Pinkbike Product Picks

Nov 19, 2012 at 16:43
by Callum Jelley  

TRICKX 3.Lite knee pads

TRICKX was launched in 2003 by Race Company, a bicycle and component distributor located in France. You may have seen some of their protective gear on the Lapierre International DH team, Cedric Gracia, or on all-around shredder Mark Weir. They offer a full lineup to protect riders from head to shins, but it is their 3.Lite knee pads that we take a closer look at here. Like a few other options on the market, they employ the visco-elastic density changing D3O padding that goes from pliable to rigid in an instant. D30 should make for a bit more comfort compared to pads that use solid plastic knee cups. TRICKX uses a layer of Kevlar over the knee to resist damage from sliding over rocks, and sections of 18-millimeter thick padding on the sides to keep top tube-induced bruises to a minimum. Airprene fabric is employed out back in an effort to allow for some circulation, while Velcro straps at the top and bottom of the pads work in conjunction with silicone gripper strips to keep them in place. Skinny jean wearers take note: the long and relatively slim design is tailored for those riders who might wear the 3.Lite knee pads underneath pants. Small, medium, and large sizes available. MSRP $100 USD
TRICKX

Trick X pads
The 3.Lite knee pads fit great and provide protection when it's needed.


Pinkbike's Take:
bigquotesThe slim, snug design design makes the 3.Lite knee pads a treat to wear, and the soft neoprene interior only adds to their comfort. No, we likely wouldn't wear them on an all-day pedalling adventure, but they are cozy enough to rock all day in the bike park without complaint. The shallow knee cup lets them sit in profile with your leg, allowing them to be worn under riding pants or the skinniest of hipster jeans without hassle, and we found them to do a very good job at staying put during a ride. We've used D3O-equipped pads before and have been impressed with how the shape-shifting material functions, and it was no different with the TRICKX units. Due to a minor error in speed judgment while testing the 3.Lite knee pads, we know for a fact that they work quite well. If we were to be nit picky, we might ask for slightly slimmer padding on the sides, but dedicated park rats will likely appreciate the extra protection. All in all, a very comfy soft shell knee pad that hardens up exactly when you need it to. - Callum Jelley



SDG/ODI Lock-On grips

A collaboration between SDG and ODI has produced a 130mm wide signature grip that sports the SDG logo for traction, along with forgiving rubber edges that border the transition from grip to Lock-On collar. The front side of each grip features slightly ramped logos, and the proven Lock-On system keeps them from spinning while also making installation and removal a cinch. Available in black, red, aqua and lime green. MSRP $29.95 USD
SDG Components

SDG Lock-on grips
The SDG/ODI grip is a good choice for riders who prefer larger diameter grips.


Pinkbike's Take:
bigquotesIt is hard to fault an ODI Lock-On grip, with the locking collars working just as advertised - no slipping and no troubles to be had. The SDG version is a touch fatter than the commonly used Ruffian, and a bit closer to the larger diameter Rogue grips, so these should be popular with riders who have big paws. We found the circular SDG logo design to be comfortable and well cushioned, while the ramped design gives the grip a bespoke feeling. Small hands? You might want to stick to something a bit thinner. - Callum Jelley



Tioga Psycho Genius Venture 2.5-inch tire

Born from the Psycho Genius all-mountain tire and using a re-designed version of Tioga’s triangular tread block layout, the Psycho Genius Venture is a formidable looking tire. The large volume 2.5-inch casing is protected with Tioga's MAG60+ reinforced side-walls that are claimed to provide serious abrasion protection. This reinforcement adds a bit of weight, but also brings with it the peace of mind that comes from not needing to worry about paper-thin sidewalls. The tire's center tread runs into deeper, wider spaced cornering knobs, with the layout being designed to distort under cornering pressure and offer up more edges when you need it most. Tioga also uses two different compounds to build the Psycho Genius Venture, with softer sides and a harder crown to make the most of rolling speed and traction. It all adds up to 825 grams for the Kevlar bead version tested here (steel bead available as well). MSRP $65 USD.
Tioga

Tioga tire
The Psycho Genius Venture may look weird, but they perform very well.


Pinkbike's Take:
bigquotesThe burly 2.5-inch Psycho Genius Venture spent a year in development before being released, undergoing a few different mold changes along the way, but it seems to have been worth the wait, as the tire has performed quite well for us. While not a featherweight tire by any stretch of the imagination, the 830-gram Venture is more than acceptable given its 2.5-inch width and sturdy casing. It rolls surprisingly fast along flowing climbs, and we have to say that it offers fantastic grip when pushed hard through rough, root-filled terrain. 'Consistent' is the adjective that first comes to mind when describing the Venture - Tioga is obviously on to something with their novel looking Psycho Genius tread pattern. This tire would make a good choice on a mid-travel trail bike that is going to be ridden hard by an aggressive rider who doesn't want the weight of heavy downhill tires. - Callum Jelley



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74 Comments

  • + 83
 Where's my "none of the above" option?
  • + 19
 get the grips
  • + 92
 Get a grip mate.
  • + 25
 The knee pads are waaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaay overpriced.
  • + 2
 I want the grips
  • + 1
 I'm losing my grip
  • - 7
 It's not on there.
  • + 33
 Pads have a stupid name. Trickx? Next we will be forgoing the E on Extreme again. Perhaps they could wrap the logo in some purple lightening bolts and earthquake lines.
  • + 9
 The 'none of the above option' was probably sending the wrong message. Nobody should believe they simply can choose not to buy new products just because they are shoved in our faces. It's bad for business.
  • - 8
 There is nothing good about those tires. What a horrible design. If they spent over a year developing that, then that person needs a new job. Clearly doesn't ride a bike and or knows nothing about how tires work.
  • + 10
 did you even care to read the review of the tire Sanchez? They specifically say, "The Psycho Genius Venture may look weird, but they perform very well." I'll bet you're the guy who puts touch up paint on your frame and parts whenever they get a scratch because looking good is way more important than riding fast
  • - 4
 As the guy who has not only been a tire tester and designer, I can tell you by looking at them they would work like shit. Stepped knobs? What is this the 90's? Once that starts rounding off you have lost any climbing or descending attributes that tire had. Now if all you ride is slick rock then they would be pretty damn good. In any kind of softer or looser dirt then good bye traction!
  • - 1
 do grips really need to be tested? how often do you get grips and are like "wow i wish i hadn't bought the cheap ones my hands are just flying off!"
  • + 1
 Ardents have stepped knobs also and seem to have a good reputation. I don't like them though. Tioga seem to have taken the approach of "more edges to grip more bits of earth".
  • + 3
 Ardents are mediocre at best. Not shitty, but not that good either.
  • + 2
 I love my ardents for high altitude enduro in CO. What's better?
  • + 2
 Weirwolf is slightly terraced, and it did not round off, instead the top step wore down but I still have the other ones, which grip like glue exept in pine needles.
  • + 1
 @wallyeroc. I've always wondered what conditions the ardents work well in. I've never been able to push them into the ground enough to get any grip. They seem to just skate across the surface. My favorite combo for mixed conditions is butcher front and high roller rear!
  • - 1
 Ardents are best in intermediate/soft conditions. IE: not too hard, not too soft. The knobs are small so they have less contact patch for hard conditions (slip) and the knobs aren't really deep enough or shaped right to really bite into the ground (braking or climbing). They were designed without a real purpose in mind, and that right there is the overwhelming problem with mtb tire designers. Tires that look kinda cool, but don't really work very well.
  • + 1
 Personally I define a good rear tire as one that holds on climbs but can be easily drifted around on the downs. 100% guarantee not everyone likes that combo in a tire. It's really a to each his own kinda thing
[Reply]
  • + 15
 I rock the SDG/ODI grips, and it is like my hands are clipped in. Best grip ever.
  • + 10
 yup odi/tld or odi/sdg, cant go wrong with either!
  • + 32
 I like to hollow out an extra large frankfurter sausage and slip one over each end of my bars before a ride for grips. That way I am always ready for a tasty snack at any point and can ward off angry badgers when the need arises with a simple meaty distraction.
  • - 2
 What, no love for the odi/intense?
  • + 1
 How do these perform in hot weather or rain? I'll try gloves or grips that seem super tacky together, but then turn loose once I start sweating.
  • + 2
 I personally don't like DH without gloves, and no matter how hot/sweaty my hands get, it is tacky. Same with the rain.
  • + 1
 never tryed odi/intense tbh, I'm happy with my combo of odi/tld or odi/sdg depending on racing season or not
  • + 1
 The intense are cool if you like flanged, and you like MX waffle with just enough extra rubber on the top to absorb some shock.
  • + 1
 Try the Odi/Raceface Sniper grip Wink
[Reply]
  • + 9
 I gotta say, today's reviews were all for me. I like fat grips, fat tires, and soft knee pads. All of these look nice, and if I come into some money I'll be looking for them
[Reply]
  • + 8
 Im interested in the tires for sure
[Reply]
  • + 2
 wtf dont reviewers provide actual width measurements in tire reviews? we all know how all over the map stated widths vs actual can be and this 2.5 at a reasonable weight is gonna be of interest for alot of riders from trail to rigid cushion.
  • + 1
 at least providing the metric measurement would be a start, this was the first thing i thought too.
  • + 1
 And stickiness reference against a tyre reference that most people would know and understand for example "slightly stickier than a Maxxis 50 Duro but not as sticky as Conti Black Chilli DH compund". Also the wear rate. Could be the best tyre in the world until it wears out in 15 days.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I'll take all of them! ive had those grips and they're super comfy but not as grippy as the tld ones (the tradeoff choose comfort or grip), I'd like d3o pads to replace my old beat up 661 evos for AM riding and that tire just looks awesome! really curious to see how that gecko foot tech crap actually works.
  • + 1
 Flip the TLD grips around (one way is grippy and the other is softer).
  • + 1
 not the same cushiony feel tho
  • + 1
 Get Oneal Sinners. Sas-tec armour is far superior to D3O.
  • + 1
 yep but doesn't pedal as well, I use race face digs for dh and if im doing gnarly am/enduro, and d3o isnt that bad either, it pedals amazing for the protection you get
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Its hard to believe that that tire tread will work. Comparing it visually to the best gripping tires like minion, high roller, butcher, Hans dampf it doesn't look very inspiring.
[Reply]
  • + 4
 Flipping hell 100 bucks for knee pads? What is this industry coming to?
  • + 1
 that's actually not that crazy for a set of d3o pads...they're often anywhere from 80-120 bucks...
[Reply]
  • + 0
 Had those grips. They suck. And def more similar to ruffians than the rogues. Had them all. Then I saw the light, esi chunky ftw. Never going back. And I'm surprised the grips aren't held on with safety wire, pb loves their wire.
  • + 1
 Agree but ESI Racer for me.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Been using the odi sdg grips for a while and I gotta say they are definitely my new fav. Ive always loved odi grips, ruffians, Troy lee pattern,etc cant get enough of em.
[Reply]
  • + 0
 Comeon pb. Tire is better than - compared to what? Cheng Shin, Wallyworld? Looks like freshlybranded lowend OEM pattern and this type of thread didn`t work in th nineties and wont in 21st.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 thb its kind of easy choice grips thier going to be what £20 the grips but the pads cost me life savings and the tyers arnt cheap so grips!?
[Reply]
  • + 1
 2.5 inch tires at 800 grams? That is bloody light. Any lighter and pinch flats are a problem. They look like they would shed mud well.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I've been looking for some good kneepads lately but after seeing the price tag on those I would much rather hav some TLD lopes knee-shin guards
  • + 2
 Try the t.h.e Maxi...very comfy, great protection, and good price.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Do you think that the Lite Knee Pads may also fit well for women? It is hard to find a comfortable knee pad that isn't huge. The slim design has my interest.
[Reply]
  • + 3
 ive got the grips and love them
[Reply]
  • + 1
 The grips are great, I've been running them for a while. I take a large Fox glove and the grips are perfect for me.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 The ramps on the underside of the grips provide super tacky gripping surface.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 Tioga tires are soooooo good. iam running the normal genious in the 2.35
[Reply]
  • + 1
 ....go with the grips... i use the ruffian grips from ODI but may try these next
[Reply]
  • + 2
 I love the ODI lock on's. Have them on all my MTB bikes. Get a grip!!!
[Reply]
  • - 2
 Honestly. What happened to the sick products that used to be in product picks. Now all you see is a pair of grips some pads and a tire. Id rather see quality parts being shown than weekly posts about stuff people dont really care about
[Reply]
  • + 2
 Need something fatter than ruffians , thinner than rogues.
  • + 1
 Moabs fit in that niche... but personally, i don't care for the pattern.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Silly rabbit, Trickx is for kids!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Grips look great. I have been eyeballing them for some time now.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Finally grips that are made for big hands!
  • + 3
 race face strafe.
  • + 1
 Oury as well.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 The best grips i ever had.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 ATTENTION.......finally some all mountain stuff
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I have those grips. Has a few pairs and abolsutely love them!
[Reply]
  • + 0
 Agreed they are super grippy but dont chew your hands apart
[Reply]
  • + 1
 not another knee pad...
[Reply]

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