Whistler Opening Weekend - A road trip journal.

Jun 3, 2009 at 0:08
Jun 3, 2009
by Joshua Pierce  
 
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I throw on the car stereo and set the iPod at random (consulting the 0rac1e). As if perfectly planned, Zeppelinʼs The Rain Song comes on and the Quathiaski Cove ferry starts moving out of its secluded harbor. Itʼs grey and misty out there, a fine rain making everything seem remote, subdued. My beautiful female consort is on a 4-day exploratory mission around Quadra Island with a whole pod (or is it gaggle?) of other kayak guides, getting to know the territory that theyʼll be paddling over the next 4 months.

Perfect day for a road trip.

My first stop is base lodge at Mount Washington, which is actually a 16 kilometer climb before you get there. Yeah, I know the bike park doesnʼt open for over a month, but I wanted to go see what their excuse for opening so damn late might be. As far as I could tell the place was pretty much deserted, pointing to the probability that the Mt Washington crew just lets Mother Nature take care of getting the trails ready. Fair enough, I mean we are on Island time here.

The view from Mount Washington. Just need to get over to those mountains...

The view from Mount Washington. Just need to get over to those mountains...



After taking in the view, I dropped back down to the highway and decided to head to Cumberland and see what was happening at Dodge City Cycles. Turned out there was a street festival going on in Cumberland, and Dunsmuir Avenue was filled with booths, kids with painted faces, and couples with shaggy dogs wandering around checking everything out. Cumberland seemed to be in a sun bubble where the rain was magically held back for the festivities. I weaved through the smiling faces and went immediately to get a mocha at Tarbells, where the staff was super friendly, defintely enjoying the party atmosphere. Next, over to DCC. I had a positive memory of visiting these guys back in 2004 when I was staying in Merville for a short time. Big disappointment. The staff at DCC all felt to me like they had better things to do. Way more important things to do. They also seemed to have sectioned off the store with a dividing wall in the centEr, making it feel small and crowded. Iʼve been looking for a Magura brake adapter and asked someone about it, and was directed to the mechanic, who really put out as little effort as possible without actually refusing to talk to me. He made a half-hearted attempt to look up the part but dropped the ball after a glance at a catalog. During this noncommittal interaction I asked him about good spots to ride and he said I could buy a trail map, then he told me he had to finish the bike he was working on. Well, Iʼve never bought a trail map in my life (read on to see why) and Iʼm not about to start, because I prefer to actually meet people and go riding. Obviously, it wasnʼt going to happen here. Now, Iʼm not expecting the DCC staff to divulge inside
information to every dork who walks through the door asking for good places to ride. It was just this underlying snide and superior attitude that ran through the place that made me walk out the door thinking, ʻscrew youʼ. And guess what? Screw them. No need to go back. A bike shop has to have something special going on, otherwise Iʼll buy my stuff online for 40% less, right? No stickers for those guys.

Stickers. A free passport to good banter in unfamiliar bike shops the world over. Or should be.

Stickers. A free passport to good banter in unfamiliar bike shops the world over. Or should be.


Onward to Arrowsmith Bikes in Parksville, where a staff member actually said hey to me when I walked in so things were already looking up. They were really friendly and open at Arrowsmith and wanted to help with the Magura thing, but no such luck. Good shop with lots of the necessary stuff and a cool vibe. Those guys I would deal with. So by now Iʼm pretty close to Nanaimo, so I figure I should get over to Delicadoʼs and have a roll-up for the ferry ride over to the mainland. Man, they make the best roll-ups. Hmmm, come to think of it Iʼd like one of those right now...

Made it to the ferry with 5 minutes to spare, then headed on over to Horseshoe Bay and up Highway 99 to experience massive amounts of road construction and condo sprawl. Last time I rolled through Squamish in 2004, it had one intersection. Now it seems to have about 10 kilometers of mall sprawl and mondo condos. It passes through my head that British Columbia should change their provincial motto to ʻThe Ugliest Crap Youʼve Ever Seen in The Most Beautiful Setting Youʼve Ever Seenʼ. Remind me to email BC Premier Gordon Campbell to suggest this. And p.s., Screw the Olympics. Cops are nested into all the 50 km/h construction zones, and people are being pulled over in both directions on the Sea to Sky highway. Itʼs not complicated, people - just
obey the speed limit in the construction zones!

Whistler. A ridiculous spectacle of Western excess sautéed in a Disneyland aesthetic with a Mall for a brain. Full Retail Hell. Full Retail Paradise. Whatever. It was manic. The
notorious Long Weekend when Whistler is descended upon by thousands of idle teens and middle class families. Everywhere, the feeling that Something was going on that You Werenʼt a Part Of. And the shoulder-to-shoulder crowds all seemed to be...shopping. Here we are in one of the most amazing bunch of land formations on the planet, and we all want to go shopping? Did I miss the damn memo for self-lobotomy?

I wandered into the information building in the main village and found out about a sweet little B&B close by called the Cedar Springs. The rates at this place were amazing, the owner Jackie was really friendly and helpful, and the breakfasts were absolutely epic. Homemade bread, buttermilk blueberry banana pancakes, fresh fruit, good coffee...easily the best breakfast Iʼve had away from home. Iʼm not exaggerating, it was awesome and it cost under 80 bucks a night! And after one of her breakfast, I wasnʼt hungry for like 15 hours. Super positive experience. Once I checked in and met a few of the people staying there, and had some of Jackieʼs freshly baked zucchini-banana bread, it was back to the village to sample more of the manic carnival energy. I used my Magura adapter search as an excuse to check out the Villageʼs bike shops. First stop was Fanatyk-Co, whose crew was a good jumble of Canadians, Aussies, and Kiwis. Small shop but good selection of the necessary gear. No Magura adapters of course, but one optimistic dude tried to upsell me an entire brakeset. The good-natured banter which ensued eventually led to them suggesting I check out Summit, which was across the street, or Kathmandu, whose reputation for holding on to old school bits and pieces sounded hopeful. I put my search off for the night in order to explore other aspects of Whistler, but resumed the next morning. Kathmandu is the closest thing in Whistler to what I would call a ʻlocalʼ bike shop - actually, more of a blend of bikes, boards and bongs. Squireled wa-a-a-y out of the way and impossible to find (although I seem to remember it was somewhere near the KFC - commonly referred to as the Dirty Bird), Kathmandu was low-key, unpretentious, and, most importantly, actually had a bunch of Magura adapters kicking around. When I got there the laid-back Kiwi mechanic was working on an XC fanaticʼs Element 90, which had inadvertently sucked a piece of wire into the derailleur pulleys. The Kiwi did a very competent and efficient extraction, probably spending about a half hour in total on the bike to make sure everything was tuned sweetly, and only charged the kid 15 bucks. Once the kid was on his way, the mechanic started searching through bins and finally
located his secret stash of Magura adapters - all 3 of which turned out to be for an obscure, non-IS, long-forgotten fork mount lost somewhere in the legendary mists of time. All this bike shop research was beginning to threaten my riding time, so I ended up testing out a set of Avid Elixirs, courtesy of Fanatyk-Co.

OK, finally, time for first tracks. All my haphazard wanderings from the previous night had familiarized me with the layout of the village, at least enough to find my way to the ticket booth and get a lift pass, which set me back 42 bucks, $9 less than the regular season price. I was about 5th or 6th on the lift, and for whatever reason, I was nervous as hell. The chairlift bubbles were still in place and, on the first run around the bullwheel, were set to automatically lower, so I was stuck in this discolored translucent plastic shell listening to the amplified sound of my own breathing, like some outtake from 2001: A Space Odyssey.

Whistler. Every bit of bike porn Iʼve ever subjected myself to has included something featuring this place. I already knew what the trails looked like - the trail names - the drops and features - even the people who ride here - from videos, photo shoots, magazine articles, and friendʼs descriptions. Without question, the single best-known mountain bike destination in the world. Hype or not, Whistlerʼs bike park has become the model on which every other resort is based, the arbiter by which every other resort is measured. And here I am alone in a plastic bubble with no idea how long the lift even takes. Breathe in. Breathe out. Find my gloves. Find my goggles. Find my gloves again. Wonder why Iʼm breathing so loud. Tighten the straps on my backpack. Wonder why the liftʼs taking so long. Breathe more. Damn thatʼs loud. Man, can I ever feel the coffee kicking in full force when it gets mixed with adrenaline. Holy crap, Iʼm at Whistler. Finally the bubble latch is released and I am free to unload! A grinning Australian liftee in black-framed Oakleys holds the handlebar of my Free and we casually nod at each
other as I take the bike from him. I roll down the ramp, past the trailmap board, down to the sign that says Bike Park Privileges Revoked For Riding on This Road, and then right back up again to the trail map. I glance at the board as if I can actually make sense of it, then do the only logical thing: follow someone else to the trails. I donʼt know about you, but trailmaps make no sense to me at all - until Iʼve familiarized myself with the territory. Then, I can kind of see where those map guys were coming from when they decided to pretend that the multicolored squiggles that interweave all over the place, with numbers and arrows and diamonds and double diamonds and blue patches and green patches, are actually trails. Letʼs just say I value personal experience above whatever kind of foreknowledge those damn maps are supposed to provide.

A short pedal to the trailheads and Iʼm riding past small white signs with black lettering that say things like: A-Line, Schleyer, Joyride, B-Line. B-Line sounds like a good place to warm up. From the knowledge of Whistler that just seems to become part of your brain once you start gravity riding, B-Line is understood to be a casual stroll down the hill without consequences. Which means no gaps, no drops, no technical. Itʼs considered Intermediate in the bike park, but if you canʼt roll down B-Line, you should really go back to knitting. B-Line is almost as relaxed as an old armchair; comfortable, familiar, and every once in a while itʼll kick back and spring the footrest out when youʼre not expecting it to, just enough to keep you alert, but not enough to knock you off the chair. The spring runoff had made some of the corners nice and gooey, to remind riders that getting dirty is part of the fun. This trail is definitely a great first-run warm-up: make sure the bike is working the way it should, make sure youʼre awake enough. No real surprises, just a nicely bermed meander down the mountain to get a rider used to being on a bike after whatever abuse theyʼve subjected themselves to the previous night.

The thing about the Whistler bike park is that itʼs carefully (almost too carefully) tailored, and itʼs easy to gradually increase the challenge level. Crank It Up, for example, is exactly like someone took B-Line and turned it up a notch or two. Still no big challenges, just a ʻrollercoaster of funʼ as a riding buddy of mine likes to describe it. What gives B-Line and Crank It Up an intermediate rating is the fact that they both are interspersed with tabletop kickers. But if youʼre just learning, these runs are perfect for gradually increasing your speed and learning how to take some air. Crank it Up also gives you some easy wall rides to try out. Remember kids, the faster you go, the smoother it is. Only a limited amount of trails were ready to rip this early in the season, although for opening weekend the Whistler crew had been working diligently to get the snow cleared off and the things flowing smoothly on the runs that were open. There was still too much snow on the higher elevations for the Garbanzo lift to be running, but most of the lines to the west of Fitzsimmons were ready for action. I tried the top of Joyride to Schleyer next, whose legendary status is, uh...legendary. A technical trail with some good rocks, roots and drops and a couple of good surprises. Being an easterner, Schleyer is more like the kind of trail I am used to seeing. On my first run down, there were a few sections I had to stop and look at before dropping, but again the trail is so well built that it had
lots of gnarly flow to it, and nothing too huge. The end of the Schleyer trail spaghettis out into lots of trail choices, all similar in technical level to Schleyer itself. Next, I had to hit A-Line. It seems that every resort building mountain bike trails now has a run that they refer to as ʻtheir version of A-Lineʼ. Youʼve already heard what itʼs like, and youʼve already seen lots of photos of it, so Iʼm not going to bore you too much with the description: lots of tabletops, some gap jumps, big berms, lots of fast flowy bike highway. Yes, itʼs as fun as it sounds. At the end of the trail as you approach the Fitzsimmons lift, there are a few different line choices to direct you back to the chair or the village.

The rest of the day was spent exploring variations on these themes - Joyride, Rock City, Clown Shoes, Whistler Downhill, and whatever else was open. I didnʼt pay too much attention to the trail names after a while, I was too busy refilling the void left by a winter of wanting to go riding but living in a snow belt. Not only was this my first ride at the Whistler Bike Park, it was my first ride of the season. I noticed that at about 3:30 in the afternoon I still hadnʼt stopped for lunch and was feeling a bit worn around the edges, so I took a quick break, found a grocery store, downed a couple of Powerades and ate a banana or two, then got the hell back up there and ripped it up till they wouldnʼt let me on the lift anymore. What a perfect way to start the season! Just to spite all the weather reports that insisted it would be rainy and overcast, Mother Nature provided a perfect weekend, above 25 degrees and beautifully shiny. Iʼm taking this as an omen for the rest of the season out here - the precedent has been set!

In spite of the fact that it takes about a day to get there, Iʼm planning on returning for Crankworx just to experience the spectacle and film WomenzWorx, and try out the Garbanzo-accessed runs. In case youʼve never heard of it, WomenzWorx is...yep, you guessed it, a women-only freeride comp that takes place during CrankWorx. According to the Pique, Whistlerʼs weekly rag, women represent the fastest-growing demographic in gravity riding right now. So letʼs start featuring women in the bike media! Itʼs time to change it up and take a break from all the cockwaving macho metalhead crap thatʼs been totally done to death. It isnʼt just pimply 12-year-old boys who love this sport. People of all ages, shapes and sizes are into it, and a couple of days in the Whistler Bike Park will prove this to you without question.

Even if you canʼt stand the over representation of Whistler in the bike media and all the hype surrounding it, you know you have to check it out. In spite of all the noise, all the riders I met were chill, laid back and in it for the good times. Everyone who loves our sport has to experience the place for themselves and see where theyʼre at with it. I know I walked away feeling a huge sense of accomplishment. Somehow my riding was stepped up just by being there, if only for the fact that Iʼve finally experienced first-hand the trails that are continually rocked by the some of the best riders in our sport.

-mpathic.pinkbike.com
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44 Comments

  • + 10
 wow you like bananas
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  • + 3
 "Something was going on that You Werenʼt a Part Of. And the shoulder-to-shoulder crowds all seemed to be...shopping. Here we are in one of the most amazing bunch of land formations on the planet, and we all want to go shopping? Did I miss the damn memo for self-lobotomy?"

Exactly how I felt the entire weekend.
[Reply]
  • + 3
 Your experience aside, DCC is usually a great shop. Getting onto the trail map issue. Yes the maps are 4$. But that money goes into the Cumberland Community Forest Society (www.cumberlandforest.com) who currently OWN a large portion of the land used for some of the best bike trails in this area. And there is a large mortgage payment that comes with that, just like owning land or a house. So these maps, in a way, help offset the cost of that. They are very high quality maps, not your Microsoft Paint project. I might be biased to it, but people have to realize its going towards a good thing, not someones beer fund.
  • + 0
 thanks for the info, much appreciated. It makes more sense when you know what it's going toward. If someone at DCC had told me that, I probably would've bought a map just to support the trailwork.
The thing about walking into any bike shop is that first impression, and I've worked at bike shops where people have said the same (or way worse) about us. And I've recommended shops to friends where I've had a great experience, and they've come back with some horror story about how they were treated.
  • + 1
 Well I shouldnt be quoted for the info I gave, it is my understanding that the fees are a part of it. Mount Washington is no whistler, let that be said. Its making small steps, but the feeling I get being a local is that they really don't care a lot about summer activities instead they do it because that type of riding IE whistler silverstar etc is so popular, so they more or less have to do that to compete. When I say I don't see them interested in summer, its the little things that make the Whistlers famous; proper grooming, proper jump layout (not too: big, small, steep, flat etc). Basically spending money to make money. Instead I think it is there to capitalize on a monopoly of a market they have on the Island. I still have fun there regardless, just picked up my seasons today. I will say this though, Every year I have gone up, it has gotten better, so there is progress happening and they are getting their stuff together.
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  • + 4
 Such an honest write up, I had to smile as you described you're first lift up, was exactly the same as my first time at Whistler. A few more pics would have put the icing on the cake but the article more than made up for it.
  • + 2
 definitely will be doing more photos in the future. This trip I was too into riding to remove the lens cap!
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  • + 2
 It is about time somebody pointed out how good Whistler is, that kind of information is just so hard to come by! And what an incredible in depth review of Mount Washington, one I will come to rely on as I ride there this season. Thank you for enlightening us all saving us the expense of actually having to go to these places now. That will leave me with far more time to shop as you so beautifully chronicled in your "article".

The ability to judge is an incredible thing, it is a privilege and a freedom for the person passing judgement but it has a power that used irresponsibly can cause huge damage to people and situations beyond an individual's understanding. I have just openly judged your article an in doing so undermined something you put effort and time into. I would like you to consider the ramifications of your comments and consider as to whether things were exacty as you describe or whether you, like I, were writing for effect?
  • - 2
 once again, like the above comment, I really don't understand how you could have read the article and thought I was judging Mt. Washington. Maybe you guys were reading a different article. Truth is, I can't wait to get out and ride there, I was just bummed that it wasn't open yet. maybe you guys should actually read what was written, rather than rush to the assumption that there is judgement being passed.
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  • + 2
 Hopefully everyone that reads this article also takes the time to read the comments and sees that this guy wrote a horrible review on a bike shop and that every local that read it left a comment to defend them.
DCC is a great shop. tons of product and they know about the stuff they sell. I've never gone in there and felt like they had better things to do. did you ever think maybe the street festival going on may have made their day a little busy?
  • + 0
 And hopefully everyone that reads the article and the comments takes the time to realize that everyone's experience is different. I will repeat that experience is not right or wrong, it's just experience. When I walked into DCC, there were two other customers in the store, so they weren't busy in spite of the festival. A first impression when you walk into any store is important, and I reported on mine. Obviously there are a couple of people who feel very defensive and got upset when something they love was criticized, but once again, if you take the time to read the comments, you'll see that there are a few people who had the same experience as I did walking into DCC, so it was not an isolated incident. Hopefully DCC will see this as constructive, and maybe it will help them to be a bit more open to us 'outsiders'.
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  • + 2
 As a Squamish resident I think 'mondo condos' lining the highway is a bit of literary hyperbole. Gratuitous use of adjectives aside, nice article about the spirit of our sport, those episodic moments like the first time at Whis and the first ride after the long winter are our common experiences that binds us as a community. Peace.
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  • + 1
 The only time ive riden mt washington i experienced an overall locals only feeling about the whole park.Me and my wife had never been there before and my wifes new to mountain parks and we were pretty much told that there was nothing for her level of riding.Everyone that worked at the park seemed generaly disinterested giving us any idea what we had to look forward to.while i was on the chairlift with a guy from new york on my first run up he told me his freind broke her vwrist on the first run down using full rental bike and pads.i dont know what hill policy is at mountain bike parks but they didnt offer up any kind of rebate on the rentals,but maybe thats jus how it goes.Only did three runs then left because my wife was freaked out by potetialy paying over 100 bucks to find out she cant ride the mountain.Oh well im gonna stick to silverstar and check out whistler due to this reveiw.
  • + 1
 sorry to hear about your experience at Mt. Washington, I've heard similar things about it also. I think your wife will find it a lot easier to deal with at Whistler.
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  • + 1
 Good to see the Quadra produces great writers as well as some of the sicker riders i know. The elitist attitude at DCC lately is something we were discussing on the trail yesterday, to bad but its definitely not the sort of vibe Cumberland usually puts out...
[Reply]
  • + 1
 To judge the hill at Mount Washington without ever having ridden there seems pathetic, influencing opinions of people who may never be lucky enough to ride the diamond in the rough on Vancouver Island. For all those out there it is a place to come to a build your own opinions of. For me and all I know, it is a far cry from the hedonism of Whistler and that is o.k. by us. As for the savage assessment of DCC, you were simply wrong. The village of Cumberland revolves around few things, bikes being right up there. DCC acts a a central hub for all things good in the town and, it is a place people are made to feel welcome and wanted, however small their need. Maps are sold for the benefit of those who need them, just like the phone is answered to people who get lost on the trails and need a route home. I have waited for 10 minute conversations to end, rapt in overhearing them as the staff exude excitement and enthusiasm for the ride they are describing for somebody to try. The shop has only ever made we want to go back.
So please, enjoy the memories you now have, and it is a shame that you had some experiences or recollections that won't make you as happy. But I hope your judgements weren't based on as little as your rode at Mount Washington, were they?

While what I have written is long I agree, I am speaking for a lot of people that live here and won't have had time to read this because they will be riding more and writing less, somehting you may consider before your next judgement.
  • - 1
 don't know what you're referring to, as there is absolutely no 'judgement' of Mt. Washington whatsoever in my article. All I said was that it wasn't open yet. That's not a qualitative judgement, that's what is normally known as a fact. As for DCC, I was reporting my experience, which is not 'wrong' or 'right'. It is simply my experience. If I'd had a different experience walking in there, I would have written something different.
  • + 2
 "I wanted to go see what their excuse for opening so damn late might be" this sounds a lot like a judgement to me, when will you launch an attack on all the other bike parks around BC for opening at the same time?

Your article annoys me because of your lack of respect, Pinkbike should be ashamed to let angry diatribes that lack any semblance of factual, informative reporting feature on their website. There seems to be a theme in the comments about it, locals are angry and people who haven't been lucky enough to ride these amazing locations are interested. My experience of your article is that I will unfortunately not get the 5 minutes back I spent reading it. I hope the next time you write something you sound less like a dyslexic food critic, full of criticism with no skill in the presentation! Please, keep your experiences to yourself and be content in the knowledge that DCC has such a good reputation and quality of service that people here will laugh about your article and discredit the entire thing because of the rubbish you wrote.
  • + 4
 hmm. There's no anger there my friend, except what you're bringing to it. The statement you quote is meant as a lighthearted expression of my own impatience because I really want to ride there. Any negativity is purely your own invention.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Great writup man, Whistler is amazing...and the off park riding is superb as well. The last time I was in DCC I got great service, he even drew the new trails on the map for me...this was a few years ago...sorry to hear it's gone downhill since then.
  • + 1
 I was there beginning of last season so maybe they just hadent gotten into the swing of things yet.Ill give them the benifit of the doubt i guess.Mt washington that is.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 DCC has always given me the same attitude that you got, once a dude rode a bike around the shop for 15 mins before saying "hey" to me. I had to go down to Simons Cycles in Comox to get info on trails in Cumberland. They spent 1/2hr going through the trail map mapping out good runs and then gave me the map. Great article man, thanks.
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  • + 2
 Makes me feel that i would actually be in your place. So well written! I bet theres nothing else like Whistler, and ever will be. I must complete the Holy crusade towards the mountain of the mountains... MUST!
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  • + 4
 Great write up... I felt like I was riding with you. Then I realised I wasnt Frown I wanna go to Whistler!!!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Surprised they would post this with such a scathing review of a shop in there, but that is honestly what people want to hear. Going into a shop that doesn't care if you go into it is a very deflating experience.

Good article, describes exactly how I felt my first (and only) time there last summer.
[Reply]
  • + 3
 Wow, our whistler opening weekend will be up tomorrow! Yours sounded sick!!
[Reply]
  • + 0
 for us who live here the "mall" keeps people coming to Whistler, filling the hotels and offering up an opportunity to live here and maybe raise a family in this magnifigant valley...remember that this is first and foremost a ski and snowboard town, with mtnbiking taking up a close 3rd, therefore we have enough amenities to serve two massive mountains and 2 million ski visits. So I guess your town hasn't grown an inch since 2004? as you assume Squamish should have? it is also a great little town with sweet bike trails and amazing climbing, its becoming a more of bedroom community for Whistler and Vancouver cause of the new highway 99, lots of people want to live there. Your elitist island view distorts the reality of these towns and make you sound like they aren't good enough for you.
As for your first lift ride, you probably loaded up your bike and followed too close to bike rack. There is a sensor by your feet that picks up movement so when the chair comes around, if nothing was tripped after the bikes left, then the bubble automatically comes down. If you load you bike and wait to walk to the green line then the sensor gets tripped and the bubble stays open.
Funny that you complain about the crowds during one of the busiest weekends in town, yet you are planning to come here for the craziest part of the summer, Crankworx. Have you seen the crowd photos from the slopestyle? Make your trip at the beginning of September, bring your XC bike too and really explore what this town really has to offer.
Nice article though....
  • + 1
 the lift ride thing was definitely comic, just a nod to my own stupidity at not knowing how the thing works! Thanks for the advice on when to come, I actually have ridden the non-bike park trails with friends who live there and it was a great experience.
  • + 1
 yeah agreed. Squamish has changed a bit in 5 years.

Also, I'm certain Squamish had more than one traffic light in 2004. I've lived here for 6 years now. Were you looking out the window and driving through red lights or was a big coffee mug blocking your vision?
  • + 1
 "And p.s., Screw the Olympics. Cops are nested into all the 50 km/h construction zones, and people are being pulled over in both directions on the Sea to Sky highway. Itʼs not complicated, people - just
obey the speed limit in the construction zones!"

Its not as bad as you make it out to sound. Police are out there sometimes but never in all the construction zones!
Yes, if there is work going on and people out on the road you should drive 50km/h. If the road is empty of equipment and people and all that sign is doing is stopping the cones from getting blown over, maybe consider using the pedal on the right.

I'm not telling you to speed vast amounts. But this method will remove the image of any tailgating Dodge Ram crew cab from your rear view mirror.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Women's Gravity! hey thats really cool. Good for you for supporting that movement. I really hope to see a nice integration of that aspect into the current culture. Good luck
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Finally an intelligent and interesting article on Pinkbike. Great write up and it got me stoked on being there in 4 weeks. Can't wait!
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  • + 2
 Great write up! Definitely made me want to leave the prairies and road trip it to the Mountains. So Jealous
  • + 1
 I did the move years ago and never regretted it. Consider this your invitation.
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  • + 1
 We should forward this article to their local newspaper. It's a great read and I can't wait to go this year! Too bad about DCC.
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  • + 2
 Arrrrghhhh. Reading this was painful. *Whistler, I love you*
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  • + 1
 i love whistler. each day i wake up here, it feels like a dream Smile lucky me.
  • + 1
 listen to "YES" by LMFAO
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  • + 1
 Great read with the morning coffee here at my work desk.
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  • + 1
 That may be one of the best online article I have read!!! Nice work!!
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  • + 1
 highland opened may15th ,ha!
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  • + 1
 Amazingly well written, Felt like I was beside you.
  • + 1
 And I will be there tomorrow Smile
[Reply]

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