already incredibly strained economy. I agree with cyrix in that if you want to waste your hard earned money on them then knock your socks off and go right ahead, but as others have stated it is definitely an unnecessary expenditure when there are so many more less expensive and better quality products available. Especially after reading the reviews about the pins and wobbling pedal body over the bushing.
[Reply]
  • + 7
 Yeaaa those purple pins match my tight pants! 320g for ti axle is decent but $300 for pedals is just retarded. wellgo mg1 ti $80 and half the weight of these expensive pedals but most people would buy these just to look at them. Now that everyone running 5 10 shoes traction not such a problem, its about the weight and durabiliy in my opinion,
  • + 1
 320g for a Ti axle decent? Many Cro-mo axle equppied flats come under 400g, why pay so much over for something less reliable, just because it's max 40g per pedal less? Comparing to usualy heavy flat pedal shoe being main part of "propelling rotating mass" - it's nothing.
  • + 1
 Ya i with you, these pedals for over $300 are a joke. I been using MG-1 cromo axles (376g per pair)on all four of my bikes for the last 6 years. Still have my first pair of them and they working great. So thats 4 pairs of pedals for about $135 shipped, and they lasting mad long. I've seen people rocking these predator pedals and they usually just compensating for something, no need to spend that much.
[Reply]
  • + 11
 Is it just me or is this ridiculous to pay for pedals?
  • + 6
 No sir it is not just you
[Reply]
  • + 4
 Why Why Why??? They look great, but, Way tooo pricey.. Just like straitline This company needs to have their heads examined, I just cant support companies that try to rip people off like that!!
  • + 4
 Just because they are more expensive does not mean they are a rip off. Straitlines, twenty6 and some other high end pedals use higher quality materials, tighter tolerances, higher quality finishes, more intricate machining, made in usa, etc the list goes on. You get what you pay for. They aren't ripping us off at all. In fact I wouldn't be surprised if their profit margins were less than companies that make the cheap mass produced pedals like wellgo. If you don't want want to pay the price or can't appreciate the effort guys like Tyker put into creating these products, don't buy them. It's not like there are a lack of choices in what is probably one of the most saturated markets in the industry.
  • + 1
 I understand what you're saying, the pedals are very nice, and Tyker should be proud of what he has created, but perhaps hes alittle too proud? Materials, labor, machining, there is no excuse for these prices, as a mountain bike community I believe we should stand up against companies that do this with prices, and believe me, the prices WILL go down. Companies want our business, but as consumers we have to draw the line somewhere. Its just like the Bank of America issues that just happened recently, they started charging extra fees, people stuck together took their business elsewhere then B.of.A dropped the extra fees. IT WORKS, it just takes time and patience, We just need to stick together!!
  • + 2
 That doesn't make any sense. Its like saying that if we hold out on buying Ferraris they will eventually lower their prices and they will sell much less. They would be losing money on their products. Your idea would work in a world where time, materials, labour, etc cost nothing.
  • + 0
 Like i know what you're trying to say but I'm trying to say that these pedals are only overpriced if you compare them to a truvativ or wellgo. These aren't comparable pedals in the context of the factors I've already mentioned. If you only care about function then yes these are extremely over priced pedals.
  • + 5
 Did you not read the review ? He pretty much says that they are not worth the money with out actually saying it , so in this case it does make them a rip-off surely?
Pins that wear down exceptionally fast and poor tolerances on the bearings causing play AND being very expensive , so your " higher quality materials, tighter tolerances, higher quality finishes, more intricate machining, made in usa " statement has no grounds.
  • + 5
 you obviously don't get it. The haas machine and associated equipment he has is not cheap. Running one and maintaining one is not cheap (you ever have to replace a vector drive when it dies?). Cutting a pedal from a solid chunk of aluminum is not cheap. Making the spindle for the pedal out a round chunk of steel is not cheap. Cutting the spindle out of a chunk of titanium is f-ing expensive as heck. You obviously have no clue the amount of time and machining that goes into parts like this. You probably also whine about how much chris king headsets cost or hadley hubs. You pay for quality. You pay for stuff that looks nice or is light. Is any of this needed? For 90-98% of the riders out there, probably not. But there is something nice about riding a set of hadleys or have a CK headset in mango on the front of your bike, and then being able to say that these parts weren't made by what amounts to communist slave labor in china or where ever. These parts are made by people in the biking community that support the biking community. On top of that, I will venture a guess here and say that these pedals are not the bread and butter at Twenty6. They are probably just show piece that they sell a few of per year and don't need to sell a bunch and people that want them will be willing to pay for them. Or the pricing probably reflect the fact that these pedals eat up machine time. I be that in the time it takes to make 1 pair of pedals they could make 20+ stems. If you don't see the value in them, hey thats great. But some people out there do see the value or just want to buy parts like this to individualize their bikes.
  • - 3
 Ferraris? We are talking about pedals, they're just pedals, no gold, no diamonds, no fancy platinum trim, just two chunks of metal placed in a machine for 30 mins..
  • + 4
 I'm not denying there is high production costs involved , I never said there was not , my argument is that these are NOT high quality and do NOT justify the price , the review is 50 percent negative so regardless of how much production costs the end product is still unworthy of being that price , if they were charging 30 quid then yea who cares if they have bad bearings and poor tolerances but they are not 30 quid..
  • + 2
 @ bigburd

I was never trying to defend these pedals in particular and it was never an element of the argument, hence why I said if you're talking about these pedals based on function they are extremely overpriced. Unfortunately companies do not take into account real world use into their pricing. I was attempting to try and explain to dthomas that high end companies like Twenty6, Straitline, CK, etc. are not ripping people off (i.e. making ridiculously margins on their parts). Maybe I wasn't being clear enough and you misinterpreted my comments.

@dthomas

I honestly don't know how I can explain this concept to you any more clearly. High-end companies are not ripping people off. Higher end parts actually cost MORE to produce therefore boycotting the brand will not lower their prices. They don't pull their MSRP out of thin air, its called cost of goods sold.
  • - 1
 jv86416

Obviously we all know higher end materials cost more..and if Twenty6 was not making a healthy profit off of these pedals, they wouldn't be making them. Its called business, I am only saying they are shooting for too much profit, which is called bad business, ie (rip off). Now if the review had said "these were the best pedals on the face of the planet" (and had proof..) the debate may be a bit different, but in my eyes the review was not that. There seems to be function issues with them.. Hence, way too pricey for a pair of pedals. So if we all sit back like sheep and except these prices, the prices will only continue to go up..
  • + 1
 sheep are easy targets, true. mike levy seems more on the wolf side of that equation. that is why I've been enjoying Mike Levy's call on products he's reviewed. he doesn't sound like sheep to me.
  • + 1
 Huh?? :\ Clearly,, Mike is not a sheep, he calls em, how he sees em, which is what he did, he pointed out the pro's and con's of this product as he always does. I always appreciate his no B.S reviews, never throwing in glorified hype where it is unjust. I apologize if my earlier comment sounded like I was dogging Mike, that is surely not the case.
  • + 2
 sortafast, thank you for that. I want to rant to people that have no CLUE about the overhead on machining...but they will never get it, and MG-1's will be in their future. Also did anyone think about the passion that goes into products like these? Some people don't have a passion to make sh**ty cheap products for the sport they love...
  • + 1
 Bottom line, 195 - 300 for a pair of pedals is completely ridiculous and absurd. How anyone can justify that is just not a smart person. The two most disposable parts on a bike are tires and pedals, you bash pedals into rocks I mean comon, $200+? I just bought some wellgo's that look better(IMO), are lighter, much cheaper, and whose axle and bearings will outlast these and the straightlines. for $80, on sale for $50. I think ill take my extra $150 and put it towards something else o_0
  • + 1
 @krashDH85

No clue?? Every pedal company out there has overhead on machining, they aren't using chisels and hammers believe me, and you talk about passion, should an extra $150 be added for passion? Tell Diety they have no passion because they have affordable components. It blows my mind that anyone would defend $300 pedals!!
  • + 3
 $195 MSRP for THESE pedals is justifiable. Just because YOU can't justify that much doesn't mean others can't. Frankly I'd buy a pair of these pedals in a heart beat (and they are on my shopping list for when I get my next frame) because I have talked with the owner of the company more than once and can totally relate to what he is doing and companies like this need more support in the bike industry to bring Mfg back to our shores. And, they are down to earth nice folks that ride and build stuff for people that enjoy riding as well. I am sure the price would go down if they could afford to have an automated machining cell like most of the big manufactures have in their Taiwanese and Chinese facilities. Even Straitline has a machining cell that just pumps out pedals for a pretty decent price, but you idiots still bitch about their MSRP too then quote how cheap the wellgos are. Its like comparing a Kia to a BMW 3 series. Yeah, they do much of the same things, but The BMW is in a whole different league in performance and construction and down right awesomeness. Twenty6 is a small shop with not a lot of employees and not a lot of $500,000 machines with another $750,000 in tooling to make make what they do. If you want to crap on their pedals, great. But until you morons have even the slightest clue what it takes to make something like this, bring it to market and do all of this with out a huge multi-million dollar budget, I would strongly suggest you evaluate what you say before saying it.
  • + 3
 @ dthomas I am really just blown away by what you are saying. Saying they are making too much profit? Do you actually think they are making too much profit off these? How can they make too much profit when it costs them probably 5-10 times more money to produce these pedals than it costs Wellgo? Just look at the end caps alone! Wellgo is probably ripping you off more than Twenty6 if you're just talking about profit margins.
Second, there are barely any pedal companies that have an overhead on machining. Only companies that actually make their own pedals in house have any machine overhead. Most bike companies nowadays are run from an office - with a factory in Taiwan on speed dial.
  • + 1
 @jv86416 & sortafast

You two are the market they are looking for...fashion over function..
$300 for pedals, I guess there's always a sucker out there somewhere...maybe Santa will bring you a pair...if his elves can afford them..
  • + 2
 Ok , I think we have cleared this one up now , yes the pedals are expensive to produce and no in this case they are not top end product due to poor production tolerances and other things but people who can afford them will afford them and others won't .

Let's just drop this and get back to our respective bikes with pedals we can justify Smile
  • + 3
 Yes, they are a top end product - what's the poor production tolerance you're talking about? It clearly states that the little bit of room around the bearing is so that you don't have to press-fit them - which is nice if you ever want to service them yourself. That sounds like "intentional" tolerances, not "poor" tolerances.
  • + 1
 Bottom line is most people aren't going to pay over 200 dollars for pedals when they could get them for free or a fraction of the price. To most people the difference in weight, traction, style, and quality isn't worth 10x the price of standard pedals. Everythings based on opinion..
  • + 2
 hey dt.... break a leg ... dont bust balls....ball breaker... from a hater hater
  • + 1
 Read this again, and ill be a hater some more. $300 for pedals is a f**cking joke. In my opinion, which is valued is some VERY small circles lol, they are ugly as fook. And its not like comparing Kia to BMW, its more like comparing a Nissan GTR to a Ferrari 430. Same performance, but your going to pay 10x more for a flashier looking ride.
  • + 1
 go huck yourself!!!
[Reply]
  • + 3
 To each his/her own but the only place I'd put these is on a bike in a showroom. For the price and the fact that the pedals are gonna get punished at the bike park there's no way to justify having these over other things that money could buy. Unless money is no object...unfortunately not in my case.
[Reply]
  • + 3
 I have had my same prerunner pedals for over two years now on my Santa Cruz V-10 and love them. They have been beat to hell and still have great traction and look great. I will for sure be upgrading to the Preds this year.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 Having had a few pedals I have to say for my riding style I enjoy Twenty6 pedals. The pins breaking before pulling out of the pedal body and destroying the body is a nice feature. We see alot of pedals here at the shop with half the pins missing and no threads left to put new pins in. People seem to have the money and want to buy these considering how many we sell.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 So the Alu pins suck? Don't buy them! Get steel if your a hack. I have two sets of Prerunners and a set of Ralleye's. Talk all the smack you want but I have not maintained them at all. Minus replacing pins my hack ass loses they have been perfect. Hope to have my ti predators here soon!!
  • + 2
 No kidding I have had my aluminum ones on since I've had the pedal and only a pretty serious hit has broken them...
[Reply]
  • + 2
 Why is pinkbike so obsessed with overpriced pedals? It seems like half of their product reviews are pedal reviews, and honestly, I feel like pedals are one of the lowest-tech parts on a bike. I can understand devoting a huge amount of time in reviewing a fork or a wheelset, but pedals? Why the special attention?
  • + 0
 ^ seriously. pretty soon there will be constant seatpost reviews. and subsequent arguments about the justification of a $550 platinum Thomson post, and if their new clamp design warrants the price tag. Facepalm
[Reply]
  • + 3
 You get what you pay for, I been running Twenty6 Ralley Ti pedals for 4 years with moderate use no problems, sure they cost me $300 but I haven't had to replace them and I still like them.
[Reply]
  • + 6
 They just look too nice to ride, they`re such works of art.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 i have the 2011 prerunners, and they are incredible!! Tyler Jarosz is the owner, the designer, the machine programer, the maker.. A one man show who stands behind his kick ass swag....."nuff said...thats right, they cost more money, but well worth it...oh yeah and they are MADE IN THE USA!!!!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 cool pedals but im not sure the steel/ti pins still have the break off point the steel pins are more brittle it looks like the pins used for shimano chains i would image its about the same strength as one of those and thier supposed to break, wonder how much new pins are once you burn through the spares
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I'm still waiting for the Tioga MT Zero, to be released and tested. It's been 3 months since they were revealed and they said they'd be available in 2 months. I wonder what's the hold up.

4mm center, 7mm outer, dual concave, cast steel body, 450g, $99... mmmm. I was gonna go with Point1 Podiums until I saw the Tiogas.
  • + 2
 The Tiogas are doomed to fail horribly. No spindle for support is no bueno.
  • + 2
 the tioga pedals are a cool concept but after holding them, im not entirely sure they could take the abuse of a DH bike, just from holding them i could see them failing... the podiums are by far the better choice in pedal, light, and reliable. just my 0.02c
  • + 1
 Tioga looks to be slated for Jan '12 now, estimated to weight 490g (up from 450g), and come with a disclaimer: "Not for DH/FR riding."

I changed my mind on the Tioga pedals and I was gonna get the Podiums, but for that amount of cash, I said F it, I want color, so got the Prerunners instead. Then saw there was very limited colors in cro-mo and saw a color in Ti that I liked... I can't believe I spent so much on pedals. I guess I could justify it by considering what people pay for XTR pedals and Ti Eggbeater pedals. At 265g, it's less than half the weight of my old Sunline V-1s (590g) and much thinner.
  • + 1
 Actually, I think I'd be more willing to trust that huge bearing than a tiny fastener holding on a pedal body to a spindle as found on this pedal and the Podiums. I've seen a few reports of the pedal body separating from the spindle due to the threads of that nut being stripped out.
[Reply]
  • + 4
 Yeah that has to be a typo, no one in their right might would pay that much for a consumer level pedal.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I've got a set of Kore Elite CNC pedals, the elder model and they may be larger than these and with 14 pins per side they are ultimate traction monsters. Sure, they weigh in a bit more than these, but I love them. Just my 2 cents when talking about large platforms.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Pin upkeep is a pain. I also highly recommend steel pins. Alloy ones break off, fall out, and round off. I will repeat what the author said for emphasis, the traction really does decrease greatly as the pins wear down and round off. It seriously only takes maybe 5 rides to wear them down using 5.10 shoes. Never wore down the threaded set pin style, but have bent a few, which makes removal really hard. Put new steel ones on and haven't had to replace any for a number of rides. Much better, but not lighter than any other pedals out there really. Actually, I recommend that people get Point1 Podiums instead. These aren't all they're hyped up to be.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 The price is pretty eye wateringly high. I guess that's driven by the fact they aren't made in bulk in a Chinese sweat shop by workers being paid $10 a week. You pay extra for US designed and manufactured.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Wonder how they compare to the StraitLines. I would love to have a pedal grippy like the straitline with a slightly larger platform for the five tens. They work great with the Freeriders but I like my Karvers for big hills and they are really wide.
  • + 1
 Straitlines w/a larger platform? My new Straitlines are like spiked pizza boxes compared to my old Azonic Xs. Does anyone make a larger platform?

(edit) Oh, and if anyone pays more than $110 US, they just ain't trying.
  • + 1
 Staitlines are the biggest I know of. But with a narrower Freeride shoe I find they fit on the pedal better. So would like to have one maybe a 1/4 inch wider to fit the Impacts and Karvers more comfortably. Find it help get the knees out without your foot rolling over the pedal.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 For sure. Twenty6 pedals it has an amazing look, nice design but there´s no comparission with Straitline AMP pedals. AMP pedals are 320 grams with Chromo Axle, the Twenty6 it has the same weight even with TI axle. The TI version from AMP pedals are 40 grams under the TI Twenty6 version. If i´m going to spend 286 dls, i will buy AMP TI version...
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I've noticed with a lot of the Twenty6 pedals that come through our shop the anodized parts always seem to fade really bad, like with the green and purple on the pedals after they had been used is a really dull shade of what it used to be. Seems to me that they need to work on their anodization process, it seems pretty silly to pay that much for anodized pedals only to have them fade after what seems like only a season that pinkbike tested them.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 they should charge a little more, then this would be an even better product. options are good though, thanks for your efforts!
[Reply]
  • + 3
 So to recap : they look pretty but in reality are sub-standard due to poor internals and weak pins , BARGAIN !!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Yeah they look cool but for the price I'd rather get straightlines. They are the best pedals iv ever had and never had a problem with them especially traction.
[Reply]
  • + 3
 Love the look, but I'm just never gonna spend that much on pedals...
[Reply]
  • + 1
 and i thought my dmr v12 pedals were expensive at 60 quid that price tag is huge also this now make my next pedals look cheap (dmr vaults Smile ) at 79 quid
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Straitline AMP pedals if i was going to spend this much cash AND the pins don't break off after one ride - not as many colors but black will do on any color bike
[Reply]
  • + 1
 So they have the same problem as the old model had - alu pins seem like a good idea untill you ride them. I use screws in my prerunners and they are now awesome.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 too much for me, but they look very nice
[Reply]
  • + 1
 "What is the most important factor for you when considering new platform pedals?"

# 5 - LOOKS
[Reply]
  • + 1
 straitlines amp pedals with steel axels are 4 grams heavier than 26's ti axels and its 99$ cheaper.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Anyone here ride the Canfield Crampons? I've had my eye on these. WHat do you think?
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Some people drives bentleys, wears versaces and live in beverly hill. Myself I drive a honda civic so I buy wellgo.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I have 2 sets of Rallies and a set of Pre-runners and LOVE them. I think its time to uprade one of the sets of Rallies.
[Reply]
  • - 1
 these pedals are such obvious pieces of shit i cant even believe people get talked into buying them. supporting independant bike manufacturers is cool, but not at this cost when the benefits are so obviously ZERO
  • + 1
 You know it's funny, I almost agree with you. I ride the Twenty6 PreRunners with the titanium axle and they're quite nice, but when I held the Predator at Interbike it felt like it would be way too big for most peoples' feet. I wouldn't say they're a piece of shit, but I think they're overkill and very flashy.
  • + 1
 you got talked into buying 200 dollar pedals? i'm shocked
  • + 1
 No one talked me into it. I wanted sub-300g pedals that were grippy and looked good. The PreRunner met all those criteria.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 hopefully their more durable than previous models.
I doubt it though looking at those pins Frown
[Reply]
  • + 1
 lets all buy overpriced prettyboi shit and support the ever increasing prices of bike parts.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 haters gon' hate.... if ur complaining about the price, you've never ridden them!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 $194.99 to $284.99 USD....WTF?
Sticking with my Canfield Crampons for now.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 Their pedals are so aesthetically pleasing.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 U-G-L-Y....they aint got no alibi !
[Reply]
  • + 2
 did i just get this right? 300USD for a pedal?!

not sure if serious
  • + 7
 No - you get 2 !!
[Reply]
  • + 2
 very nice pedals but way to much money
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Seriously, unless your a total weight weenie go for Burgtec Penthouse MKIII's. probably the best flats of all time
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Well engineered, great craftsmanship, love the newer concave design. Good work fellas.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 for $300 I want a 250gr, bombproof pedal that is super thin and has good concave shape
  • + 1
 Get the titanium PreRunners.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 These pins could cut your shin in half
[Reply]
  • + 1
 if straitline were to come out with more colours,till own the market
[Reply]
  • + 1
 i sooo want these! i would buy them if they were 100 dollars cheaper
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I will keep my DE Facto pedals.
[Reply]
  • + 0
 Just get a set of Wellgo Mg-1 and be done with.
  • + 9
 Or ya know....let people buy what they want/like.
  • + 4
 People do not buy what they want/like generally , more a case of what has been advertised the strongest or was ridden by the coolest rider.
  • + 6
 if you are intelligent enough...price is never an issue. you either can afford it or not. window shopping can lead to bitch and moaning. the pricey pretty stuff is always around. the only thing cooler than riding a nice bike is maybe looking at one, too. ...and if you got bank you're doin both.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 they look so sick. :O
[Reply]

Post a Comment



Copyright © 2000 - 2014. Pinkbike.com. All rights reserved.
dv16 0.066431
Mobile Version of Website