X-Fusion Vengeance HLR Fork Review

Oct 28, 2010 at 0:09
Oct 28, 2010
by Mike Levy  
 
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X-Fusion may be the underdogs right now, but they've pulled out all of the stops with their 160 mm travel Vengeance HLR. Inside you can read my thoughts on the X-Fusion all-mountain fork, as well as check out its impressive internals to see what makes it tick.

Read on,



X-Fusion Vengeance HLR


Watch the video to see the Vengeance fork fully explained and then put through its paces by X-Fusion front man John Hauer

Views: 39,367    Faves: 69    Comments: 14


X-Fusion is making a big effort to win the hearts and minds of riders who are looking for high performing suspension and they are fully aware that it will be a hard battle. As it sits right now, the Big Four rule the roost in this category, but X-Fusion is looking to change this with their new fork, the Vengeance. It is available in two flavours; the HLR model tested here that features separate high and low compression adjusters, as well as rebound, and the less expensive RC model that allows you to tune compression and rebound. Both are air sprung and let you change the travel from 160 mm down to 130 mm and 100 mm internally. Both the Vengeance HLR and RC models are available in standard 1 1/8th, tapered, and full 1.5
X-Fusion is making a big effort to win the hearts and minds of riders who are looking for high performing suspension and they are fully aware that it will be a hard battle. As it sits right now, the Big Four rule the roost in this category, but X-Fusion is looking to change this with their new fork, the Vengeance. It is available in two flavours; the HLR model tested here that features separate high and low compression adjusters, as well as rebound, and the less expensive RC model that allows you to tune compression and rebound. Both are air sprung and let you change the travel from 160 mm down to 130 mm and 100 mm internally. Both the Vengeance HLR and RC models are available in standard 1 1/8th, tapered, and full 1.5" steerer options to fit any frame and headset combination out there.
You won't find a fancy quick release axle system on the Vengeance which may put off some riders, but others will prefer the standard and secure looking pinch bolt system that X-Fusion has chosen to use. I can't think of a time when I was racing to get my front wheel off to fix a flat on my all-mountain bike anyhow. A 5 mm allen key is required to loosen the single pinch bolts on each side, as well as thread the axle from the lowers. This photo also shows the low and high speed compression knobs that are located at the bottom of the right leg. Both are clearly labeled and protected from damage by a threaded aluminum cap. Rebound is adjusted via the red aluminum knob atop the right fork leg. All three adjusters use highly defined detents to eliminate guessing when it comes to time make adjustments. You'll find an air pressure chart at the bottom of the left leg to give you a good starting point. The finish is as good as any other high end fork on the market, all knobs are aluminum, and an internal inspection would reveal that there are no cheap plastic parts hidden from view.
You won't find a fancy quick release axle system on the Vengeance which may put off some riders, but others will prefer the standard and secure looking pinch bolt system that X-Fusion has chosen to use. I can't think of a time when I was racing to get my front wheel off to fix a flat on my all-mountain bike anyhow. A 5 mm allen key is required to loosen the single pinch bolts on each side, as well as thread the axle from the lowers. This photo also shows the low and high speed compression knobs that are located at the bottom of the right leg. Both are clearly labeled and protected from damage by a threaded aluminum cap. Rebound is adjusted via the red aluminum knob atop the right fork leg. All three adjusters use highly defined detents to eliminate guessing when it comes to time make adjustments. You'll find an air pressure chart at the bottom of the left leg to give you a good starting point. The finish is as good as any other high end fork on the market, all knobs are aluminum, and an internal inspection would reveal that there are no cheap plastic parts hidden from view.
You're looking at the sealed, but serviceable, twin tube damper cartridge that is housed in the right leg of the Vengeance. The larger diameter silver tube encompasses the damping cartridge and completely separates lube and damping oil from one another. This not only keeps cavitation to a minimum due to the system preventing the oil from sloshing about inside the fork, but it also eliminates the chance of dirt and grime that has managed to get past the seals from mixing in with the damping oil. There is also less oil needed within the fork to perform damping duties, thereby lower weight as well. Under compression, the oil runs through the compression damping circuits that are located at the bottom of the cartridge and then out the ports into the outer chamber that is created by the silver tube. The opposite happens during the rebound stroke, with the oil flowing in through the ports, past the check valve, and through the rebound assembly.
You're looking at the sealed, but serviceable, twin tube damper cartridge that is housed in the right leg of the Vengeance. The larger diameter silver tube encompasses the damping cartridge and completely separates lube and damping oil from one another. This not only keeps cavitation to a minimum due to the system preventing the oil from sloshing about inside the fork, but it also eliminates the chance of dirt and grime that has managed to get past the seals from mixing in with the damping oil. There is also less oil needed within the fork to perform damping duties, thereby lower weight as well. Under compression, the oil runs through the compression damping circuits that are located at the bottom of the cartridge and then out the ports into the outer chamber that is created by the silver tube. The opposite happens during the rebound stroke, with the oil flowing in through the ports, past the check valve, and through the rebound assembly.
This is the anodized rebound piston inside the Vengeance. The spring loaded shim at the left side (top) of the piston acts as the check valve, with the shims on the opposite side controlling the high speed rebound stroke. The large threaded top cap on the far left seals the damping oil within the silver outer tube.
This is the anodized rebound piston inside the Vengeance. The spring loaded shim at the left side (top) of the piston acts as the check valve, with the shims on the opposite side controlling the high speed rebound stroke. The large threaded top cap on the far left seals the damping oil within the silver outer tube.
Those trick looking anodized aluminum knobs at the bottom of the fork are attached to this CNC'd piece of hardware that controls the separate high and low speed compression duties of the HLR and allows you to tune each one independently of one another. The blue dial (low speed compression) is attached to the black adjuster on the far right of the unit. Turning this dictates oil flow during low speed compression action, such as braking, body movement, and smoother landings. Turning it to the right adds damping and you'll find that the fork will use less travel during these instances, turning it to the left has the opposite effect. High speed compression is adjusted via the gold knob that is attached to the silver section just above this, you can see where the setscrew tightens against it. Extra high speed compression will keep the Vengeance from using too much travel during hard hits. This photo also clearly shows the oil ports in the damper tube in relation to the ports on the compression assembly.
Those trick looking anodized aluminum knobs at the bottom of the fork are attached to this CNC'd piece of hardware that controls the separate high and low speed compression duties of the HLR and allows you to tune each one independently of one another. The blue dial (low speed compression) is attached to the black adjuster on the far right of the unit. Turning this dictates oil flow during low speed compression action, such as braking, body movement, and smoother landings. Turning it to the right adds damping and you'll find that the fork will use less travel during these instances, turning it to the left has the opposite effect. High speed compression is adjusted via the gold knob that is attached to the silver section just above this, you can see where the setscrew tightens against it. Extra high speed compression will keep the Vengeance from using too much travel during hard hits. This photo also clearly shows the oil ports in the damper tube in relation to the ports on the compression assembly.

Specifications
Release Date 2010
Price $799.99
Weight 2406 g
Color Options Black, white
Travel 160 mm Travel - refers to the distance the wheel can move in respect to the frame. Typically measured in millimeters, most forks range from 80 to 203 mm of travel
Spring Air
Crown Single
Body Type Magnesium
Rebound External Rebound - is how quick your fork returns to a fully extended position after being compressed. Almost all after-market forks feature external rebound adjustment for easy fine tuning.
Stanchion material Aluminum
Steer Tube 1.125
Damping oil Damping - The process of absorbing the energy of impacts transmitted through the forks or rear shock during the compression stroke, and absorbing the energy of the spring during the rebound stroke.
DropOut Options 20mm
Compression High and Low External Compression - This is the damping circuit that absorbs the compression energy force on the damper. Compression damping is used to adjust how quickly a fork or rear shock compresses when hitting a bump, and is adjustable on some products. When compression damping is too soft, this condition allows most of the available travel to be used without attaining control of the wheel. When it's adjusted too firmly, the wheel will jump or "dance" about when hitting small bumps, again failing to gain control of the wheel.


Setting up the Vengeance is a piece of cake, and unlike a lot of other forks out there, the suggested air pressures listed on the leg actually make sense and put me very close to the pressure that I'm currently running. The aluminum dials are easy to turn and and I had a usable setup to start with that let me hit the trails within a few minutes of tinkering. The rebound adjustment range is wide enough to handle low pressures for smaller riders, as well as higher spring rates that a larger or more aggressive rider would require. You can find a setup guide on the X-Fusion website, but it doesn't have any recommendations for either of the compression settings. If you are familiar with what the adjustments do, start in the middle and adjust each independently from there. For a brand new fork, it was incredibly smooth right out of the box and didn't feel like it needed any break in time whatsoever. In fact, even after plenty of trail miles the Vengeance doesn't feel any smoother than when it was taken out of the packaging - very impressive. Having had saddle time on another company's forks that use special coatings to reduce friction, I'll say that the Vengeance fork on my bike was every bit as good. It simply feels as if the tolerances between the stanchions and bushings are spot on. There is really no point in me going on about how stiff the fork felt. It uses a 20 mm thru-axle and 36 mm stanchion tubes, of course it's going to be as stiff as hell! For those who voice concern over X-Fusion using a single pinch bolt on each side of the dropout, no reason to worry. It's all about the contact area and there is plenty of it down there.
Setting up the Vengeance is a piece of cake, and unlike a lot of other forks out there, the suggested air pressures listed on the leg actually make sense and put me very close to the pressure that I'm currently running. The aluminum dials are easy to turn and and I had a usable setup to start with that let me hit the trails within a few minutes of tinkering. The rebound adjustment range is wide enough to handle low pressures for smaller riders, as well as higher spring rates that a larger or more aggressive rider would require. You can find a setup guide on the X-Fusion website, but it doesn't have any recommendations for either of the compression settings. If you are familiar with what the adjustments do, start in the middle and adjust each independently from there. For a brand new fork, it was incredibly smooth right out of the box and didn't feel like it needed any break in time whatsoever. In fact, even after plenty of trail miles the Vengeance doesn't feel any smoother than when it was taken out of the packaging - very impressive. Having had saddle time on another company's forks that use special coatings to reduce friction, I'll say that the Vengeance fork on my bike was every bit as good. It simply feels as if the tolerances between the stanchions and bushings are spot on. There is really no point in me going on about how stiff the fork felt. It uses a 20 mm thru-axle and 36 mm stanchion tubes, of course it's going to be as stiff as hell! For those who voice concern over X-Fusion using a single pinch bolt on each side of the dropout, no reason to worry. It's all about the contact area and there is plenty of it down there.
On the trail the Vengeance did a great job of absorbing the terrain and keeping my wheel on the ground, which is the goal of any well setup suspension, isn't it? The fork's very active and supple beginning stroke allowed the front wheel to get up and out of the way quickly when crossing over small trail chatter, but I did find myself adding some low speed compression as the fork had a tendency to gobble up a bit too much travel than was called for during hard braking or on steep pitches of trail. Thankfully, the L/S compression adjustment is very effective and does a great job of keeping the fork higher in its travel without transmitting a harsh feel through to the bars. Just keep in mind that you may need to give the L/S dial a few more clicks than you'd first expect. On the opposite end of the spectrum the black fork handled fast and heavy hits great - no spiking or excessively hard bottom out and it has no qualms about you pushing the limits of what your all-mountain bike is capable of. After much knob turning I settled on a slightly faster rebound stroke than what I've run on other forks. A bit too slow and it felt as if the fork would get a step or two behind the terrain, but it came to life once I sped the rebound speed up only one or two clicks. The fork proved to have a quality feel to it, which I was expecting after seeing the caliber of the internals and knowing how much work the guys at X-Fusion have put in to having a properly tuned fork. Besides the excellent action, the range of feel that the external adjustments have is also impressive. They allow you to alter the personality of the Vengeance drastically depending on what you are looking for or the terrain on any given day. Reliability has also been impressive, but if a problem does arise it is good to know that they do have a fully stocked service center in California should any work need to be performed.
On the trail the Vengeance did a great job of absorbing the terrain and keeping my wheel on the ground, which is the goal of any well setup suspension, isn't it? The fork's very active and supple beginning stroke allowed the front wheel to get up and out of the way quickly when crossing over small trail chatter, but I did find myself adding some low speed compression as the fork had a tendency to gobble up a bit too much travel than was called for during hard braking or on steep pitches of trail. Thankfully, the L/S compression adjustment is very effective and does a great job of keeping the fork higher in its travel without transmitting a harsh feel through to the bars. Just keep in mind that you may need to give the L/S dial a few more clicks than you'd first expect. On the opposite end of the spectrum the black fork handled fast and heavy hits great - no spiking or excessively hard bottom out and it has no qualms about you pushing the limits of what your all-mountain bike is capable of. After much knob turning I settled on a slightly faster rebound stroke than what I've run on other forks. A bit too slow and it felt as if the fork would get a step or two behind the terrain, but it came to life once I sped the rebound speed up only one or two clicks. The fork proved to have a quality feel to it, which I was expecting after seeing the caliber of the internals and knowing how much work the guys at X-Fusion have put in to having a properly tuned fork. Besides the excellent action, the range of feel that the external adjustments have is also impressive. They allow you to alter the personality of the Vengeance drastically depending on what you are looking for or the terrain on any given day. Reliability has also been impressive, but if a problem does arise it is good to know that they do have a fully stocked service center in California should any work need to be performed.
So, it's a great fork, but there a few things that could make it even better. The Vengeance has adjustable travel that is changed by altering the position of the top out spacer within the fork and the procedure is simple enough, but there are sure to be riders who won't consider the Vengeance until there is an on-the-fly travel adjust included, especially considering the axle to crown length is slightly longer than that of its bushy tailed competition. The traditional 20 mm axle may also dissuade some riders from picking up the Vengeance, but this should be pretty low on the list of demands when looking for a new 6
So, it's a great fork, but there a few things that could make it even better. The Vengeance has adjustable travel that is changed by altering the position of the top out spacer within the fork and the procedure is simple enough, but there are sure to be riders who won't consider the Vengeance until there is an on-the-fly travel adjust included, especially considering the axle to crown length is slightly longer than that of its bushy tailed competition. The traditional 20 mm axle may also dissuade some riders from picking up the Vengeance, but this should be pretty low on the list of demands when looking for a new 6" fork. Keep in mind that X-Fusion has just launched their X-15 QR system on the new Velvet XC/Trail fork so it's safe to say that we should expect a 20 mm version for the Vengeance soon. The Vengeance HLR feels great on the trails, it's quite adjustable, and has a very competitive price as well. X-Fusion may not be the first name that springs to mind when thinking about a new aftermarket fork for your bike, but I can certainly see this changing soon once more riders begin to use their products.


Visit the X-Fusion website for more information. You can also follow them on their Twitter and Facebook pages.

X-Fusion is clearly an underdog when talking about high end suspension, but after testing the Vengeance HLR, I am liking their odds. Have you had trail time on the Vengeance HLR? What do you make of another player in the game? Let's hear what you think!
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140 Comments

  • + 13
 Forgot to add to my post...........when you call X-Fusion in the US, you get a person that actually answers the phone without those annoying prompts! And they answer your question!
[Reply]
  • + 7
 I have had this fork since it was released. Dollar for dollar and pound for pound, one of the best performing forks out there. I have ridden this for on everything the NW has to offer. From the rocky and rooty, to the buffed and bermd, to drop gap gap drop. And a couple of weekends in whistler to boot. This fork handled all of this type of terrain phenomenally. I ride at least four days a week(Kinda nice having sick ass trails close to work)and I weigh 200 plus pounds and it does not have a single problem, still rides just as smooth as the day first day I road it. And it is between 200 - 300 dollars less than a comparable fork. Saving that kind of money, I can put up with using a 5mm Allen (I have used QR20 on other manufactures, the time differences and difficulty is negligible) and the weight penalty (mine weighs just under 5 pounds). Seriously, a half a pound difference and people have a problem. I have an idea, eat one less cheese burger. X-fusion has made a solid product. Nuff said
  • + 2
 Is the fork still with you and preforming great?
  • + 5
 You know it. I just got back from whistler last weekend. I still love that fork. The best I have ridden.
[Reply]
  • + 4
 I've got this fork on my Nomad C and I must say I am impressed. One of the best features, I think, is the high and low speed compression. If you're not stoked that Fox has done away with their h/lsc and replaced it with a traditional lockout system for the 36 Float and Talas models, then this fork is just what the doctor ordered.
  • + 1
 Looks great, solid and a really good performer. Unfortunately the weight is a bit high. At 2400g one could expect some travel adjustment there. And yes I do believe FOX did a bit of a bad joke with 36 160 series... how is that? you get LSC adjustment or HSC in RLC? If it is LSC as my friend says, then it is "acceptable"...
  • + 1
 Mine was 2305g. www.pinkbike.com/photo/5226879 Not a bad weight for a relatively inexpensive fork with a lot of nice tech and adjustability.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 I don't know where that $1570 MSRP for the Float 36 came from, but I haven't seen an MSRP listed anywhere above $1050, even for the 2011 Float 36 RC2. That's far from an $800 difference in price. I don't think the $1570 MSRP for the Fox is accurate.
  • + 2
 I believe the MSRP for the TALAS is somewhere in that price range in Canada... at least thats what i remember the book saying last time i checked...
  • + 2
 Im aussie, aka the Vengenance is $1000 Aus, and the good 36 was circa $1800 RRP at the start of this year when the dollar was at .7US cents: the fox's should of come down abit more and I'd hope for the lack of performance difference.

The aussie X-fusion importer is one the most helpful guys I've come across, this seems to go for all their distributors.
[Reply]
  • + 3
 "...the axle to crown length is slightly longer than that of its bushy tailed competition."

FYI, A-C-height is 15mm longer than on the 160mm Fox 36 and Lyrik.
Fore sure a thing to bear in mind at least.
  • + 2
 So it's 560mm? That is tall... Almost as tall as a 180mm fork!
  • + 6
 can save you some money on angle set if you're into this recently most-wanted infamous slack geo! Turning your shavy-leggy AM bike into a NUschool do-it-all shredder! (that apparently can't uphill anymore, and dirt jumps like crap, so it is as do-it-all, as a regular DH bike...)
  • + 2
 The point of an angleset is to slacken the HA without raising the BB, which is the opposite of what a taller fork does.
  • + 0
 buy a shorter shock then! that will cheer you up no end Smile
  • + 1
 if you want a strong fork.. SINGLE CROWN..in 150mm or more.. the one crown has to be beefy .. to prevent it from BREAKING..and getting bad reviews.. i have a travis 200mm and its a little higher than this one..due to the crown.. travis DC is lower.. due to the ...... crown..
[Reply]
  • + 5
 I love the fact that in the video that the rider is riding like he trusts his front end 100%. Bodes well for this fork.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Been beating on this thing for 6 months now and not a problem. Once it is dialed no need to worry about anything other than routine maintenance. The guys at x-fusion have the best customer service hands down. If you look online you can find this fork (HLR) for less than $600. Compare that to the Float.
  • + 3
 Meant to say been beating on this fork. That first sentence sounds wrong.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I recently got a new Vengeance HLR, it is a great fork! I have it set at 100 mm on my Specialized SX. It works great on the trails and for dirt jumping, without changing settings. Its super smooth and all the adjustments actually work. The fork has a very high quality feel to it, just like any Fox or RS fork. I dont know if any of you have dealt with Fox or Marzzochi customer service, they are not good. X Fusion has great customer service, they have helpful people who know their shit. If youre gonna spend a lot of money, it is nice to have a company that really backs up their product and supports the riders. All and all I dont think I would buy a fork from the "big four" again.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 hmmm interesting. I said last year that x-fusion would have to do a lot to impress me, well they have. looks like a great fork, in the vid it looked super plush. The price is on par/ slightly lower then the competition. However i'm still not sure i'd buy one. I've had two fox forks and loved them both so i don't see a reason to change. I will have to say that if a friend was looking into getting a new fork i'd tell them to give this one a good hard look. good work x-fusion!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I will say I am stoked to get my hands on one of these forks. I have heard nothing but good things about it from top level riders. I myself have been racing at a high level for over 13 years. I have recently stepped away from the main stream race scene on the East Coast. My goal this year was to build up the best do it all bike for XC, Freeriding, and DH. I choose the Trek Remedy, due to owning one in 2008 for my rehab after my big crash at the US OPEN. It was built up like a mini DH bike. Now on a 2010 Remedy and currently have a RS Lyrik 2-Step air. (It’s for sell) The replacement fork will be the new Vengeance HLR and matched up with a Vector HLR on the rear. I feel this will give me what I am truly looking for in a Do It All bike. I have been sponsored by many great companies with great product in the past. From my experience with the guys at X-Fusion so far is some of the best I have ever seen. Plan to see big things from these guys!!!!!
[Reply]
  • + 4
 I like that there is no quick release; I am never in a hurry when I've to exchange the wheel.
And this way, it looks clean.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I've been rocking this fork since the start of the year, and it's not let me down once. Used it on thrash bike for downhill shuttles, to all mountain to dirt jumping. Performance wise it's the best value for money fork going around. It may have the QR style axle or on the fly adjust, but a fox is another $800 for that, I know which i prefer to have. I've nose cased it, landed crooked etc and its been more than capable fork, the day they released a new 200mm dual crown I'll be putting the race team on them.
  • + 1
 Have you had any issues with those two adjustment tabs on the bottom of the steerer? It is all novel and cool looking, but also looks liek a disaster waiting to happen. My Lyrik and totem knobs took about 1ride to fall off. Fox covers their at least...though for 800$ more they'd better Smile Curious to know if they get too gunked up or fall off or whatever.
  • + 1
 "This photo also shows the low and high speed compression knobs that are located at the bottom of the right leg. Both are clearly labeled and protected from damage by a threaded aluminum cap"

Looks like they're using a Fox style cover.
[Reply]
  • + 4
 "the Big Four"...? Fox, RockShox, rigid and not riding.
  • - 5
 marzocchi and bos i think are the other two
  • + 8
 marzocchi and manitou i thought
  • - 2
 manitou are nearly dead arent they?? Bos make a Gorgeous looking 160mm fork though..
  • + 4
 ignore the above..they are growing again. Blank Stare
  • + 3
 Magura make another 160mm fork which is supposed to be very good. Fox, Rockshox and Marzocchi definately, but not sure on the 4th.
  • + 1
 The Wotan is the 160mm Magura fork. I bought the old PB test fork a while back lol. It's neat.
  • - 3
 Fox, RockShox, Manitou, and Suntour
  • + 9
 It's Fox RS Marzo Manitou. Don't see why people find that so hard... Facepalm
  • - 4
 Rock Shox, Fox, RST, and Suntour?
  • + 1
 let's wait until this comment get like 500 sub comments with people arguing on who deserves to be in the great four Big Grin looks promising so I'm off for popcorn... mah I don't eat that crap, prefer cashew nuts
  • - 2
 Big 4 would be RockShox, RockShox, RockShox and RockShox Smile
  • + 11
 or Hannibal Smith, BA Baracus, Face and Murdock
  • + 2
 WAKI clearly wins
  • - 3
 Big 4: Sun Tour, BOS, RST, and magura
  • - 2
 Nah, it's Suntour, DT Swiss, RST, and Magura.
  • + 1
 IMHO the big four should be Fox, RS, Marzocchi and DT Swiss.Fox and RS are shoe-ins, Marz makes a relatively cheap product that performs and lasts and DT is rippin it up, theyre expensive as anything but are really nice to ride and, from servicing a few, pretty well built all things considered... Manitou is a dying animal that needs to be put out of its misery, BOS is too boutique (even compared to DT) and X-Fusion... they're called X-Fusion for fXXXs sake... that name is a marketing fail if ive ever seen one. Their stuff is getting better, but X-Fusion sounds like something id only be happy with if the bike cost under $1000. Oh, and really like Magura's stuff... until this year, kit might be solid but it looks super super cheap.
  • + 1
 RS, Fox, Marzocchi, and Manitou. Bos, DT swiss, and Magura haven't achieved market saturation. Anyone can instantly recognize a dorado, and yet I cannot remember what a bos or magura fork looks like, as I have only seen a couple at whistler before. personal opinions about brand quality are irrelevant to success. ignoring what I just said, X-fusion is doing really well. my father runs an 02 pva on his enduro, and it is the nicest 5-6 inch travel rear shock i've ever tried.
  • + 1
 Maguras have dual arches, BOS has a piggy back on the lower leg. Wink
In a way they are more recognizable than a fox or marzo.

I get your point though.
  • + 1
 Marzo are pretty distinctive from a distance, with the crown that sticks out and the M shaped arch
  • + 0
 PEOPLE WHO SAY SUNTOUR and RST; you fail!
  • + 1
 Suntour kind of make Marzocchi's forks, but I see your point
  • + 7
 whoever is making the shocks and forks for walmart bikes is probably selling more than 'the big 4' combined.
[Reply]
  • + 3
 bos is not even close to one of the big 4, even though they have had some issues, manitou is still on of the big guns
  • + 2
 yeh for sure, and dont bos put their internals in other manufacturers externals for some of their models?
[Reply]
  • + 4
 that guy on the vid was bloody quick
[Reply]
  • + 3
 You know X-fusion is the only compony i know that puts the price on there adds/news feeds. THANK YOU
[Reply]
  • + 1
 X-fusion is making a cool product and they are really a good company to work with. The fork looks really nice, Props to them! Always nice to have another option keeps the big dogs looking over their shoulder.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Go buy X-Fusion shocks and forks today! You will not be disappointed with the product it is top notch. By far the best customer service!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 2 of my buddies ride them and have nothing but great things to say. Really impressive piece of equipment - let's hope for a coil version!
[Reply]
  • + 2
 If their forks are anything like their shocks then you bet you bought a nice piece of componetry!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I've been on one for a few months. Easily the best fork I have ridden yet. If they came out with a dual crown 8" dh fork it would kill everything out there.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 x fusion arn't known to be the best manufacturer in the world, but i would definitely like to try these forks, the look pretty smart!
[Reply]
  • + 2
 pretty sick shred vid-fork looks fun.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Fairly expensive msrp I'd say. I bought a 36 float 180 new for $800 two months ago...
  • + 3
 You can't compare MSRP to final sale prices... apples to apples and all that.
The Vengeance MSRP is $799 ($850 CDN). MSRP on a F0X 36 Float RC2 is $1570 (according to Pinkbike).
  • + 1
 But the X Fusion is a better fork.
  • + 1
 2011 36 Float RLC is $975 MSRP ($990 tapered).
  • + 2
 ya, in the states, i called fox, to buy it from california, its around 1040$ for a 36 160 float, and 1100$ for the 180. then in canada, its 1600$ for the 160, and something crazier for the 180, anyway, in total i paid 1100 for my 180 float, and i'm loving it!

dont believe me, call up almost any bike shop in canada.
  • + 1
 now that our dollar has been so similar for a few years, its damn time the prices evened out. im tired of buying a bikie for 20% ore than someone in the US. when the dollar hit par 2 years ago, the industry claimed an extra year wopuld be neccesary to even the price. now thats bullshit; i may start buying in the states.
  • + 1
 That's what I do. Everythings cheaper. Go to Europe. While the euro is down. And go nuts. You can get full xtr drive train for half the price. Same goes for every other component.
  • + 1
 Why are bikes more expensive here? Because we are a much much smaller market. I would bet that Canada's bicycle market is quite a bit smaller than California's let alone all of the US.
  • + 1
 Exactly. Over 50% of all of fox racing shox products are sold in California.
  • - 1
 Where did you get that figure, andrewavid? That seems like a pretty specific bit of information for a 19 year old from Canada to have.
  • + 3
 if he pulled it out of his ass then he used the canadian art of bullshit, which is difficult to master but imperative to survival.
  • + 0
 to Seraph:
no actually i research what i buy, I actually care about where i spend my hard earned money, and i get around, i went to europe in august and found everything to be amazingly cheaper in euros at the time. and yes, fox does sell around half of their inventory in california. ask around.

I've talked to fox, and their distributors, and bike shops throughout ontario and quebec, unless your friends with any of them, your gonna be paying out the ass over here

so please, research before you question my "figure", and then use my age as an excuse for being wrong.
  • + 1
 You don't need to put "figure" in quotes, because it actually is a figure. Also I never said you were wrong, I was just questioning where you get your information, because you name some pretty impressive figures.

Maybe I'll call Fox tomorrow and ask them what their sales look like yearly. They're not very far from where I work.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 Looks like a Fox Lyrik. Are they made in the same Factory or what?
  • + 1
 sorry man, not a fox or a lyrik try again
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Very nice looking forks, and great write up.

Anyone know who sells X-Fusion in the UK?
  • + 1
 Propel, the same people who import Formula and Morewood.

www.propelbike.com
  • + 1
 I don't think anyone services them though.
  • + 1
 tf tuned are going to soon ish i think
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Looks nice, good thers still a 20mm fork out there. I wish u can adjust the travel externaly or I'd be all over it.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Man I LOVE that trail!!! Who cares about the shock I just want to know where this trail is. Looks like so much FUN!
  • + 1
 S Gap and Steven's Canyon
  • + 1
 You get all excited over some quadruple track? That trail would be fun if it wasn't 8 feet wide.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I'm intrested to ride one of these forks. They look pretty solid
[Reply]
  • + 1
 would they fit on my Norco Aline 2009
[Reply]
  • + 1
 One on order for the buddy bike. We'll see how she goes.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 What is that front wheels? it sure as a nice hub.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Good looking fork. Would love to see them make a dual crown fork.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 throwin down john! sick stuff gap looks primo
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Anyone know who the rider is? Quite a ripper and fun looking trail!
  • + 1
 John Hauer is the rider, I dont know what trail that is.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Very nice fork!!
[Reply]
  • + 0
 looks like spinner internals
  • + 1
 not a bad thing when they made rockshox up to 06 (pre-all that lower breakage) and have dealings with BOS..
[Reply]
  • - 1
 Low and high speed compression on the bottom of fork. No likey.
[Reply]
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