Hwulex

  • Member since Sep 11, 2008
  • 97 Followers
  • Whistler , British Columbia
  • Male / 32

Freerider.
Trail builder.
Photographer.

Block user

Recent

Hwulex rachellefrazer's article
Apr 14, 2014 at 9:49
3 days
Results: Sea Otter Classic Downhill
Yeah Leishman! Killing it!
Hwulex mikelevy's article
Apr 14, 2014 at 9:47
3 days
Emily Batty's Trek Superfly - Pietermaritzburg World Cup
[L=http://www.chainreactioncycles.com/ca/en/saddles?f=4294965442&sort=pricehigh]Saddle with a hole[/L]? Don't know if that's woman specific, I know I want to try one. I agree about pretty paint-jobs and different names though being a very lazy way to market to women. There's been long such discussions in other threads and elsewhere online but the market segment is [i]currently[/i] very small, so it's a large investment to create women-specific products. That who pulls it off though will reap the reward.
Hwulex mikelevy's article
Apr 12, 2014 at 23:57
Apr 12, 2014
Emily Batty's Trek Superfly - Pietermaritzburg World Cup
Not that low. I have way more saddle-handlebar drop than that on my Covert when the Reverb is at full extension.
Hwulex leelau's article
Apr 9, 2014 at 13:32
Apr 9, 2014
Chilcotin Parks Plan
Agreed. And yet: www.uvm.edu/~snrvtdc/trails/ComparingHikingMtnBikingHorseRidingImpacts.pdf Pg 5: "Several USA studies report that even low levels of horse use results in more severe impacts to soils, vegetation and trails than from hikers or other users (Table 2). Differences were due to the greater weight per unit area of a horse and rider compared to a person. The pressure per unit area of a horse and rider can be ten times greater"
Hwulex leelau's article
Apr 9, 2014 at 12:08
Apr 9, 2014
Chilcotin Parks Plan
Pg 5: "The extent and severity of mountain biking impacts appears to be connected with different riding styles. Impacts are likely to be greater when riding is faster, less controlled, occurs on steeper slopes and in wetter conditions. In Western Australia impacts from different styles of bike riding were compared on trails (Goeft and Alder, 2001). Trail erosion and widening, soil compaction and vegetation damage on a recreational bike trail and a racing trail were recorded over 1 year in the wet and the dry season. Impacts were confined to the trail centre with few impacts to trailside vegetation, which is consistent with a past USA study (Bjorkman, 1998). Although the racing trail was wider after an event there was no widening over the longer term. The authors concluded that even though bike riders prefer downhill runs, steep slopes, curves and water stations (features related to higher impacts), mountain biking is sustainable so long as that trails are appropriately designed, located, and managed." Basically: build the trails properly, and the trails take care of themselves.
Hwulex leelau's article
Apr 9, 2014 at 12:08
Apr 9, 2014
Chilcotin Parks Plan
Thank you for your dedication and time in disseminating this information. I have read through the draft plan and written an extensively worded reply in support of mountain biking, and questioning their proposals and lack of supporting evidence. Some articles others may wish to quote BC Parks allow drilling and piplines http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/carol-linnitt/bc-parks-bill-4-passes_b_5030406.html Comparing hiking, mountain biking and horse riding impacts on vegetation and soils in Australia and the United States of America http://www.uvm.edu/~snrvtdc/trails/ComparingHikingMtnBikingHorseRidingImpacts.pdf Pg 5: "Soil and vegetative changes on trail treads occurred rapidly initially and then tapered off, exemplifying the curvilinear use-impact relationship" Pg 5: "Several USA studies report that even low levels of horse use results in more severe impacts to soils, vegetation and trails than from hikers or other users (Table 2). Differences were due to the greater weight per unit area of a horse and rider compared to a person. For example, the pressure per unit area of a horse and rider can be ten times greater" Pg 5: "Under the conditions tested, researchers found no evidence that mountain bike impacts to soils, vegetation and trails were signi´Čücantly greater than impacts from hikers. "
Hwulex peakleaders's article
Mar 22, 2014 at 8:48
Mar 22, 2014
Want to Teach Mountain Biking in Whistler?
Depends on your field too. I'm lucky in that I studied Computer Science so am pretty mobile when it comes to finding new work, either local or just freelancing online. After 2.5 years here I secured a job in the mountain IT dept which, whilst is never going to match city wages or potential, I do get to have a 'proper' job that pays well enough and still live in the mountains. Let me know if you're ever in town, we'll go shred.
Hwulex peakleaders's article
Mar 21, 2014 at 15:23
Mar 21, 2014
Want to Teach Mountain Biking in Whistler?
Don't forget that if you're looking from Canada, the exchange rate wills screw ya. It was better a few months ago, but has been getting progressively worse for us over the last 12 months. I flew back to the UK recently and was exchanging at 1.87 CAD to 1 GBP :(
Hwulex peakleaders's article
Mar 21, 2014 at 15:20
Mar 21, 2014
Want to Teach Mountain Biking in Whistler?
Not necessarily too late, I did this course in its inaugural year in 2009 and then came back in 2010 at age 29 to work as a coach, moving in to staff housing for the summer. Four years later I'm still here, though I moved out of staff after that first summer and winter. Staff is a lot more empty and chilled in summer, and not quite the raucous party-town it is in winter. I jacked in a good job, sold all my crap and moved from the UK and am now a permanent resident and looking to buy property here in the next year or so.
Hwulex peakleaders's article
Mar 21, 2014 at 10:44
Mar 21, 2014
Want to Teach Mountain Biking in Whistler?
If you actually want to get a job coaching biking one day, I'm sure that makes quite a difference! I know a lot of people that are total shredders, incredibly fast, but could never effectively teach somebody else how to ride; "Follow me" and "do what I do" aren't valid coaching techniques. Understanding bike and body movements, why you move how do on your bike, and mostly being able to break a technique down in to digestible replicable steps is important, as is having more than one way of delivering your point as the same thing doesn't work for everybody. Saying the same thing over and over 50 times isn't going to work if the 'student' just isn't getting what you're saying. Being good at something doesn't make you a teacher.
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