Block user

Recent

PLC07 pinkbikeaudience's article
Oct 28, 2014 at 13:26
2 days
Ask Pinkbike: Mounting a Guide, Enduro Bike Capabilities, Trail Etiquette
Only get a big bike if the terrain truly calls for a big bike. Getting too much bike will not only slow you when you want to go uphill, but it will slow you when you go downhill too. I have done lots of trails and parks and honestly, there really aren't many places that overwhelmed my 145mm bike. A 160mm would be good enough almost anywhere.
PLC07 mikelevy's article
Oct 14, 2014 at 11:12
Oct 14, 2014
Ghost AMR Riot Lector 7 - Review
Honestly, I've been using the 145mm bike a lot lately and I even brought it to the local DH resort to see how much it could really handle and I found it takes quite a gnarly track before it becomes overwhelmed by the terrain and even then, its usually only specific sections. I'd even go as far as saying that in most xc/am networks, 95% of the time, I don't even bother taking pro pedal off because the added firmness is actually more useful on the downs than additional plushness would be . I've often found myself wishing I actually had a smaller bike but then I remind myself that most offerings below 140mm have flimsy frames and suboptimal geo when it comes to charging down so this is why I feel burly 140ish bikes are where its at. Only place where I'd see 160-180mm frames have their place is if you're riding true DH trails with no lift access and the climbs being non technical fireroads, which is a little too specific for me as I hardly ever encountered such trails in my area.
PLC07 mikelevy's article
Oct 13, 2014 at 11:44
Oct 13, 2014
Ghost AMR Riot Lector 7 - Review
I really do like this sport a lot and happily sank a ridiculous amount of money in it but the day I need to take a loan to ride a bike is the day I stop riding.
PLC07 mikelevy's article
Oct 13, 2014 at 8:02
Oct 13, 2014
Ghost AMR Riot Lector 7 - Review
The thing is that its a canadian website and we don't really have access to YT/Canyon so all those comparisons don't mean much here.
PLC07 mikelevy's article
Oct 13, 2014 at 5:17
Oct 13, 2014
Ghost AMR Riot Lector 7 - Review
I find that the burlier bikes around 140-150mm are the best all arounders. They pedal good enough to get you through most climbs yet still really fun on the downs. I once considered buying a smaller travel bike (120mm ish) for trails that require more efficiency than travel, while keeping a bigger bike (160mm ish) for the rougher trails. What I noticed though, is that when you're travelling to new places, you never really know which bike you're going to need, and sometimes, the networks with the most gruelling climbs... also have tough downhill trails too so there is no perfect option. Of course, a jack of all trades will never be the best at anything in particular but it will still be good enough in most situations, as opposed to bikes at either end of the spectrum, which excel in some areas but are severly lacking in others.
Oct 8, 2014 at 17:33
Oct 8, 2014
PLC07 pinkbikeaudience's article
Oct 7, 2014 at 16:36
Oct 7, 2014
Ask Pinkbike - Crank Woes, Coil vs Air Shock, and Which Nukeproof?
I find the faster you ride, the stiffer, your spring rate will need to be. From my experience, stiff coil shocks have low small bump sensitivity while air shocks have higher early stroke sensitivity and also higher end stroke ramping up. Unless you're in an area where you can always ride pedal to the metal all the time (so, anything but DH), I find air better in every other situation.
PLC07 mikekazimer's article
Oct 6, 2014 at 19:17
Oct 6, 2014
Opinion: Do You Suffer From Bike Envy?
Well, you can bike year round in some locations but in a lot of places they have some sort of winter or off season. Never rode in the desert but apparently its a pain in the ass during summer since the heat is really bad. Correct me if I'm wrong but there aren't all that many places where you can ride 365 days a year. I used my location because well, that's where I live and and they don't sell us the bikes cheaper because we only get to ride half the year. The only reason I compared it to rock climbing was to establish a reference base cost. An arbitrary 17$ a ride would make sense I guess (assuming the initial gear investment was minimal) so I wanted to calculate how much you'd have to ride a bike to get down to a 17$ a ride. The answer is: much more than most people actually ride.
PLC07 mikekazimer's article
Oct 3, 2014 at 15:40
Oct 3, 2014
Opinion: Do You Suffer From Bike Envy?
An old marketing trick called "price anchoring" consists in making a super expensive line of product to justify an overpriced lower line. Those 10k bikes only exist to make you believe that you're being reasonable when buying a 6k bike.
Load more...
You must login to Pinkbike.
Don't have an account? Sign up

Join Pinkbike  Login
Copyright © 2000 - 2014. Pinkbike.com. All rights reserved.
dv16 0.040239
Mobile Version of Website