Ibis Mojo HD Review

Oct 22, 2012 at 3:39
by Richard Cunningham  
TESTED
IBIS
MOJO HD
BY Richard Cunningham
Harold Preston puts the Mojo HD's suspension to task down the boulders of Circus Circus. Greg Lambert photo

The sculpted carbon fiber frame of the Ibis Mojo is among the most recognizable profiles in the mountain bike world. The 160-millimeter-travel Mojo HD is Ibis’ most recent addition and while it looks almost identical to the original Mojo, the HD chassis is produced from entirely different molds, has different dw-link suspension geometry and a vastly different carbon layup schedule. The Mojo HD came to life when Ibis signed Brian Lopes, who assisted Ibis in dialing in the metrics of the new design to suit his powerful and precise technical riding style. The match could not have been better, as Lopes would immediately put it on the podium in dual slalom, 4X and enduro events, and for an unprecedented stretch, ruled the Air DH at Whistler’s annual Crankworx festival. By accident or design, Ibis’ Mojo HD emerged from the mold as one of the best do-it-all AM/trailbikes.


About the Mojo HD

Newer Geometry chart
  Ibis offers the Mojo HD with 160 or 180-millimeter fork travel options and in a range of builds from XC to freeride. Ibis furnishes two geometry charts to depict the metrics created by the different-length forks. Our test model features the 160-millimeter Fox Float 36 RLC option. Greg Lambert photo


Ibis Sells the Mojo HD as a fame and shock only, or built up in one of six component options (Shimano SLX, XT or XTR, or SRAM X.9 X.0 or XX) that range in price from $4721 to $7538. There are a number of optional component upgrades available also, and to sort that out. Ibis offers a 'bike builder' on its extensive website that instantly updates your imaginary Mojo HD with colors, components and prices. For those who need a more gravity oriented build, Ibis decks out the SRAM X.9 version with beefier components and offers an upgrade to a coil-over Fox DHX RC4 Kashima shock. The price of our Shimano XT Mojo, upgraded with a KS remote dropper post, and XTR Shadow Plus rear derailleur and a Fox 36 RC2 160 fork is $6100 USD.

Ibis Mojo HD head tube badge chain guide boss polycarbonate downtube protector dw-link graphic.
  (Clockwise) Cast in bronze, the Ibis head-badge accents the Mojo HD's tapered head tube. A look between the crankset and the frame shows the large upper pivot boss where the HD's chainguide mounts. Ibis routes the rear derailleur housing and brake hose under the Mojo's polycarbonate down tube protector. Ibis was a first adopter of the dw-link rear suspension.


Mojo HD frames are made in four sizes (small, medium, large and X-large) and in black/natural, white or ‘Vitamin-P’ green. Ibis chose a 67-degree head angle, but because the frame is optimized a 160 fork. If you need a more DH friendly HD, adding the optional 180-millimeter fork slackens the head tube angle to 66 degrees and raises the bottom bracket slightly. The tapered head tube is a must on bikes in this category as is its provision for a dropper seatpost. Ibis wisely chose easily serviceable external, full-run shift housings and they tuck alongside the brake hoses behind a nice-looking molded-plastic down-tube guard. The HD frame is made in Taiwan by a factory that Ibis has been working with since the first Mojo, so its construction has been optimized and the workmanship is beautiful from every angle. The HD frame weighs only 6.3 pounds with a Fox Float CTD shock. The MSRP for the frame and shock is $2699 USD.

Ibis Mojo HD Fox 36 RLT fork Dual-link rear suspension Stan s NoTubes ZTR Flow rims.
  Three forms of suspension: The addition of the Fox 36 fork made the Mojo HD virtually immune to the imbedded rocks that litter trails in Southern California. The triangulated carbon fiber swingarm of the HD rocks on an overbuilt pair of aluminum links. The short flanges of Stan's ZTR Flow rims free the side-walls of the tire to form a more circular profile - which also adds volume to the tubeless 2.2-inch tires.


Ibis was one of the first bike makers to adopt dw-link rear suspension, which is a patented technical domain that, in the case of the Mojo HD, is applied to a dual-link rear suspension to keep it from compressing with each pedal stroke. Much of the Mojo HD’s magic sprouts from its combination of well-balanced frame geometry and the full-time pedaling efficiency of its rear suspension design. Carbon fiber frames are a living document, and Ibis is constantly revising the sequence and orientation of each layer of carbon fiber to extract more performance at the lowest possible weight. In the case of the Mojo HD, the goal is to make a frame that can withstand downhill punishment, at a weight that results in a bike that can climb happily all day. No small order, but time and persistence have successfully mated those divergent goals into one chassis.

Longevity of the 160-millimeter-travel Ibis rear suspension is enhanced by beefed up links and the addition of doubled-up angular contact bearings in the highly stressed lower link. Ibis makes upkeep easy when the time comes to service the bearings. They sell the complete link with bearings installed for about the price that you’d pay for the bearings over the counter - so it's remove, replace and ride. The rear axle fits 142/12-millimeter options and there is a sturdy, direct-mount option for Shimano Shadow-type rear derailleurs. With its all-mountain and racing intentions, we would expect ISCG tabs at the bottom bracket. Ibis instead furnishes its own MRP design that encircles the bottom bracket cup and securely bolts to the frame through the lower link’s pivot point. The reason for the custom guide is that the placement of the Mojo HD’s lower rocker is dictated by the dw-link metrics, which cause it to interfere with the three-bolt ISCG location. History has proven that the Ibis/MRP guide fares well, but for those who wish for a second option, there is word at e.Thirteen that a Mojo HD guide is in the works there.

Ibis Mojo HD Shimano XTR Shadow Plus derailleur Formula RXO brake KS Lev remote dropper post.
  (From left) Ibis upgraded the Mojo HD to Shimano's Shadow Plus rear derailleur to secure the chain from dropping from the Mojo's unguided triple crankset. We were impressed by the power and feel of the Formula RXO oval-piston brakes. The Mojo's optional five-inch-stroke KS Supernatural dropper post (Ibis normally specs the LEV) was a blessing - most of the time.


Component Highlights

Ibis set up our test bike with its mid-priced Shimano XT kit, which results a build that leans toward the trail-riding side of the Mojo HD’s all-mountain DNA. Wheels were built around Stan's NoTubes ZTR Flow rims that were converted to tubeless. ZTR Flow rims measure only 22.5 millimeters inside-to-inside, which is on the narrow end of AM-width rims, but the ultra-low flanges gave the 2.2-inch Specialized Purgatory tires a rounder profile and a more tactile feel on the dirt. One upgrade to the XT build was its 160-millimeter-stroke Fox 36 RLC fork (The 34 is standard), the second was a KS Remote dropper post – both extras were to be well appreciated during testing.

Odd for a 160-millimeter-travel all-mountain bike like the HD, was its triple crankset. Ibis founder Scott Nicol maintains that, since the Mojo HD used a friction-clutch-equipped Shimano XTR Shadow Plus rear derailleur, there was almost no situation that could derail the chain, so Ibis prefers the lower gearing options of the triple crankset to give riders a leg up on super-steep climbs. The final shout-out goes to the HD’s oval-piston Formula RXO brakes with a 160/180mm rotor combination. The Italian-made stoppers are as powerful as they are beautiful. All said and done, the XT build added to the Mojo’s 6.3-pound frame with its Fox Kashima Factory Float CTD shock comes in one ounce shy of 29 pounds (13.14kg).


Riding the Mojo HD

We tested the Ibis Mojo HD on a variety of terrain, from gravity intensive shuttle sessions to epic trail rides in the mountains. We usually have three to five bikes to choose from and all are pretty sweet rides, but the Ibis was usually the first one missing from the rack when the clock hands pointed to ride thirty. Much of the HD’s popularity is attributable to its easy-mannered handling, which came as a surprise. Usually, when a pro racer like Brian Lopes has a hand in designing a bike, the end result handles more like a highly specific tool than the versatile performer that he helped the Mojo HD become. Riding with Brian, however, and one quickly learns that Lopes is versatile as a mountain bike racer has ever been – and he is a master of the corners. It should then come as no surprise that the Mojo HD mirrors those attributes.

  Harold Preston sends a step-down directly out of a fast left-hander for the first time on the Ibis. The HD required only a few minutes to familiarize with, after which, the only recurring complaint was the narrow 680-millimeter handlebar (Ibis has since upgraded the HD with a 711mm wide handebar). Greg Lambert photo


Setup notes: Fox’s 36 RLC fork and Float shock are well understood and easy to get right. We found that setting the shock at 30-percent sag and the fork at 25-percent returned the most balanced suspension feel between climbing and descending. We also discovered that its ample, 160-millimeter suspension allowed us to use a bit faster rebound setting on both ends for technical trail rides.

Pedaling: No big surprise here; Ibis chose the dw-link suspension configuration specifically because of its anti-bob pedaling action. The Mojo HD can scramble uphill quite well, and it gets going quickly from both a seated and a standing position. While purist XC geeks may protest that the HD’s shock still moves around under power, we think that is a triumph. Ibis mellowed the HD’s ‘anti-squat’ function a bit, which translates to a deeper feeling, more capable rear suspension. By contrast, most dw-link designs we’ve tested feel as if they have less suspension travel than their numbers suggest.

Suspension: We have already mentioned that the Mojo’s rear suspension can soak up a good deal of pounding, but the Float CTD shock was developed for trailbike applications and it will go through its travel with a hard landing or G-out. Those who want true all-mountain/enduro performance may want to take Ibis up on the optional DHX RC4 coil-over shock option. That said; the HD is an easy jumper that can recover from a bad landing like a cat.
While we have not yet had the chance to ride the Mojo HD with its standard 160mm Fox Float 34 CTD fork, we would proffer that the 36 is the better match. The 36 RLC is a relatively lightweight fork, and it is designed to plow through technical rock gardens and suck up nose first landings - and that contributes to the HD’s courage-enhancing manners. If there is no apparent route down a technical section, although it won’t be pretty, a straight line will furnish acceptable results.

Technical handling: With its 67-degree head angle, the Mojo HD is one degree steeper than many of its 2013 competitors. Those who like to carve corners, however, will appreciate the HD’s numbers as they are. Hit the turns hard and the medium-sized chassis tends to carve a tight line. The bike drifts easily when pushed beyond traction and its secure feel at the handlebars encourages its rider to experiment with alternative lines. Braking is powerful and while Formula’s oval-piston calipers deliver a monstrous amount of clamp, the feel at the levers is quite easy to modulate. We liked Formula’s integrated reach adjustment, which can be manipulated with gloved fingers. Configured as a trailbike, the Mojo HD rolls fast and can get enough grip from its Specialized Purgatory Control tires to put in a good performance, but there was always a sense that the bike was limited by its rubber. Switching to more aggressive tires made a pronounced improvement in ultimate turning and braking situations when we were shuttling.

  The Mojo HD is easy around the corners, as one may expect from a bike that was co-designed by the lord of gate racing. Greg Lambert photo


Component Report:

• Wider handlebar: The Mojo HD is spec’ed with a 685-millimeter Easton EA 70 low-rise handlebar, which feels like an XC racing bar by today’s standards. We’d like to see a bar in the 750-millimeter range The HD can be pushed harder than its wimpy bars will allow.
• Two-by crankset: Shimano’s XT triple crankset? Really? After riding a number of quick-reacting two-by and one-by-ten drivetrains, hacking through 30 gear options makes the Mojo feel more like a truck.
• Derailleur clutches: We appreciated the upgrade to Shimano’s Shadow Plus rear derailleur, we only dropped a chain twice throughout six months of testing, so it could be argued that its friction clutch can be used in lieu of a proper chain guide – but we still dropped the chain.
• Dropper blues: The KS Supernatural remote dropper seatpost operated perfectly for three months, after which, it randomly failed to reach full extension. We should note that a poor-performing dropper post may be better than none at all, but the spotty performance of most droppers, including the popularly priced KS, is inexcusable this late in the game.


Pinkbike's take:
bigquotes As a hard-driving technical trailbike, the Mojo HD is such a standout performer in the Ibis range that we wonder how or what they will have to come up with to supersede it? The Mojo HD chassis feels far more rigid and precise than its XC predecessor and regardless of the resemblance, it feels from the outset like a completely new design. The HD weighs a couple of pounds more than the original Mojo in similar trim, but it accelerates much faster out of the turns and climbs nearly as well. Like all of the most desired bikes in the AM/trail category, the Mojo HD is centrally balanced and it always seems to have enough handling in reserve to encourage its rider to push harder or to try a new line. If you are a 26-inch-wheel devotee seeking the mythical 'one bike to rule them all,' the Mojo HD certainly has earned the credentials. We'd recommend the HD to anyone who is taking a serious look at Enduro racing as well.- RC

201 Comments

  • + 101
 Dear Santa...
  • + 59
 ....I want coal for Christmas
  • + 45
 you mean rich mom and dad
  • + 31
 I'd settle for a medium sized lottery win
  • + 12
 I bought one of these back in June, and it changed my life. I have been riding and racing since 1998 and this is the best all-around bike I've ever ridden. Just saying.
  • + 7
 Im with Scott, just saying...
  • + 12
 Good point Mnorris. Scot Nicol is a friend of mine and a kick ass bike rider, so I trust his advice. I took the bike how Ibis wanted it set up. The XT triple, with its wider range of options is still a great option for a trail riding. After the test was over, though, we agreed that the hard-charging nature of the HD would been a better match for a double or single-chainring drivetrain. RC
  • - 3
 i adore my SL and will not buy an HD for an extra inch. It has a 36 and rides sweet
  • + 5
 Wait.... what do you mean "rich mom and dad?" D: @thebillygoat6000
  • + 1
 I haven't ridden the SL madmon, but based on this article I have to assume that there are far more differences in the bikes than simply and extra inch of travel. Maybe you wouldn't buy an HD when you already have an SL, but who would spend that kind of money to own two such similar bikes?
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  • + 25
 Happy to see the Mojo HD get some attention (and a positive review) from PinkBike! I have had my Mojo HD for 2 years now, and I can't think of one other enduro-style bike I would rather have. This bike is a true "do it all" enduro/trailbike. The frame design is beautiful, timeless, and I really can't imagine ever selling it.
  • + 1
 Totally agree with ya, I'm gone for a few happy years with mine ==> ed91.pinkbike.com/album/Ibis-Mojo-HD-160-2011
  • + 2
 Yeah, got mine early this Spring, made me a MUCH better rider. Took it to Northstar and hit Livewire... OMG, heaven! sphotos-b.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ash4/457965_10150731292819558_974004238_o.jpg
  • + 2
 @apensity, wow you're right ,it looks like heaven
  • + 3
 I agree with the HD being beautiful, jdcatch.. When I first saw it a couple years ago, I thought it was ugly as fuck! But then one day something just clicked in my brain, and it was like Ohhh.. I get it now! Sexy bike!
  • + 1
 Absolutely. I ride a lot as it is, and this bike actually made me want to ride more than I did already. Plus, I've never got so much attention on the trail based on what I was riding than my HD, which is never a bad thing Razz
  • + 1
 Same here...3 seasons on it now, was actually fortunate to have the very first nude carbon (it was a "paint sample" apparently) a couple months before more came out. Wow has my riding improved over the last few seasons, so stoked. FAST on the ups, FASTER on the downs. For next season I'm not sure what I'm going to do because its time to start replacing too many parts and I think I've seen the 29er light, uh oh! The SCTBLTc would be one fast Enduro racer. That said I want to stick with Ibis as their service has been ****in' phenomenal and will probably wait until they come out with some long travel 27"er because I'm definitely sold on bigger wheels.

Isn't it amazing that with minimal changes over three seasons and new product reviews are STILL coming out gushing all over the HD!!!
  • + 1
 robnow, you could 27.5 your current HD.. You'd lose a little travel in the 160 mode, but still. No need to leave what ya got!
  • + 1
 Yeah, but its a compromise. You can only fit the smaller of the rubber available, I definitely want the bigger rubber, i.e. the Schwalbe Nobby Nics or Hans Dampf don't fit, and I need some mud clearance. Also, the geometry isn't ideally designed around the 650b, although I should say in 140 mode the numbers look decent enough.
  • + 1
 robnow, bet I got an even earlier "paint sample" nude carbon as mine has black on black (barely visible design) so I ended up putting an Ibis sticker to have some signage Smile

yeah amazing bike - sold my regular mojo and my DH bikes after I got this one does it all (Northstar one day, XC the next with light wheelset)

i47.tinypic.com/2mdkpkx.jpg
i47.tinypic.com/2vaf2na.jpg
  • + 1
 adumesny, beginning of June/10. Saw your pic on TGR and didn't even notice the HD, Tahoe looks beaut, GOOD TIMES!!
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  • + 21
 So when is there going to be an Ibis Dh bike ?Smile
  • + 1
 YEEEAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAH !!!!!
  • - 2
 Lopes won the air dh with it, so I think it's gonna stay as a light dh bike
  • + 12
 ... though Stevie won it this year - with the Devinci Dixon Carbon...
  • + 2
 I emailed Ibis about the possibility of a DH bike and they said no. Not in the foreseeable future. They recommended Pivot Phoenix or Giant Glory.
  • + 1
 It's called the Santa Cruz V-10 Carbon. Or the Nomad Carbon (with extended rear travel link) Wink They look somewhat similar you know?

Hell, you probably can put a Dual-Crown on the Ibis HD and drop the crowns a bit to make the Axle-to-Crown equal to a 180mm fork (only need to drop less than a 1", compared to Fox 36 Van 170-180mm vs. White Bro's Inverted Groove). It would be the exact same height/geo but with a 200mm fork (when you slid the crowns), and I'm sure it can handle light/grooved DH alright.
  • + 3
 Yeah, they've sort of gotten "lucky" by having Lopes help design them ONE bike in their line to "do it all"... It's clearly a testament to how well they did designing it that it works for everything from Trail-riding to Mini-DH aye... but I'd like to see some more expansion of the line cuse as of right now the HD is the ONLY Ibis that holds any interest to me personaly. It does hold quite a bit of interest though Wink , still, I'd really like to see a longer travel rig and a proper DH bike, but then they don't really have the "team" to need one do they??? With Lopes and the Euro Enduro killers out there rockin the HD I can see why they've forgone making multiple bikes. It's sure led to a very VERY good single bike aye. Clearly focus leads to quality products.
  • + 2
 I agree with what you said about focusing on the one bike. I believe it's truly to make ONE single amazing bike then 3+ average, mediocre bikes. Quality > Quantity.
  • + 2
 I have seen one of these set up with a Fox 40 (reduced to 7" of travel) and a low stack height, and built as a kind of light-duty dh bike, and the thing looked like it would RIP. Based on my HD (with a Talas 180) and how well it descends already, I can't imagine how fun a setup like that would be.
  • + 1
 @SpicyMike: that's pretty much what I was thinking...they've clearly made ONE bike that can do nerly everything... SOME companies have 10 bikes that can "kind of" do one thing well... I say Ibis is onto something. Maybe make an 8" version of the Mojo with a little lower standover, but they've NAILED the recipet for a killer bike so why dilute the gene pool and take away from the focus of making the Mojo what it is: A total ripper for everything BUT maybe full on DH racing...

@ScottRallye: I would LOVE to have seen that...sounds like one hell of a bike aye. PLus one fork swap and youve got the same killer "AM machine" you started out with... I'm not at all interested in Ibis's other bikes, but the Mojo HD sure has me smitten aye.
  • + 1
 Seriously, I mean it already is specced for a 180mm fork which infers to some light DH capability. If I were them, just saying for a DH version, I would just increase the rear travel either by making the links larger (expanding the frame) or retrofit some kind of extension on the top link. Then just add 1mm of extra CF inside and out on the general stress points.
  • + 2
 I think its pretty rad of Ibis to suggest other companys' DH bikes rather than just say, get the HD and be happy with that.
  • + 1
 @six66: Where has Ibis done this??? Not questioning your statement, just really interested in that little tidbit aye. Were they recomneding any specific bike or just to "Look to another company for a full-on DH bike" kind of thing???
  • + 2
 THey reccomended the giant glory or the pivot pheonix.
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  • + 7
 About the seat post: it's not a LEV on the pics but another model from KS. Popularly priced??? Dunno for the US but in Switzerland the KS LEV's more expensive than a RS Reverb 8-(
  • + 3
 That was the first thing I noticed (being a LEV owner).
The LEV has a bottom clamp, not a top (moving) clamp like the one pictured.
My LEV has been problem free since I bought it.
  • + 1
 my lev has cable issues all the time
  • + 7
 ...I like my reverb.....
  • + 1
 Think it says right off in the review that they spec'd the Supernatural versus the "usual LEV"... I've heard nothing but praise for the LEV so it sounds like they sort of shot themselves in the foot spec'ing the SN aye. KS's own site says somethign to the tune of "we know we make the most expensive post on the market..." so it's not like they're hiding the price of their gear I will say though that they have the WIDEST line of droper posts I've ever seen from a company (their Hybrid Coil/Air shock is kind intreaguing too aye...) IF the quality and longevity were there across the board they'd be unstopable, but it appears tht the LEV is their priciest for a reason. The Old 950i is the only one I've had any exp. with and it wasn't great... being in the market for a new build over the winter though, I'm really looking hard at the LEV (I really like the sleek look of their remote lever -vs- the reverb's "waiting to have your knee break it off" plunger... although I hear the Reverb is the elephants danglies aye so I might have to try it... I'm still used to the "non-remote" versions anyway)

EDIT: NM, RC corrected the model name at some point...
  • + 1
 its weird they didn't give RC the usual spec for the review, anybody know why? reviewers aren't people you cheap out on...
  • + 1
 RC replied to someone's post that he got a "build suggested to him by another rider..." (something to that effect) and that's why the drivetrin was as it was... Maybe that's the reason fo the post change too??? I know I wouldn't own one of these bikes and run a tripple ring (hell I haven't ridden anything more then 2 rngs - and mostly just ONE- in over ten years), I'd have it set-up as a 1x10-11 personaly. Maybe a 2x now that they've really stepped up the design of the two ring guides (still hate Front Der.s/shifters though... SO used to not having much on that left side fo the bars aye Wink It just seems so strange now days to have to mess with a shifter on the left side... With as light as this bike is and as truly "do it all" as it can be built for long travel and all, a Hammerschmidt would be sweet... No front Der's to have interfere with the linkage and what not (course the HS seems to be a "love hate thing" and I've never ridden one so maybe I WOULDN'T want one but on paper it sure seems like THE answer... Or a Gear-box Smile !!!!!
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  • + 5
 This bike is a weapon! Got one in the spring, came off a Iron Horse 6 point 6. The more I ride the more I love it, worth every penny! I now ride further and more frequently, no other bike has done that for me. I ride it mainly CC, but taken it thru the DH park many times, and actually preferred it over my Sunday for it's snappy agile prowess. Life changer. Been riding mountain bike since '88
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  • + 4
 the only problem with this bike, as I know it in real life, is that it's extremely noisy while riding
doesn't sound healthy at all...
I wonder why this isn't mentioned in any test, did you experience any sort of creaking or noisiness?
  • + 7
 No creaking after winter spring and summer of 2012. One of us got lucky?
RC
  • + 1
 Mine creaked incessantly. I ALWAYS traced the creak back to some peripheral component - seat rails, chain ring bolts, loose rear axle, shock bolts. Never was pivots.The frame seems to amplify creak-age.
  • + 4
 why am I getting neg props for this? haha
amplifying is the obvious explanation I think
after some reading I discovered on a german site that the chainguide solution made some noise during their test
but even the old mojo seems to be a rather loud bike, probably a disadvantage of monocoque + carbon
  • + 2
 any bike that gets ridden will creak at some point or all points.
  • + 1
 Why complain about neg props?

Those who did it may just not agree with what you say, which is perfectly reasonable.
  • + 4
 you're right, never saw it this way
more like the "he's talking bullsh*t"- button Wink
  • + 5
 I rode with a guy on one and it was really wierd... it was pretty much SILENT on the downhills but had some creaking at the linkage on the climbs back up (at Blackrock it's a straight climb up a fire-road a lot of the time so you hear things pretty clearly)... it was nothing like the Norco VPS "Beer-Can" of old or the famed early SC Nomads w/o the zirc grease ports but it sure was odd to hear it creak that way. I have NO idea what the riders "maintinence schedule" is like and certainly it could come down to a link that just hadn't been hit with a greese gun. I will say that the Carbon acted like a drum though, maybe it even amplified it like the mentioned Norco's Monococque used to do??? Either way, I def. heard some creaking... But I was jealous as hell of the bike so maybe I was making it up to make myself feel better Wink hahahahahahaha. Sure was an AWESOME bike aye. Handled all the chunder and hits on the way down but pedaled up like an XC bike (his had the 180mm Fork too Drool )
  • + 1
 I have ridden mine hard for several months now, and it's the most silent bike I've ever owned. I can't get over it in fact. I expected that "rocks in an empty can" effect that some hydroformed aluminum designs have, and it's absolutely absent.
  • + 4
 I had creaking in mine but dis-assembled over a winter and greased all surfaces. Silent for two seasons. Best 45 minutes I ever spent. Okay let me rephrase that. Best 45 minutes I ever spent trouble-shooting a creaking bike.
  • + 1
 3rd season now on the HD and the only "creaking" issues stem around seatpost and forks. Remember with the seatpost to use carbon paste and to tighten enough. Unfortunately I don't run a dropper post and every ride because they're all climbs to downhills I end up dropping at least twice if not more per ride so seat post and tube have worn down a little and I need to tighten seatpost binder more to avoid creaking. My Fox 36 started creaking this season.
  • + 1
 @robnow, have you tried loctite 290 on the crown to stanchion (above and below) and/or crown to steerer interface? Apply, jiggle the forks, leave for a while, wipe excess off. Solved my vanilla creak problem.
  • + 1
 @jzPV and @jiMEG my hd developed a creak after about a 1 year of riding....greased the thru axle maxle (which was bone dry) and the creaking went away. creaking is not a frame issue on this bike. grease your bolts, pedals threads, carbon paste your carbon post and bar and your hd will be quiet. a shadow plus derailleur with the button in the "ON" position will also ensure to put you to sleep while riding down the trails or up if you are slow.
  • + 0
 Very noisy bike indeed. It's on par with the old Dogbone link on the GT XCR series. I remember having to replace something in that assembly on an hourly basis.
  • + 1
 @singletrackslayer: You are saying you have to replace or service a Mojo HD on an hourly basis? I find that extremely hard to believe.
  • + 3
 whoever is saying nonsense about the HD is saying it because they wish they had one or some tiff against reasonably priced carbon full suspension frames. the @ singletrackslayer was hearing his inproperly cut chain rattle in his shimano slx drivetrain while slapping against his shoes.
  • + 1
 I think that SIngletrackslayer was refering to another frame having to have one of it's "dogbone" links replaced, not the Ibis... hell I can't imagine enough people can afford to or DO in fact own one of these mazing bikes enough to have that type of service issue.... PLus something tels me if Ibis ound out their frames were "eating" parts, they'd offer a fix...they sure seem like they've done their homework aye. Sicklines build of their HD ws just plain....well SICK, I don't care for several aspects of the buid in this review, but the frame ain't one of them Wink I'd want a shorter stem and a 1 or 2x set-up for starters...
  • + 2
 one of my only gripes with mine was the bar/stem combo it ships with. just like the review says, my stem was too long and the bars too narrow. I replaced them with gravity light stem and BooBars and love the setup.
  • + 1
 the ec70xc is the wrong bar for the hd and even for the mojo SLR. too narrow unless you got narrow shoulders and body....i changed mine to easton haven carbon ...
[Reply]
  • + 4
 To add a piece of info RC left out... Scot Nicol has officially said the Mojo HD swingarm is 650B compatible (with existing 2012 available tires like the NeoMoto 2.3 / Nevegal 2.35). The HD140 needs no modifications, the HD160 requires a compression limiter inside the shock to reduce the maximum travel... otherwise the tire will smack the back of the seattube. One of the pricing options includes X-Fusion shock and Vengence fork, and the Vengence is also 650B compatible officially without modifications.
[Reply]
  • + 3
 Great bike. Spent two seasons on one with a coil. The coil greatly improves the downhill performance of this firm riding suspension design. I had a seat stay crack in a crash with another rider. Ibis crash replaced it for $350 plus shipping. The bike is well built, and has good geometry. The geo is getting a little dated though. An updated version should have a slacker HA, lower BB and shorter chain stays. Looking forward to V2.0.
[Reply]
  • + 3
 so looks like they put a lesser KS' style post on the bike, call it the wrong name and then slate it for poor performance....!! maybe if you fitted it with a KS LEV you would of had the reliability you wanted.... and you would also of got rid of that horrid cable loop when the post is dropped... WIN - WIN
  • + 2
 Noted and corrected. Ibis offers the LEV option, but substituted the KS Supernatural for our test bike. RC
[Reply]
  • + 3
 With a quick ctrl F search, Santa Claus is mentioned 3 times more than Santa Cruz. I don't think we need to go back to the days of constant shootouts, but this review would benefit from more comparisons to the other popular 160mm carbon frames out there.
[Reply]
  • + 3
 Year and a half on mine, and I'm still loving it. I've changed the stock RP23 to Vivid R2C coil and there is no way I'm going back to air again.. Right now, I'm halfway to my dream build unluckypete.com/2012/09/project-ibis-mojo-hd-evo/#photos
  • + 1
 Just try a BOS Vip'r .... it could change your mind !!!
  • + 3
 tupa that's a beautiful bike you have there! so jealous
[Reply]
  • + 2
 Shortsighted to complain about stock spec w/ a triple: you can use the very same parts to run 3x10, ring bash 2x10 guide, ring bash 1x10 guide, or taco bash 1x10 guide. If you want something more particular, you'll doubtless be buying it yourself anyway. The triple give decent choices for the cost of a few washers, rather than lock the buyer into a dedicated 2x10 and the questionable guides available for them.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 btw, the rider, harry, is a san diego local and is a dedicated rider. he has a small business selling small items such as the iMountainBike t's and socks he's sporting in the pics, which i imagine are virtually unknown anywhere outside this area. can't afford an ibis? no matter, add a little mojo to your flow

website: wwwimountainbiketrailscom.businesscatalyst.com/index.html

cool vids too.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 I'm on year 2 of mine. Several hundred hours of BC and PNW riding. No complaints! One thing that should have been mentioned is the 140mm configuration for the HD. The snappier feel and low BB are worth it. I have the Fox 36 and Elka coil for Whistler, and a Revelation WC and Float for all of my other riding, including Shore. 30lb shredder with DH tires, or 26 lbs AM shredder for everything else. It really does feel like an XC bike in 140mm without giving up too much. Also, the actual (unsagged) headangle measures slightly slacker than advertised. As well, E-thirteen does now sell the TRs+ chainguide for the Mojo.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I love my Mojo HD. IMO, what sets it apart from most of its competitors is its stable handling while turning. One wheel drift, two wheel drift, it doesn't matter. The bike always feels predictable when pushing. Its almost like a grown man's slalom bike. While different riding styles gravitate to different bikes, this has been my favorite ride in the nearly 20 years I have been riding. Having said that, the suspension on the Mojo is not as plush feeling as some other designs. That hasn't held me back and it seems to work really well through rock gardens. However, it does spook people who are used to highly active suspension designs.
  • + 1
 Which bikes are some of the more plusher feeling bikes? Im in the market for a new AM bike and got to demo a HD and loved it. Im coming off a trek remedy with a fox 32 150, and looking for somthing a little beefier for more technical terrain. The HD was very stiff and I loved the feel of the fox 36 compared to the 32 on my remedy. Also looking at a rocky mountain slayer, trek slash and specialized enduro. Havent got to ride any of these bikes and wondering how they compare to the HD? The slayer 70 seems like a good deal. Anyone got to ride any of these bikes and know how they compare to the HD? Thanks
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Not sure why they would even offer a 3x10 on this bike or any bike for that matter, yes including 9ers. Pretty much every demo I have ridden this year has a 3x10 on it. I run either a 1x10 or a 2x10 on my trail bike, and I found all the extra gears to be redundant on the demos. Then for some reason I can't seem to ever find the right gear with the 3x10. I find my self constantly shifting. It seems everyone I talk to who has ridden a 3x10 setup agrees that all those gears are just not necessary.
I regularly climb 20%plus grades here in Colorado with my 27-40 crank and 11-36 cassette. This setup is low enough to spin up the steepest of climbs and I have yet to spin it out on the dirt. Just for speed reference here in Colorado it's pretty easy to find your self hitting 30-40mph on the downhills.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Bought mine last summer after a frame glich with my el Guapo. Afetr a year of tweaking & testing I gotta say I couldn't be happier. Climbs like a squirrel on crack & comes down like thunder (or as on buddy commented " Sounded like a bull moose in heat coming down the trail"). Interesting that the changes recommended by the author are almost spot on to the changes I've made. Wider, higher rise bars, 2x10 setup, reverb dropper post. Love my Mojo!!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I'm in the market for a AM/Enduro style bike been looking at all the different companies but just stumbled across Mojo! Amazing looking bike and there is a shop about 20 miles from where I work...... Guess where I'm going tomorrow :-)
I currently have a Marin Mount Vision 1997 model. Things have changed a little since I bought that bike new in 1996.
I was pretty much sold on either a Nukeproof or Mondraker but my head has been turned! Can't wait to try one of these out.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I have been lucky enough to build on of these gorgeous bikes recently, but with some changes from the original built kit.
Replace 3x10 to XT 2x10 with a shadow + rear derailleur, reverb dropper, Chris king head set, renthal fatbar 780, renthal stem, hope M4 brakes, stans ZTR flow ex tubeless on Chris king hubs with Hans Dampf 2.35, gobi xm carbon seat and rails and the soon addition of a Chris king ceramic bottom bracket.
Take a look
My opinion the perfect all round bike you can build and looks amazing!!!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Hey guys, I know there's been no posts for a while but I was hoping some of you experienced riders could offer some advice? Long story short, I just got hooked on MTB big time a few months back and decided to upgrade the existing "hardly ridden" $700 Merida and with the usual confusion.. "what the hell do you choose" 29er 650B yada yada... one of the guys I ride with his buddy can't ride any more with stuffed back and offer me his Ibis Mojo HD (hardly ridden) for under 3k.. he paid 8k so I said yes thinking this was stupid to pass up... The dilemma is I'm thinking 26er is the wrong move and people are saying you should have gone 29er! ...You're no spring chicken and the HD is for serious skilled riders!
  • + 1
 An ibis mojo is capable of so much more than any 29er. Don't buy into the hype. You would be a fool to pass up a mojo hd for under 3000.
  • + 1
 Thanks for the vote of confidence, I did buy it and it's awesome! Now just need to get some riding chops happening ;-)
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Nice review, unfortunately after owning one of these for just over a year I would have to disagree with the review on the quality of the bike. Since purchasing the bike in may of last year the bike has spend many days and cost an exorbitant amount of money (on top of the already heavy price tag) to fix. Everything from component (Ibis labelled hubs) and pivots all have required extensive work. Worst is the customer service that folks at ibis have provided.... In the end, save some cash and buy something with a smaller price tag, proven reliability and a builder who stands behind their product. Certainly contact me if you have any questions!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 this bike is epic i got mine last month and i would never look back the bike is a animal down single tracks and for a 160mm travel bike it goes up hill nicely i love it and yes i agree with having wide bars i got renthal fatbars on mine !!!!!!! I LOVE IT !!!!!!!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I'm not usually a big fan of RC's view points or review "theorys" over the years, but I gotta admit, he nailed this one pretty dam well. Great review RC and awesome bike. We'd all be lucky to have one of these in the stable...

I'm really interested that it came spec'd with Specialized Tires... I know that they've had some great tires over the last few yers, but they sure don't seem to be a typical choice for builds (esp. not their AM tires to my knowledge). Does Ibis have some sort of connection with the Big S or something??? For some reason I can't seem to shake this feeling that I've read somewhere that they do??? I could be wrong, it's not the first time it's happened today Wink I know it's unpopular these days to say the N-word, but I'd run Nevegals F/R on it... haven't found a better tire for the NW yet IMO. Man this bike is the stuff that DREAMS are made of (minus the tripple ring set-up) aye. Seems liek the only things it can't do would be WC XC and DH racing and maybe the Rampage. Everything else... giver!!!! Ibis really nailed it aye.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Framegeometry looks really dated, no Chainguide, 3 Rings (!!!!). Painful Formula brakehandles. Narrow handlebar. Substitute parts.
Design looks very klunky.
Looks like one more push from Ibis to clear the existing stock and then announce the replacement bike.
  • + 1
 You might be surprised that the "dated" geometry works fantastic. Have you ridden one?
  • + 1
 Dated geometry? More than I care... Riding 62-63 degree headangles and want more slack... My Absolut SX runs 65 degree and 120mm, twitchy fun on short and angly tracks but not for a longday of riding
  • + 1
 Switched to the HD after 2 S-Works Enduros (which I loved). I love the HD even more. Climbs like a champ, descends even better. I think this is less a push by Ibis, than a genuine response by the PB staff. They had it for 6 months, and said it was often the first bike to disappear at ride-30. I can believe that. I even got mine out of the garage this evening just to ride it down the driveway and loop around in the street and back up the driveway. It makes me smile even catching it out of the corner of my eye. My dream bike for sure.
Not quite one bike to rule them all though... I do also have a trials bike and a road bike...
  • + 1
 In Japanese, わかば wakaba is used to refer to either new leaves or a new driver. I've got a pair of wakaba magnetized marks on the door of my classroom; all new drivers in Japan are required to have these on their cars for the first year after they get their license. Fun to see the word here on pinkbike.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Glad to see Richard Cunningham is writing and Riding again. Great review, I agree about the tires, upgraded to beefier tires. I suspect they pick the tires based on weight , or lack there of. I demo'ed the bike and knew I had to get one.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Richard Cunningham....THE TEA BAG EATER! (Sprung fans will know what im talking about!). Awesome bike BTW, a mate has one and it stood up to the Alps this year with no issues at all. The first one he had did develop hairline cracks from the riveted cable guides though. IBIS has excellent customer service though, it was replaced FOC within 2 weeks.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Im in the market for a new AM bike and got to demo a HD and loved it. Im coming off a trek remedy with a fox 32 150, and looking for somthing a little beefier for more technical terrain. The HD was very stiff and I loved the feel of the fox 36 compared to the 32 on my remedy. Also looking at a rocky mountain slayer, trek slash and specialized enduro. Havent got to ride any of these bikes and wondering how they compare to the HD? The slayer 70 seems like a good deal. Anyone got to ride any of these bikes and know how they compare to the HD? Thanks
[Reply]
  • + 3
 Amazing bike capible of more than most human can put down. Great video of our local hero A Dub riding the SH&t out of this bike in JH, WY USA

vimeo.com/31175717
  • + 1
 and it is HD so you know it is better quality! rumors of 3D coming soon!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Now I've hot a dropper post dilemma. Mountain Bike Action said that the post was perfectly reliable, and was given a 5-star rating, and now from this test I'm hearing about some problems. This decision just got a whole lot harder. Anyone have good luck with a specific dropper post?
  • + 22
 Stop reading Mountain Bike Action.
  • + 1
 @chainsawGeoff

I use a ks dropzone since spring. Reliable and no problems at all - also use it for 2 enduro races (specialzed enduroseries - enduroseries.net) and after some crashes there was never a problem. Does what it should and was by far the cheapest one with a handlebar remote.

Perfect solution for me and no problems so far
  • + 2
 If you read some of the other comments down here you'll see that the dropper post used isn't a ks lev but actually a lower spec one Look where the cable goes, the lev connects in the middle not at the top. So the lev should be reliable. And if you're that worried get a reverb
  • + 1
 CG - what's up dude? Aren't you from Texas? I still have your jumpercables.
  • + 2
 I've been using a KS for over two years, zero problems. I would like a new LEV, but my old 950r just keeps on keepin on. imo, KS and reverb are the best options.
  • + 2
 KS i900 is problem free, wiggles a bit but not noticeable when riding, and it goes with my red colour scheme.
  • + 1
 @listeryu

nothing against the KS post, just the whole MBA thing.

@p-dub-4

Yeah I'm from Texas, but I moved to China a few months ago for a year. And you do have my jumper cables! I'll get them back when I go to SF next year.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 The bike I thought I would love when I tested it.... I was not disappointed.
The only bike that came close (and was possibly better on my short test) was the SB66 which I never thought I would love.
  • + 1
 how did the SB66 compare on the descents?
  • + 1
 both bikes were very capable on the descents. The SB66 was only fitted with the long travel 32mm Fox fork, but it still managed to handle the descents very well. Where they both worked was on pumping off of back sides on rocky terrain to carry or gain speed. The descent was purely on feel, the climbing was on cleaning technical sections. It would be interesting to have both bikes for longer and get the opportunity to do some timed runs on them. I am not a fan of judging a bikes descending capability on feel, as some feel very nice, but only because you are going so much slower.
  • + 1
 That is probably true, but for me its about which bike I have the most fun on, not which bike I have the best timed run on.
  • + 1
 I had a SB66a and decided I wanted to try a carbon frame. I was able to borrow a buddys MojoHD and I spent a lot of time on it. I really really wanted to love this boke but it didn't compare the the SB66 for my style of riding, aggressive AM Enduro, steep rock gardens, drops, etc. especially going down. As a trail bike it pedaled well and handled tight switchbacks very well, maybe better than the SB66, but once pointed down the SB66 really outclassed it. The SB66 has this low locked in feeling, like you''re in the bike, where the Mojo felt like you were on top of it and definitely needed a lot of rider input to keep the same lines as the SB66. The MOjo felt like a long travel trail bike.
  • + 1
 I havent rode the SB66 but its hard to believe a bike with a 32 150 fork feels better on descents than a bike with a 36 160. Seems like the 36 would be quite stiffer feeling than a 32. I guess I need to demo more bikes. I have rode a trek slash but it didnt feel as dialed as the Mojo. Maybe the suspention wasnt properly set up but the Mojo felt more plush and dialed once pointed down. Would also like to ride a Rocky Mountain slayer 70, and specialized enduro to compare to the Mojo HD. Anyone rode either of these and know how they compare to the Mojo?
  • + 1
 Mine has a 160mm fork.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 Which would you choose: Ibis Mojo HD or Transition Covert Carbon, for trail/AM use and occasional bike park weekends with a coil?
  • + 1
 good question .... i'm throwing the specialized enduro and the new cube stereo also into the pot! ....I'd rather go with the covert...amazing looks and cock and balls tech is as good as it gets! Big Grin
  • + 6
 DW link is far superior to single pivot. Go with the Ibis.
  • + 1
 Even with cock and balls technology out there, I'm for the DW link. Sorry Sam-squatch.
  • + 2
 It took a PUSH tuned Vivid coil with a fair amount of sag to get my HD to ride smooth, glued and squatty. It's a firm, high riding suspension design.

I'd seriously look into the 2013 S Works Enduro with a DB Air if I were you though. It's a little slacker, a little lower and a little shorter in the rear end - more of your modern "enduro/AM" bike geometry.

The HD is starting to show it's age regarding geometry - that being said it is still a great trail bike though.

The timing of this article is interesting. The HD has been around for quite a while(in bike model time), and Ibis recently posted in MTBR a request for 5 new bike ideas. Is this the HD Swan Song we are reading here, PB?
  • + 4
 Everyone needs the lasted geo I guess;-) I also think the word of the last five years in MTBing is 'plush'. The fact is the Mojo is a firm snappy bike with good control and manners. It's a fast bike. Not everybody wants this trait. As well, it may have longish chain stays but it's shorter than a Nomad, it's close competitor. With an angleset, my HD is 66.5 in the 140 mode with a Revelation WC with a really nice low BB...65.5 in 160mm mode with a Fox36. The Whister 'Nomads' were killing the local races, and the Oregon Enduro series on TRc's. Aren't they 68 degree head angles? It's the rider!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 yo tengo un mojo hd con 135x12 de rueda trasera ,le he puesto una direccion de 1,5% + =65,5% y le voy a poner uma marzocchi 55 rc3 evo ti de170mm con un roco atra como ira eso
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I've spent some quality time with a mojo sl. Great bike, I'm sure the HD is too, but the chainstay would be too long for my style of riding. 16.5" to 16.8" shainstay is where it's at for a super fun ride.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Ya the mojo hd is exactly what i would buy if had the $$$$. That dw link is the best and ibis did great job on the frame. Not sure about 180mm fork but hey ibis put me on one of those!
  • + 1
 While everything depends on personal opinions and on skills, I love my 180 Talas in my HD! I throw a lot of work at this fork and it copes with everything amazingly.
  • + 1
 Ya i see the frame weighs 6.3 lbs with rear shock so that pretty burly construction. 29lbs complete with 160-180 travel is perfect. My current a.m. setup is exact same weights but only 140mm of fsr travel. Bottom line I would pedal to the moon on that rig!!!!! Gimme one of those ibis so i can really mojo in hd.
[Reply]
  • + 4
 i loved this guy in happy days
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Love my IBIS, has amazing geo, eats downhill and literally sucks up the trail on the ups, incredible design and looks stunning Smile

Ifoundmymojo.pinkbike.com/album/Ibis-Mojo-HD-160
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Great article Richard! It was fun to meet you again on the trail yesterday. You got the article posted fast! Let's hear it for grey beards!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I should add that the cable mounting on top of the Mojo is a bit lame. I wish they had just used molded cable guides like they do on the SL-R.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 The Ibis Mojo HD was awesome to ride, total time rolling on the bike was about 30 minutes, I got comfortable quickly. A few more days would have been fun!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Magnificent review of the Mojo HD! This bike is looking great. I have wanted one since it was just rumors. Thank you for the wonderful story! RideOn!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Did you address the seat post issues? What did you do to fix?

I will be buying a post shortly and just want to be prepared for the added maintenance.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 Would like to see one with SixPack WHITE Leader handlebars. That would make my day www.sixpack-shop.ca
[Reply]
  • + 1
 That test rider looks like one of those 80-year-old fake tan dudes from LA who are fighting for their lives to look under-40. Or Kato Kalin.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Got mine this year too - it is an awesome bike!
a href="http://www.pinkbike.com/photo/8816872/?s6">http://www.pinkbike.com/photo/8816872/?s6 /a>
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Sounds like an awesome bike. I'd put a cane creek angleset and slacken the headangle to 66º with 160mm fork and it'd be perfect!
[Reply]
  • + 2
 If I had the money this would be my dream bike, love it in white too !!! Smile
[Reply]
  • + 1
 "...but the Ibis was usually the first one missing from the rack when the clock hands pointed to ride thirty."

Love that phrase
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Love my HD, great geometry, eats the downs and sucks up the ups, looks fantastic Smile

Ifoundmymojo.pinkbike.com/album/Ibis-Mojo-HD-160
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Where did you get the KS cable protector (under the saddle)? I need that! On those really nasty days they stop working in no time...:-(
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I just put my second ride on my brand new med Mojo HD 650B. It is amazing, full story is here forums.mtbr.com/650b/mojo-hd-650-build-815365.html
[Reply]
  • + 1
 so there is a ibis mojo HD refresh/upgrade or refined bike coming out from Ibis soon?????????????????????????? what????????
[Reply]
  • + 2
 "Got my Mojo work'in" {Howoll'in Wolf}
[Reply]
  • + 0
 "a poor-performing dropper post may be better than none at all"
I disagree with that, no way I would go out for a ride with a poor performing seatpost.
[Reply]
  • - 1
 Seen 2 frames come cracked out of the box...keep an eye on your seat tubes! Major production issue of 2011. Whistler rep. claimed that's NORMAL and denied production issues....Just throwing it out there!
  • + 2
 denied???? I know of a guy that wasn't sure if his had a crack or if it was just the paint cracking. Ibis took the triangle back no questions asked! It turns out it was just the paint Lol!
  • + 1
 Who is the Whistler rep? I wouldn't mind getting his feedback on those denials. I didn't think Ibis had Reps though, as they are Dealer Direct..........
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I made the multi-thousand dollar mistake of riding one on my favorite local trails and had to have one. Love mine to death.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Hoy a set of bos devilles on and it's the ultimate bike, IMO. Well just have a look at mine... Mmm
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Got to go with the Crank Brothers wheelset. www.pinkbike.com/photo/8826271
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I think this is my favourite looking bike - i'll take mine in green please!
[Reply]
  • + 2
 Fuckin love my HD. Best bike I've ever ridden.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 Those Troy Lee Designs ruckus shorts are nice.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Expensive But Was Worth Every Penny Big Grin
Can't see me ever needing another bike
[Reply]
  • + 1
 The Mojo SLR is the most recent Mojo, not the HD. Killer bike, awesome customer service.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 680mm bar is small for an XC bike. Hard to believe this bike came with a narrow bar. It needs a CHROMAG dashboard.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 What a great bike. Now all they need to do is offer a proper XL with a 25"+ top tube please.
  • + 3
 see SB-66c
[Reply]
  • + 1
 THat thing needs a sexy rider to go with it... santa better bring it to me.
[Reply]
  • + 0
 Just a little advertising to the Mojo users wanting for a slacker (steeper but why) angle up front ==> www.pinkbike.com/buysell/1207408
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Take a look at my Mojo HD She is a beauty!!!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 for the price they didnt put a RS reverb? WTF
  • + 1
 And it's not even the KS LEV as the text says
  • + 3
 that's what I was thinking. that's not a LEV they have on there. I've had my LEV for three months not too, with nary a problem. great post.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 It's the best AM bike out there period! So much so I bought one.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Ibis make really really nice bikes would be sweet to see a dh bike...
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Formula RX Oval!?
It looks just a normal RX for me...
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Add a Chromag OSX bar and Ranger stem and this bike can't be beat.
  • + 1
 nice setup
[Reply]
  • - 1
 Does Pink Bike delete comments? There was a comment this morning saying this article sounded like it was written for (Mountain Bike Action). It appears to be gone now...???
[Reply]
  • + 1
 i would like to see it tested with a 180 fork and rc4 shock !!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 algien save si me valdria el nuevo vasculante trasero de 145x12 saludos
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Mojo Too expensive , get a giant reign 2.
  • + 1
 Wouldn't the Reign X be a better side by side for this rig??? Travel and "intended use" wise. I agree it's a pretty dam spendy bike, but man I can't think of a lot of bikes that have this things true "All mountain" chops. I think Giant makes a sweet bike, but they're not in the carbon game yet (or am I living under another rock???) so the Ibis is kind of in a "different league" and that's reflected in the price I think...
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Looks like a Kirk Revolution, and for that season I'm ooot.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Wow, RC still writes as badly as he did when he was still with MBA... =p
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Do want......badly.
[Reply]
  • - 1
 great test! hope they bring up a test of the carbon transition covert and the new carbon cube stereo as well!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 ^*mummy and daddy
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I love my HD!
[Reply]
  • - 2
 That thing is sexy as....!!!! Please please Santa , bring me one!!
[Reply]
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