Yeti SB5c - Review

Jul 16, 2014
by Mike Kazimer  
 
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Yeti Cycles worked hard to keep the details of their latest trail bike, the SB5c, under wraps until development was completed and production was underway, which is why details about the new bike have been nearly nonexistent, at least until now. The SB5c is a full carbon affair, with a 67° head angle and 127mm of rear travel via a very unique suspension design called Switch Infinity, the details of which we'll be diving into shortly. Earlier this summer, Yeti granted us a behind-the-scenes look at the new bike during a visit to their headquarters in Golden, Colorado, along with a chance to put one of of the first production models through its paces back home in the Pacific Northwest. Available in five sizes, from XS to XL, the SB5c will be offered with several different build kits, starting with an X01 equipped version for $6599. Our test bike came shod with ENVE's M60 wheels and a dropper post, which boosts its price to $8999 USD.


SB5c Details

• Intended use: trail
• Wheel size: 27.5''
• Rear wheel travel: 127mm
• Carbon fiber frame
• Switch Infinity suspension design
• Fox Float FIT CTD 140mm fork
• Sizes: XS, S, M, L, XL
• Colors: turquoise, black
• Weight: 26lb (size M w/o pedals)
• MSRP: $8999 USD


Frame Design

Yeti's bikes have always been curvy, eye-catching affairs, a tradition dating all the way back to the rounded stays of the ARC hardtail from the early 90s, and the SB5's carbon frame continues this trend. With the exception of the seat tube, there's hardly a straight line to be found – even the chain stays have a slight upward curve to them. Yeti hasn't given in to the
internal cable routing trend yet, but they've done well by cleanly routing everything along the top of the down tube, along with including a exit point for a stealth dropper post. The bike uses a PressFit 30 bottom bracket, and a bolt on ISCG adaptor is available for riders who wish to run a chain guide. Lately, we've been seeing more and more bikes designed without making concessions for a front derailleur, but the SB5 isn't one of them. Yeti's designers felt that enough riders still desired the extended gear range provided by a 2x or 3x setup that they weren't quite ready to make a bike that was only 1x compatible.

Yeti SB5c review
  Yeti's attention to detail is evident on the SB5, with everything the from the head tube badge to the front derailleur cover done up in the company's signature style.


Switch Infinity Suspension Design

Three years in the making, and developed in collaboration with Fox Racing Shox, Yeti Cyles' Switch Infinity suspension design is unlike anything currently on the market. No, that's not a second shock located just above the bottom bracket, despite what the distinctive color of the Kashima coating might lead you to believe. It's actually two short rails, the heart of Yeti's “translating pivot” suspension configuration. Initially, as the bike goes through its travel the carrier moves upwards on the rails, giving the bike a rearward axle path for improved pedaling and small bump absorption. As the rear wheel goes deeper into its travel the mechanism moves downwards, reducing the amount of chain tension for better big hit performance. The unit itself doesn't actually move that much – about 4mm in either direction – but when you attach a 17.4 inch lever to that (the length of the SB5's chainstays), it does make a difference in the bike's wheel path.

Yeti 2015
  The SB5c's rear wheel path is dictated by the two Kashima coated aluminum rods housed just above the bottom bracket.

The description of how the Switch Infinity works may sounds very much like how Yeti's Switch eccentric system behaves, but according to Steve Hoogendoorn, Yeti's vice president and one of the designers of the new system, “The motion is similar between the two, but mechanically there's a really big difference. With the eccentric we essentially have a really, really short link – something that's less than 15mm, whereas the mechanical analogy for the rail is the exact opposite. Instead of creating a short link, we're creating what's essentially a link that's an infinite length long. That difference allows us to not have the feeling of the suspension locking up, and it opens doors due to the flexibility of the system. We're able to tune wheel path and anti-squat extremely precisely and accurately, which we couldn't do as easily with the Switch.” Another advantage of the Switch Infinity system is the weight savings it brings to the table – this new layout saves 100 grams over the previous eccentric system.

Yeti 2015
  Countless test miles were put on prototypes of the Switch Infinity system while Yeti refined it into what it is today.



Various prototype “mules” were scattered about during our visit to Yeti's headquarters, visual evidence of the multiple iterations the new system has gone through. As the concept began to approach reality, Yeti contacted Fox Racing Shox in order to harness their knowledge of bushing and stanchion technology, as well as their testing capabilities. One of the biggest concerns for the system was weather. Although the frame design does protect the back of the unit from any direct mud or dirt spray, it's still rather exposed to the elements, especially considering its positioning on the frame. Fox's test facility includes machinery that can cycle suspension elements millions of times while they are submerged in anything from water to sand, allowing the engineers to see how they hold up in the worst of the worst conditions. Five different types of bushings were tested, and in the end, Yeti's designers ended up choosing to go with the same ones that Fox uses in their suspension forks, with seals from Fox's off-road division.

The unit itself is fairly simple, and it can easily be removed from the frame if necessary by unscrewing the four bolts that hold it into place. Each aluminum shaft is surrounded by a bushing and two dust seals, and a grease port is located on each one to keep things running smoothly. A hollow axle runs between each of the two rods and sits on sealed cartridge bearings. This axle threads into the driveside of the frame, and is then locked securely into place using an expanding collet system. As to whether this system could be adapted to longer travel applications, be it in the form of a SB66 successor or even a full blown DH bike, Peter Zawistowski, Yeti's engineer said, “The length of the rails doesn't change that much with different amounts of travel. It's more where the rail is located and the angle of the rail, along with where the link is located in relation to the rail. Regardless of the travel, that motion doesn't change that much.”

Specifications
Price $8999
Travel 127mm
Rear Shock Fox Float CTD
Fork Fox Float 34 140 Factory
Headset Cane Creek 40
Cassette SRAM XG1195 11spd
Crankarms SRAM X1 1400 (32T)
Chain SRAM 11spd
Shifter Pods SRAM X01 11spd
Handlebar Easton Haven Carbon 740mm
Stem Thomson Elite
Grips Yeti lock-on
Brakes Shimano XT
Wheelset Enve M60
Hubs DT Swiss 240
Rim Enve
Tires Maxxis Ikon 2.2 TR/ Ardent 2.4 TR
Seat Yeti WTB Volt Custom
Seatpost Thomson Elite Dropper
Yeti SB5 Review





The fact that the SB5 has Kashima coated rails tucked into its carbon frame should provide enough fuel to keep armchair engineers yammering away in the forums for the next year, but speculation only goes so far, and what really matter is how the SB5c rides in the real world. We were able to convince Yeti to send one of the first production models up to the Pacific Northwest, where we would be able to see how it handled our steep, rooty, twisty, and often wet, trails.


Climbing

Suspension set up on the SB5c was quick and easy – the Switch Infinity system doesn't require anything strange as far as rear shock set up goes, and once the Fox Float CTD was set between 25-30% sag depending on personal preference, numbers that ended up being close to body weight, the bike was ready to go.

This season has seen a bumper crop of bikes that are mediocre climbers and excellent descenders, which is fine if most of your riding involves dirt road climbs and rowdy descents, but it's not as great for those rides with an elevation profile that looks like the EKG machine readout, with both technical climbs and descents. That's where the SB5 comes in. Weighing only 26 pounds, and shod with the fast rolling Maxxis Ikon in the rear, this bike is a climbing fiend, whether it's grinding out the miles on a long, sustained section of singletrack, or sprinting up a wall of roots that requires extra-precise wheel placement to avoid losing traction. It's a bike that encouraged out of the saddle sprinting, typically to the dismay of my riding partners, who were no doubt wishing I was testing something ten pounds heavier.

The SB5's lack of pedal bob is sufficient enough that a good portion of my time aboard the bike was spent with the rear shock flipped into Descend mode, especially on trails with chunky climbs that required as much traction as possible. It was on those type of trails that this bike ended up being the most fun. Yes, it is possible to use the words 'climbing' and 'fun' in the same sentence, particularly on a nimble, light bike that makes it easy to unlock the tricky sequences that would stymie a more cumbersome, less maneuverable machine. The bike felt well balanced, and even when speeds slowed to a crawl, a little hop here and an extra pedal stroke there would keep the SB5 deftly picking its way up the hill.

Yeti SB5c review
  Okay, so maybe it's not always raining in the Pacific Northwest, but there are still plenty of roots and rocks.

Descending

The SB5c retains its nimbleness on the descents as well, and on high speed, smoother sections of trail it's like riding a hummingbird, effortlessly zipping in and out of turns, but with enough stability that it never felt twitchy. It doesn't ride like the Cadillac its numbers (a long top tube and 442mm chainstays) suggest, with handling more on par with that of an Indy race car, giving it the ability to bob and weave around corners with pinpoint precision. The bike's top notch handling can make it easy to get a little over-excited and forget that this is a trail bike, not an all-mountain rig - on really rough, chopped up sections of trail it was necessary to rein it in a bit to avoid getting bounced off line. This wasn't anything to do with the frame itself, as its stiffness both climbing and descending was excellent, but more to do with the combination of the bike's light weight, low profile tires, and 127mm of travel. This is a trail bike through and through, and it excels at its intended purpose. For those big, all-day backcountry adventures, the type that are available within close proximity to Yeti's Colorado headquarters, the SB5 is a stellar companion, a bike that can make the climbs feel as painless as possible, and remain extremely well composed on the descents.

What about the Switch Infinity system? Well, its transition from upward to downward movement was seamless, providing a good platform for standing up and sprinting, while also having travel in reserve for the bigger hits. There were no harsh bottom outs, even when using all of the travel on larger jumps and drops. The only time I noticed anything slightly different than expected from the rear suspension was on a portion of trail that has a rhythm section consisting of five or so smaller jumps in a row, with many of the landings leading directly into the takeoff of the next jump. When the bike first touched down there was plenty of support, but the simultaneous combination of landing and preloading for the next jump occasionally made the bike sink further into its travel than expected. It took a fairly specific set of circumstances for this to occur, and it wasn't detrimental to the handling, it just took a little getting used to. Otherwise, the mechanism itself was silent, even after being given a good soaking and a mud bath from a summer storm. The true test would be to ride it over the course of an entire season, but so far there's no reason to expect that it should require anything out of the ordinary when it comes to maintenance, and it's a good deal easier to service than the eccentric unit that preceded it.


Yeti SB5 review

Component Check

• Maxxis Ardent 2.4 and Ikon 2.2 tires: The Ardent / Ikon combo would be great for most Colorado style riding, which entails miles of hardpacked, and often dusty trails. In our neck of the woods things tend to be wetter and steeper, and trading in the Ardent for something meatier would be on the short list of recommended component swaps. The Ikon rear tire's super low profile tread pattern also had me a little skeptical at first, but in dry to slightly wet conditions it performed much better than expected, especially set up tubeless and with reduced air pressure. It's still something of a specialist, and it wouldn't be ideal for really wet or steep, loose terrain, but for summer time trail riding, when the trails are typically running hard and fast, the Ikon's low rolling resistance will let you go even faster.

• Easton Haven bar and Thomson Elite stem: Our test bike came with a 740mm Easton Haven carbon handlebar and a 70mm Thomson X4 stem. They're both well made, high end components, but the trouble is that one's a little too short and the other's a little too long. Yes, 740mm is probably perfect for some, but why not spec a wider bar and give riders the option of trimming it down? These are little details, but just because a bike has less travel and is intended for trail riding doesn't mean that the benefits of a wide bar and short stem don't apply. Plus, Yeti's geometry, which has traditionally favored longer top tubes than many other companies, lends itself perfectly to the use of a shorter stem.

• Fox 34 Float: With seven different settings in the Trail mode, having a fully open Descend mode almost becomes unnecessary. The fork's progression from supple beginning stroke to a firmer ramp up felt a little sudden - the beginning portion of the travel is extremely soft, but then it stiffens up quite quickly as it goes through its travel. No doubt this is Fox's response to complaints that prior versions dove through their travel too quickly, but it seems as if this progression could be slightly less abrupt, providing a more gradual ramp up.

• ENVE M60 wheels: The M60 wheels didn't give us any problems, and certainly added to the overall liveliness of the bike due to their stiffness and vibration damping. As to whether they're worth the over $2,000 upcharge, well, that's between you and your wallet.


Yeti SB5c review
  Fast and playful, the SB5c is happiest bounding from one side of the trail to the other.



Pinkbike's Take:
bigquotesThe SB5c is an excellent addition to the Yeti family, a well executed trail bike tailor made for those long rides that are the epitome of mountain biking, rides chock full of long climbs and hopefully even longer descents. We'd make a couple small changes to the bike's tires and cockpit, but other than that it's ready to rocket up and down the trails right out of the box. Light, fast, and most importantly, fun, the SB5 fits our definition of how a trail bike should behave. We've been fans of Yeti's Switch suspension technology since its introduction, and the sentiment continues with the new Switch Infinity design. The fact that Yeti has been able to make the system lighter and simpler without losing any of the traits that earned the previous version praise is impressive, and we're excited about its potential, especially when it comes time for Yeti to release longer travel offerings. - Mike Kazimer


www.yeticycles.com
Must Read This Week

342 Comments

  • + 391
 I can't wait to never ever try this new technology
  • + 66
 If we start saving now, we might get the 3rd gen of this design!
  • + 43
 The old switch looked cleaner
  • + 104
 As an engineer I love all this stuff but as a realist I ask does it really make any difference. Lots of very fast and great handling motor bikes make do with a simple single pivot swing arm.. If pedaling is your thing then there is vpp in its many forms. To me this looks like a maintenance pain in the proverbial. Hooking mud and mulch out of the handy storage box. Meh. I can't afford it anyway!
  • - 81
 I can't think of anything good to say about it either. Bag of shite.
  • + 8
 Maybe I'll get a chance to try the sb66 if it becomes less expensive
  • + 17
 how about, "it looks wicked cool." end of story.
  • + 21
 Sb66 frames going for $1200 on backcountry.com. Will climb just as good, descend better and doesnt have a storage location for dirt at a fraction of the cost.
  • + 68
 Right-on Yeti. At least they're trying to really innovate, as opposed to reinventing a wheel size and calling that innovation. Too bad more companies don't try to design some sort of break-through suspension technology instead of changing wheel sizes and geometry, and marketing the sh*t out of it.
  • + 7
 Here's a video from Bike Magazine Youtube channel. It's a bit more insightful.

www.youtube.com/watch?v=gfESIGj46-Q
  • - 12
 slodown, you realize this frame is in a new wheelsize, abandoning the whole "26 holdout" image yeti was trying to push. it's also all over the first page of every MTB website...kind of "marketing the shirt out of it".

There also isn't a huge amount of breakthrough here. Just another way of accomplishing something that's marginally better, at a huge weight and complexity price.
  • + 2
 It might be the best thing since the invention of suspension or even the wheel but it will cost the world and it's just another thing to get serviced!
  • + 2
 as far as "breakthrough" bigger wheels on a bike thats 6k+ vs something new w bigger wheels I'm for something new and creative. Agree or not 650b tips the scale on marketing drumming up some hype w minimal tech input/advancement vs a true leap forward in performance. Yes theres no denying it will perform better in certain areas but for the bulk of a whole industry to suddenly decide 26 has to go is $ not the renaissance. Glad to see Yeti innovating...
  • + 10
 Well.. maybe they should make a plastic cap to hide it? Less mud inside, cleaner looks. I could even forget it was there.
  • + 5
 No, if you start saving now, you will get THIS generation of the technology.....3 years later...
  • - 5
 My deep thought? DAMN UGLY.
  • - 14
 GREAT! Now I need 2 rear shocks
  • + 3
 I think it looks ridiculous, the frame itself is just delightful to behold, absolutely stunning then you cast your eyes on that weird double kashima contraption.
  • + 2
 I've been noticing with all the new bikes coming out, almost none are available in 29er format. I believe the 29er markets end is already in the horizon.
  • + 6
 Such an array of opinions, I think it looks amazing, and I'd love to try it out. But I'm more interested in the sb66 replacement
  • + 2
 Come on guys, it's only $8,000 dollar$$$$, for the price you might as well just give it a try!
  • + 1
 I do all my sb66 switch service 2 times a year, as I can read from the review I will be pleaced to have less bearings to service, I asked this on another forum to Chris a year ago, less service and grease ports, for me this is a better maintenance solution than the original switch technology. Just pls make 26" so I can use all my components on it.

Just saying
  • + 29
 God you people are dumbasses. Wtf do you expect to pay for a full carbon (enve wheels) build?! You buy a Specialized Sworks Epic and youre gonna drop 12 grand. A carbon built Bronson or TRc 10+. Yeti doesn't give a shit if you cant afford it. The people who can will definitely want to try it out. I don't want to see another single pivot trail bike, look how many comments on just this one article, everyone is talking about this bike. This is innovation at it's best and I am so ready to see more of this type of stuff.
  • + 7
 I love my SB66
  • + 4
 @Liberty555 I totally agree with you. In struggling to see what this brings to the table as opposed to a traditional pivot design. Does the slider provide long term and short term mechanical advantages to a sealed bearing system? Less friction? Longer life?

I only say this because at the end of the day, all rear suspension designs control chain tension and leverage ratio. Some use virtual pivot points, some use linkage driven single pivots, but they aim to do the same thing, which provide their interpretation of what is a good leverage ratio and a good amount of chain tension to resist pedalling forces. All these things, regardless of marketing spiel, are associated with compromise. It's impossible to have small bump compliance when the bikes initial rearward axle path tensions the chain for small (pedalling) forces. A design which uses chain tension to stiffen the rear end will be less active under pedalling, and hence will be less compliant on technical climbs relative to a more active design (less chain tension). However the more active bike will be less efficient... It's a trade off. Every brand has their interpretation of what they believe is the best amount of chain tension, and every rider wants something different (which is based on a huge set of criteria such as aggression, type of trail, terrain etc). The same applies to leverage ratio, where some riders like a linear feel, others like progression, mid stroke support, ramp up near bottom out etc.

My point is, all these bikes do a variant of the same thing, but marketing puts a name to it, and sells it as better, yet it's the same trade offs. So again, I don't really know what this suspension design brings to the table. Maybe the rail is better than a pivot.
  • + 6
 Think of it this way, maybe the design is more functional than it seems, it's kind of a landmark moment when PB doesn't break a set of Enve wheels on a test bike.....
  • + 3
 Who knows, maybe the wheels didn't break because the bike couldn't handle the abuse which the previous ENVE equipped test bikes could Razz

Only time under consumer abuse/use will show how good the bikes are, and I'll happily accept that it works if it survives without too many complaints from real riders. I imagine the testers knew the system inside out, and knew how to properly look after it, with out stuffing it up.
  • + 7
 2 mistakes you should avoid as a company if you don't like pinkbike user shitstorms:

1) offering a bike at a price tag most users cannot afford or are not willing to afford
2) incorporating new technology

on a sidenote: it's exactly the same in the German bike forums, but I thought Americans were more open to innovation.

Thank god bike forums didn't exist in the 90s, otherwise we might still be running rigid bikes. Wink
[Reply]
  • + 96
 Sorry, I was looking for a bike with 128mm of travel. This obviously won't do.
  • + 62
 Every mm counts... So says my wife.
  • + 7
 Mine's a chode.
  • + 15
 127mm = 5 inches. Maybe 3 significant figures is superfluous, but its origin isn't random.
  • + 6
 As much as these people believe that this tech will entail more maintenance it won't, the guys over at yeti claim every 150 hours of riding it should be greased which is not a problem because the link has a grease port. As for a storage compartment that will collect mud and dust; the compartment is directly over the bb which will make it extremely hard for mud to collect in that area. I trust that the guys over at yeti; they know whats up and have their shit together. I doubt they would come out with this design if they did not fully trust that it is better than the original switch link. With this link the switch in engagement will be a lot smoother and less noticeable, it will also neutralize the shock much more while pedaling.
  • + 8
 NO! 127.5 is the best
  • + 3
 Oops, I replied to the wrong comment.
[Reply]
  • + 86
 As sweet as this bike may be, I think I would rather get 95% of the performance by buying a Kona Process 111, and also a used motorcycle, and also a trip to Utah.
  • + 23
 who says you only get 95% of the performance?
  • - 39
 I cant wait to see some tosser with one of these. so i can scream past them on my HT and LOL.
  • + 61
 What happens if that 'tosser' is Jared Graves?
  • + 4
 swap out the 111 for the 134 and i am game
  • + 8
 Graves is welded to his SB66, because he's a racer not a marketer.
  • + 156
 yes I am a racer, which is why this new technology is awesome, innovation/refinement to stay on top of the game
  • + 5
 The process 111 is awesome
  • + 21
 If you doubt Yeti's ability to build a great-handling, great riding bike, you haven't ridden one...
  • + 8
 I've loved every Yeti I've owned, once your part of the tribe it's hard to say anything bad about their bikes.
  • + 1
 Hard but not impossible, I hated my ASX I felt it rode like a gate. Beautifully made though.
  • + 2
 @jaredgraves. Will we see you competing on this bike or maybe on a longer travel version of this???

BTW, Awesome riding, awesome write-ups!
  • + 5
 So awesome when a god like pro is summoned AND smash the troll who summoned him! BTW love your riding Mr. Graves!
  • + 1
 @jared
Would you ride it with a Fox 36? Or is that to much for the frame?
  • + 2
 Hey Mr Graves, does that mean you'll be riding one of these at Colorado? It is Yeti's home turf after all.
  • + 2
 Awesome to read Graves comment. As the presumed poster child for 26 will you tell us why you still ride your 66 and when/if you will switch to the 75?
  • + 3
 As you just saw pro athletes are first and foremost marketers for their brand. Why should they bite the hand which feeds them?
  • + 1
 A guy like Graves could go ride for anyone, if he didn't like Yetis I'm pretty sure he would be gone already.
  • - 10
 @ Hammm, I had to google Jared Graves as i hadnt heard of him. Very impressed. reguardless my comment was about the price -v- performance.
And maybe I would have to wait till mr Graves stopped before I could fly past him, But I would still LOL.
  • + 6
 You boy need to receive some mtb education if you don't know who jared graves is....
  • + 1
 @satim , Step away from the keyboard. Your Austrailian and you don't know who Jared Graves is???
  • + 6
 @rickyretardo, At least im Honest, so what if I didnt know who he was. You dont know what a New Zealand flag looks like and im not telling you to Step away from the keyboard.
  • - 2
 Hey Jackass, the two flags look basically identical except for the stars, your an idiot
  • + 2
 Nah he's a kiwi, if you look closely you can see that his little flag has got red stars and shit.
[Reply]
  • + 61
 Just to save people time: 'Looks like a session','something about wheel size', 'YT Capra is cheaper'
  • + 47
 You are forgetting that 'Norbs got robbed'.
  • + 3
 Havnt heard that one for awhile
  • + 29
 Lacondaguy got robbed
  • + 17
 I'm just waiting for Waki's comment
[Reply]
  • + 30
 That design is insane and awesome
  • + 15
 is it just me or does it look like that infinity system would have serious long term reliability issues?
  • + 9
 I'm not so sure about that, it's only a couple bushings, seals and a grease port. At the very least, if it is maintained properly it will be cheap to service. Those big eccentric bearings aren't cheap on the SB66.
  • + 5
 Your fork and shock have the same long term issues.
  • + 1
 Seems like I remember people having mixed results with the reliability of the rail system on the DH bike, but this looks far better protected.
  • + 3
 Get on another fairly popular forum - a dude from Yeti posts there a lot - he is detailing all of the testing that went into this - it's been bullet proof. The man Graves even throws in a comment about the durability and gives a nice jab to "internet experts" doubting its reliability. They've been testing this for over 3 years.
  • + 4
 Yeti knows they have a solid system here. Why else would they bump their standard 2 year warranty to 5? This thing is going to be just as durable and easy to maintain and clean as the switch link... if not easier.
  • - 1
 Do you not know that some people have been burning through switch link bearings?
  • + 3
 Personal experience: no issues with switch links, and non with the rails. If at all i would be worried about the "fox" part. not to much good experiences there for me in the last few years
  • + 2
 @groghunter I'm sure it happens, but I would assume only those who ride in mud nearly all of the time. I have 1000 miles on my SB 95 and tore my linkage apart last week just to check it, and it was fine. Didn't even really need grease (and I'll admit, I was surprised, I power wash the crap out of my bike when I need to).
  • + 1
 @michibretz Agreed, though I'm skeptical how actually 'fox" that part is, since it seems to essentially be a bushing & a pair of dust seals. But I'd have picked something that has a better reputation for durability than Kashima
  • + 1
 Yeti seems to love snif... putting rails on their bikes. this system looks more simple and reliable than the one mounted on the 303.
  • + 1
 It will be nice some type of cover to seal/hide the entire system from the elements. It will be better protected and not a nest for mud and dirt, and maybe even more beautiful to look at.
  • + 2
 no, a cover will actually cause more harm than good. Remember those 'accordion' covers that used to be on forks? They just ended up keeping dirt in rather than out. no cover!
  • + 1
 SB66, absolutely correct no cover so dirt can fall out again is the best solution...
[Reply]
  • + 28
 That bike looks STIFF. It looks bizarre yet very interesting. Nice to see yeti trying something new here!
[Reply]
  • + 26
 Looks great Yeti. When does the 160mm version come out?
  • + 16
 That's what I'm sayin! Gimme 26in wheels and 160mm travel.
  • - 24
 No shit!
I can't see anyone throwing down that much cash for a bike that only has 127 mm of travel. (That comes out to $77 per mm after tax!!) My guess is with all the way better options out there, they'll sell something like 6 bikes total.... world wide.... maybe 8 if they have another color option!
  • + 19
 you really don't know what makes a good bike if you think its all about the travel. Noob
  • + 6
 Everyone was waiting for you Yeti on the enduro segment with a modern bike (27.5 ou 29).
If I'm not wrong this is a big trend on the market or I missed something.
How can you miss that ? There is no more enduro bike in your catalog and you release a third trail bike (SB95, SB75 and now this SB5)?
That's really a joke. 2 years I was waiting for something from this company. I'm a yetifan, but here I give up.
My money will go for a Spe Enduro or a Canyon Strive CF.
I'm so disapointed...
  • + 7
 Its certainly not Enduro enough but I would guess that rather than risking going to market with this new tech in the currently massive Enduro market, they are testing the water on a different demographic to gauge responses, tweak as necessary for longer travel bikes and will leverage its anticipated success. Otherwise it might be a significant risk to the brand and heritage to launch their Bronson/Nomad/Enduro/Slash killer only to find it receive a luke warm reception.

I'd put money on the ~160mm bike being launched in the near future and when Graves has done something with it, it will sell very well.
  • + 13
 f*ck me @yeti115, your life sucks, eh.
  • + 3
 Agreed, it suggests to me they want to work longer on the SB6650bc, which is no bad thing
  • + 0
 No, a good bike is not defined by travel but it does limit what you can do on it, for the money they are asking a would like a bike that could cope with long stints in the saddle and uplift day shredding, a 127mm frame is not very versatile. For the money of there top build you could get a YT Capra, a Tues, a dirt jump bike and have change
  • + 2
 @Mfro : good analyse.
@brotherluke : lol. Luckily, I still have my good old 575... ;-)
  • + 0
 If the switch infinity does what it's supposed to do that 127mm will probably feel like at least 150mm.
  • + 11
 The reason they are making/selling this bike (127mm) first is that it is applicable in every part of America (substitute your country of choice). Shops in Florida, Vermont, Colorado, Wisconsin, California etc will all be buying this bike because every state has trails suitable for the needs of 127mm of travel. 160mm of travel seems (to many people, not myself) semi-limiting, heavy etc. Once they show that this works here, they will expand it into other categories for sure.
  • + 2
 @yeti115 give yeti some time, there could be more coming....
  • + 5
 Fact is that all the interneters are (or wish they were) Enduro, but the people who actually buy bikes en mass are trail riders who want an all-arounder. Not necessarily a 6 inch super bike. Yes that would sell, maybe even to you, but in a bike shop where it really counts a majority people are buying 5 inch all around bikes. They are buying bikes that they can ride every day everywhere. Maybe a day or two at a bike park, a Moab vacation or an XC or Enduro race or two per year. The vast majority of their riding will be done with friends on local trails. From what I see that is this bike. Bulls-eye Yeti.
  • + 2
 @Mcfc, how is a 127mm frame not versatile? My Blur TRc only has 125mm and it works just about everywhere besides a world downhill course. Six inches of travel is great and all, but I find most people buy more travel than they are capable of using.
  • + 1
 I am very guilty of that riding a spesh pitch (150mm) with a 160mm van 36. Feels like a mini dh bike and still climbs well that being said if I could afford it I'd get something like this, or a process 111 or 134 no questions asked.
[Reply]
  • + 20
 You keyboard warriors are hilarious. While everyone is allowed to have their own opinion, whats with slamming product(s) that you have never seen, used or ridden? go get a demo, ride or use a product then give an educated response to the release of new gear. Never mind the designers and engineers that commit years of their working life trying to create something that innovative product that works and performs they way they say it does. Fox have put their name on the hardware... name another company that has that.. Ride the new SB5C and then review your ridiculous opinions. Do you think Yeti would release a production model product that would wear out quickly in mud if suspension was exposed?? ummm ITS A MOUNTAIN BIKE. Sheesh.
  • + 56
 NOOOOO dont tell them that! im enjoying my breakfast reading some of these expert opinions! Havnt stopped laughing for 20 minutes! In all seriousness, It is extremely durable, it is light, and works friggen amazingly. But everyone will know that soon enough, till then, looking forward to reading more armchair expert opinions.
  • - 3
 i don't equate skepticism or valid questions on longevity of any new technology as blind hate. i regard yeti HIGHLY, but NO manufacturer churns out perfection every time.

i think the argument that "if you haven't ridden it, then STFU" is pretty hollow. it's clear from all the pricing/carbon haters here that no one has the money OR industry connections to ride/test every single new tech that comes out. Nor, do i think you need an engineering degree to figure out what works, or what has the potential to fail/weak points if you have years of riding different suspension designs.
  • + 30
 Well, when youve spent some time on this bike, as well as the prototypes along the way, then you read the information and opinions that some people here spread around like they know what they are talking about, then it really does make you do some faceplam's. Your right though, Nothing is ever perfect, which is why this bike and technology is here now, its a step closer to it than the previous design.
  • + 31
 @jaredgraves - what do you know? Do you go riding bikes in ridiculous conditions pushing yourself to extremes all over the world? Have you won World Championships and podiumed in a World Championship DH on your trailbike? ...wait...what? You have? Oh... my bad. Carry on mate!! Love reading your journal and following your career. Respect. Inspiration. Go Grubby go!!!! Oh, and yes - I think this bike is brilliant for the bulk of American trail riders. Why do armchair critics doubt Yeti? The company is almost single-handedly responsible for the evolution of MtB racing (through finding and developing great racers) and the modern trailbike.
  • - 9
 "Do you think Yeti would release a production model product that would wear out quickly in mud if suspension was exposed?? ummm ITS A MOUNTAIN BIKE. Sheesh."

Haha, do a little search on the 66, it did exactly that.

Comparing a pro rider, who rides in a very different way, and has a team of people supporting him to make sure his bike and kit are perfect is very different from the actual people who pay for these products and ride them without a mechanic following them round and replacing bearing every month is a very different story.

I've seen the frustrations of a die hard Yeti riding buddy of mine, who has been through THREE SB66C's and they have all fallen apparent on him. Bearings are sh*t, Switch link seized & wore the bearing seat in the the front triangle & the third one just cracked. This is the guy who has a Yeti tattoo for gods sake. Now he rides a Santa Cruz, and has no issues.

Considering the small number of frames they sell, the failure rate is mighty impressive.
  • + 12
 The old "a buddy of mine" story. I love those.
  • - 1
 Almost as nice as the brand fanboi's!
  • + 4
 " NOOOOO dont tell them that! im enjoying my breakfast reading some of these expert opinions! Havnt stopped laughing for 20 minutes! In all seriousness, It is extremely durable, it is light, and works friggen amazingly. But everyone will know that soon enough, till then, looking forward to reading more armchair expert opinions."

-Says the guy that gets paid to ride one. @jaredgraves-No disrespect intended as you could mow 99% of this message board down in a race (on a shi$%y hardtail from the 90's). But a Yeti-sponsored rider telling potential consumers that a bike is amazing is little more than smart marketing...and that message should be taken with a grain of salt.
  • + 8
 Well, when every media outlet that had the chance to preview the bike have had overwhelmingly positive opinions, it kind of goes against all the negative responses I'm reading here. Call me naive, but I'm not going to read a positive review and then jump to the conclusion that "it must suck, because reasons and stuff!"
  • + 5
 My argument against the "Fox put their name to it" comment is that Fox put their name to their 2013 Float 34 fork...............which was/is pants.
  • + 3
 Saw this on FB... funny stuff, haha.
  • + 2
 While I can certainly see where you are coming from ryan83 - having met Jared on a number of occasions (and even had him sleep on our floor once - which still seems to make my wife blush a little) I would say if he says good things about a bike he means them. There are some riders I would not say this about - heck even I talked up the Fusion bikes when they sponsored our team and they seemed to be made of bloody ice, they shattered so quickly - but having followed Jared's career he is honest and forthright about what he rides and likes. It has been my experience that he would tend to say nothing before he pipes up if he is not fully on board with the message.

Possibly what more people should be doing is just stowing the opinions until they ride it and understanding it may not be for them. By all means read the reviews, but don't take it as gospel that you will like a bike that the reviewer likes or hate one they hate. Surprise, surprise we all ride differently, with different needs around the edges of the two constants - going up and down a mountain.

And $8999... Sort of expect it nowadays. This is why I have a kidney for sale on ebay Smile
  • + 1
 Trinket, typically people who can afford $9K bikes can have their bikes regularly serviced at their lbs. Just a thought...
  • + 1
 Hey Gravesy, While your out galanting the globes finest trails I'll do some good ol' dusty, pea gravel shredding down here in Oz......So that'll be Infinity plus 1 for me!!
  • + 2
 Hi jared, are you able to give us an inside scoop on how if compares to the SB66 and SB75? I'm a huge fan of the 66 and interested to know more about differences in the ride from someone who knows.
  • + 1
 I bet you a SB5c he's not going going to answer you.
  • + 3
 Doesn't hurt to ask :-). If he does bonus.
  • + 10
 Im gonna reply just to see if Triber66 will come good on his promise! OK, so this is not intended to be the new 66, this is the first bike to be sold using this new technology, so you cant really compare it to the 66 or 75. Its intended purpose is slightly different to those. People can say whatever they want about me commenting, but I assure you my thought below are 100% honest and sincere, im not trying to sell anyone bikes, just give truthful information. The only reason im commenting on here is because all these negative comments are from people who have never seen (in person) and certainly never ridden this bike. And when you know just how good, and RELIABLE/MUD CAPABLE!!! this new technology is, the comments being made are honestly, pretty damn frustrating.
ANYWAY.....
So ill keep it simple, besides, I dont know too many big fancy engineer type words, basically this bike and the switch infinity technology is a refinement of the old switch, it does everything a little better. Better small bump, ramps up a bit harder at the end of the stroke, better pedalling, Lighter Weight, and better reliability, and I dont know how many times I have to say that mud riding has no short or long term major issues for this bike (servicing and maintainence at some point is inevitable, just as it is on any bike. Do people really expect a bike to be 100% maintainence free?) trust me, its handles mud just as well as ANY other bike on the market), and the bike has refined geometry for modern day riding.
Seems to me that people are always afraid of something different, which no doubt this bike is, but if nothing ever evolved, we'd still be riding full rigid clunkers.
  • + 4
 Crf-999....I owe you a bike! Gotta love Jared Graves! : )
  • + 2
 That's why the MtB world and Pinkbike loves you Jared. Approachable and real. Go get some in CO this weekend! Referring to race results, of course...
  • + 3
 Thanks Jared, a good little insight into the bike and very much appreciated. I don't know much about the engineering stuff, just enough to build and keep my own bikes working, so I appreciate the layman's rundown. I really like Yeti brand and look forward to having a crack at the SB5 once a demo is available at the LBS when considering your comments.

Without sounding like a keyboard wanker .... which I probably am .... It seems like the SB5 may be more suitable to the trails we have around Sydney, Blue Mountains & Central Coast than the SB66. We don't have a lot of rides with prolonged descents so the SB66 while being a great bike, and one I happily admit will never have the skills to ride anywhere near its limits, felt wasted on the type of trails I would regularly ride ..... kind of like driving an F1 car on a go kart track is guess, you know its good but its not the right place to get the most out of it. The points you raise of "better pedalling, Lighter weight" are two of the things that disappointed me with the SB66 purely due to the nature of riding near me where a lot of pedalling is require to maintain momentum, which no reflection on what overall is an incredible bike. If I was riding places like Mt Buller regularly I would buy a SB66 in a heartbeat due to the glorious long descents, but as I sadly don't have these rides available I started looking for in other brands offerings in a 5 - 6 inch travel bike that will allow me to do those places when I travel but also pedals well enough to have fun on local trails ..... looks like I will wait to ride the SB5 before making the final call on the next bike as it sounds like it may be more suited to my local trails.

Thanks again mate and all the best with the remaining rounds of the EWS, bring that trophy back to Australia!!!!!

And thanks for the laugh Triber66, you're a good sport.
[Reply]
  • + 19
 I'm digging these new short travel but aggressive geo bikes. Personally, I think 27.5 is the right wheel size for short travel trail bikes of this nature. I don't see a compelling case for using this bike with a front derailleur though. Wish they had dropped support for the 2x. Good to see suspension tech advancing, though I'm a little worried about the maintenance/reliability of the infinity switch. Time will tell.
  • + 4
 YeahI agree on this type of machine is all about 1x11. I've been running single ring for years and don't see the point in anything else. One thing with this design....that fancy suspension system looks like a great place to accumulate mud!! Is there no way that they could have shielded that from the elements?
  • + 2
 I like the short travel aggressive bikes too, fun!
  • + 3
 I agree completely kzuma - a super light bike that goes the distance. time and again i find myself over-gunned on the travel side with 150mm, regardless of the trail profile, but by the same token, I don't want to ride an xc bike. this is a category that has legs. i know i'm gonna get punished for saying this, but enduro, at least here in the us, is for punters that arent fast enough to race dh and too lazy to climb aggressively. yeti is anticipating the massive gap that the enduro category has created in the market - despite what the haters are saying, this was a smart move.
  • + 3
 I think it's funny people get all fired up about mfrs offering choices when it comes to wheel size and other standards, but when it comes to front derailleurs and chainrings people are disappointed that it's even an option. It doesn't seem like Yeti has made any glaring design compromises to offer FD compatibility (and Shimano's new hardware does away with a lot of the FD/tire interference issues anyway), and TBH Shimano's modern front shifting (last few years) is just as reliable as the rear shifting; it really does work well. 1x11 is sexy and popular, but I much prefer the greater setup flexibility, both for performance and cost reasons.
  • + 2
 Yeah I never quite understood the front der hate... mine works just fine and reliably. The only thing I ever have to do is adjust for the gradual cable stretch.
  • + 2
 @haljohnson Scott's XC race FS the Spark 700 series (27.5) has 120mm travel Smile
[Reply]
  • + 19
 Can't lie, I stopped reading at $8999.
  • + 5
 That's with Enve wheels though. It's only $6600 with normal wheels and components Smile
  • + 9
 In the UK, where they seem to think $1 = £1 these prices are just insane.. I can't understand who would pay this much when you can buy a non carbon bike with the same angles and spec for half the price.
Great looking bike though.
  • + 5
 1$ = 1£ = 1€
  • + 5
 I totally agree. Massively over priced for what it is. When you can buy an awesome bike for the same price as this frame then what must logic say??
  • - 4
 better stop mountain biking then. Because all bikes are expensive
  • + 5
 no theyre not, some are amazing value. what stupid bloody comment!!
  • + 1
 yeah but what would you expect for a carbon bike and carbon hoops
  • + 1
 FFS you can buy a new top of the range KTM 450 EXC "Six Days" for less!!
  • + 1
 Yep I expect a snaptastic time. And you didn't say carbon bikes you said mountain bikes.
  • + 2
 1$ = 1£ = 1€ ...true but not a brands choice... the stunning effect of taxes and country specific distribution cost...
[Reply]
  • + 13
 Haha love it, read the first part and Yeti are basically saying our old system was just a novel idea and didn't really accurately govern anti-squat or wheel path very well and also caused the suspension to lock up a bit due to the contradicting motions of the eccentric rocker... But hey this should be fine!
[Reply]
  • + 13
 I'm pretty sure I can afford one of these, I just have to sell my house and live in a van....sounds reasonable.
[Reply]
  • + 9
 I can't believe how many people are afraid of this system in dirt/mud. I would say that the lower link on any VPP bike is more exposed to dirt/mud/and even ROCKS compared to this system - but because they are fully sealed (like this is) - there aren't any problems.

I am on an sb66c. It kills every other bike I've ridden as an all mountan/enduro/trail killing machine. It seriously stays glued to the ground on chunky descents and has almost zero bob uphill (even with the rear shock on D mode).

This looks like a more refined version without any patent royalites (which means Yeti can reinvest that money to keep making better and better bikes). I'd be interested to try this bike, but being in Utah I really can't wait to try a 6-7" travel version.

I see this bike as the new ASR5c... hopefully a replacement for the ASR7 rolls around with this tech - and hopefully in a 26" platform.
  • + 3
 I believe it was yeti prez Chris Conroy said in a recent interview, that there will be no more 26" bikes coming out.
[Reply]
  • + 12
 Does this bike come in an "E Bike" option?
  • + 12
 And reflectors on the rims?
[Reply]
  • + 11
 Whoa...dropper post AND a QR collar? Such versatility!
  • + 3
 That's so when your dropper inevitably fails in the "down" position you have some hope of getting the saddle to an almost acceptable height for pedaling back to the shop, and can quickly remove it for the rebuild. When OE specs start calling for a standard collar, we'll know droppers have finally matured in the reliability area.
  • + 0
 That's the Super Enduro QR Collar!!! Sure, it may look like a normal QR collar but this is Enduro specific and allows you to extend the range of your dropper post. Groundbreaking and you can buy this new Enduro QR for only $239!
[Reply]
  • + 6
 Yeti, I hate you. It took me 4 years, 3 bikes( two of which were Yetis), with varying amounts of travel and different wheel size, to come to the conclusion that my next bike I am willing to save and dump 8K into would be the SB95c. Now this is here and i definitely have to look into it. I hate you, you Yeti bike maker people.

And for those of you who yack about price: Life is sweet when you're older and have a career that pays you enough to be able to save 8K in a reasonable amount of time to purchase one of these machines (reasonable being a year, or so. I'm not ballin, trust me!). The downside? Older (in my case going on 36), not as much time to train, wife, kids, longer recovery time for injuries, hard rides, etc. My point, rather, a point, I am trying to make is that a lot of us who have been riding since the days of Johnny-T, Palmer, DeMattei, Tinker, Vouilloz (in his Sun days with Martinez) and all of the old skool fools were at one point broke, young groms who were frustrated with bicycle prices. Unless a person is born into money, then he/she has probably been the yearning wide-eyed youngin that rides the Specialized S-works with the used manitou fork and mix-matched race-face-shimano components at the Mammoth MTN NORBA nationals with the Rocky Mountain jersey because the yellow and black color scheme looks cool, winning the sport class XC race against the kids he/she thought were "rich." Grow up, get a job, and keep riding.
  • + 0
 And now there's no reason to buy a SB95c. I'll wait to see this technology trickle to that model thankyouverymuch.
  • + 1
 Yeah, that's what I was thinkin
  • + 2
 yep - getting older has it's upsides
  • + 0
 CaliCol - Really, 36 is older? Oh you kid!
  • + 0
 40 is just around the corner son -
  • + 2
 40's just your second puberty.
  • + 1
 Herzalot, I said 'older,' not straight-up old. I'm old enough to remember NORBA and when Gracia was with Cannondale back when Myles Rockwell was racing. I doubt a lot of these kids here even know who Rockwell is! But, yes, I am young, no doubt. I guess my point is that I have enjoyed mountain biking more in my 30's than I did in my teens and twenties. Also, my line of work ages one quickly. Humping 50-60lbs of gear on ridge lines near the Hindu Kush takes it's toll on the body!
[Reply]
  • + 10
 Dammit make the SB-76 already!
  • + 6
 Saw your post and thought hmmmmmm SR-71. I know people talk about stealth looking bikes but thats pushing the envelope...
  • + 1
 Amen Zack! But I think you meant SB-76c
  • + 1
 Herzalot, SR-71 Blackbird, google it
  • + 1
 No I know what the SR71 is (I've had the good fortune of being buzzed by them in Colorado Springs - silent approaching and F-Iing LOUD after they pass), I was actually referring to Z-WAAAAAZ' comment about the SB 76 (which by Yeti naming conventions would be a 27" wheeled bike with 6" of travel). I too want to believe that this is on deck for Yeti, but I was reminding Zack to add in the c for carbon.
[Reply]
  • + 5
 I'm sure this frame is fantastic. However, most knuckleheads won't see past the 127mm of travel number despite the fact that it may be on-par or better than bikes with 20-30mm more travel. So I question their strategy when it seems like they could have scaled this to a 150mm bike with just a few tweaks.

Either way that paint is sexy and it's refreshing to see a company continuing to develop suspension designs and not just retrofitting wheels on their current lineup and calling it a "new bike" (ie Specialized).
  • + 3
 ryan83, something that took me forever to realize is that I like a particular type of trail and no matter how much travel I have I will be the rider that I am. I have said this in a previous post and I will say it again: If you are fast, you are fast. The amount of travel does not matter. For the type of riding I do, I don't need anything more than 130-140mm of travel. I wish I had the cajones to sail off of hips and doubles, but I don't, so this bike is something that perks my interest.
  • + 1
 @Cali don't be telling that to too many. They may get all butthurt and stuff. Whilst travel and geo are useful to some degree. They may not be entirely indicative of how one sus design compares to another design. I have talked to a few that did not like the feel or complicated design of the switch on previous models. I personally loved how it felt. The harder I pushed the faster it went and better it handled. Yeah, it was not super plush at the top of the stroke (perhaps that particular setup). But I really like sprinting out of the saddle more than feeling of pedaling a sofa.
  • + 2
 Ryan, you don't think they will make other bikes with this design? You will see a 6" all mountain version soon I'll bet.
[Reply]
  • + 5
 I have no idea what I know about bikes, I've owned two, and ridden two, off road, on hills, mountains, mud and shit. One time I competed in Enduro, it was like mountain biking, but it was different, it was enduro-specific biking. This bike looks enduro specific. My social science educated brain can't engineer how it works, and as a result, I'm just going to berate it, along with other fashionista pinkbike things, like; SPD's are ghey, 26 4 life, 35mm Stems or go home you 70mm stem xc mincer, dual-ply, while I struggle to set up my derailleur. I think this bike is silly, it has rationale behind it, and as result, does not conform to norms, so I'll hiss and boo, while I should be shredding and not giving a f*ck.
[Reply]
  • + 6
 Having a sb66 for this season has been unreal, Likely the most balanced and capable bike I've Ridden.. Really keen to try out this even more refined version, and with the larger wheels!
  • + 0
 It's not a replacement for SB66, more the SB75
  • + 2
 Right, I can see how you interpreted that. I just meant that the switch link is a beautiful thing, and that the switch infinity seems like it will be as well Wink
[Reply]
  • + 8
 I have no interest in this new bike from Yeti.
  • + 12
 I want my water bottle inside the front triangle.
  • + 2
 Thanks for telling us that! How would I sleep if your interests weren't posted genre?
[Reply]
  • + 4
 I think this is a clever way to improve the switch pain in the ass maintenance technology, if they put this on a 26 wheel sized frame I will buy the frame, I will not throw all my 26 hard earned components just because a MKT guy belives I got more money for 27 o 29 frame bikes ....

Pls, put this on a 26 inch frame dudes Smile
[Reply]
  • + 9
 Why over complicate?
  • + 16
 Because if no-one over complicated your car wouldn't have A/C, Radio, Remote Locking or electric wind

Innovate > Complicate
  • + 4
 Yep I hate all that shit too.
  • + 11
 you are confusing innovation with complication, complication is NOT a requirement of innovation...
  • + 3
 The simplest design that produces the desired result is the best design...This system has obviously produced the results that Yeti were after and it's not exactly over complex. A fantastic example of design innovation! Massive props to Yeti and their devoted team of riders and engineers!
  • + 1
 No it's not. But I fail to see how this is complicated. Just because you don't understand it, it doesn't mean it's complicated. It works exactly the same as the rail design did on the 303DH, just located in a different place with different rails.
  • + 1
 It's not complicated... full stop! People just get confused and write it off as over complex because they fail to understand how it works. And yeah, it isn't too dissimilar in desired outcome to the rail design of the Yeti 303DH, but by no means does it 'work exactly the same', it just produces similar, but more desirable results in relation to the rear axle path during the compression of the suspension into it's stroke. The fact that this new design is an evolution of the old rail design to make it more effective constitutes design innovation! Nothing is ever perfect, therefore innovation of a design is necessary to get it to be as good as it can be. People should stop being so skeptical and writing the bike off as pointless and over engineered before riding it and exploring its function in proper detail! If you think it's over complex buy an Orange Five or something. And as far as the 'The simplest design that produces THE DESIRED RESULT is the best design' thing goes, it kinda is as long as it's possible with current technology and funds! Just to be clear, I'm not trying to express my opinion on the bike as I've never ridden it and will withhold my opinion until I have, I'm just expressing my opinion on design innovation... Yours sincerely, a p*ssed off armchair engineer!
  • + 1
 I wasn't disagreeing with you...
  • + 1
 Oh sh*t, sorry buddy!
[Reply]
  • + 3
 I'll reserve judgement until I ride one. It might be brilliant.
Except for the cynical changing of standards to stimulate the market (cough....wheelsize....cough), we should encourage development. Good on Yeti for trying something new.
[Reply]
  • + 3
 Don't see mud being an issue, I've seen suspension designs that are much more prone to being packed with mud. It's not even open on the back.... Honestly how many people ride in the wet enough for it to be an issue? And those who do it's not like you're never going to hose off your 6grand + bike. I think it's great they're innovating and I think it's one of the best looking bikes I've ever seen. The reviews all seem to say it preformed as claimed as well.
[Reply]
  • + 4
 Time will tell... look how long Kona kept the magic link around... Foes also has an extending rear shock mount they showed off at Sea Otter that adds negative travel to drop the wheel after the shock fully extends.
  • + 1
 + 1000 As an unfortunate member of the kona magic link air shock family, there's nothing worse than waiting a month in prime riding season for kona to send a replacement for their silly proprietary auxiliary shock! Oh but don't worry they worked out the kinks the second year they used that part... Oh wait they went ENTIRELY AWAY from the magic link after...
  • - 1
 If kona had gone to Fox or rs for the magic shock maybe it wouldn't have been dropped?? Who knows it worked great when it's working and setup right. Does way more than this switch dribble.
But the magic link would never work or fit in the new process frames so maybe not
[Reply]
  • + 2
 Never thought I'd see the day when kona get more love than yeti on pb!
Don't really see the point of this bike. If it's only got 127 mm of travel why do you need a fancy expensive pivot design . Review didn't exactly make it sound like a game changer or clever idea, just a bit different in certain situations. Dread to think of the spares cost in a few years.
So why the crazy price tag?
[Reply]
  • + 2
 It still looks like Yeti didn't ride this in the mud or wet much. Dirt and grit are bound to be thrown around the link, I sold my SB66 because I was using six or more sets of bearings a year. Sadly I cant see this being any different.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 "It's going to be utterly useless in the mud. That thing has got unique, expensive replacement parts written all over it, for when it inevitably sh*ts itself"


Have you ever seen any high performance product that doesn't wear??? you people amaze me. You all sound like you want to buy a bike that stays perfect its entire life without servicing it. Here's a tip, buy ANY bike, sit in your lounge room beside your computer and keep punching the keys on your keyboard. your bike will last forever.
  • + 4
 Yep, but I prefer it to last months, not days.

Yeti don't exactly have the best history when it comes to making reliable bikes, past or present.

This looks like a VERY complicated way of slightly altering a single pivot design if you look at the kinematics. Coupled with a yeti badge = trouble Smile
[Reply]
  • + 4
 If I owned this bike I think I would spend as much time looking at it as I would riding it. It's a thing of beauty. Love Yeti, always have.
[Reply]
  • + 3
 After reading the review and the explanation of the design, it really isn't as complex or as scary as it looks. On the other hand, it makes you appreciate the simplicity of a good steel hardtail.
  • + 2
 I love my hardtail, it never lets me down.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 I saw those two new articles and clicked first on the SB5 specific one, read it and was intruiged.
Then I started to read this article, saw the X1 drivetrain and immediatly assumed that this bike like so many others these days comes as a 1x only.

But I read on regardless and voilà, it doesn't!
Hooray for Yeti!

Riding hardtails only and if it's not singlespeed then a 2x drivetrain, this bike looks and reads very tasty.
I'll definately consider buying this frame when I'll be looking for a full susser, next year. Let's hope they keep it in production long enough.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 Liked the old Switch setup. Climbed and descended as promised. Wanted more fork upfront then and would really like to ride one with the new 36. Would prefer a proper water bottle mount for those times when I'm feeling "Enduro Specific".
[Reply]
  • + 1
 "The Ardent / Ikon combo would be great for most Colorado style riding, which entails miles of hardpacked, and often dusty trails. In our neck of the woods things tend to be wetter and steeper, and trading in the Ardent for something meatier would be on the short list of recommended component."

Someone has shown you the wrong Colorado trails. Dry yes, but steep and rocky for most intermediate/expert trails. I fully agree with the swap and think Yeti should stock this bike with a 2.4 Ardent in the back or skip those and put on 2.3 High Rollers.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 i could see that area packing up with mud in gloppy conditions. i know it's been tested to 500hrs...but how many rebuilds, bushings during that time?

I also wished that this initial offering had more travel, more descending orientated. a 66 or 66.5 degree headtube and at least 140mm of travel i think would have made more sense given the current market trend/offerings
  • + 26
 500 hours with no bushing or rebuilds, thats the point! Total testing time, FAR more than 500 hours, this has been coming for almost 3 years
  • + 9
 good to see you on PB Jared, wished more Pros would do it more often. Been fun seeing you and Rude killing it on the EWS this season!
  • + 2
 Well all I'll say is when they buying public purchase this extremely expensive bike then the proof will be in the pudding.... time will tell how good and how durable it is when it's in normal riders hands over a few years! Then we''ll see.
  • + 2
 Also the thing is Jared we may be a bunch of arm chair engineers but we are the arm chair people who end up buying this product and spending our hard earned cash on it. I appreciate that you have spent a lot of time testing it and developing the product but as we are the buying public we look at the very complicated suspension set up and it scares the vast majority of us. I would like to see how that "Switch" area copes with british mud and how much the british mud will wear it. The only way we can assess this product is from the pictures on here as most of us haven't got the privilege of 500 hours of testing like you and your engineers so I think your comments are a little out of touch. Also please bare in mind that we are also potential, if not existing customers of Yeti and we have the right to have an opinion on a product without been shot down in a ball of flames by one of its employees! As I said time will tell with this, I really do hope that it turns out to be and awesome product (it needs to be at that price), but the jury is out until then!
  • + 4
 "oh no! how will it cope with a British winter?" clean it off when you're finished riding and don't store it outside. Mud is mud is mud. Wet dirt in California, BC, Australia, Europe, Asia and even the UK are all variations on a thing called mud. You Brits need to stop thinking your mud is superior to everyone else's.

And Matt, the public doesn't test bikes for 500+ hours because we're not releasing a bike to the public. In addition, someone who has ridden the bike for countless hours and, i would assume, has given the designers input into how it rides, his comments on the bike in question are definitely not out of touch (he hasn't commented on the price though).
  • + 4
 I see this design as incredibly simple and uncomplicated, and "it scares the vast majority of us" is such a ridiculous assumption. Also, you have a right to voice an opinion just as much as someone, anyone (employee or not) has the right to shoot that opinion down in a ball of flames. Its a friggin comment board, on pinkbike no less!
  • + 1
 X number of years of testing and x number of intensive testing hours doesn't mean much without context.
3 years of testing without major service?
3 years of testing in Megavalanche mud?
3 years of testing with maintenance every 4 hours?
How long does cleaning take, and how thorough does it need to be?
Just look at acceptance of carbon as a material. Some potential Consumers didn't trust it until they could be silenced (relatively) by clips like the Santa Cruz test vid. Yeti would benefit greatly by providing evidence (assuming suitable evidence exists), but probably won't because it exposes them to too much risk. Which is hilarious considering they've taken the risk of putting the link on their bike in the first place. At least they could blame Fox...

Only sales and everyday joe testing will really show how this bike holds up to use from the testers that matter most, the consumer. As I've said in previous posts it'll be interesting to see if this system has advantages over a normal pivot, because it's really hard to find a truly poorly performing bike these days, and there is proven, high performance competition in the aggressive trail bike category; Bikes which also have firm pedalling platforms with nice mid and end strokes. There are also plenty of active suspension bikes in the same category which are also very good.
  • + 1
 Well read what people have been saying. Simple observation kwymore
  • + 2
 And totally agree with everything you are saying ZeGermans. It's the testing under the people that buy the bike will be its true test of durability and reliability. Time will tell for sure. I really do hope it turns out to be brilliant. As I have already stated it needs to at that price as you can buy a fantastic bike for the same price as this frame. Good luck with it Yeti
[Reply]
  • + 1
 my bike has no suspension. remember how santa cruz used a single pivot forever? and kona had the walking four bar for a looong time? because they were really simple, easy to work on, and they functioned just fine. i feel like if someone brought this into my shop and asked me to work on it, my eyeballs would explode.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I'm more confused as to why they didn't come out with the SB66 replacement first. That one been in the rumor mills for a long time now. Instead they seemingly just obsoleted the SB75 that they just released. I was pretty close to getting an SB75 too, but now I'm glad I held off. Feel bad for the dealers that probably have back stock of bikes that are gonna be hard to move.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I do look forward to trying this new tech, but is it just another thing to brake on that race run of a life time?
If the theory is right and proven. I would expect other companies to adopt and improve this new way. But it does look sick!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 The more I think about these new suspension designs the more I look at my Specialized FSR and think "Damn that thing never makes noise and keeps on going through rain, mud, sand, etc..." If I'm going to throw down over 5k for a bike it damn well better have a suspension design that doesn't need expensive parts, tons of maintenance, gather mud/dirt, or cause me to have to ghetto engineer a "fix" to remedy an issue that the bike never should have left the factory with. I could almost live with the sb66/95 suspension design/maintenance and have considered them heavily for a next bike but if the sb75 or whatever they call it comes out looking like this my money will go somewhere else.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Man, from these comments, you'd think all these haters are riding single pivots. Added complexity for added performance. Is the trade-off in terms of increased performance vs increased maintenance and parts replacements worth it? Only time will tell. But I don't get the vitriol being spit here.
  • + 2
 Or they are riding dual link designs which also control a virtual pivot to do the same thing all good suspension designs do (including linkage driven single pivots), and that is manage chain tension and leverage ratio, which is exactly what this yeti bike does too, albeit with an relatively (to a sealed pivot) exposed rail instead of a pivot.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 2 mistakes a company should avoid if they aren't into user shitstorms:

1) offering a bike at a price tag most users cannot afford or are not willing to afford
2) incorporating new technology

on a sidenote: it's exactly the same in the German bike forums, but I thought Americans were more open to innovation.

Thank god bike forums didn't exist in the 90s, otherwise we might still be running rigid bikes. Wink
[Reply]
  • + 1
 In the Netherlands we have a saying "Wie niet waagt, blijft maagd" (if you don't try, jou stay a virgin).. Big or to big steps ahead in technology will result in little useful changes in the mtb industry. If its really useful it wil stick.
[Reply]
  • + 5
 more complex means more parts to break and more $$$
  • + 4
 To which the answer is 'Orange 5'.
  • + 2
 yeah - yeti is well supported by LBS and distributors in the UK but still have to pay top dollah for replacement parts and bearing kits. MF'in rip off
[Reply]
  • + 1
 .... its not a second a shock... get that into your skulls people.
if you dont want new tech, buy old tech. Simple. Stop groaning about the fact you cant afford it / dont need / dont want it...
I remember an old timer telling me he still doesnt see the need for disc brakes... doesnt mean he is right, or any of you tech haters...
[Reply]
  • + 1
 just bought myself a sb66c recently and near that price also would have waited but wanted a 6in travel bike and the sb66c is just perfect cant fault it can do anything I throw at it but guess i'll have to wait a few years for next time, looks mint though would defiantly buy this great work yeti will be having yetis for a long time now
[Reply]
  • + 2
 My bike is a part of that bumper crop of mediocre climbers, but to me it feels like a rocket up hill (compared to the 8" single pivot it replaced). It's got me wondering what life is like on an actual xc bike.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I have a sneaking suspicion that this crazy design has more to do with other companie's pattents than anything else. I think just about any design you could try and produce would be stepping into the territory of some other makers pattent. Almost everyone has some variation of an imaginary pivot location, and all are heavily pattented!
[Reply]
  • + 5
 who would really be able to appreciate this bike and want those tires
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Looks sweet! Yeti bikes seem to be growing on me. A great review. I need to get rid of my KS LEV as the clamp just doesnt grip so I'd be interested to know how the Thomson Elite Dropper performed?
[Reply]
  • + 0
 And this my friends is the result of the SC lawsuit. No more clean pivot, now its something that wreaks of in-house yeti design. Switch was brought to Yeti, it wasn't created in-house. But this monstrosity with 100 bolts, 6000 parts, and frankenbike design is full on "we did this ourselves dad look!". It looks like a series of linked recoveries that somehow will be the bane of shop mechanics, owners, and every person who thinks a torque wrench is stupid.

Want 6lbs of mud in your BB? You got it! Yeti does better when they bring in external suspension designs, because all they've really ever done is "Its got extra rails and stuff", and glorified single pivots in the 575, ASR-5, and ASR-7 bikes.

The current switch is super solid, but this is a futile exercise in avoiding a protracted legal battle with SC and getting devoured in millions of dollars of legal fees.

Yeti should have made enough duckets on the switch bikes to have brought in anybody who doesn't stare at any kind of rail and become aroused.

I like Yeti, don't get me wrong, the current gen of switch bikes are super solid, but really, you guys should just hire someone outside of the company or license someone else's designs. You have proven historically to be of average quality in designing your own.

Thats all from CO, its all conjecture. All of you engineers know that "the more moving parts, and complexity, the better"..... Yeti has a boner log for rails.
  • + 3
 Absolute nonsense. See the bike in person and you will understand their is very little to go wrong. IMHO it will require less maintenance than the original Switch. 100 bolts? Try 4. The sliders are held in by four whole bolts. Instead of a pivot link with four bearings this thing slides up and down. Pretty simple stuff.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 This is a damn nice bike. i just got the Kona process 134dl for 3500 and i thought that was really steep. But Ive never had more fun on a bike. I bet this Yeti is a Beast up and down
[Reply]
  • + 2
 25-30% sag!? Try 15-20%. Even on a long travel bike you want 25% at the most with the front being set up stiffer with about 5% less sag than the rear.
[Reply]
  • + 0
 How did that make it past the "wouldn't this be a good idea" stage?

It's going to be utterly useless in the mud. That thing has got unique, expensive replacement parts written all over it, for when it inevitably sh*ts itself.

Why can't they pick a system and stick with it?
  • + 1
 I'd happily 'engineer' a cover of the mechanisms using an old innertube and some adhesive.
  • + 1
 Yeah, Engineering a cover on a $9000 bike.
Seems comical to me.
  • + 6
 because it wont shit itself in the mud, its been tested for years to make sure of that
  • - 1
 Time will tell. For now i'll stick with my Orange and get a Santa Cruz Nomad Next season.
  • + 5
 How does your shock or fork not crap out in the mud? Must be a bunch of rigid frame/fork riders.
  • - 1
 Uh huh, just there was no bearing 'issues' with the older Switch Link bikes too. (SB66)

They ate bearings like fatties love cake, then Yeti repeatedly denied there was any issues and tried to weasel out of warranty claims.

Stick to riding bikes Jared Wink
  • + 1
 @trinket ... only the bearings on the first year bikes had those problems...
  • + 2
 Mine was an '13 model year & I had 3 sets of bearings in 9 months. Then the frame developed some other issues - eventually got warrantied & then was sold. Rode nice, but it was way too fragile.
[Reply]
  • + 0
 This is getting insane. Overcomplicated, overpriced (probably not overpriced from a cost/development standpoint, but overpriced from a my pocketbook standpoint). I am honestly rebelling and only buying single pivot bikes from this point forward. The $2-3k I save with my single pivot will be spent on beers to chug post ride because I had some minor pedal bob and was 2 seconds slower on that climb. I mean seriously.
  • + 2
 Devinci, Commencal, Kona, many others. and even now lapierre (on their DH bike) make linkage driven single pivots which work extremely well.. All tuned slightly differently though; some linear, some firm under pedal forces, some progressive. A linkage driven single pivot can be tuned with pivot placement and link length.
[Reply]
  • + 0
 I've ridden my SB66c in all kinds of shit terrain, rocks, mud, roots and done little more then wash it and clean around the seals of the linkages. Basic maintenance and zero issues. I ride in the Tetons almost daily. This is unforgiving terrain. Come here and test gear (as Yeti has done) and talk to me after. This "my old buddy" bullshit on frame failures is a bit much. If that guy keeps blowing frames and seals and bearings, he must be doing something wrong. I've ridden an ASR5c HARD for years, zero issues. Same now with my SB66. Test it, ride it, buy it, or otherwise....shut up!
  • + 3
 Maybe you're a bigger mincer than you think?

There are endless stories out there about wrecked SB66's. But you keep kidding yourself otherwise!
  • + 1
 I guess I'll keep kidding myself then. Having too much fun on my SB66, until I wreck it that is...
[Reply]
  • + 3
 I like the external cable routing! The Bike looks pretty interesting and I'd like to have a testride.
[Reply]
  • + 3
 Imagine the fun you'll have trying to get mud/dirt/crap out of that tiny little area the switch assembly sits in!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Call me crazy, but I still prefer Yeti's single pivot design of yesteryear. I've had a couple 575's and now a 7 for the last few years. Yes, I know, innovate or die, but damn, I've had no issues with that platform.
[Reply]
  • + 0
 I don't know about the guys at Yeti, but the trails I ride on actually have dust/dirt on them... which accumulates in crevices, which then degrades things. I bet Yeti will charge hundreds of dollars for service/replacement kits for these things, and say that's "normal wear and tear"... no thanks. That's called an over-engineered, over-complicated design that I'd be surprised if it gives any performance advantage over anything else out there with properly set-up suspension.

This right here is why bike prices are getting out of control, becasue Yeti (and Intense and who ever else) releases excessively priced bikes that makes the industry think it's ok... companies like Specialized, Trek and Giant are rolling in the cash because now THEY can charge premiums (because these other companies do) on designs that they have already make their returns on 10 fold and people are paying it because the spending public now thinks it's ok too to pay that much.

This bike right here is an example of the reason, well above and beyond any wheel-size or frame material debate, why the bike industry is the way it is. Over-priced and under-performanced.
  • + 3
 not sure if you noticed but yeti has bumped their standard 2 year warranty to a 5 year warranty for this bike. They must KNOW that this system is solid. I would not be worried about it. Hell, it is simpler to maintain and clean than their current switch link and that thing is so solid!
  • + 2
 Funny....I seem to remember people saying the same thing with suspension showed up on the scene.............
[Reply]
  • + 2
 Beautiful, innovative, simple grease ports, awesome engineering. I like it !!!
[Reply]
  • + 4
 Kona magic link?
  • + 2
 Having just watched the video of it in action. Id say comparing this to a magic link is a insult to the magic link. The magic link actually did something, And did it well. But nobody likes proprietary stuff unless it's yeti, so magic link was killed off.
[Reply]
  • + 0
 "As the rear wheel goes deeper into its travel the mechanism moves downwards, reducing the amount of chain tension for better big hit performance"

When are you pedaling and experiencing a big hit at the same time?
  • + 1
 more chain tension = better pedaling, less chain tension = better big hit performance.

They are saying that as it goes deep into its travel it gets less chain tension, exactly when you WOULDN'T be pedaling
  • + 0
 Thanks for the reply.I'm still not following. I thought the only thing that causes chain tension is pedaling. When your not pedaling (like on a big hit), the chain is relatively slack anyway, so the idea of less chain tension due to the suspension design on a big hit (while you're not pedaling anyway) doesn't make sense to me.
  • + 0
 I think they are trying to say chain growth where they say tension
  • + 0
 That would make more sense, but i even so, i don't see how less chain growth would affect a big hit.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 How in the world is this bike 26lbs? 34mm Fox fork, all that travel, dropper post, and all this extra switch hardware? Not buying the published riding weight.
  • + 2
 That weight is correct - I verified it on a Park DS-1 scale. The hardware itself doesn't add that much weight, plus it has light wheels, tires, and a 1x drivetrain.
  • + 1
 Ikons are a 600-700 gram tire, which is like almost a pound lighter than what anyone with a brain would use for this bike. So, that's 2 lbs... 28 lbs for a $9k bike is OKish.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 Demo? Hell yes. Buy? 99% no. Looks like that would start creaking in 5 seconds in socal dust.
[Reply]
  • + 3
 Mike one question - SOLO or this?
  • + 0
 thats what im thinkin, just wanted his own opinion as I really like the solo
  • - 2
 as a former owner of a blur LTc i can say in all honesty that i will never own another santa cruz as long as i live. possibly the most over rated bikes in the world both the bike i had before it and after it were superior in every way (orange 5 and canyon strive).
the yeti SB66 i owned was superb though still regret selling it.
  • + 2
 Orange 5 = wannabe Heckler
  • + 2
 disagree sandgroper the five is quintessentially English and feels awesome on the trail, had a heckler for a bit and it just didnt feel as aggressive
  • + 1
 No worries. I was just stirring a fella who was bagging a brand after riding just one of their bikes. Cos you know every Santa Cruz must be shit if he thinks the LTc wasn't that good.
  • + 1
 lol - i get ya but I had a bullit and loved that one, great piece of kit - gotta get a ccdb on it though (which i now run on my five)
  • + 1
 ity wasn't just the bike but the whole owning experience, being told i had to buy a £120 pro pack to get hold of a single bolt, the constant stripping to stop the thing creaking sizing that would suit a T-rex etc.
  • + 0
 Yeti > Solo
[Reply]
  • + 2
 I just crapped 127mm in my pants. This looks amazing. I can't wait to demo one. Way to innovate Yeti!
[Reply]
  • + 2
 Yeti y u no xx1 kit without enve???
[Reply]
  • + 1
 This bike is amazing people...Einstein stuff...take note this is the future of innovation
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Pb comments are like th fb of MTB ing. Only nobody reads your comments so shutup with your armchair teenage speculation.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 is anyone else not seeing kona's magic link here? i mean its basically just a flashier version by fox and yeti!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I'm feeling the love of this bike Smile got sb66 maybe I "need" a trail bike jajajaja Razz
[Reply]
  • + 1
 yeti's starting to disobey the sacred engineering rule a bit too much for my taste
[Reply]
  • + 0
 Good luck finding what's creaking on that bike! Maybe you can take it to Jiffy lube after each ride, so they can dip it on an oil tank!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Yeti nice bike. Can I have one of your carbon Arc hardtail? Small size.thanks.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 no way to your comment above, I don't care about the Ibis this is pioneering and interesting, get lost Ibis.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 How can this contribute to suspension performance so drastically? Why not use it as a geometry switch?
[Reply]
  • + 0
 "the SB5c will be offered with several different build kits, STARTING with an X01 equipped version for $6599" Cool, great. When's the Capra coming in stock.
  • + 2
 the capra is just a clothes horse dude, looked at one in les gets during the passportes its heavier than my alloy spicy 527. both the press and public are getting carried away simply because or the parts spec. the frame is mediocre at best.
  • + 0
 And wait times are LONG, Mediums arround mid November?
  • + 1
 spicys are light... and that's why they crack all the time
  • + 1
 not the 2014 frames, not heard of a single failure yet, the older ones weren't as bad as keyboard warriors would have you believe either.
[Reply]
  • - 2
 Will this shock "enduro" though, I see no mention of that? Personally I would rather spend the extra money and have my suspension tuned by Craig at Avalanche. Lately I have not been impressed with any of my Fox suspension components.
[Reply]
  • + 3
 Mud pocket technology
[Reply]
  • + 2
 Infinity system? Should call it insanity system.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 im not falling for another kashima coated infinity and beyond marketing ploy... not to say i wouldnt love to ride it
[Reply]
  • - 2
 9grand for a bike....this indusrty has become overly greedy....it is pushing people out of the sport.....saw rick rude on this at mtn creek...yes it stayed level and rode nice.....but we are werkn class people.....good luck w this trail bike......not for me
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Yeti should get into making wheelchairs They'd make some sweet wheelchairs.
[Reply]
  • + 3
 8999? Really...
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Haters gonna hate! Procrastinators gonna procrastinate!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Definitely not a bike for the Fox haters!
[Reply]
  • + 0
 Nice looking bike but in the uk it would cost an arm and a leg so on that note I won't be changing my Canyon Strive CF order
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Frame weighs 5.1 lbs. I'm impressed.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Love my SB95 but make a 6 inch plus 29er please!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 SHUT UP AND TAKE MY MONEY YETI !!!!!
  • - 4
 This!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I wanna see it with a Pike on the front
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Reminds me of the Corsair Crown
[Reply]
  • + 0
 Looking forward to seeing the 6 inch travel version of this bike, I imagine it would come with a fox 36 and the Float X?
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I too hate innovation and new technology.
[Reply]
  • + 0
 Looks cool and all but how many times can Yeti re-invent the basic single pivot.
[Reply]
  • + 0
 It's been building up a while now but.....The bicycle industry has now jumped the shark!!!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 The switch link was w**k,this will be even w**kerer.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 If Jared Graves Doesnt use it. It Doesnt exist
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Need this on the 303 :O
[Reply]
  • + 0
 Why not just use FSR? It works. No patents.
[Reply]
  • - 1
 So wait is this kinda like an overpriced I-Drive that works slightly differently but in effect does the same thing?
[Reply]
  • + 1
 .o one will buy this
  • - 4
 The same group of guys that buy the Automatic Transmission Porsche/Corvette etc..target market! There's always some dumbass with lots of money.
[Reply]
  • + 0
 Not interested. But that new Ibis thats coming out, Ooo la la!!!
[Reply]
  • + 0
 Once they build a 6" 650b version I just might consider retiring my sb66.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Maintenance nightmare
[Reply]
  • + 0
 The closest I will get to riding one of these is a demo day! haha!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 This bike is so pretty..
[Reply]
  • + 0
 Epic! I'm waiting on the 26" non-kashima!
[Reply]
  • + 0
 Climbing
Descending
How well does it snap a gate?
  • + 2
 Could this replace the 4X?
[Reply]
  • - 2
 Good luck finding a bike shop that will know how to fix this system when it breaks...
[Reply]
  • - 1
 Hell! What part of "make the SB-76" sentence Yeti can't understand?
[Reply]
  • - 1
 They lost me at $8,999.00
  • + 2
 $6600 with XO1 and no Enve Wheels.
[Reply]
  • - 2
 Why wouldn't they go with internal cable routing is there disadvantages with it?
  • + 3
 External routing makes maintenance a little bit easier. It's even better when you are a mechanic and only have few minutes to repair a bike between two races.
  • + 0
 What about this bike seems to be designed for "easier maintenance?" LOL
  • + 2
 Take a look at the new Nomad's internal routing. So awesome! It took me 15 minutes to feed my stealth dropper cable through my Enduro 29 and only 15 seconds on my new Nomad.
[Reply]
  • + 0
 This looks great!
[Reply]
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