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Nov 17, 2014 at 9:52
Nov 17, 2014
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Nov 17, 2014 at 9:42
Nov 17, 2014
Marlfox87 mattwragg's article
Nov 14, 2014 at 11:58
Nov 14, 2014
11 Steps to Getting POD
No offense man, but your comments indicate otherwise. Everyone commenting here has tried to politely give feedback and encourage you and your photography, and you have primarily replied with rude and belittling comments that place the blame on others and their decisions. You're the only one here who seems to have hurt feelings, for which I truly am sorry. I actively participate in photo contests year round and i know just how hard it is to have your creative work torn to shreds by someone who prefers a photo of a potted plant. Don't get discouraged though, you're in good company. Leonardo Da'Vinci, arguably the greatest artist ever, was considered a massive failure until his 40s. Instead of blaming his failure on others he just simply kept on drawing. Go back and study the picture you don't understand and maybe you might learn something new. If all you care about is getting POD or proving that your photo is better than someone else's photo, and all you do is repeatedly refer back to that one photo you took, then unfortunately you will probably never produce a POD worthy shoot. And even more sad is that you will miss out on the amazing art that is photography.
Marlfox87 mattwragg's article
Nov 13, 2014 at 20:57
Nov 13, 2014
11 Steps to Getting POD
I'm not saying it isn't a good photo, but it really didn't jump out as a great photo (even if it was technically difficult). I know it may sound nitpicky, (and it's only one photographer's opinion ), but the thing that bothered me the most was the background composition. Background colors felt flat and the cars and trailers distracted from the rider. That and the horizon line passing right through the rider is a technical no-no.All of these minor elements combined made the shot feel more like a snapshot than a well composed piece, and distracted me from the actual rider. I had to make myself focus on him even though he dominates so much of the frame. Don't give up though. Just keep shooting. When I started shooting photography I was given the advice that no matter how good your first ten thousand fully edited pictures are, you don't really begin to excel as a photographer until after 10,000 shots.
Marlfox87 GDPipsqueak's article
Nov 3, 2014 at 9:00
Nov 3, 2014
Marlfox87 GDPipsqueak's article
Nov 3, 2014 at 8:16
Nov 3, 2014
Surviving Nepal On a Bike
Also as a side note.. next time you end up in sub-freezing temperatures with wet clothes. A really great trick is to hang them out overnight. When the water inside them freezes you can beat the frozen water out of them and they will be dry. Very cold, but dry.If you leave them bunched up they'll freeze into a useless ball. This is something I picked up from a Scandinavian roommate I had. Not sure if this is similar to what you did with the creek, but that is what came to my mind. Thought you might enjoy that.
Marlfox87 GDPipsqueak's article
Nov 3, 2014 at 8:15
Nov 3, 2014
Surviving Nepal On a Bike
I'm fully ready to admit that I don't know the whole story, which is why I held off on calling you and your friends "idiots", but I can only draw from what you tell and how you tell it. Honestly, I'm just glad that you're alive, albeit you left safety with nothing but peanuts for food, (at least that is all that's mentioned) and by doing so put yourself in a life and death situation in order to catch a plane(once again, this is all that is mentioned). To us in the mountain community these choices appear to us about as dumb as trying to cross the Kalahari without water. Please understand that although the choice was dumb, it doesn't mean that you are. We all make these kinds of mistakes. The end result that you are alive and that no unborn babies are going without father, is what is paramount. I hope your next venture into the mountains goes better and that next time something like this does happen you will have a better experience. I'm also sure that you're tired of reading all of these negative comments, and are probably ready to just be done with this whole affair. But, if you want to share more about your experience I would love to hear it. I'm sure there is lots I could learn, and I would do my best to not pass judgement. Best of luck with everything.
Marlfox87 GDPipsqueak's article
Nov 3, 2014 at 8:15
Nov 3, 2014
Surviving Nepal On a Bike
We're not looking for fault in your story, and I apologize for those who have answered rashly. Whatever criticism I wrote, I wrote because it appears to me as obvious, and your account seems to treat it lightly. So obviously I feel a need to raise a voice of warning, and I am speaking to prevent anyone from getting the wrong idea about this situation. It's probably a cultural thing with us mountain folks, and maybe the cultural divide between me and you is enough that I didn't fully understand how you were meaning to tell things. You yourself wrote of this cultural divide when you said, "Maybe they were right, but in our understated South African terms this was just unnecessary drama". For me in my culture you don't consider what a more experienced traveler tells you as 'unnecessary drama', and maybe you didn't either. Unfortunately that isn't what comes across in the text. The text reads as if it were written by someone who is inexperienced and arrogant, and in my culture to tell the story the way you did is an indication of someone who you do not want to be traveling with in the mountains.
Marlfox87 GDPipsqueak's article
Nov 3, 2014 at 8:15
Nov 3, 2014
Surviving Nepal On a Bike
I'm glad you're not seeking my sanction or approval, but I was never asking for it. I'm glad you're alive, and like I tried to imply in my original comment but probably failed: we have all been there. We've all been in that situation where we get caught with our pants down and things get really bad, really fast. That doesn't make you an idiot, and I'm sorry if I implied that. I read your story, and having had similar experiences in the high mountains I felt that I could appreciate the bleakness of your situation. What really makes me cringe here is the slew of comments reading "Epic..." "now that's a real adventure", etc, etc... which is not the perspective anyone who may at some point be in those mountains should have. You know as well as I... mountains kill. They do it fast and without mercy. Where I live we lose a half dozen skiers, hikers, etc to freak storms, avalanches, and what not every year. I'm sure in South Africa you lose a fair amount of tourists every year who aren't aware of things that to you are "common sense". For example when you wrote "we had good South African sunglasses and sunscreen - two things that turned out to be crucial" it reads like this was something you had just discovered, and maybe you already knew this but sunscreen is an essential item when at high altitude in snow. For me and my culture, that's just common sense.
Marlfox87 GDPipsqueak's article
Nov 2, 2014 at 9:01
Nov 2, 2014
Surviving Nepal On a Bike
While I'm glad everyone in this party made it to safety, I have serious issues with the aggrandizement of poor decision making. Freak snow storms happen, and honestly we're not always prepared for everything. However, the fact that these guys left shelter and food because they were afraid to miss a flight makes wonder. This thinking led to them not being in a place where "no one had any idea that we were fighting our way down the valley, way off any commercial hiking route" when rescue was an option. Reading this story makes me wonder if a bad situation was made only worse because priorities were a little mixed up. If they'd been caught out in the open and were struggling towards shelter, or if their need to get out of the mountains was something more pressing than catching a flight because " I had business in the United Kingdom" I could probably see this story in a different light, but to me this story seems to try and make a really dumb decision into the "adventure of a lifetime". Which in the end results in even more people disrespecting the awesome power that are the high mountains. While beautiful, these places kill, and they easily do it in milder conditions. And don't think I'm just commentating from the couch. A few years ago, in an attempt to photograph the sunrise over the Teton Range I too got caught in a freak snow storm at midnight and had to pack up and hike out. I generally don't tell people this story because when I think on it the majority of the danger I was in came about from me not respecting those potential dangers. Like I said, I'm glad everyone made it out alive, but I've got serious issues with the publication and spreading of this kind of event as an "adventure story."
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